George Washington collection SC.GWC

George Washington collection SC.GWC


[logo]

Special Collections at the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington

PO Box 3600
Mount Vernon, VA 22121
Telephone: 703-799-3600
URL: http://www.mountvernon.org/library

Michele Lee, Special Collections Librarian

Repository
Special Collections at the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington
Identification
SC.GWC
Title
George Washington collection 1654 September 6 - 1799 December 12
Quantity
7.5 Linear Feet
Creator
Washington, George, 1732-1799
Language
English .

Administrative Information

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research during scheduled appointments. Researchers must complete the Washington Library's Special Collections and Archives Registration Form before access is provided. The library reserves the right to restrict access to certain items for preservation purposes.

Preferred Citation

[Name and date of item], George Washington Collection, [Folder], Special Collections, Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington [hereafter Washington Library], Mount Vernon, Virginia.


Scope and Contents

This collection contains letters to and from George Washington that have been aquired by the MVLA since 1858. For more information, see content note for individal items. The collection grows organically as new items are acquired.

Arrangement

The collection is divided into four series: From George Washington; To George Washington; Ledgers and Bound Manuscripts; and Oversized. Each series is arranged in chronological order by date.

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Alden, Judah, 1750-1845
  • Alton, Jonathan
  • Anderson, James, 1745-1807
  • Austin, 1757?-1794
  • Ball, Burgess, 1749-1800
  • Bassett, Burwell, -1793
  • Bassett, Burwell, 1764-1841
  • Ben, 1729?- (River Farm)
  • Ben, 1777?- (Carter)
  • Biddle, Clement, 1740-1814
  • Boatswain (Ditcher)
  • Boatswain, -1794?
  • Bordley, J. B. (John Beale), 1727-1804
  • Boucher, Jonathan, 1738-1804
  • Branham, Caroline, 1764?-1843
  • Bushnell, David, 1740-
  • Butler, James (Overseer)
  • Caesar, 1749?- (Union Farm)
  • Carey, Robert
  • Carrington, Edward, 1749-1810
  • Charles (Ditcher)
  • Charlotte, active 1782- (Seamstress)
  • Chastellux, François Jean, marquis de, 1734-1788
  • Churchill, Henry, 1732-1760
  • Clendenin, George, 1746-1797
  • Clinton, George, 1739-1812
  • Corre, Joseph
  • Craik, James, 1730-1814
  • Crow, Hyland (Overseer)
  • Custis, Daniel Parke, 1711-1757
  • Custis, George Washington Parke, 1781-1857
  • Custis, John Parke, 1754-1781
  • Cyrus, 1775?- (Carpenter)
  • Davis, Betty, active 1792- (Spinner)
  • Davis, Tom, active 1792- (Bricklayer)
  • Dickerson, Jonathan
  • Dinwiddie, Robert, 1693-1770
  • Doll, 1747?- (Union Farm)
  • Donaldson, James (Carpenter)
  • Fairfax, Bryan Fairfax, Baron, 1736-1802
  • Fairfax, George William, 1724-1787
  • Fairfax, Sally Cary, 1730-1811
  • Fanny, 1769?- (River Farm)
  • Fitzgerald, John, -1799
  • French, Penelope Manley, approximately 1739-
  • Gibbs, Caleb, 1755-1818
  • Giles, approximately 1750- (Postilion)
  • Gilpin, George, 1740-1813
  • Gordon, William, 1728-1807
  • Gray, Davy, 1743?-
  • Green, Thomas (Carpenter)
  • Greene, Christopher, 1737-1781
  • Greene, Nathanael, Major General, 1742-1786
  • Greenwood, John, 1760-1819
  • Grier, David
  • Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804
  • Hannah, 1739?- (Dogue Run Farm)
  • Harrison, Benjamin, approximately 1726-1791
  • Henry, Patrick, 1736-1799
  • Herbert, William
  • Hooe, Robert Townsend, 1743-1809
  • Humphreys, David, 1752-1818
  • Isaac, active 1773-1799 (Carpenter)
  • Jasper, Dick, active 1786-
  • Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826
  • Kate, active 1779-1799 (Muddy Hole Farm)
  • Lafayette, Marie Adrienne de Noailles, marquise de, 1759-1807
  • Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert Du Motier, marquis de, 1757-1834
  • Law, Thomas, 1756-1834
  • Lear, Tobias, 1762-1816
  • Lee, Frank, -1821
  • Lee, Lucy (Cook)
  • Lee, William, approximately 1752-
  • Lewis, Betty Washington, 1733-1797
  • Lewis, Eleanor Parke Custis, 1779-1852
  • Lewis, Fielding, 1725-1781 or 1782
  • Lewis, Howell, 1771-1822
  • Lewis, John, 1747-1825
  • Lewis, Lawrence, 1767-1839
  • Lewis, Robert, 1769-1829
  • Lewis, Warner, 1720-1779
  • Mason, George, 1725-1792
  • Mason, Thomas
  • McKoy, Henry (Overseer)
  • Monroe, James, 1758-1831
  • Montgomery, John
  • Moustier, Eléonore-François-Elie, marquis de, 1751-1817
  • Muclus, William
  • Muse, Battaile
  • Navarro García de Valladares, Diego José, 1708-1784
  • Nicolas, Lewis
  • Paul, 1763?- (Union Farm)
  • Peacey, William
  • Peale, Charles Willson
  • Pearce, William (Farm manager)
  • Pearson, Eliphalet
  • Peter, Thomas, 1769-1834
  • Peyton, Craven
  • Pickering, Timothy, 1745-1829
  • Posey, John
  • Powel, Elizabeth Willing, 1743-1830
  • Powel, Samuel, 1738-1793
  • Randolph, Edmund, 1753-1813
  • Richardson, Joe (Postilion)
  • Richmond, approximately 1778-
  • Rochambeau, Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur, comte de, 1725-1807
  • Ruth, 1729?- (River Farm)
  • Sam, 1759?- (Cook)
  • Savage, William
  • Sheels, Christopher, 1776-
  • Sinah, 1772?- (Mansion House Farm)
  • Smith, Joe, approximately 1778- (Carpenter)
  • Snyder, G. W.
  • Sprigg, Robert
  • Staphorst, Nicholaas van, 1742-1801
  • Stewart, David
  • Stoy, William, 1726-1801
  • Stuart, David, 1753-1814
  • Tallmadge, Benjamin, 1754-1835
  • Triplett, William
  • Trumbull, John, 1756-1843
  • Trumbull, Jonathan, 1740-1809
  • Waller, Benjamin, 1716-1786
  • Washington, Augustine, 1718?-1762
  • Washington, Bushrod, 1762-1829
  • Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-1793
  • Washington, George, 1732-1799
  • Washington, Hannah Fairfax, 1742-1804
  • Washington, Harriot
  • Washington, John Augustine, 1736-1787
  • Washington, Lawrence, 1718-1752
  • Washington, Lund, 1737-1796
  • Washington, Martha, 1731-1802
  • Washington, Thornton (1760-1787)
  • Washington, William Augustine, 1757-1810
  • Weissenfels, Frederick
  • White, Alexander, 1738-1804
  • Whitting, Anthony, -1793
  • Will, 1739?- (Muddy Hole Farm)
  • Willis, Francis (1745-1829)

Significant Places Associated With the Collection

  • Belvoir Mansion
  • Deer park
  • Dogue Run Farm
  • Fairfax County (Va.)
  • Ferry Farm (Fairfax county, Va.)
  • France -- Foreign relations
  • French's farm (Mount Vernon, Va.)
  • Mansion Interiors
  • Mansion exterior
  • Martha Washington Garret Chamber
  • Mount Vernon (Va. : Estate)
  • Muddy Hole Farm
  • New Room
  • New York (N.Y.)
  • Piazza
  • River Farm
  • Sixteen-sided Treading Barn
  • United States -- History -- French and Indian War, 1754-1763
  • United States -- History -- Revolution, 1775-1783
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1789-1797
  • greenhouse slave quarters

Container List

Series 1. From George Washington
1654 September 6 - 1799 December 12English.
  • Text box: 1 folder: 1654.09.06 RM-283; MS-2832
    Deed, Giles Brent
    Washington, George, 1732-17991654 September 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Clerical copy of a deed for 1000 acres of land along the south bank of the Potomac River, Westmoreland County (the area became Fairfax County in 1742), Virginia, granted to Giles Brent, Junior. George Washington purchased the tract of land in 1760 and at that time may have acquired and annotated this copy of the 1654 deed. On the verso of the document George Washington's inscription reads, "1 copy, Richard Bennett, esq., grant to Giles Brent for 1000 acs. of Ld. 6th September 1654."

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1749.11.02 RM-1064; MS-5705
    Survey, James Hamilton
    Washington, George, 1732-17991749 November 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington drafted this survey for James Hamilton in 1749. Signed "Washington, SCC" (for Surveyor of Culpeper County), this survey details 350 acres on the border of Augusta County, Virginia, along the Cacapehon (Cacapon) or Lost River.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1749.11.09 RM-1142; MS-5828
    Survey and plat, Barnaby McHandry
    Washington, George, 1732-17991749 November 9George Washington embarked on his first career as a surveyor of Virginia's uncharted western lands at the age of sixteen. Over the next three years he surveyed more than 70,000 acres under the employ of Lord Fairfax, proprietor of the Northern Neck. This position enabled him to earn an income, better his social standing, and acquire significant tracts of land. Washington also developed an intimate knowledge of Virginia's backcountry that served him well in two military conflicts. Signed "Washington, SCC" (for Surveyor of Culpeper County), this survey details 400 acres of Augusta County, Virginia, along the Cacapehon (Cacapon) or Lost River. The left section of the document's text has been lost, but a masterfully drafted plat and a scale of poles are intact on the right side of the page. As a result of the partial text loss the survey only carries the date 1749. However, THE PAPERS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON states that on November 9, 1749, Washington surveyed 400 acres on the Lost River for Barnaby McHendry (McHandry). In his journal, Washington records that he made this survey for Barnaby McHandry on November 9th-10th, 1749. As transcribed by Joseph M. Toner in JOURNAL OF MY JOURNEY OVER THE MOUNTAINS, Washington writes: November 9th 10th 1749 Then Survey'd for Barnaby McHandry a certain Tract of Waste and ungranted Land Situate in Frederick County on the Lost River of Cacapehon and Bounded as followeth Beginning 48 po. below William Bakers Corner 2 Chesnut Oaks and a White Oak and runs thence So 55º Et Two hundred and fifty two poles to two Mountain Burches and a white Oak on the M side thence So 35º Wt Two hundred and fifty two po to a Lynn a Maple and a Mountain Burch thence No 55º Wt Two hundred and Fifty two po to two white Oaks and a Hickory from thence to the Beginning Plat Drawn Barnaby McHandry's land was on the border of Augusta and Frederick Counties. This accounts for the survey describing the land as in Augusta County, while Washington's journal describes the land as situated in Frederick County. This survey and plat has also sometimes been described as a deed. For additional background on gentlemen surveyors see Sarah S. Hughes, SURVEYORS AND STATESMEN: LAND MEASURING IN COLONIAL VIRGINIA (Richmond, VA: Virginia Surveyors Foundation, 1979) 72, 85, 156-165.English.
    Scope and Contents

    Signed "Washington, SCC" (for Surveyor of Culpeper County), this survey details 400 acres of Augusta County, Virginia, along the Cacapehon (Cacapon) or Lost River. The left section of the document's text has been lost, but a masterfully drafted plat and a scale of poles are intact on the right side of the page.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1750.03.01 A-353.1
    Indenture, Henry Trenn to Lawrence Washington, witnessed by George Washington
    1 pages
    probably 1750 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Henry Trenn binds himself to pay £50 unless he "make or cause to be made unto the above sd. Lawrence Washington ... a Lease for the Term of nine hundred ninety & nine Years of all the Land which is at this present overflowed by the sd. Washington Mill Dam included within the sd. Trenn Bounds on Dogue Runn ..."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1750.04.05 folder: OUT RM-1035;MS-5671
    Survey, Edward Kinnison
    Washington, George, 1732-17991750 April 5English.
  • Text box: 1 folder: 1750.04.14 MS-5834
    Survey, George Nixon
    Washington, George, 1732-17991750 April 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Signed "Washington, SCC" (for Surveyor of Culpeper County), this survey details 400 acres of Frederick County along the North River. These lands originally belonged to George Nixon who assigned them to David Wood, on behalf of Daniel Wood. The latter assigned the lands to Dr. James Craik, George Washington's friend and physician, and Philip Bush in 1771. Washington recorded the survey in his field book on April 14, 1750, but may have incorrectly dated the finished document which reads June 14, 1750. It is one of 49 he completed within a month beginning on March 30, 1750.

    Chainman John Lonem is also named on the survey. Washington frequently worked with Lonem, who was known as a reliable and speedy worker.

    Bibliography
  • Text box: 1 folder: 1751.04.02 RM-919; MS-5451
    Survey, Samuel Isaac
    1751 April 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Plat of 360 acres, with prose description of measurements on adjacent leaf.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1751.04.04 RM-1108; MS-5786
    Survey, Ulrich Beeler
    1751 April 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Plat map--Long Marsh Run 633 acres.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1752.04.12 RM-950; MS-5502
    Survey, William Nayler
    1752 April 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    A survey of 269 acres made for the tract's future owner, William Nayler. The land on the Cacapon River which is now the NW border of West Virginia and Virginia

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1754.03.07 RM-1225
    Letter, to Robert Dinwiddie
    Washington, George, 1732-17991754 March 7In March 1754 Major George Washington prepared for his first military mission – to build a fort at the Allegheny, Ohio, and Monongahela Rivers in response a growing French presence in the region. He followed direct orders from Lieutenant Governor Robert Dinwiddie and recruited approximately 150 Virginia soldiers to join him. With minimal pay and incentive, recruitment was not an easy task. And, in the months leading up to the westward expedition, Washington wrote several letters to Dinwiddie strongly advocating for supplies, uniforms, and consistent pay for his troops. While addressing all of those issues in letter, Washington also offered his personal observations of Native Americans with a request for proper uniforms – most notably red coats. He proposed that if full uniforms could not be procured, the uniform red coat would suffice as "red with them [Native Americans] is compard to Blood and is look'd upon as the distinguishing marks of Warriours and great Men." Washington argued that proper uniforms would earn the respect of Native Americans: "[t]he shabby and ragged appearance the French common Soldiers make affords great matter for ridicule amongst the Indians and I really believe is the chief motive why they hate and despise them as they do." Wanting to gain Native American support and ultimately fortify the western lands, Dinwiddie agreed to Washington's requests. Perhaps a naïve perspective on the challenges that Washington and his troops would face in this expedition, this letter nonetheless provides a glimpse into the life of a young, bold, and ambitious Washington. He concluded the letter with a measure of confidence in his observations, "I hope Your Honour will pardon this freedom, which I should not have assum'd but with a good Intention It is my acquaintance with these Indians, and a Study of their Tempers that has in some measure let me into their Customs and dispositions."English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington wrote this letter to Lieutenant-Governor Dinwiddie as he prepared for his first military appointment, an expedition with 160 soldiers to the forks of the Allegheny, Ohio and Monongahela Rivers. He requested supplies, uniforms, clarification of pay for troops, and offered his personal observations of Native Americans.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1754.12.10 RM-698; MS-4745
    Document, "Memorandum of the Division of Slaves of the Late Lawrence Washington Esq."
    1754 December 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    This document divides Lawrence Lewis' slaves between Col. George Lee and the brothers of Lawrence Washington. It is signed by GW, George Lee, Ann Lee, and Aug. Washington. Witnessed by William Fairfax, George William Fairfax, Robert Merrie, John Dalton, Thomas Plummer, John Tuberville, John Carlyle, Sarah Carlyle, and Bryan Fairfax.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1757.12.22 RM-1217.001
    Letter, to William Smith
    Washington, George, 1732-17991757 December 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington wrote to Smith and provided a list of subscribers, including himself, to the American Magazine and Monthly Chronicle for the British Colonies.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1758.05.05 RM-1020: MS-5648
    Document, Court of Caroline County, re. Joseph Stevens
    1758 May 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Documents detail trial charges of Joseph Stevens. Signed by Zachary Lewis A court document giving outcome of the trial is also included, Feb. 1758. Trial held in Caroline County, Virginia.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1758.09.25 W-429
    Letter, to George William Fairfax
    Washington, George, 1732-17991758 September 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington wrote this letter to George William Fairfax to inform him of Major Grant's unfortunate expedition to Fort Duquesne. Washington describes the circumstances of the attack, the significant number of men and officers killed, and concludes: "It is with infinite pleasure I tell you that the Virginians, Officers and Men, distinguished themselves in the most eminent manner - that the General has Complimented me publickly on their good behaviour, and that every Mouth resounds their Praises. The Highlanders and them are become one People, shaking each other by the hand wherever they meet tho. perfect stranger's."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1759.04.01 W-416
    Letter, to John Alton
    Washington, George, 1732-17991759 April 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Expects to be up [to Mount Vernon] tomorrow -- Miles sent to get key from Col. Fairfax -- Alton to get house in order, make fires in lower rooms and air them -- two bedsteads put up, one in hall room, one in little dining room -- get out chairs and tables and clean and rub them and stair case -- find eggs and chickens and "prepare in the best manner you can for our coming." Autograph letter signed, integral cover, docketed, "Given to Mr. [ ] Clemson - January 24th 1832 at Mount Vernon by Mrs. Jane Washington supposed to have been written soon after his marriage and Braddocks defeat."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1759.04.11 A-680
    Decree, The court of Chancery in the Suit of Clifton against Carroll
    1759 April 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Court decrees that Sale of William Clifton's lands to Thomas Colville and George Johnston to be put aside, and lands are to be sold at public auction to pay off his just debts to Charles Carroll and other defendants. Washington G.W. bought this land at auction, and it became his River farm.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1759.08.09 2018-SC-004
    Letter, to Burwell Bassett
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    2 pages
    1759 August 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed. Washington writes to his brother-in-law Burwell Bassett. The letter was carried to Fredericksburg from Mount Vernon by Miles Richardson, who had been one of Washington's batmen in the Virginia Regiment during Forbes' Campaign of 1758. Richardson was hired by Washington, most likely as a valet, from January 1, 1759 – May 10, 1759.

    Written within the first year of Washingotn's marriage to Martha Dandridge Custis, the letter mentions visiting John Mercer to sort through papers related to the estate of Martha's late husband Daniel Parke Custis. Washington writes that he will bring Martha with him on the visit in case she is needed to answer any lingering questions about the Custis estate.

    Washington also asks Bassett to procure a horse brand for George William Fairfax from James Danworth and to purchase canary seed for Martha's birds. This is the earliest known reference to pets at Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1759.08.09 RM-619; MS-4524
    Letter, to Henry Churchill
    Washington, George, 1732-17991759 August 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sending an envoy to pick up a Chestnut mare which Colonel Bassett has purchased. Urges him to visit at Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1759.09.20 RM-1180; MS-5918
    Invoice, sundry goods shipped from Robert Cary
    Carey, Robert1759 September 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    List of sundry goods ordered by George Washington consisting of a variety of items inlcuding furniture, textiles, clothing, food, and tools. Many of these purchases are related to Martha Washington and her two children, John Parke Custis and Martha (Patsy) Custis, due to the Washingtons' recent marriage.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1759.10.01 W-428
    Document, Survey of Mount Vernon
    Washington, George, 1732-17991759 October 1-2English.
    Scope and Contents

    "I endeavourd to find out the true bounds of my Mount Vernon Tract of Land - but not knowing where it divided from Spencer's part of the River, nor being able to find harrison cornr Ash mentiond in his Deed to stand on the River side at the Mouth the Blind Pocoson - I began at two Ash trees and Elm ..."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.00.00 W-675
    Sundry accounts
    Washington, George, 1732-17991760-1764English.
    Scope and Contents

    Weekly reports of work done by carpenters, with prices charged on most & for whom work was done--also account of breeding mares (?) and acct. of staves, tools, nails, leather, etc. loaned or given out--acct. of days of work done by John Askew, list of things needing to be repaired by carpenters--quantity of cider, brandy & peach mobey in each still--"An Account taken of the Days which John Askew missed working for Collo. Washington in the Six Months pr. agreement which says is to be made up by the said Askew ..."--Brandy delivered to Thomas Nichols.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.00.00 RM-296; MS-2914
    Note, smithwork
    1760English.
  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.04.02 A-680.6
    Letter, to Benjamin Waller
    Washington, George, 1732-17991760 April 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    The letter deals with Washington's negotiations for the River Farm, then called Clifton's Neck. Clifton has sold land to Mr. [Thomson] Mason for a greater price after promising to sell it to him first--was told that Clifton had no clear title to land--nothing in writing, but terms agreed on--George Washington thinks only equitable way is to put up land for public auction, so all disputants will have equal chance to purchase it.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.05.15 RM-1220
    Document, Account of Rent Payments for Mount Vernon
    Washington, George, 1732-17991760 May 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Land document written and signed by George Washington regarding his ownership of Mount Vernon. This document was the final rent payment before George Washington full inherited the property.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.05.20 A-680.2
    Clifton tract
    1760 May 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Reports the sale on behalf of the Commissioners, G. Fairfax, G. Washington & Chas. Green of the Clifton tract to George Washington at auction for L1210.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.05.20 A-680.4
    Clifton tract
    Fairfax, George William, 1724-17871760 May 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Notice of the sale of the Clifton Land [River Farm] to [George] Washington

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1760.08.00 A-680.1
    Clifton tract
    1760 AugustEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Statement of cash and bills paid and in hand as a result of Court order in Chancerty pursuant to suit of Clifton vs. Carroll and others.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1762.06.20 RM-1087; MS-5766
    Letter, to Robert Cary
    Washington, George, 1732-17991762 June 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington writes to Robert Cary and Company, British creditors, about the severe drought and therefore the inability to grow tobacco and grain this season. George Washington also shows frustration with the time it takes to receive supplies from Great Britain and to ship his crops to them.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 folder: OUT MS-5479
    Lottery ticket, #210
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mountain road lottery ticket

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 RM-1038; MS-5677
    Lottery ticket, #233
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    Moutain Road ticket

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 RM-1097; MS-5768
    Lottery ticket, #353
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    12 month ticket signed by George Washington as an official of the lottery. Tickets were sold to raise money to open roads from Virginia West to help in the settlement of the West.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 RM-1104; MS-5780
    Lottery ticket, #354
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    Engraved ticket, signed by George Washington as an official of the lottery. Purpose of the lottery was to raise money for Virginia to build roads to the western part of Virginia, thus opening up tracts of land further west for development.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 RM-980; MS-5594
    Lottery ticket, #362
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    Engraved ticket, signed by George Washington as an official of the lottery. Purpose of the lottery was to raise money for Virginia to build roads to the western part of Virginia, thus opening up tracts of land further west for development.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 RM-980; MS-5593
    Lottery ticket, #380
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    Engraved ticket, signed by George Washington as an official of the lottery. Purpose of the lottery was to raise money for Virginia to build roads to the western part of Virginia, thus opening up tracts of land further west for development.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.00.00 MS-5905
    Lottery ticket, #224
    1768English.
    Scope and Contents

    Engraved ticket, signed by George Washington as an official of the lottery. Purpose of the lottery was to raise money for Virginia to build roads to the western part of Virginia, thus opening up tracts of land further west for development.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.05.19 RM-466; MS-3584
    Letter, to Burwell Bassett
    Washington, George, 1732-17991768 May 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Handwritten receipt for the purchase of a horse "for the use of Master Custis."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.06.20 W-1237
    Order, to Robert Cary
    Washington, George, 1732-17991768 June 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Invoice of goods to be sent to Geo. Washington Potomack River, Virginia"--items ranging from nails and curry combs, and almonds and raisons to lace, ribbon, silk, and a coat made up for a "middle sized woman."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1768.07.31 MS-321
    Letter, to Jonathan Boucher
    1768 July 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends [Latin] books to Master [John Parke] Custis, who forgot them--[Jacky's] illness (worms)] call Dr. Mercer if symptons return--how is the boy taking his unaccustomed absence from home:--does he need anything?--his bed and bedding--didn't mean for [Boucher] to give [Jacky] special indulgence or partiality, but feels he should have as little disapation and indulgence as is necessary to good health and spirits--he meant merely that if [Jacky] were kept under [Boucher's] eye he would benefit from [Boucher's] good examples--however, he realizes every parent's anxiety for child makes same request--so withdraws his request--[Boucher's] letter to Revd. Mr. Addison forwarded by Dr. Ramney

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1769.01.26 RM-1041; MS-5681
    Letter, to Jonathan Boucher
    1769 January 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    "To the Revd. Mr. Baucher in St. Mary's parish Caroline City".GW, doting stepfather, sends absentee excuse for Jackie Custis's late return to school after the holidays.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1769.04.21 RM-631; MS-4556
    Letter, to George Mason
    Washington, George, 1732-17991769 April 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington's land agreement with George Mason, dated April 21, 1769. George Mason lived at Gunston Hall, which is located just below Mount Vernon on the Potomac River in Fairfax County. Surveys inherited in Washington's day were often inaccurate and this land agreement settled a long-standing dispute concerning the boundary line that divided Mount Vernon from Mason's property. This folio incorporates both a legal contract and the elements of a survey that Washington himself undertook in 1769 to settle the inaccurate western boundary of the lands between Dogue Creek and Little Hunting Creek. The one page document is written in a clerical hand and is endorsed with George Washington's signature.

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1769.04.24 RM-81; MS-2228
    Letter, to Jonathan Boucher
    Washington, George, 1732-17991769 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    A caring and involved father, George Washington wrote this letter to his stepson's tutor, the Reverend Jonathan Boucher. In it he instructs his ward's tutor to enroll John Parke Custis with a particular dancing master. Written from Mount Vernon on April 24, 1769, Washington states, "In respect to the Dancing Gentry, I am glad to find you have such choice of them, …Newman...I have heard him well spoken of as a teacher in that Science… you will be so good therefore Sir to enter Mastr Custis with Mr. Newman for a year or otherwise, as he may form his School."

  • Text box: 1 folder: 1769.10.10 A-481.1
    Survey, to John Posey
    Washington, George, 1732-17991769 October 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Plat & Memorandum of a survey made by George Washington for Capt. John Posey

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1770.00.00 A-301.1
    Accounts
    1770-1777English.
    Scope and Contents

    Moneys expended and received on behalf of George Washington by [probably a manager or overseer].

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1770.04.23 RM-1022; MS-5650
    Contract, to John Posey
    Posey, John1770 April 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Agreement for lease of 7 acres of land by John Posey to George Washington.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1771.06.26 RM-1208
    Receipt, William Carlin
    1771 June 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    William Carlin was a tailor in Alexandria. His account book is among our treasures and includes entries for clothes made for the Washington's, members of the Mount Vernon household, and other Virginia customers such as the Fairfax's, George Mason, and David Ramsey. Entries for George Washington span from 1765 to 1771 and this receipt corresponds directly to entries in the account book. The services on the receipt include 'making a suit for Frank' and 'altering a pr. Lether (sp) Bretches to Giles.'

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1773.09.16 W-424
    Account, to George William Fairfax
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Peyton, Craven1773 September 16 - 1774 April 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account : George William Fairfax with Craven Peyton

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1773.06.20 RM-950; MS-5503
    Letter, to Burwell Bassett
    Washington, George, 1732-17991773 June 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    "It is an easier matter to conceive than to describe, the distress of this family; especially that of the unhappy parent of our dear Patsy Custis, when I inform you that yesterday removed the sweet Innocent girl into a more happy and peaceful abode than any she has met with in the affected path she hitherto has trod."

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1773.10.18 W-425
    Account, to George William Fairfax
    1773 October 18 - 1774 June 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account of cash sent Mr. Francis Willis, draft on Osgood Hanbury & Co., to Mr. Ramsey for postage, to Truro Parish for Fairfax's pew.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1774.00.00 W-1369/A
    Drawing, West elevation of Mansion with basement floor plan on reverse
    Washington, George, 1732-17991774English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington carefully drafted this elegant west elevation of his Mount Vernon mansion. It provides insight into Washington's plans for the second major expansion of his home. The elevation has wide doors and nearly symmetrical windows, while the final construction favored transom lights and the powerful exterior asymmetry of windows, preserving the symmetry of the interior rooms. The undated manuscript was probably drafted prior to construction, which began in 1774. This is the only extant exterior drawing of the mansion made by George Washington. On the verso, also in Washington's hand, is a floor plan for the mansion's cellar.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1774.01.25 RM-703; MS-4831
    Account, to Peter Hog
    1774 January 25English.
  • Text box: 2 folder: 1774.02.24 RM-1179.002
    Document, Promissory note for Fairfax's pew at Truro Parish
    Washington, George, 1732-17991774 February 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Promissory note for George William Fairfax's pew at Truro Parish. The document is signed by George Washington who served as an agent for Fairfax.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1774.05.17 A-373.3
    Document, Summary of Pleas, George Washington and Bryan Fairfax vs. William Savage and Thomson Mason
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Fairfax, Bryan Fairfax, Baron, 1736-1802Savage, WilliamMason, Thomas1774 May 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Summary of pleas with case starting on May 18, 1772; other action taken on Feb. 22, 1774, and Mar. 23, 1774 -- final judgement given May 17, 1774-Savage ordered to pay £606.17.6. Document, laminated, watermarks (crown over GR, and crown over heraldic device), docketed "Washington vs. Savage - Record". | [As trustees for Mrs. William Savage (formerly Mrs. Charles Green) Washington and Fairfax were attempting to collect the money which her husband had promised in regular payments. Mason stood as security for the bond]. |

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1773.03.00 W-1203/A
    Account, to William Herbert
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Herbert, William1775 March-JulyEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington endorsed this account of his financial transactions with the prominent Alexandria merchant William Herbert. A frequent visitor to Mount Vernon, Herbert was an Irish immigrant who married Sarah Carlyle and later became the President of the Bank of Alexandria. Herbert signed this two page account and Washington endorsed it on the verso. The transactions recorded here date from March through July of 1775.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1775.04.20 W-1203/B
    Bill, to William Herbert
    Washington, George, 1732-17991775 April 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill for making coat and waistcoat, breeches, altering a coat and breeches, making another coat on a later date, and making a suit of regimentals.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1775.06.19 W-714-a-b
    Letter, to Burwell Bassett
    Washington, George, 1732-17991775 June 19Written from Philadelphia on June 19, 1775, George Washington announced to Burwell Bassett (Martha's brother-in-law) that he has just been unanimously elected by the colonies as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army. Washington eloquently expressed, "I am now Imbarkd on a tempestuous Ocean from whence, perhaps, no friendly harbor is to be found." He had humbly accepted this responsibility and stated, "I can answer but for three things, a firm belief of the justice of our Cause - close attention in the prosecution of it - and the strictest Integrety." Washington concluded by expressing his concerns for Martha's loneliness during his absence.English.
    Scope and Contents

    Fears for the cause and for his character if he fails--Congress in Committee have consented to a Continental Currency & have ordered 2 million dollars to be struck off for payment of troops & other expences of defence--15,000 men voted as a Continental army, & he hopes more will be voted--other high officers not named yet--asks him and Mrs. Bassett to visit Mt. Vernon and take Mrs. Washington down to [Eltham] with them--uneasy at leaving her alone at Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1775.06.23 MSS-252
    Letter, to Martha Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991775 June 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes a short letter before leaving for camp at Boston: "I go fully trusting in that Providence which has been more bountiful than I deserve, and in full confidence of a happy Meeting with you sometime in the Fall ... I have not time to add more, as I am surrounded with company to take leave of me. I retain an unalterable affection for you, which neither time or distance can change. My best love to Jack and Nelly, and regards for the rest of the Family ..."

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1775.08.15 MS-5306
    Bond, to George William Fairfax
    1774 August 15English.
  • Text box: 2 folder: 1775.11.26 A-516.8
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991775 November 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    This is a directive to his managers on subjects of responsibility during his absence

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1776.12.14 W-438
    Letter, to [James] Ewing
    Washington, George, 1732-17991776 December 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Instructions on keeping the enemy from crossing the river [Delaware]--plan for a retreat towards Philadelphia if necessary--send a spy across the river--make a show of having fresh troops to gain time--get someone into Trenton for news of boats being built.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1777.00.00 RM-1094; MS-5763-5765
    Document, Washington's taxable accounts during the Revolutionary War
    1777-1787English.
    Scope and Contents

    Partially printed assessments of George Washington's accounts primarily during the Revolutionary War.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1777.04.03 RM-186; MS-2572
    Letter, to Nicholas Cook
    1777 April 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Informs Cook of the problems of the army in enlisting new recruits and obtaining arms. Intent of Hessians to leave R.I. winter quarter and Continentals' need to raise more men to protect States. Begs that each state meet its quota of troops.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1778.03.18 W-680
    Letter, to Kitty Livingston
    Washington, George, 1732-17991778 March 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Presents her with a lock of hair.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1778.10.08 MSS-469
    Letter, to George Clinton
    Washington, George, 1732-17991778 October 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    General Washington writes from Fishkill [N. Y.] to New York governor George Clinton. Abuse of citizens in this state by army officers -- ordered boat containing Mr. Cuyler's family and belongings to be stopped short of Fishkill -- those aboard shouldn't be permitted to review the works at West Point -- sends by express packets addressed to Clinton and [government of N. Y.], sent down by flag -- they contain extraordinary Manifesto and proclamation -- if boat with Cuyler's effects is to return, write General Putnam -- he [George Washington] returns to Fredericksburg [N. Y.] this afternoon. Document signed, in hand of (?), docketed "Genl. Washington Letter Octr. 8th 1778, concerning a Flag sent from New York for Mr. Cuyler & his Effects &c with a Manifesto of the Commre at New York.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1778.11.25 RM-1034; MS-5668
    Letter, to Jacob Bayley
    Washington, George, 1732-17991778 November 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Written from Fredericksburg, NY, Washington orders delay of Canadian expedition, but continued preparation for it; civil treatment of Native Americans; winter weather.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1779.04.03 MS-5073
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991779 April 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington writes to Lund Washington from his headquarters in Middlebrook, NJ on 1779 April 3; makes arrangements for a shipment of fine Bordeaux claret; discusses financial matters concerning the estate of George Mercer; referenes the exchange of two slaves between Mount Vernon and his mother's home in Fredericksburg; questions Lund on the status of planting and propogating of trees, admonishing him for not answering some of his early queries and questions his management techniques; reports that things are slow on the war front and a recent storm impacted British transports.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1779.03.31 RM-1213
    Letter, to Nathanael Greene
    Washington, George, 1732-17991779 March 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    While encamped at Middlebrook, New Jersey for the winter of 1779 George Washington wrote this letter to Nathanial Greene about trading one of his horses for another.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1779.05.29 RM-271; MS-2783
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991779 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Personal letter to Lund, expressing the General's feelings about the general "decay of public spirit & virtue", which is contributing to the severe economic problems of the time.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1779.06.03 RM-907; MS-5409
    Letter, to Arthur St. Clair
    1779 June 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter from George Washington to Arthur St. Clair regarding instructions for handling British soldiers without assistance from other divisions. Uncertainty over British movements and intentions prevented St. Clair from settling on a course for his division.

  • Text Box 15 folder: 1799.07.15 RM-1195
    Document, Detailed list of enslaved workers on French's farm
    Washington, George, 1732-1799probably 1799 July 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington rented the slaves from Mrs. Penelope Manley French, widow of Daniel French of Rose Hill. In July 1799, Washington wrote to Mrs. French's son-in-law, Benjamin Delany about returning the slaves.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.04.11 RM-770; MS-5124
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    1780 April 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter asking Lund Washington for legal advice relating to a chancery suit depending between Mr James Mercer & "the persons for whom I am acting as Attorney." He believes that Lund has a better understanding than "[his] own knowledge of these kind of proceedings is capable of affording..."

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.04.15 RM-34; MS-2040
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991780 April 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Re: a chariot Washington has ordered made in Philadelphia at £210 specie or paper equivalent.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.04.30 A-851
    Letter, to Don Diego Navarro
    Washington, George, 1732-17991780 April 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Reports death of Don Juan Mirailles [Spanish envoy] who came on visit with Minister of France and was seized on arrival with "a violent biliary complaint" -- died despite best care of physicians and himself -- present his respects to [Mirailles's] lady. Autograph letter signed, watermark (J. Taylor, & an encircled armed figure). | Navarro was Governor & Capt. General of Cuba.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.05.18 RM-731; MS-4919
    Letter, to Clement Biddle
    1780 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington acknowledges Biddle's resignation from his position and praises Biddle's duty as an officer.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.07.17 A-734.2
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991780 July 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund's late trip to Philadelphia--British & French fleets arrived--few recruits--promised aid from states will probably arrive too late--fears [Mt. Vernon] crops may be ruined by drought--how many colts are there?

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.11.23 2017-SC-001-001
    Letter, to Judah Alden
    Washington, George, 1732-17991780 November 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter from George Washington, in the hand of Tench Tilghman, to Major Judah Alden. The letter is sent from Washington's headquarters, Passaic Falls, New Jersey. The correspondence lays out an elaborate plan of attack meant to fall into the hands of the enemy. The "misinformation" was a spy tactic in hopes that it would be intercepted and throw off British forces. The body of the letter is in the hand of Tilghman with the exception of one line by Washington's reading, "but are not to make fires or discover themselves."

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1780.11.27 2018-SC-019-001
    Letter, to Christopher Greene
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804
    1 pages 34 x 21 cm
    1780 November 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter in Alexander Hamilton's hand, signed by Washington. Washington issues orders for Colonel Christopher Greene's First Rhode Island Regiment, which included formerly enslaved African American soldiers, to march from Newport to West Point under Rochambeau. Washington writes, "only come on with such officers as are to remain in service on the new arrangement and such men as engaged for the war, or at least for a term, that will last through the next campaign. The other men you may dismiss, unless the Count de Rochambeau should find any employment for them where they are now."

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1781.01.03 RM-501; MS-4085
    Letter, to Charles Pettit
    1781 January 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enquiring about a transaction of bills to have been deposited in the Virginia Loan Office. Also, requesting a good family Steward be employed for the Washington family.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1781.04.08 RM-1221
    Letter, to Benjamin Tallmadge
    Washington, George, 1732-17991781 April 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge, 8 April 1781, in which Washington asks Tallmadge to transmit a letter to Rochambeau. Washington contemplated a daring raid on the British troop on Long Island. "The success of the Enterprise," Washington wrote to Tallmadge, "must depend, on … the secrecy of the attempt, and a knowledge of the exact situation of the enemy."

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1781.10.30 RM-1003 ; MS-5629
    Letter, to Timothy Pickering
    Washington, George, 1732-17991781 October 301781 November 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    The warrant requests Pickering send 200 pounds from British Military Chest to Col. Edward Carrington for the Southern Army.

  • Text box: 2 folder: 1782.07.20 A-417.4
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1782 July 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Just returned from a Committee--will accompany her to Mr. Bingham's tomorrow afternoon.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1782.12.14 2018-SC-019-002
    Letter, to François Jean de Beauvoir, chevalier de Chastellux
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    3 pages 23 x 38 cm, unfolded
    1782 December 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed. Washington writes about the sorrow he felt when Chastellux departed to return to France: "A sense of your public services to this country, and gratitude for your private friendship, quite overcame me at the moment of our separation." Washington adds, "I truly say, never in my life did I ever part with a man to whom my soul clave more sincerely than it did to you." Washington hopes that, after the war, he can accompany Chastellux on a tour of North America. In the postscript, Washington writes that he is enclosing a letter to Marquis de Lafayette.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1783.03.19 RM-1034; MS-5669
    Letter, to Benjamin Harrison
    Washington, George, 1732-17991783 March 19Written from Newburgh while facing a mutiny due to a lack of soldier's pay and supplies, George Washington appealed to Virginia's governor, Benjamin Harrison, for financial support of his troops. Referencing an earlier letter, he began, "About the first of this Month I wrote you along letter. I touched upon the state of the Army. …I little expected at the time of writing that letter, that we were on the eve of an important crisis to this Army; when the touch stone of discord was to be applied—and the virtue of its members to undergo the severest trial." Washington continued, "You have not been altogether unacquainted, I dare say, with the fears, the hopes, the apprehensions and the expectations of the Army relatively to the provision which is to be made for them hereafter. Altho' a firm reliance on the integrety of Congress and a belief that the Public would finally do justice to all its Servants, and give an indisputable Security for the payment of the half-pay of the Officers had kept them amidst a variety of sufferings tolerably quiet and contented for two or three years past; Yet the total want of pay—the little prospect of receiving any from the unpromising state of the public finances—and the absolute aversion of the States to establish any Continental funds for the payment of the Debt due to the Army, did at the close of the last Campaign excite greater discontents & threaten more serious & alarming consequences than it is easy for me to describe or you to conceive." With words of praise for his troops, he ended his request: "all the feelings of gratitude towards a body of Men who have merited infinitely well of their Country." Washington wrote thousands of similar letters to state and local leaders throughout the Revolution.English.
    Scope and Contents

    Written from Newburg, NY, Washington supports financial plight of soldiers, inspite of brewing conspiracy against him.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.05.10 2017-SC-003-001
    Letter, to François Jean de Beauvoir, chevalier de Chastellux
    Washington, George, 1732-17991783 May 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    In this letter, George Washington continued with an update on the changing and hopefully improving state of affairs in America.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.06.07 RM-897; MS-5395
    Letter, to Caleb Gardner
    1783 June 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter of introduction on behalf of George Washington's "nephew... who has been in bad health for more than twelve Months—He is advised by his Physicians to spend the summer on the Island of Rhode Island for the benefit of the Sea Air & Climate—"

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.06.09 RM-1016; MS-5643
    Discharge certificate, Samuel Hall Matross
    1783 June 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Discharge from the American Army, signed by George Washington and Jonathan Trumbull.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.06.21 RM-1134; MS-5820
    Discharge certificate, Henry Leider
    1783 June 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sergeant Henry Leider's discharge certificate from the Continental Army.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.07.01 A-581
    Account, Martha Washington's expenses
    1783 July 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    "An Acct. of Mrs. Washington's Expences from Virginia to my Winter Quarters & back again to Virginia according to the Memms. and accts. which I have received from her & those who accompd. her"--expences amounting to £1064.1

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.08.13 A-508
    Letter, to Lund Washington
    1783 August 13English.
  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.10.00 W-667
    Account, Martha Washington's expenses
    1783 OctoberEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Cost of things bought in Philadelphia by Mrs. Washington

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1783.10.12 2017-SC-003-002
    Letter, to François Jean de Beauvoir, chevalier de Chastellux
    Washington, George, 1732-17991783 October 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Princeton. In this letter, after successfully commanding the Army, George Washington discusses his strong desire to retire and concludes the letter with updates on the state of independence and his continued travels to explore western lands.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.01.01 A-516.4
    Indenture, Deed of Lease from Penelope French and Benjamin Dulany to John Robertson for part of Mount Vernon tract
    1784 January 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Signed by Penelope French, Benjamin Dulany, and John Robertson - witnessed by Going Lanphier and Robert Lanphier with some marginal notes in handwriting of George Washington.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.02.01 2017-SC-003-003
    Letter, to François Jean de Beauvoir, chevalier de Chastellux
    Washington, George, 1732-17991784 February 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mount Vernon. In this letter, after returning to Mount Vernon on Christmas Eve 1783, George Washington enthusiastically remarked that he was finally able to retire.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.04.04 W-793
    Letter, to Thomas Mifflin
    1784 April 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introduces the Count de Laval Monmorency, brother to Duke de Laval and Colonel in Regiment of Royal Auvergne--he is on a tour from Charleston to New York.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.05.18 MSS-619
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1784 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will be careful of letter and box for Mrs. Fitzhugh--leaves city immediately after meeting of the Society.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.08.10 2016-SC-009
    Letter, to William Gordon
    Washington, George, 1732-17991784 August 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington thanks Gordon for sending him newspapers from Boston and mentions issues he is having with people settling on his lands near the Ohio River, which is he is about to leave Virginia to take care of.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.08.20 RM-617; MS-4521
    Account, to Henry Whiting
    1784 August 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for rents owed and paid by Henry Whiting on account of plantation rented from George Washington for 11 years by Whiting's father.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1784.11.26 RM-211; MS-2678
    Letter, to George Augustine Washington
    1784 November 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington acknowledges receipt of several letters from George Augustine Washington at Barbadoes and Bermuda.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1785.00.00 MS-5716
    Leaf from George Washington's notes on Compendium of Husbandry
    Washington, George, 1732-1799circa 1785These two pages contain George Washington's handwritten notes on Charles Varlo's A New System of Husbandry, published in 1785. Revealing Washington's pioneering approach to agriculture, they record fascinating experiments including the soaking of seeds in a complex "pickle" of liquor and oil to enlarge the size of the seeds and prevent insects, rodents, and birds from preying upon them. This leaf was originally part of his notebook titled "Compend of Husbandry" in which he collected advice and techniques from modern agricultural writers whose reforms were called the "new husbandry."English.
    Scope and Contents

    Leaf from a notebook kept by George Washington suggestions which includes improvements and experiments in modern farming techniques and inventions from experts of the time.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.00.00 W-1369/B
    Plans, greenhouse and quarters
    circa 1785English.
    Scope and Contents

    Plans for the Greenhouse quarters drawn and annotated by George Washington about 1785

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.00.00 W-799
    Memorandum and sketch, greenhouse and quarters
    Washington, George, 1732-17991785English.
    Scope and Contents

    Memorandum notes that Quarters to be 16' wide; half of that with 4' projection sufficient width for greenhouse; chimneys and where to place them; in front part of greenhouse need 2 tiers of windows; windows close together; chimneys in quarters; front of quarters might be wood with brick underpinning--center or greenhouse part all brick to the eves; rafters same angle; describes how to place windows in greenhouse.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.02.09 RM-360; MS-3074
    Document, page from Mount Vernon ledger
    1785 February 9-April 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Leaf from a Mount Vernon ledger.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.03.24 RM-62; MS-2136
    Letter, to William Hunter
    1785 March 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Please forward enclosed letter ... requests current cash prices of good plank (inch, inch & quarter, inch & half) in Alexandria ... if vessel presently in harbor and has some for sale, master should call at Mount Vernon ...

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.03.05 W-809/A
    Document, field notes
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Henry, Patrick, 1736-17991785 March 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Docketed "Rough field Notes taken by George Washington in running the courses of the Land bot. from George & Jas. Mercer".

    [reverse of document dated Mar. 5, 1785, Patrick Henry to George Washington].

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.03.15 2018-SC-072
    Letter, to Colonel Frederick Weissenfels
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    2 pages 31 x 19 cm
    1785 March 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed. Washington responds to a former Revolutionary officer's request for assistance. Washington offers to provide a certificate of service to Weissenfels if he can first send a testament of services from his commanding officer, Governor George Clinton.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.04.12 RM-1033; MS-5667
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    1785 April 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington discusses terms for hiring new miller Joseph Davenport who will replace miller Roberts.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.05.17 W-1091
    Account, Cash Memorandum Book
    1785 May 17-December 24English.
    General

    Original Location: From GW Box 3

    Scope and Contents

    Daily expenditures from cash fund on hand, and money received, with detailed explanation of some receipts and expenditures.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.06.15 RM-488; MS-4700
    Letter, to Judge Michael Jenifer Stone
    1785 June 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerning the purchase of shares of stock in the Potomac Company.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.06.15 A-417.1
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1785 June 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anyone recommended by Mr. Powel is welcome at Mt. Vernon--encloses letter from an unknown gentleman [this was a Mr. Charles Vancouver, desiring to dedicate a publication to George Washington]--investigate to see what others think of author & his project.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.07.19 A-417.2
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1785 July 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Powel's advice has made him write Mr. [Charles] Vancouver, declining dedication of his publication--hopes to see Dr. Mayes, Powel's friend, on return from Caroline--Mrs. Macauly Graham's journey to the south--Mrs. Powel's letter to his nephew [Bushrod Washington] in Fredericksburg will be cared for.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1785.09.05 2017-SC-003-004
    Letter, to François Jean de Beauvoir, marquis de Chastellux
    Washington, George, 1732-17991785 September 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mount Vernon. George Washington opened this letter with a response to Chastellux's previous flattery, he continued with his hopes for peaceful trade and poetically outlined how nations might accomplish such a noble task, and he concluded with his plans for the Potomac Navigation Company, further identifying peaceful trade as a means of uniting nations.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.10.01 W-552
    Letter, to Jonathan Trumbull
    1785 October 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter of condolence on Gov. Trumbull's death [Jonathan Trumbull Sr.]

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.10.27 RM-1107; MS-5783
    Account, to Battaile Muse
    Washington, George, 1732-17991785 October 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington contracts in advance to purchase all 1,000 bushels of wheat from Mr. Battaile Muse. Purchased for George Washington's mill. Paid 6 shillings per bushel.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.10.29 RM-200; MS-2646
    Letter, to George Gilpin
    Washington, George, 1732-17991785 October 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington first asks Gilpin for the use of a scow with which he intends to dredge mud from the river bottom for trial as fertilizer. Then he goes into some detail about the making of a water level and staff which he desires, "I have joiners that could execute the wooden work ... but my Smith is too great a bungler to entrust anything to him, ..." Washington asks Gilpin to have the iron work done for him, or, if he thinks it preferable to make the complete instrument for him.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1785.12.27 A-417.3
    Lettter, to Samuel Powel
    1785 December 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter discussing the "Agricultural Society of Philadelphia," also known as the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture.

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1786.02.08 RM-774; MS-5158
    Letter, to Messrs. Lyles & Co.
    1786 February 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington hopes to trade 25 barrels of fine flour for ". . . a she ass from Surinam, . ."

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1786.02.27 RM-544; MS-4191
    Letter, to Josias Hawkins
    1786 February 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    A character testimonial on behalf of Mr. Booth, (of Westmoreland Co., Va.).

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1786.03.20 W-696
    Document, Washer Blunt Bill to The Potomac Company
    1786 March 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    fragment, endorsed "Rect. No. 149 Walker Blunt Block Maker".

    General

    Original Location, From GW Box 3

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1786.04.05 A-417.7
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1786 April 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Presents Rev. Mr. Griffith, who owns much property in Alexandria--he wants to borrow money to build--good securities--would not hesitate to make loan himself, had he the money.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.04.10 W-433
    Letter, to Jonathan Trumbull
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786 April 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed, Mount Vernon. Washington writes that he has only just received Trumbull's letter and enclosure of Feb. 20, and he hopes Trumbull will make his southern tour and visit Mount Vernon. Washington mentions the marriage of George Augustine Washington and Fanny Bassett, who are living with him, and encloses a letter for Mr. Dwight. This is Rev. Timothy Dwight, who sent Washington a copy of the "Conquest of Canaan."

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.04.23 A-516.10
    Account
    1786 April 23-May 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Covers period April 23-29, including "6 half Johan. and half a Guinea to pay Mr. Buchanan my dividd. of the cash for the James River Navigation and recd. from his office 426 dollars in Indents (paper) for Interest on my Loan Office Certificates emitted in this state of Virginia." Includes money paid for rum, wool cards, G. & L. Washington's schooling [Samuel's children], flour, ferriage, etc.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.05.15 W-419
    Letter, to John Rumney
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786 May 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed with integral address panel, Mount Vernon to Whitehaven. Washington writes that he received 1400 Flags with small breakage, sent £50 bill on Wakelin Welch, and will settle for balance before Mr. Sanderson leaves country.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.05.18 RM-903, MS-5403
    Letter, to George Taylor, Jr.
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed with address panel. Mount Vernon to New York. Washington thanks Taylor for the apples and pickled and fried oysters that he sent.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.06.20 A-837
    Letter, to David Humphreys
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786 June 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mount Vernon. In this letter, George Washington sends his congratulations to David Humphreys on return to America [from London] and invites him to Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.08.05 A-384.3
    Letter, to William Peacey
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786 August 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter signed. Mount Vernon. Sends several letters of James Bloxham's--Bloxham undecided about staying longer than a year--"In a word he seems rather to have expected to have found well organized farms, than that the end and design of my employing him was to make them so."--if Bloxham's wife is to come, let her come on ship to Alexandria or nearby ports--she can pay for seed, implements, etc., and be repaid in Virginia.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1786.12.26 RM-801; MS-5216
    Letter, to George Digges
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786 December 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed. Mount Vernon. Washington asks Digges if he would inquire among his friends on the Eastern Shore, Maryland "if I could be furnished with one thousand feet of the best plan plank; precisely 24 feet long (when dressed) - To be without sap, or knots. - It is for the floor of my New room." Years before Washington had set aside some like lumber but "behold! half of it was stolen, and the other half will match no plank I can now get."

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.03.13 RM-951; MS-5504
    Letter, to Charles Willson Peale
    Washington, George, 1732-17991787 March 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Acknowledges Peale's receipt of Golden Pheasant. Sent body of French Hen. Wishes Peale success with mezzotinto prints.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.06.06 A-417.9
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1787 June 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Incloses copy of the Vision of Columbus which he promised--his copies just came to hand.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.06.00 W-1203/C
    Receipt, Elizabeth Jones
    probably 1787 June 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    For 3 ruffled shirts, 1 plain one, 4 stockings, 1 pair breeches, etc.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.06.09 W-434
    Letter, to Governor Clinton
    1787 June 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Advising him that he will discharge the balance owing--Mr. Morris will have his agent in New York pay $840, about £325.6. as per account of January.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.06.10 W-439
    Letter, to George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991787 June 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Regrets hearing that George Augustine Washington is ill, wants him not to do more than he can safely do. Instructions about Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.07.23 A-417.8
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1787 July 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will call for her in carriage in hopes of accompanying her to Lansdown this evening.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.07.25 A-417.15
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    Washington, George, 1732-17991787 July 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks for inquiring into prices of painting and lining carriages--he has employed a Mr. Clark to repair chariot--well spoken of--can see progress every day when passing his workshop in the Square.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.09.02 MS-5821
    Letter, to George Augustine Washington, with letter of provenance
    Washington, George, 1732-17991787 September 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington appointed George Augustine Washington manager of Mount Vernon in his absence. The letter gives detailed instruction of farming Mount Vernon, as well as decorating the mansion, improvements to farm buildings, supervision and care of the servants, miscellaneous purchases.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.09.07 A-417.14
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1787 September 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has perused contents of enclosed--finds it good and just, and thinks they will meet with favorable reception of his nephew [Bushrod Washington].

  • Text box: 3 folder: 1787.09.28 RM-948; MS-5499
    Letter, to Robert Sprigg
    Washington, George, 1732-17991787 September 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Dear Sir, I have this moment been favored with your letter and with out date from Prince Georges County and have ordered the Jennies to be delivered to Mr. Dove--hoping both will prove with foal. Royal Gift never fails ...,".

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.10.18 RM-587; MS-4470
    List, workers employed at the Shanandoah Falls, Potomac Navigation Company
    1787 October 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lists the names, occupations, and salaries of 86 workmen on the Potomac Company canal near Harper's Ferry.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.11.05 A-417.6
    Letter, to Mr. Digges
    1787 November 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introduces Mr. and Mrs. [Samuel] Powel of Philadelphia.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.11.30 A-417.13
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1787 November 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    The Powel's safe arrival in Philadelphia [after visit at Mt. Vernon]--the Mr. Morrises [Robert and Gouvernor] visited on way to Richmond--hopes to hear of the [Pennsylvania] state convention's decision on Federal Government--Spanish chestnuts--will send more about the 1st of October next year.

    General

    Original location, From GW Box 3

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1787.12.17 W-415
    Letter, to General Weedon
    1787 December 17English.
  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.01.07 A-384.4
    Letter, to William Peacey
    1788 January 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks for seeds--glad Caleb Hall did not come from England--thanks for offer to send blacksmiths & mill wrights, but needs none--no benefits for people of that kind to come over--"Whenever we have a regular & firm government established the prospect for these people will be much more pleasing."--Bloxham well.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.01.14 A-417.11
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    Washington, George, 1732-17991788 January 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thoughts about various states debating ratification of Constitution--generosity of landholders in county of Philadelphia in proposing it for seat of Federal government.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.02.05 RM-153; MS-2430
    Letter, to Charles Carter
    1788 February 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington passes on some information about Irish wolf dogs to Carter which he received from an Irish gentleman. George Washington does not think that mastiffs will fulfill the purpose of hunting wolves which Carter apparently wants.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.04.25 2017-SC-003-005
    Letter, to François Jean de Beauvoir, marquis de Chastellux
    Washington, George, 1732-17991788 April 25-May 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    In this letter, George Washington reveals his humorous side after learning of Chastellux's recent marriage and Washington ended the letter with important information on the Constitution and methods of united the now new nation.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.05.18 A-607
    Invitation, to Mr. and Mrs. Porter
    1788 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Invitation to dinner for Monday, May 19, 1788. Answer is requested.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.08.31 RM-1108; MS-5785
    Letter, to Annis Boudinot Stockton
    1788 August 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks her for her composition in his honor--new government--hopes those of her sex will introduce federal fashions and national manners instead of following foreign manners and fashions.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.09.05 MSS-788
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1788 September 15English.
  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.09.16 W-431
    Letter, to Thomas Peters
    1788 September 16English.
  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.11.06 RM-254; MS-2751
    Letter, to William Smith
    1788 November 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington introduces the Count de Moustier, from the Court of France, and the Marchioness de Brehan, who are returning to New York and propose to pass through Baltimore.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.11.24 A-417.16
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1788 November 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introdues [Ferdinand] Fairfax, son of [Bryan] Fairfax, his godson--he goes to Philadelphia to complete his studies.

  • Text box: 4 folder: 1788.11.25 folder: OUT MS-4096
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1788 November 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington advises his nephew about his contemplated move to Alexandria to set up a law practice.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.01.16 RM-36; MS-2042
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1789 January 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter discussing Bushrod renting George Washington's townhouse in Alexandria, as well as the stable and garden.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.03.18 RM-530; MS-2042
    Legal document, Power of Attorney to George Augustine Washington
    1789 March 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington grants his nephew, George Augustine Washington, power of attorney during the former's absence from Mount Vernon. George Washington was preparing to take office as first President of the United States, and George Augustine Washington acted as manager of Mount Vernon during George Washington's first term. Witnessed by Tobias Lear and John Fairfax.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.05.00 RM-1167; MS-5091
    "Accounts to be raised in the Books of the President of the United States"
    1789 May-1797 MarchEnglish.
  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.06.03 H-1199/c
    Invoice, to Robert Lewis
    1789 June 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill from President to Mr. Lewis

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.08.05 RM-684; MS-4662
    Presidential appointment, to Vincent Redman
    1789 August 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Presidential appointment to Redman as customs collector at the port of Yeocomico River in Virginia. The rest of the document is filled in by Tobias Lear. This appointment followed the first Tariff Act of July 4, 178

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.09.03 folder: OUT RM-1145
    Invitation, to Edmund Lee
    1789 September 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    On September 3, 1789, George Washington sent this letter to Edmund Jennings Lee inviting him to dine at Mount Vernon along with John Marshall and Bushrod Washington. Marshall had recently returned from service as peace commissioner to France and Washington hoped to persuade him to run for Congress in the upcoming election. Lee must have declined this invitation, because his name is not recorded in Washington's diary among his dinner guests that evening.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.09.21 W-436
    Letter, to David Stuart
    1789 September 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Advises Stuart, as administrator of estate of John Parke Custis, to let Mr. Alexander have disputed land [J.P. Custis' "Abingdon" estate] back and pay him a fair rent for the time it was out of his possession -- has no time to give reasons -- Martha Washington adds her approval at bottom of letter in short note and signature.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1789.12.15 A-417.17
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1789 December 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sorry to find the report on the Hessian Fly to Maj. Jackson has been recalled--hasn't written Mr. [Arthur] Young about it--is informed, especially in Connecticut, that fly is now in wheat too--it is a pity farmers won't stick to yellow-bearded wheat, which is immune.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.00.00 [RM-1079; MS-5722] & [RM-988; MS-5605] & [RM-1114: MS-5797] & [RM-1172; MS-5908]
    Document, blank dinner invitation from President and Mrs. Washington
    1790English.
    Scope and Contents

    Partially printed on card from President Washington and Mrs. Washington--not filled out.

    General

    [RM-1079; MS-5722]; [RM-988; MS-5605]; [RM-1114; MS-5797]

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.02.07 W-427
    Note, extract copied from letter by George Augustine Washington
    1790 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Written in George Washington;s hand, this note is extracted from a letter from George Augustine Washington to George Washignton. The letter gives length of bolting cloth now in the mill--Col. Biddle observes has the difference between cloth and reel covered with coarse linen.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.02.21 A-417.18
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1790 February 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks to Society for letter and present accompanying it -- beneficial consequences to rural economy from prizes awarded -- Mr. Matthewson's improvements in art of cheese making. Signed by Washington, though not written in his hand.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.04.11 W-430
    Letter, to David Stuart
    Washington, George, 1732-17991790 April 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Consents to agreement with Mr. Alexander in order to avoid a legal decision -- forwarded it to Lund Washington -- question of assumption not taken up yet -- it has been fully discussed and majority will be small on whichever side wins -- will not send the original papers [pertaining to above agreement] to him in Williamsburg.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.06.00 W-1310/a.54
    Account, with Joseph Corre
    1790 June-AugustEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Account amounting to £51.6.2 for ice and "mouls" of ice cream.

  • 2018-SC-042
    Letter, to Marie Adrienne de Noailles, Marquise de Lafayette
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    3 pages
    1790 June 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    New York. Autograph letter signed. Washington writes in response to a letter from the wife of Lafayette requesting a brevet commision at the rank of captain for Joseph-Léonard Poirey, a French officer who served under her husband.

    Washington writes, "And you will, I dare flatter myself, do me the justice to believe that I can never be more happy than in according marks of attention to so good a friend to America and so excellent a patriot as Madame la Marquise de la Fayette. Nor did she need any excuse for making use of her own language to be the interpreter of so much politeness & persuasion as she has found means to convey in one short letter. In truth that language, at least when used by her, seems made on purpose to have fine things communicated in it; and I question whether any other, at least in the hands of any other person, would have been equally competent to the effect."

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.06.20 A-417.19
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1790 June 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received his letter by Mr. Robert Parish -- declines proposals for dedicating the travels of William Bartram to himself, as it sets a bad precedent -- however, approves book and adds name as a subscriber.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.07.22 RM-770; MS-5083
    Letter cover, to Joseph Jones
    1790 July 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter cover only, signature has been clipped

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.11.23 RM-530; MS-4495
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1790 November 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    On a trip from Mount Vernon to Philadelphia, Washington complains about his coachman, Dunn, who has given many "proofs of his want of skill in driving ..." and "... this Morning was found much intoxicated." Lear is asked to make inquiries after a new driver.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.12.01 W-789
    Letter, to Governor Clinton
    1790 December 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Discusses Gov. Clinton's letter of 26th containing news from Capt. Brant of the expedition against the Indians which was ambushed [Gen. Harmar's expedition] -- sounds true but awaits more news -- our force ought to have been large enough to tackle a force of 1,000 or more -- friendly sentiments of Capt. Brant -- his account of Gen. St. Clair not true nor the account of affairs at Muskingum -- Brant tried to prevent any treaty -- St. Clair wanted no more land than already given -- treaty of Muskingum.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1790.12.19 RM-186; MS-2573
    Letter, to Burgess Ball
    1790 December 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Impossible to arrange an exchange of property with Ball, who wishes to have land held by George Washington in Berkeley County. Not possible because property leased to tenants and value greater than Ball believes it to be. Would be willing to work an exchange, however, for some of his land west of the Alleghany River.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.02.00 W-1310/a.60
    Invoice, to John Barnes
    1791 February-AprilEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Account for Feb. 21 and April 2 for Best Bourbon Coffee, amounting to £8.15.4.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.02.04 A-301.2
    Letter, to William Hunter
    1791 February 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to the Mayor of Alexandria saying that an accurate survey is necessary of 10 miles square in question [the land for the Federal City] -- has engaged Mr. Ellicott to make it -- hopes corporation of Alexandria, Virginia will give all necessary help.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.04.06 RM-530; MS-4496
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1791 April 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    While on his Southern tour, Washington writes to Lear that "I am perfectly satisfied that every necessary and proper step will be taken to procure a good Steward, and a good House keeper ..." for the Philadelphia household. Orders a garden worker to be paid.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.08.02 A-417.20
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1791 August 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Presents one set of the Annals sent him by Mr. Arthur Young to the Philadelphia Society for Promoting Agriculture as requested.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.08.14 W-722
    Letter, to Anthony Whiting
    Washington, George, 1732-17991791 August 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Major George A. Washington gone to Berkeley so he will address him [Whitting] on Mount Vernon matters -- send weekly reports -- corn at the mill should be ready -- gather this corn & stalks together for fodder -- plant this meadow in grass -- further instructions on harvesting and seeding -- all autumn grain and grass to be put in as soon as possible -- wants an overseer for Dogue Run, a man with a small family -- house for overseer, can move one from the Mansion to Dogue Run easier than build a new one, add a brick chimney -- this was originally at Dogue Run -- instructions for Tom Davis, bricklayer, about "the other Wing of the Green House" -- be sure brick work on old & new walls coincide exactly -- instructions for Will, "if ... is not likely to provide shoes enough for the Negroes in due Season" -- clover -- use the barn floor to tread wheat -- not to use Mr. Lund Washington's smith for work on Harrows, Mt. Vernon's smiths are competent -- how is wheat crop -- if 335 bushels all? -- crop short indeed.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.09.04 RM-759; MS-5023
    Letter, to Anthony Whiting
    Washington, George, 1732-17991791 September 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to his Mount Vernon overseer about farm matters; mentions crop rotation system, decreasing productivity of land, wheat experiments, mill production, and missing horse.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1791.11.14 W-422
    Letter, to Governor Martin
    1791 November 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to North Carolina's Governor that he has received letter with notice of cession of land in North Carolina for building lighthouses -- mentions recent southern tour -- thanks him for reception in North Carolina -- object was "To see with my own eyes the situation of the Country, and to learn on the spot the condition and disposition of our Citizens." Written in the hand of Tobias Lear.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.04.23 A-417.21
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1792 April 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks her for sending enclosed "Strictures &c" to him to read -- it hasn't caused him any pain -- he regrets author didn't spend some of time investigating the facts instead of writing the pamphlet. If he had done so, the author "might have found many of his charges as unsupported as the 'baseless fabric of a vision'" (quoting from The Tempest, IV,1). The pamphlet referred to was "Strictures and observations upon the three executive departments of the government of the United States..." by Massachusettensis ([Philadelphia], 1792).

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.05.06 RM-1087; MS-5746
    Invitation, to Mr. Gilbert
    1792 May 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Invitation from George Washington to Mr. Gilbert. Partially printed. Filled in by George Washington. Mr. Gilbert, who is invited to dine at 4:00, is unidentified. Engraved invitation does not include phrase "and Mrs. Washington" like others issued at the time.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.05.20 A-301.3
    Letter, to Hannah Fairfax Washington
    1792 May 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pressing public business causes delay in answering letter -- thanks for information he requested on genealogy of Washington family -- returns herewith will of Lawrence Washington as she desires.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.06.22 A-417.23
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1792 June 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington will gladly accept one of tubs of grape vines from Madeira if Mr. Powel doesn't need them all -- a vessel sails for Alexandria in a few days -- will send sundry parcels to Mt. Vernon.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.07.01 W-417
    Letter, to Anthony Whiting
    Washington, George, 1732-17991792 July 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Discusses plantation management.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.08.08 2019-SC-003
    Letter, to Richard Chichester
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    2 pages 24 x 20 cm
    1792 August 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed. Washington denies a request from his neighbor to hunt deer on his property.

  • Text box: 5 folder: 1792.12.23 A-301.4
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    1792 December 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has heard that Maj. Harrison of Loudon County intends selling his land adjoining George Washington's in Fairfax -- Washington wishes to buy for sole reason of ridding himself of the "villainies" which are performed by those tenants who occupy Harrison's land -- land no good for a farm -- if he can get good price make the bargain, so long as title is clear and not under any encumbrances of leases.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.00.00 RM-490-F; MS-3945
    Articles of agreement, house carpenter and joiner
    1793English.
    Scope and Contents

    Contracts services for one year-house carpenter and Joiner should conduct themselves soberly, honestly and deliberately-duties: superintend Negro carpenters, use proper care with tools, keep an account (in a book) of needs and things done, should set a good example, and will remain at work from light to dark-pay is 10 pounds a month- George Washington will provide: meat and meal or flour, tools, quarters, and will pay taxes.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.01.06 A-734.1
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    1793 January 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses copies of earlier letters to Lewis, in case originals miscarry -- has written Mr. [Anthony] Whitting at Mount Vernon not to sell the stud horse, but deliver him to Robert Lewis -- Lewis's aunt (Martha Washington) joins in sending greetings.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.01.30 A-301.6
    Letter, to Nicholas Van Staphurst
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 January 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will pay small sum in Amsterdam -- encloses bill of exchange drawn by George Meade on Henry Gildermeester in his favor – 2,310 guilders in Dutch currency -- will remit second exchange by British packet slated to sail on 6 February. With this sum, Washington transferred money to a Dutch banking firm in order to assist the family of the Marquis de Lafayette, who had been captured by Prussian forces as he fled France in August 1792.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.01.31 A-301.7
    Letter, to Nicholas Van Staphurst
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 January 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Please convey enclosed letter to Madame La Fayette "if you know where she is to be found" -- hold amount of bill sent subject to her order -- sent to Holland because reports in America say if Madame Lafayette is not there, it will be known where she is to be found.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.02.00 A-417.22
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1793 FebruaryEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Comments on enclosed poem that contains birthday sentiments for Mrs. Powel. The poem was copied by Tobias Lear from a 1792 manuscript by the poet Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson. Mount Vernon has both the original and Lear's copy.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.02.04 A-301.8
    Letter, to Nicholas Van Staphurst
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 February 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enclosed is second bill of exchange for 2310 guilders for Madame Lafayette.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.02-07 A-301.9
    Letter, to Thomas Parker
    1793 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received Parker's letter desiring to know terms on which he (Washington) would sell his Gloucester County land -- since he got it at valuation of £800 Virginia currency for part of a bond, he will sell it for same plus interest since 1789 -- Washington wants payment upon giving over the land, but some credit can be arranged.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.02.07 A-301.10
    Letter, to Robert Hooe
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received letter containing Mr. Bennett's claim against Colville's estate -- deals with George Washington's position as executor of Colville estate -- won't pay interest on debt thereof until court of Chancery decides whether it is just -- refers him to Mr. Keith of Alexandria who has papers dealing with estate.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.02.07 A-301.11
    Letter, to James Keith
    1793 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses Col. Robert Townsend Hooe's letter relating to the Thomas Colville estate -- wishes to have final settlement of estate -- check Mr. Bennett's account with documents and see if it seems to be correct -- Washington thinks Bennett's claim different from what he remembered legacy to be -- has referred Hooe to him for details.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.02.21 A-417
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1793 February 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Congratulations and best wishes on her birthday from both President and Mrs. Washington -- would have attended her party except for "the late event which has happened in their family" (the death of George Augustine Washington).

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.03.01 RM-1086; MS-5745
    Invitation, to Tristram Dalton
    1793 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dinner invitation from George and Martha Washington to Mr. and Mrs. Dalton and daughter. Not in Washington's hand. Tristram Dalton was a friend and first senator from Massachusetts. Invitation was issued just prior to Washington's second inauguration in the Senate chamber.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.03.03 RM-873; MS-5333
    Letter, to William Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 March 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington requires shells for lime to make mortar for about "40,000 Bricks." Constructing Dogue Run Farm 16-sided barn. Asks his nephew if he hires out "Negro carpenters by the year?" Can he recommend carpenter overseer?

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.03.11 A-750.21
    Letter, to Albert Gallatin
    1793 March 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has little information re inquiry of Mr. Thomas Bowen--only man named George Harrison in area died 50 years ago--no children--widow married man named Posey--Harrison's land left to nephew John West, from whom George Washington bought it about 20 years ago--knows nothing of affairs of Harrison's estate.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.03.14 A-301.14
    Letter, to General Wilkinson
    1793 March 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received letter from Wilkinson by way of Captain Abner Prior and shortly after the two kegs of fish from "western waters" [in Ohio] -- fish were fine and a novelty here.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.03.15 A-301.15
    Letter, to Nicholas Van Staphurst
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 March 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    By Brig Betsey, sends triplicates of letters of Jan. 30 and 31 and the third exchange for 2310 guilders for Madame Lafayette.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.03.20 A-301.16
    Letter, to Arthur Young
    1793 March 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends plan of new federal district where the seat of government will be located -- "It will serve to show you, and such as may have the curiosity to look at it, that whatever our present condition is, we have vanity enough to look forward to a better."

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.04.24 A-417.26
    Letter, to Samuel and Elizabeth Powel
    1793 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. Washington is indisposed with a cold -- afraid she will increase it by going to the circus this afternoon -- President and rest of family will go to see exhibition of Mr. Ricketts.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.04.26 A-750.22
    Letter, to William Washington
    1793 April 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. David Clark, coachmaker in Philadelphia, has asked him to write informing Col. Washington that the coach he (George Washington) had with him in Charleston was made by Clark -- he has heard it was admired for its beauty and is made of good materials -- Mr. Clark hears Col. Washington wants to have a coach made and he desires the job.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.04.30 A-301.17
    Letter, to John Joseph DeBarth
    1793 April 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Since Mr. de Barth has not made stipulated payments for land bought of Washington, lying on the Kanawas, Washington suggests canceling the bargain instead of bringing measures against De Barth for payment.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.05.04 A-417.27
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    1793 May 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received from Arthur Young two sets of his Annals, numbered 98-108--presumes one set intended, as usual, for Agricultural Society of this city--accordingly, sends them to him as president.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.05.06 A-301.18
    Letter, to William Shotwell
    1793 May 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Inquires as to price and availability of the best clover seed.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.05.07 A-301.19
    Letter, to Arthur Young
    1793 May 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    At request of several gentlemen of his acquaintance, Washington introduces Dr. Edwards, who is going to Europe for his health and to obtain knowledge of agriculture there.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.05.16 A-301.20
    Letter, to Judge Peters
    1793 May 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Arthur Young has written that the several accounts collected by George Washington of agriculture in this country "have set him afloat on the High Seas of conjecture with respect to the Agriculture of this Country ..." -- "and, as you had a hand in setting him afloat, it is but fair that you should lend your assistance to get him landed again" -- sends enclosed extracts from Young's letter and desires Peters to answer queries -- Young has been prevented by the war from coming to this country to study himself the agriculture and see what can be done along that line.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.05.29 A-301.21
    Letter, to Robert Hooe
    1793 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Agrees to Hooe's offer for flour -- will order Anthony Whitting to make delivery in Alexandria, but wishes because of harvest time that Hooe would take delivery at his mill or on river opposite -- market for flour is not falling as Hooe says, but only a temporary drop due to lack of vessels to take it to European markets -- had heard of William Shepherd's intent to apply to Loudon Court to condemn George Washington's land on Difficult Run -- encloses a copy of earlier letter to Col. Powell on subject.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.06.05 A-301.22
    Letter, to Warner Washington
    1793 June 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Hereby conveys a letter from Warner Washington III as he promised -- the younger Warner is destitute for funds in this city.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.06.10 A-608.35
    Letter, to Frances Bassett Washington
    1793 June 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enlarges on recent letter of Mrs. Washington's (dictated by him) relative to the estate in Berkeley -- in accord with provisions in George A. Washington's will, advises settling a second plantation in Berkeley including some land in Fairfax County, as a grass and small grain farm -- advises on getting tenants and drawing up contracts -- she should ask advice of George S. Washington -- Anthony Whitting's decline caused by consumption necessitates visit to Mt. Vernon but public business presses and visit will be short.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.06.21 A-301.23
    Letter, to William Tilghman
    1793 July 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Death of Anthony Whitting -- needs Tilghman's help to procure new manager -- thinks a good one may better be found on Eastern Shore of Maryland than elsewhere -- gives qualifications for the job -- lists several people in Tilghman's neighborhood whom he has had recommended -- among them is William Pearce [later manager of Mt. Vernon] -- doesn't want to lure any away from present jobs, unless they had intended leaving anyway.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.04 RM-1216
    Letter, to Burgess Ball
    1793 August 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    At the time of this letter, Washington was serving his second term as president and was living in Philadelphia. His nephew, George Augustine Washington, had served as farm manager for the previous seven years but died in 1793. In need of a new farm manager, Washington considered his nephew, Lawrence Lewis.

    Concerned that Lewis was too inexperienced for the job, Washington remarked on the necessary qualifitcations necessary: "…so little haveg it in my power to visit, or attend to my private concerns, that it becomes extremly necessary (besides fidility) to have an experienced & skilful man, of some weight, to manage my business; one whose Judgment is able to direct him in cases which may arise out of circumstances that can neither be foreseen, nor previously guarded against.

    Washington continued, "What the age of Mr Lawrence Lewis is—what opportunities he may have had to acquire any knowledge in the management of a Farm. What his disposition, whether active or indolent. Whether clear in his perceptions, & of good Judgment. Whether sober & sedate, or fond of amusements and running about—with other queries which might be asked, as well applying to a young man Just entering on the career of life; are all matters to which I am an entire stranger; and if you can give me information respecting them, I shall thank you. You will readily perceive that my sole object in these enquiries is to ascertain the competency of a character to whom I should commit an important trust; consequently, going no farther, can operate nothing to the prejudice of my Nephew, whatever, in confidence, you may say to me on the foregoing points and such others as may occur to you."

    Washington instead hired a more seasoned farm manager, William Pearce. Pearce served as farm manager until 1796 during which time Lewis came to stay at Mount Vernon and worked in some managerial capacity, but the official farm manager by then was James Anderson. Lewis eventually married Nelly Custis in 1799 and lived the remainder of his life at Woodlawn.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.04 A-301.24
    Letter, to Hyland Crow
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 August 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has heard from Mr. Robert Lewis that Crow desires increase in wages -- since he had best crop last year at Union Farm, Washington will raise him to £40 per annum as an encouragement, but will not raise him any higher hereafter.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.07 A-301.25
    Letter, to John Francis Mercer
    1793 August 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests that Mercer forward deed from "yourself & others to me" if it has been duly executed and recorded.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.07 A-301.26
    Letter, to Robert Hooe
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 August 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has given James Keith a draught on Col. Hooe for £140, the amount due Keith for his trouble in Colville estate -- asks that Hooe deduct it from what is due George Washington.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.11 RM-271; MS-2784
    Letter, to Howell Lewis
    1793 August 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis was acting Estate Manager for George Washington at Mount Vernon. The letter contains instructions for various farm activities and personal advice to young Lewis on how to write better reports.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.26 RM-490-F; MS-3939
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 August 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    100 guineas a year for superintendant of Mt. Vernon--recommends that Pearce visit the estate--to determine if all is to his liking-George Washington expects to be at Mt. Vernon on the 20th of Sept.--gives directions, mileage, stage schedule--speaks of worthless overseer to 8-10 Negro carpenters--hopes to replace him by New Year's day.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.08.26 A-301.27
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    1793 August 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Won't sell land on Difficult Run in Loudon County except for very high price -- was in treaty with a Dutchman for it for £60 per annum -- would want double what Lewis offered for the Frederick County land because when Shenandoah River is made navigable, lands near it will increase greatly in value

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.09.01 A-301.28
    Letter, to William Short
    1793 September 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introduces Tobias Lear, who leaves George Washington as Secretary after 7 years -- Lear is engaged in a mercantile scheme -- recommends him to Short's kindness.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.09.01 A-301.29
    Letter, to Arthur Young
    1793 September 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introduces Tobias Lear, who goes to Europe to carry into effect his plans for an "extensive commercial establishment" at the Federal City -- Lear can explain his long delay in writing -- encloses Mr. Richard Peters' and Mr. Thomas Jefferson's answers to his queries about American agriculture -- if there are any questions, ask Lear.

  • Text box: 6 folder: 1793.09.09 A-417.30
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1793 September 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends their regrets that Mrs. Powel cannot accompany him and Mrs. Washington to Virginia.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.10.06 RM-490-F; MS-3940
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1793 October 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington's nephew's widow has decided to move--Pearce and his family to move into Mansion--repairing of Mr. Crow's house--recommends Pearce residing in the right wing (the Hall)--list of things at his disposal --authorizes Pearce to acquire ploughs and any other tools --outlines benefits of Pearce's early arrival.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.10.24 RM-703; MS-4757
    Letter, to Richard Henry Lee
    1793 October 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington comments on the disagreeable conduct of the French minister Genet, who seems to want to involve the U.S. in war. The situation has "test[ed] the temper of the Executives."

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.10.25 A-301.30
    Letter, to Francis Willis
    1793 October 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Deals with involved estate of Samuel Washington and his last wife, Susannah Perrin Holding Washington -- had been undecided whether to try to get estate from Mrs. Washington's family in favor of his niece Harriot who was left very little -- will reach an agreement -- "Pay me one hund. pounds which I shall give to my niece for her immediate support, and I will quit claim to all the Negros which belonged to Mrs. Saml. Washington ...".

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.10.26 A-301.31
    Letter, to John Francis Mercer
    1793 October 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    An attachment has been served against Washington -- despite Mercer's orders to the contrary, collectors present notes against Mercer's brother's estate to George Washington's manager for Payment -- brought bond and mortgage of Mercer's late father and brother from Philadelphia, and will exchange them for land -- asks whether his (Washington's) signature necessary on the instrument.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.10.27 RM-490-F; MS-3941
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 October 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    In this letter George Washington has decided to engage superintendant of carpenters for another year--could not find anyone to relace-comments on man who looks after the house people, ditchers, etc.--after winter, Pearce can decide to remain at Mt. Vernon or live elsewhere--construction of house for Mr. Crow--Negro children forbidden to enter the yards and gardens (excluding the children of cook and her husband the Mulatto Frank).

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.11.24 RM-490-F; MS-3942
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1793 November 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington's general thoughts and directions on government of Mt. Vernon--Mr. Howell Lewis will remain until Pearce's arrival--farm needs much manure---plans to go largely with buck wheat as a green manure---has requested for 450 to 500 bushels for seed--does not wish to go largely with corn--plans to sow a good many oats--keeping no more than half for seed.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.12.12 folder: OUT RM-97; MS-3944
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1793 DecemberEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington instructs Pearce to take an exact account of the stock, tools and implements on each of the farms--to purchase a proper (bound) book in Alexandria for accounts--insists on the correctness of these registers--outines work of the carpenters: complete the new barn at Dogue Run, etc.--comments on live fences: cedar, lombardy poplar, and willows--hogs and sows--wants to reclaim and lay grass to the mill swamp--clover lots--potatoes--McKoy and Tom Davis--directions for lots on Muddy Hole, Union and River farms--Cyrus a slave at Mansion house--Muclus a slave--Will, a kind of overseer--stresses the need to regulate wagons and carts at the Mansion--Ehler the gardener and an agreement as to where he should eat--Lucy the cook--instructions to provide Negroes with as much meal as they can eat without waste--provisions of fish--directions for killing and preserving the hogs--clover timothy and orchard grass--post and rail fence from the Miller's house to the trunnel fence--barrier against bad neighbors--breaking of the steers to the yoke--oxen--asks for the return of large stone jars (which were filled with spirits)--wants an inventory of articles in store at Mansion--the Jack and stud horse--superfine and fine flour--allowance of meat and meal--paying of debt--overhauling the Seins now rather than in the Spring.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.12.18 RM-490-F; MS-3943
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991793 December 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Course of crops--objective was to recover the fields from exhausted state-manure-buck wheat-Indian corn-comments on the insufferable conduct of overseers-Col. Ball of Leesburgh promised to send buck wheat-commends on poor quality of common oats brought from Eastern shore-garlick and wild onions-complains about overseers not doing much fall plowing--has little dependence on overseers when left to themselves-gives directions on how Pearce is to treat overseers-warns Pearce not to be like Mr. Whiting, who is said to have drank freely-GW's observations of his overseers: Stuart, Crow, McKoy, Butler, Davy and Thomas Green.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1793.12.12 RM-767; MS-5053
    Letter, to Arthur Young
    1793 December 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Written in the hand of Bartholomew Dandridge. Washington describes his Mount Vernon estate to the English agronomist in great detail, as he is considering leasing four of the Mount Vernon farms. Includes his description of Mount Vernon: "No estate in United America is more pleasantly situated than this."

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.01.06 RM-490-F;MS-3946
    Letter, to Howell Lewis or William Pearce
    1794 January 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington sends two bank notes of one hundred dollars each for Mr. Butler--is upset that the ice house was not filled during the late freezing spell--wants to know quantity of oats that have been thrashed--instructs them to get seeds from the gardener--has sent a bundle of Poccon or Illinois nuts via Mr. Jefferson--East India hemp seed for sowing--inquires as to the appearance of the growing wheat--using Mr. Whiting's memo book, Mr. Dandridge will settle Mr. Butler's account.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.01.19 RM-490-F; MS-3947
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 January 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington inquires of condition and shelter of stock at Dogue Run and Union--instances of misconduct of Crow and McKoy--informs Pearce that he is taking on Butler again. Observations on various agricultural things. Asks about the carpenters at Mrs. Fanny Washington's. Informs Pearce that in the Eastern states, horses aided by oxen do the plowing.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.01.26 RM-490-F; MS-3948
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 January 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Crop rotation plan--hopes to bring fields into a profitable state of cultivation--mentions Mr. Stuart's suggestion that the good fields be planted with corn and poor parts with buck wheat--sending 14 bushels of clover seed--suspects that Negro seedsmen are taking toll on seeds--manure to Mansion house for oats, grass and potatoes--fences at River farm--Thomas Green taking fine flour from the mill--payment of a hundred dollars to Mr. Dulany--rent due to Mrs. French for year 1793-wages for 1793 due to estate of Mr. Anthony Whitting.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.02.09 RM-490-F; MS-3949
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 February 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington speaks of Mr. Butler's agreeable work and conduct--French furze--construction of substantial fences--pigs--planting of clover and buck wheat--wants to know of the appearance of the growing wheat and barley--progress on the new race at the mill--honey locust seed--white bent seed--inquires about the amount of St. Foin and India hemp seed--stresses the importance of selling cattle before it is too late--attending to their breeding--Mrs. Fanny Washington asks to rent her fishing landing--conditions of rent--Col. Ball must have the three shoats he requested (a boar and two sows)--payment of wages to Stuart, Crow and McKoy--intends to build dairies at both Union and Dogue Run farms.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.02.16 RM-490-F; MS-3950
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 February 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington mentions the death of Stuart's daughter--gives directions for repairs of the house in Alexandria--comments that cedar posts, chestnut or cyprus rails are better than oak--concerned about the idleness of his carpenters--barn at Dogue Run--discusses the increase of lambs reported by the overseers--a missing report of Mr. Stuart is requested--sending payment from Philadelphia of Mr. Lewis' order to Mr. Ross--white bent grass seeds received--Ehler the gardener--directions for labeling new seeds.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.02.24 RM-490-F; MS-3951
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 February 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington assents to Pearce's request to meet his children in Baltimore--payment of wages to Mr. Stuart--enclosed some early colliflower seed, sent by Mrs. Washington--promises to send copy of advertisement of terms on which jacks and stud horses are to cover--mentions Crow's inattention to stock in regards to sheep sheering--St. Foin seed and India hemp--hares being destructive--lucern--enclosed three bank notes for Rev. Mr. Muir and Mr. Hartshorne--warns not to take mares from the jacks until paid.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.02.24 A-301.32
    Letter, to Mr. Muir
    1794 February 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Regarding his annual contributions to the Alexandria Academy--Washington wishes to know what indigent or orphaned children have attended and what their progress has been, especially since he has only once received such a report.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.02.24 A-301.33
    Letter, to Charles Simms
    1794 February 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Following up on his previous letter, Washington writes that he has not had any response from Simms or James Keith regarding the Thomas Colvill estate, nor of the cash sent to Simms, nor has Washington received the documents he had requested from them.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.02 RM-490-F; MS-3952
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 March 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington explains horse advertisement--care of the youngest jack and mules--Peter--tells Pearce to keep an exact account of all mares and jenneys that go to the jacks--Mr. Prescot of Loudoun (or Fauquier) owes yet for last year--speaks of Mr. Lewis' account that the new visto is opened much further than intended--instructions to buy as much good Oznabrigs--for the making of clothes for the Negroes--requests a sample of the linnen--comments on the price of midlings and ship stuff and superfine and fine flour--corn--breaking of the ground in the fall.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.09 RM-490-F; MS-3953
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 March 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington approves the use of his own people in repairing the house in Alexandria--warns that putting the fence posts too distant will cause the rails to warp--glad to hear of Green's finishing the barn at Dogue Run--comments on the grain falling from the treading floor--lucern--directions for preparing--St. Foin and India hemp--impossible navigation has prevented him sending the promised clover and other seeds--hopes to send next week.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.15 A-301.34
    Letter, to General Spotswood
    1794 March 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Cannot possibly appoint Spotswood's son John as commander of a frigate over older and experienced officers--perhaps can make him 2nd or 3rd lieutenant--on recommendation of Mr. Brooke and others, Mr. Lawrence Muse appointed as Collector of Rappahannock [Cty] to succeed Hudson Muse.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.16 2020-SC-012
    Letter, to Burgess Ball
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    3 pages
    1794 March 16
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed, two pages plus cover page with Washington's presidential frank. Washington writes Ball regarding a shipment of goods that he expects will soon depart Philadelphia after some delay. The shipment includes clover seeds and cocoa bean shells, latter intended as a gift from Martha Washington to Ball's wife, Francis (Fanny) Washington Ball, the daughter of George's brother Charles. Finally, Washington encloses an advertisement for the stud services of his prized livestock, the horse Traveller and donkeys Knight of Malta and Compound.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.16 A-301.35
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    1794 March 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis has given him no information on Washington's lots in Winchester and Bath, Virginia [the latter now Berkeley Springs, W.Va.]--he wishes a list of all tenants, what they owe, and how they stand--asks Lewis to post copies of enclosed advertisement in area, especially at Leesburg and Fauquier Courthouse--Mr. Prescoat [Prescott] owes for last year's stud fee and a long pasturage.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.16 RM-490-F; MS-3954
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 March 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis has given him no information on Washington's lots in Winchester and Bath, Virginia [the latter now Berkeley Springs, W.Va.] -- he wishes a list of all tenants, what they owe, and how they stand -- asks Lewis to post copies of enclosed advertisement in area, especially at Leesburg and Fauquier Courthouse -- Mr. Prescoat [Prescott] owes for last year's stud fee and a long pasturage.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.23 RM-490-F; MS-3955
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 March 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington complains that the overseers did not plow in the fall--success of the crop--running rollers over the grass and wheat--spring barley--Wayles the Brewer in Alexandria--winter barley--Col. Ball is late with the buck wheat--ponders the distance between sections of the floor at the new Dogue Run barn--furnishing Mr. Smith with fish from the landing--prices--securing enough fish for the use of the people there--asks about quantity of wheat--tobacco stored in Alexandria--inquires about Pearce's family arrival--sending, on the next vessel, nine bolts of Oznabrigs--it is cheaper there than in Alexandria--gives directions on receiving payment from Col. Lyles and instructs where he is located--sending three pounds of lucern seed--directs Pearce not to accept anything but the whole sum from Col. Lyles.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.03.30 RM-490-F; MS-3956
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 March 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington decides that the space between boards on the treading floor of the new barn at Dogue Run will be an inch and a half--suggests that the oats may be tread on the same floor--will send three and a half bushels of a peculiar kind of oats--appearance of the drilled and other wheat--comments on the fine weather during March--winter barley--St. Foin and hemp--Abram--warns of Crow's not able to be trusted--warns of lack of water should mill race not be completed--Washington's sister Lewis of Fredericksburgh is allowed to have one of the unbroken mules.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.06 RM-490-F: MS-3957
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 April 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington is glad to hear that Pearce's family has safely arrived at Mt. Vernon--hopes that change of air will help to restore the eldest daughter to health--writes of the capture of vessels by the British--followed by the embargo--fall in provisions--price of flour--threshing of wheat--purchasing salt before the prices get higher--it is not Washington's expectation to stop ploughing in order to roll the grass and grain--breaking of steers--inquires of the young grass planted last fall--defends the imposition of garden seeds--provision for providing clothes for the young gardener at Alexandria--chance for lambs is bad--rams--instructions for shearing time--paper for the rooms in the house--plastering and white washing--orders for Thomas Davis to paint the houses--lower portion a stone color and the roof red.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.08 RM-17; MS-2019/A
    Letter, to James McHenry
    1794 April 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rare for Washington to answer letters applying for appointments, but because of personal regard and former public association he is replying to this one ... lists 3 reasons which explain his silence re: applications for appointments: (1) requests are so numerous and courteous replies require too much of his time; (2) courteous answers could be interpreted to mean more than was intended; (3) at the time of his Inauguration "... I resolved firmly that no man should ever charge me justly with deception ..." has never committed himself on an appointment until all information and circumstances have been examined ... on a purely personal basis without involving his public character or the Country, Washington has responded to a request of McHenry's ...

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.11 A-301.36
    Letter, to William Deakins
    1794 April 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington asks Deakins to examine contents of enclosed order and tell him the price the tobacco would fetch.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.20 RM-490-F; MS-3958
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 April 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington expresses his being sorry to learn of Pearce's not being well--discusses the amount owed to the estate of Mr. Anthony Whitting--Col. Bassett--Mr. Lear--the private papers of Mr. Whitting--his heir Mr. Ring--ready to sow buck wheat at all the farms--inquires of progress of oats and grass seeds--rain twice last week--dry in Philadelphia--instructs Pearce not to grind more wheat because of the embargo--flax--clothes for the Negroes--wool--warns Pearce to be cautious of pilferring.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.27 RM-490-F; MS-3959
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 April 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington expresses confusion over dimensions of the rooms in Alexandria house given by Thomas Green--flax seed--regulate the grass lots at Dogue Run farm--potatoes, oats and clover for the support of the stock, the Mansion house and for sale--demands particular attention to the penning of the stock--willow--informs Pearce that 5,000 white thorn plants are being sent by Mr. Lear on the ship Peggy from England--other fruit trees--lima beans.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.27 A-301.37
    Letter, to Colonel Fitzgerald
    1794 April 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Declares that Mr. Thomas Digges was during the Revolution and since a friend to the United States--Digges sent him intelligence and helped prisoners escape from England back to this country--Digges was thought to be in pay of Dr. Benjamin Franklin--Washington never knew his loyalty was questioned, though he has now disputed with Franklin over accounts--John Trumbull, in England during Revolution, declares that Digges aided the American cause.

  • Text box: 7 folder: 1794.04.30 A-301.38
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1794 April 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Writes the answers to queries regarding injunction by one John Henshaw, arising from estate settlement of George Mercer--John Tayloe, George Mason and George Washington were given power of attorney by Mercer and others in England. Washington writes that "It is really hard that I am so often called before Courts in matters in which I have no interest; but am continually saddled with the expence of defence."

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.05.04 RM-490-F; MS-3960
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 May 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington is sorry to hear that the ship Peggy has not arrived from England with his 5,000 white thorn plants--Mr. Lear's fruit trees--hoped that Pearce had discharged Green when he found him drinking--he sets such a bad example--never got an account of last year's corn--buck wheat--potatoes--preserving the apricots--does not want to because his family will not be at Mt. Vernon at all during the summer--hopes to, assuming public business permits, make a flying trip through Mt. Vernon after the rising of Congress--papering the ceiling.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.05.11 RM-490-F; MS-3961
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 May 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sending paper for two lower rooms in house--warns Pearce to wait until plaster is thoroughly dry--Green--instructions for the payment of the Sheriff's and Clerk's notes--Mrs. Fanny Washington--cut the hay and grain in time at harvest--be attentive to the drilled wheat--secure it in the seed loft at the Mansion--approves of sowing the first lot in the mill swamp with buck wheat and timothy--corn--grass--mentions Pearce's complaint of bad pastures--wool of dead sheep--inquires about corn, oats, buck wheat and clover.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.05.18 RM-490-F; MS-3962
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Crops suffering from drought--Mr. Dandridge--oats on last vessel have disappeared--has enclosed four small papers of seeds which have been sent from a curious gentleman in Europe--keeping of clover for seed--buck wheat--timothy--heavy cost of these in the markets of Philadelphia--value of various grasses--clover ought to be well cured before stacking--Crow--both cattle and sheep will benefit from turnip--asks about the drilled wheat and common wheat--ought to be ripe by the 8th or 10th of June--there are two kinds of wheat in drills at Union--inquires if Plaster of Paris was spread--hides of the dead cattle to be tanned by the old man Jack--skins of the dead sheep--Mulatto Will making shoes--Mrs. Fanny Washington--four missing heads of tobacco--Mr. Whitting--surveying in the fall--Mr. Minor--hopes to be at Mt. Vernon by the 10th of June--selling of a horse--health of slaves discussed--Sam, Doll, several spinners, Ditcher Charles--awaiting the arrival of the Peggy and the white thorn plants and Mr. Lear's fruit trees--high price of flour--embargo.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.05.24 W-795
    List, Western lands
    1794 May 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington lists and describes lands that he owns on the Ohio, East side; on the Great Kanhawa; west of the Ohio; in Kentucky; in the State of Pennsylvania; and the Great Dismal Swamp--with acreage and asking prices of each--comments by Washington--he "will let them go" if sold together for £ 50,000, although separately they are valued higher--there follows a paragraph of description for each of the 8 tracts.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.05.25 RM-490-F; MS-3963
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 May 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Crops labouring under drought--2 or 3 fine rains have fallen in Philadelphia in past week--unfavorable account of the drilled wheat--great change and decrease in number of sheep since George Washngton's leaving 5 years ago--average fleece from 5 pounds down to 2 pounds--ship Peggy arrived in George Town with the white thorn trees and Mr. Lear's fruit trees--enclosed list for gardener--fence around slave quarters at Union farm--sent oats--on next vessel Washington will send paper for the house.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.01 A-301.39
    Letter, to Francis Deakins
    1794 June 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests that Deakins endeavor to put a stop to trespassing on north part of Woodstock Manor in Montgomery County, Md. which fell to Washington's share in division of William Sprigg's property--also requests information on tenants and farms on his share.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.01 A-301.40
    Letter, to William Deakins
    1794 June 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks Deakins for trees imported in the "Peggy"--but season probably too far advanced for them to live--enclosed is note to Francis Deakins regarding Washington's land in Woodstock Manor.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.01 RM-490-F; MS-3964
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 June 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Glad to hear of rains--will give a different appearance to oats and flax--rains may enliven corn and buck wheat--fears for any grass that may have been cut--little is expected from white bent grass--save as many of the other grasses for seed--drilled wheat and common wheat--deception with respect to potatoes (210 bushels instead of 418) is an example of how little others can be trusted, black or white--Washington knows of the existence of place in Alexandria where pilfered items can be sold--corn--clover--turnip seeds--midlings and ship stuff--Mr. Douglass--will not be at Mt. Vernon until at least the end of the month.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.08 RM-490-F: MS-3965
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 June 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lambs were not to be sold--if any were, Washington never received the money--plans for the selling/care of the sheep--never kill the females--comments on those who would go against his plan--his absence has afforded them the opportunity--overseers not allowed to sell any animals--Mr. Stuart's selling butter--Washington never entertained an unfavorable opinion of Stuart and always a bad one of Green--Mrs. Stuart fraudulently furnishes butter for McKnight's Tavern--Mrs. Fanny Washington and the dampness of the cellar in the Alexandria house--Davis and his attendants taking a week to complete a job that should have taken a day--Mr. Oneill from Chester County--a freestone quarry near the lime kiln--Tom Davis and Muclus--Thomas Green--bad example for the carpenters.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.13 A-301.41
    Letter, to Colonel Fitzgerald
    1794 June 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    People write Washington with all manner of requests and he never fails to answer, despite all his public business--he requests information from Fitzgerald on matter mentioned in enclosed letter from Mr. Smith--asks him to send information and the letter back.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.15 RM-490-F; MS-3966
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 June 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington plans to leave Philadelphia on Tuesday and will probably reach Mt. Vernon either Sunday or Monday--bringing two white waiters with him--one is a hostler and the other attends to Washington--tells Pearce to try the turnip seeds to prove their goodness--preparing ground for a seed that never vegitates.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.16 A-301.42
    Document, power to collect rent
    1794 June 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington appoints [...] to collect his rents in counties of Fayette and Washington in state of Pa. The name and amount of salary left blank. Washington enclosed this power in a letter of same date to Presley Neville, desiring him to fill in name and amount himself.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.06.16 A-301.43
    Letter, to John Cannon
    1794 June 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Continual disappointment in collection of rents in Fayette and Washington Counties, Pa. forces Washington to place the matter in other hands--he directs Cannon to hand over list of tenants, etc. to [...]. (The name left blank in original and letterpress copy. Washington enclosed this in letter of same date to Presley Neville, leaving to his discretion the person to appoint to the task.)

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.07.13 RM-490-F; MS-3967
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 July 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    GW arrived in Philadelphia on Monday--travelled all day through a constant rain--sorry to hear that wet weather interupts work--especially plowing--buck wheat should be plowed in while it is still green and succulent--corn--wheat--oats looked good when he was home--hopes weather does not injure--grass--scythes--hay--replenished with good seed--scratched in with harrows, or rakes with iron teeth--hopes for considerable profit from meadow ground--Capt. Conway of Alexandria sells 400 pounds worth of hay annually--planting corn at Mill swamp not for the sake of the crop but to prepare for grass--the bridge leading to McKoy's house--those parts of the large meadow enclosure at Union farm to be set with grass as soon as possible--fine timothy--instructs Pearce to write memorandums to remind himself of Washington's directions--Mrs. Fanny Washington taking possession of Alexandria house--Mr. Oneill--quarry--send butter and wood to Mrs. F. Washington--measuring of stone--Peter--mules--last Oct., Washington supplied all farms with a complete set of plow beasts (horses or mules)--raising mules for value--night rides and treading wheat will deprive Washington of foals--Lancaster--mares bought for breeding put to work and other rascally treatment by overseers--Sarah--Mr. Lund Washington's receipt for 500 pounds--has heard of illness of Pearce's eldest daughter--should be prepared for the unfortunate event--is satisfied with Pearce's conduct--list of Washington's favorite objectives--Mrs. Washington requests one dozen of the best hams and half dozen midlings of bacon.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.07.14 folder: OUT RM-1214
    Document, two language ship passport
    1794 July 14Dutch; Flemish.
    Scope and Contents

    Ship Passport written in Dutch and English, signed by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, from the schooner Elizabeth, dated July 14, 1794.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.07.20 RM-490-F; MS-3968
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 July 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Frequent rains, not too heavy or too long, will be the making of the corn and buck wheat--directions for plowing wet fields--examine the shocks of wheat frequently--inquires of the quantity and quality of oats--timothy--clover--give John the gardener a dollar on the last day of every month, provided he behaves well--is glad to hear that Pearce's daughter is feeling better--wants to know why Betty Davis and Doll are more than half their time on the sick list--care of grass seeds--little garden by the salt house--Crow, McKoy and Butler.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.07.27 RM-490-F; MS-3969
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 July 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Cultivation in corn of the lots in the Mill swamp--corn is not so much an object with Washington as meadow--rushes, alders and other shrubs--inquires of the corn (grown, shoot well and look promising)--particular care taken with the seed of rare ripe corn Washington sent home--Butler--grass seed sown with flax at Union farm--Mr. McNeil (Oneill)--quarry--use of the young mules by the overseers and plowmen--inquiries for particular concerning Ruth, Hannah and Pegg--their being sick several weeks together.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.02 RM-258; MS-2755
    Financial record, Bank of Alexandria
    1794 August 2 - 1799 November 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account ledger with Bank of Alexandria (record of deposits and drafts) - holograph - 10 leaves - one page tipped in at end of ledger. This statement, dated March 20, 1821, concerns two of Washington's drafts to Samuel Washington in 1797 and 1799 for $ 1,000.00. Docketed on verso of final leaf: "Stuart's Exers on Washington etc. Filed with Depon of Jas. K. McKenna 16 May 1821."

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.03 RM-490-F; MS-3970
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 August 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington has moved to German Town to escape the heat of Philadephia--has not rained at Mt. Vernon for a while--fearful that drought would damage corn--put off sowing wheat until corn fields are clean, light and in good order--preparing no more land for a crop than one can handle--whatever is attempted should be well executed as it respects crops--an essential object with every farmer ought to be the destruction of weeds--his arable and pasture ground should produce nothing but grain, pulse (if he raises them), vegetables of different sorts and grasses--timothy--inquiries about the clover which was sown with the oats at Mansion house--potatoes--Crow has been applying to Col. Ball for a place--McKoy--encourages Pearce to make an agreement with whomsoever will answer his purposes--should be industrious, sober and knowing in the management of Negroes and other concerns of the farm--someone to take the place of Thomas Green to oversee the carpenters--James, Muclus, Davis--description of this overseer--Butler--received bacon in Philadelphia--buck wheat.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.10 RM-490-F: MS-3971
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 August 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Oats, wheat and clover at River farm--laying ground to clover as soon as possible--flour sold in Alexandria--woolen clothes for the people by the first of November--employment of all who can be spared on the new race at the mill--save time and water--sainfoin--potatoes at the Mansion house--gardener is to save as much seed as he can from the everlasting pea--this pea, when cut young, should make an excellent hay-drilled wheat.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.17 RM-490-F; MS-3972
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 August 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Favorable appearance of the corn--ground is in good order for wheat--buck wheat--hemp growing in the vineyard--inquires to the appearance of the potatoes--Kate (wife of Will) at Muddy Hole wishes to serve the Negro women (as a granny) on the estate--pay of 12 to 15 pounds per year--in the George Town Gazette it is written that holders of shares in the Potomac Company (treasurer William Hartshorn) are to give 12 pounds sterling per share--Washington holds 5 shares--Col. Lyles Bond--Crow and McKoy--comments on replacing them--Green--Butler--rare ripe corn.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.24 RM-490-F; MS-3973
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 August 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Workers for the new mill race--comments on the newly hired overseer--Mason--Pine going to school in Alexandria--may fall into bad habits or company there--Mr. Butler--incompetent in his present position--inquires if Groves is married or single--asks about the turnips--inquires after Pearce's youngest and eldest daughters.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.31 A-301.44
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 August 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington asks Lewis to send money from rents to payment of William Pearce in Alexandria, also rental accounts--rents may be applied to purchasing leases, but 10% won't be derived from money advanced--discusses terms of real estate transactions--transfer of leases illegal under Mr. Muse--pleased with Lewis's disposal of Bath and Winchester houses and lots and land on Potomac River, but wishes Lewis had sent the conditions under which they had been let--sends his love, and Martha's, to Mrs. Lewis.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.08.31 RM-490-F; MS-3974
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 August 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Col. Lyles bond--gives instructions on writing responses to his inquiries--drilled wheat and barley--the culture of the latter is more profitable than the former--directions for dealing with the ague and fever--Mr. Gunnel--Col. Simms of Alexandria--people have taken liberties with Washington's timber and wood during his absence--Mr. Pierce Bailey--selling a tract of land for 1500 pounds--discusses payment--Mr. Gill of Alexandria--Washington agrees to putting a still at Mt. Vernon--Pearce should contact Mr. Stuart if he has questions--young Boatswain.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.06 A-301.45
    Letter, to Peter Trenor
    1794 September 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Deals with the estate of Mrs. Margaret Green Savage, and of her husband Dr. William Savage--Washington relates outline of case still under litigation, but refers Trenor to Rev. Mr. Bryan Fairfax as the one who has best knowledge of case and is still active in it as trustee--tells Trenor "I have no more right to intermeddle in the Judicial proceedings of the Courts in this Country than you have."

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.07 RM-490-F; MS-3975
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 September 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Pyne wishes to be employed at Mt. Vernon--Washington leaves the issues in Pearce's hands--has enclosed a certificate for Mr. Butler--discusses his dismissal--directions for removing the Negro quarters at Union and River farms--warns Pearce not to wait too long.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.11 A-417.31
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1794 September 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Returns [unnamed] pamphlets herewith--thanks for perusal of them.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.14 RM-490-F; MS-3976
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 September 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Col. Lyle's bond is discussed--Washington approves of Pearce's sowing early (or distilled) wheat at different seasons to discover the best for it--double headed wheat at Union farm--heavy rains--problems as a result of it--drains in all the fields that need it--Pearce has the ague and fever--young Boatswain--Washington warns that yellow fever may possibly be in Baltimore.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.21 RM-490-F; MS-3977
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 September 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington left German Town yesterday and arrived in Philadelphia--Thomas Green has quit of his own accord--Old Bishop should be taken care of--a decision about employing Pyne should be made without much more delay--McKoy--asks about the appearance of the stone quarry--possible replacement for Green--Washington hopes to get to Mt. Vernon before Nov.--may not be possible because of rebellion in the West (Whiskey Rebellion)--Mrs. Fanny Washington requests boards for a corn house--Mrs. Washington requests some artichoke seeds.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.28 RM-490-F; MS-3978
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 September 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington mentions a new road and that Pearce is to oversee it--has engaged a Scotchman to replace Green--he is to have Green's house, garden, etc.--James Donaldson and his family will embark for Mt. Vernon on the ship Capt. Mitchell--other directions and requests in regard to the new carpenter--Pyne--is sorry to hear of Butler's illness--GW leaves Tuesday for Carlisle--still hopes to be at Mt. Vernon before Congress meets.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.28 RM-490-F; MS-3979
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 September 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington is glad to find that seeding of wheat is over--problems with the new road spoken of in last letter--Mr. Thompson Mason--advantages of new road for him--gives reasons for the construction of the new road--Crow--unproductivity of the ferries--questions if he will receive any advantage from the new public road.

  • Text box: 8 folder: 1794.09.29 2017-SC-001-003
    Memorandum, to James Donaldson
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 September 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Memorandum detailing a work contract with Mount Vernon carpenter James Donaldson, including his allowances for food, moving expenses, use of tools, use of a house, garden, and cow, and the privilege of the occasional absence, in exchange for his work. Donaldson was a white overseer of the slave carpenters at Mount Vernon. Washington hired him for his "sober and industrious" nature, but soon learned that he was not a competent overseer. Washington repeatedly wrote to his overseer at the time, William Pearce on the subject of Donald's inability to manage slave labor and Donaldson left Mount Vernon by November 1795. Autograph letter signed by Washington and Donaldson, 2 pages.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.10.01 RM-490-F; MS-3980
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 October 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington is 55 miles from Philadelphia on his way to Carlisle--comments that neither he nor Pearce is familiar with the management of buck wheat--on his current travel, Washington sees the crop on the whole road--it is cut down and remains in the field in very small cocks--presumes they will stay that way until the seed gets perfectly ripe--the potatoes too were every where digging.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.10.06 RM-490-F; MS-3981
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 October 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington informs Pearce that he will not be at Mt. Vernon until spring--tells Pearce not to delay his trip to the Eastern Shore--disperse the stock which may be endangered by the winter--no more hogs put up for pork than such as are of fit age and size.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.11.02 RM-490-F; MS-3982
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 November 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington returned to Philadelphia on Tuesday last--he expresses confidence in Pearce's care, judgment and integrity--repeats his objectives--regular course of crops; introduce grass where proper; make meadows and hedges; recover exhausted fields; improve stock--large dairies; make hay--these are much more desirable to Washington than to push the best fields out of their regular course in order to increase the next, or any other, year's crop of grains--which would eventually ruin the fields--expresses sorrow over the loss of Pearce's daughter--also, Paris and Jupiter have died--Pyne--McKoy--Washington does not expect much (in the way of overseeing the carpenters) from James Donaldson--Col. William Washington of Westmoreland--Washington repeats his observance of Donaldson--Green--housing the new family in the Green hosue--fodder was gotten in good time--corn yield--wants to know quantity of buck wheat--sorry to find that fly found in the wheat demands immediate threshing--wants Pearce to experiment with price of wheat in grain form or flour--cabins and quarters at Union farm.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.11.16 RM-490-F; MS-3983
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 November 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Potatoes and corn are likely to turn out well--keep enough buck wheat and potatoes for seed--it is miserable for a farmer to be obliged to purchase his seeds--exchanging may be useful--prices for wheat and flour in Alexandria--Sally Green and her distressed circumstances--James Donaldson into the Green house--Pyne was more a talker than [a worker]--fall plowing--cutting up the fallen timber--hogs for sale--culled sheep--Mr. Hawkins left sundry cuttings of valuable grape vines at Mr. Lund Washington's--cultivate corn and rye--conserving trees at the Mansion house--clearing fields at Dogue-run.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.11.19 RM-490-F; MS-3984
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 November 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enclosed thirteen hundred dollars--a bond from Mr. Lund Washington--fifty pounds to go to the charity school at the Academy in Alexandria--Washington's annual subscription of ten pounds to the Rev. Mr. Davis--incumbent of the Episcopal Church in Alexandria--Mr. Herbert.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.11.23 A-301.46
    Letter, to William Augustine Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 November 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Gives William A. Washington the desired information on seminaries and colleges to which he could send his children--one in "this place" seems to be doing Washington Custis no good at all--British overlooker of carpenters at Mt. Vernon seems unable to handle hands under him; Mr. Pearce might have to replace him--is there any chance of getting man spoken of before for the job?

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.11.23 RM-490-F; MS-3985
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 November 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letters to Col. William Washington of Westmoreland--the easy and simple manners of Donaldson make him unfit as an overseer of the Negro carpenters--he should, however, instruct Isaac and the boy Jem in the principles of making and repairing all kinds of farming implements--quarters for a new carpenter overseer--Mrs. Fanny Washington--descriptions of people who Washington thinks should be obliged to stay at his Alexandria house--Doctor Craik--which wines to serve his guests--claret, madeira for very extraordinary circumstances--the use of his Mt. Vernon home by curious people--hogs for pork--some bacon for the Mansion--omission of McKoy not to measure his potatoes--Washington wants to compare the crop of corn and the crop of potatoes together--whether it is better to sell wheat as grain or flour--Mr. Minor--Col. Lyles--enclosed money to discharge Washington's bond to Mr. Lund Washington.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.11.30 RM-490-F; MS-3986
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 November 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington discovers that it is more profitable to sell wheat after being ground into flour--Sally Green is cautioned against dealing with Washington's Negroes--grubbing--leaving clumps of trees when clearing--corn will be much better than if growing among single trees--wants the total account of all farms of the corn--wants sheds with brick foundation, at Dogue-run erected for the work horses, oxen, etc.--will send four or five bushels of clover seed.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.12.07 RM-490-F; MS-3987
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 December 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Problems with the bond to Mr. Lund Washington--Mr. John Mercer--Mr. Randolph--asks not to have any more smith's work done there in the future--wages due soon--prices of flour (super-fine and fine)--crop of fodder has been great--should have a great deal of hay for sale--feeding of Washington's stock--potatoes and turnips--experiment with fattening bullocks--punishing trespassers on Washington's four mile run tract--progress on the new race at the mill--James Donaldson--treatment of visitors--use of wine.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.12.12 RM-767; MS-5051
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1794 December 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Instructs Lear to look in trunks at Mount Vernon for papers concerning the Potomac Company. Supports pushing forward navigation of river, seeks opinion of English engineer [William] Weston, also may consult [Richard] Claiborne's engineer. Acknowledges the opposition to Potomac Company plans.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.12.14 RM-490-F; MS-3988
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 December 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Clearing ground for next year--asks if it would be better to have it well grubbed rather than cleaning the ground thoroughly--treatment of other like fields--No. 6 at Muddy hole--corn holes at the Mansion--orchards--directions on fences surrounding corn--clearing of woods--crop rotation--hopes Allison turns out well--possibly who Crow spent much of his time--erecting shed for the cattle by the new barn at Union farm--new sheds at Dogue-run--gathering thorn berries--Oneil quarrying stone at Mt. Vernon.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.12.21 RM-490-F; MS-3989
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1794 December 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Total amount of corn crop is 1639 barrels--stock gets 22 barrels per week--14 barrels weekly to the Negroes--totalling 233 barrels more than is made--it is from corn and wheat that Washington expects to pay overseers' wages and everything that needs to be bought--asks about the amount of oats that have been threshed--quantity of potatoes compared with that of corn to determine cultivation for next year--wants to hasten the manufacturing of all wheat due to the price increase--asks about the completion of the mill race--repairing the barn at Muddy hole--before the new barn at River farm is undertaken--brick foundations for the sheds at Dogue-run--is glad to hear so good account of Donaldson--spinning of wool--clean and dirty--allowance of provision for gardener and his wife--Peter--Mr. Lear of George Town--Col. Fitzgerald.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.12.22 A-301.167
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1794 December 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington forwards some papers to Lear relative to the Potomac River. He includes a drawing by a Mr. Claiborn describing a new method of lowering and raising boats without locks.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1794.12.28 RM-490-F; MS-3990
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991794 December 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Fencing the ground at the Mansion house for corn--rotations for Dogue-run, Muddy hole and River farms--putting oats and clover in the ground where buck wheat grew this year--leaving two or three clumps of trees when clearing the wood at No. 5 at Dogue-run--for the purpose of shade and ornament--importance of reviewing old letters--carpenters preparing frames, shingles, etc., for putting in more dormant windows in the back of the stables at Mansion house--Washington hopes that with favorable weather the fall plowing is in great forwardness--house Frank and Lucy being idle when not at their specific tasks--cucumber tree--Mrs. Washington sending a present to the gardener's wife--death of Austin--Mrs. Stiles sending his Mare and all his things to Mt. Vernon--shrubs sustaning injury from the deer--preserving the pork--old Butler--honey locust seed--Doll at the ferry--price of flour in Philadelphia still at ten dollars a barrel.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.01.04 RM-490-F; MS-3991
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 January 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Comments on Pearce's health--hopes that all the oat grounds will be in good order for early seeding--allotment of oats for Washington's horses when he comes to Mt. Vernon--asks about a fallen chimney that injured some Negro children--Doll at the ferry--ableness to work--rotation of crops at Dogue-run--asks about two plows that were sent to Mt. Vernon earlier--asks if they have been used yet.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.01.11 RM-490-F; MS-3992
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 January 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Fall in prices of wheat and flour--inclosure for corn at the Mansion house--other fences and gates--Washington's plans for the two sheds at Dogue-run--Irish potatoes--will send a bushel and a half of clean honey locust seed--directions for these--French Will--Washington's supposed promised of freedom after seven years of service--Dick at Dogue-run.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.01.14 A-288
    Letter, to Israel Shreve
    1795 January 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Despite probable increase in value of lands because of great immigration, Washington has decided to sell his lands west of Allegheny mountains due to troubles with tenants and collecting rent--he gives Shreve first choice at land in Fayette County [Pa.] on which he now lives--specifies terms--if nothing is decided by the end of February, Washington will feel free to sell land Shreve is on to another.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.01.25 RM-490-F; MS-3993
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 January 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington discusses discrepency with Miller's receipt--price of flour fell before Washington's was made ready for the market--wheat crop over all the U.S. was extremely short--price should rise again before the warm weather--Doctor Stuart--Col. Ball--inquires about the treading floor in the new barn at Dogue-run--a general rule being of leaving either single trees or clumps--gardener is allowed a fifth of what is sold from the nursery--death of Bishop--providing victuals and clothing for Donaldson's son--Donaldson should teach Isaac and the boy Jem in the principles of implements--filling up gullies--French's Will--Washington not too concerned with hunting him up--only as an example--Broad Creek--Bladensburgh--upper Marlborough--procuring seeds for the gardener--St. Foin--Mr. Lear--furze seed--Cale or cole seed--asks if the ferry people will have the field at Mansion house for corn--rotation--Mr. Lund Washington--indebted for fish--Austin.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.01.25 A-417.32
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 January 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington sends her a copy of Jefferson's "Notes of Virginia" [Notes on the State of Virginia]--cannot find "Dr. Franklin's Strictures on the abuse of the press" among his remaining volumes of the Bee--he hopes to see her at dinner tomorrow.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.02.01 RM-490-F; MS-3994
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 February 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Cedar making a good hedge--cedar berries--proper season for removing cedar trees--had success when removing them in a deep frost--wants to experiment with keeping hogs in sties from pigs--death of old Betty.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.02.08 RM-490-F; MS-3995
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 February 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. Styles--Austin--Washington doubts that the little old field at the ferry could be got in order in time for oats and clover--use it for corn, wheat and clover--agrees with the arrangement of fields Nos. 1, 3, and 6 at Muddy hole--immediate profit is not so much an object with Washington as the restoration of worn out and gullied fields--old clover lot planted with potatoes--manure the bad parts--advertising the horse and jack--can stand at last year's rate's--wheat fields covered with a thin layer of snow--has enclosed garden seeds for Ehler.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.02.15 RM-490-F; MS-3996
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 February 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Surveying the four mile run--Mr. [Lund] Washington and Mr. Terret--Moses Ball--likely Washington will have more than 100 bushels of oats to spare--had hoped for three to four thousand--hopes the price will be higher than half a crown by the end of April--transplanting young cedars--make hedges--preparing a seed--lucern--use of a heavy harrow with sharp teeth--linnen to cloath the negroes--proper care and attention given to the bacon--Smith--Old Butler--tedious execution of work by the carpenters--Betty.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.02.16 A-301.47
    Letter, to Eliphalet Pearson
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 February 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington received Pearson's letter with 1st volume and part of 2nd of Memoirs of Academy of Arts and Sciences -- gives his thanks to members of the Academy.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.02.18 RM-530; MS-4499
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1795 February 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington has spoken to Mr. William Weston, an English engineer, about Weston's visiting the falls of the Potomac. Working "on the Canal, between the Waters of Susquehanna & the Schuylkill [sic]" Weston will be arriving via Baltimore. Washington regrets that it is too late for Weston to arrange to meet Lear at the confluence of the Shenendoah and the Potomac, as Lear had wished.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.02.22 RM-490-F; MS-3997
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 February 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington was afraid the open weather (frost) would have injured the wheat--expenses of the estate covered by wheat--rolling the bad parts of a field--questions Pearce's surveying assessment of a plot--commiting a jack to the Eastern Shore--Mr. Charles Lee--Mr. Pearse Bailey--land property is rising fast in value--the number of emigrants--Col. Washington--oznabrigs--the Trial--Capt. Hand--high price of clover seed--scaley bark hiccory nut--Illinois nut--honey locust seed.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.01 RM-490-F; MS-3998
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Selling all the fish to one man is best--if Mr. Smith will give five shillings per one thousand for herring and twelve shilling in hundred for shad, Pearce had better enter into a written agreement with him--surveying the boundries--Mr. [Lund] Washington--cedar berries--oznabrigs--flax--Mr. Bayley--price of lands--especially those convenient to the federal city.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.02 A-301.48
    Letter, to Burgess Ball
    1795 March 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Regarding some of Ball's land which he wants to sell to the government to build an arsenal--Col. Pickering thinks the price too high and situation too low down--Washington doesn't want to say anything more to the Secretary of War lest anyone think he is influenced by family connection--has never seen any such act passed by Virginia legislature as Ball mentioned in his letter of 19 December.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.02 A-301.49
    Letter, to Jonathan Williams
    1795 March 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington expresses feelings of humility at praise of his work in Revolution and in the government--he gives all credit to "the Great ruler of events" and "kind Providence."

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.08 RM-490-F; MS-3999
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 March 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Wheat on the ground is in so unpromising a way--inquires to the look of the barley--roller--French's Paul--pains taken to apprehend and bring him to punishment--Dick--Betty Davis--Sarah, possibly a spinner at the Mansion, in childbed--purchase of one thousand yards of German oznabrigs--lucern seed to be had in Alexandria--new overseer at Mansion house--Allison--inquires about the price of flour in Alexandria--both superfine and fine are up again in Philadelphia.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.15 RM-490-F; MS-4000
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 March 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    On the Sloop Harmony--Capt. Ellwood--Washington has sent 972 1/2 yards of oznabrigs--Mrs. Fanny Washington---Col. Gilpin--Washington has also included various seeds--some rare and valuable--turnips--chiccory--botany bay grass seeds--requests that the gardener use his utmost skill and care--cabbage--lucern--preparing for its arrival--Sammy is to supply the place of Bristol--Cyrus, a dower slave--the children of Daphne--Mr. Smith--one purchaser for the fish--Mrs. Fanny Washington, Dr. Stuart and Mr. Lund Washington--Gray--India hemp--Pair graffs.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.22 RM-490-F; MS-4001
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 March 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    New overseers are turning out well--Grove--Allison--Washington has received twenty pounds of lucern seed--eight pounds of lucern and the like quantity of clover mixed to the acre--grasses ought to be sown on clean and well prepared ground--Betty Davis and Pearce's having difficulty distinguishing between real and feigned sickness--Paul--Mr. Dulany--artichokes.

  • Text box: 9 folder: 1795.03.29 RM-490-F; MS-4002
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 March 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Pierce Bailey--land on difficult run--inquiry of the new meadow at Dogue-run--affects of the winter weather on the growing grain, the grass and the fields which are to be sown and planted--Moses at the mill-- Tom and Ben--coopering--Gray--Isaac making ploughs--Donaldson--gardener attending to pease--an English gentleman, named Strickland--red wine and madeira--Mrs. Fanny Washington--porter.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.04.10 RM-490-F; MS-4003
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 April 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Carter Ben at the River farm, laid up many weeks--potatoe plan experiment--impediments from the weather in sowing oats--winter grain should now show its spring appearance--roller-cutting small grain before it is suffered to get too ripe--honey locust seed--advertising of Paul.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.04.12 RM-490-F; MS-4004
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 April 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington does not expect to be at Mt. Vernon by Sunday--the roads through Maryland are impassible and business in the federal city has detained him--injured parts of meadow should be resown--if that, or the other meadows, were once well taken with timothy, floods would not wash of[f] the soil.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.05.00 RM-490-F; MS-4063
    Enclosure, to William Pearce
    1795 MayEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    "Calculation of the number of Bricks wanting for the Barn at River Farm" --Bricks for barn at River Farm. Sketch is for barn at Dogue Run Farm. -total number of bricks for each section of the new barn--sketch of barn placement and surrounding grounds.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.05.04 RM-490-F; MS-4005
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 May 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Grain and grass have benefitted by the late rains--flour in the mill is to be inspected--poor prices.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.05.10 RM-490-F; MS-4006
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 May 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Wheat and grass continue to mend--warm weather and rain--also brought on oats--disposing of flour--midlings and ship stuff--Davenport--mill account for last year--the boy at the mill to go to the garden at Mansion house--two deaths in the family--one of them a young fellow--McKoy--Green--Davis--fence at Dogue-run to enclose the barn--the number of bricks required for the barn in the Neck (River farm).

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.05.25 RM-490-F; MS-4007
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 May 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington has enclosed sketches of the barn to be built at River farm--2 inch planks of white oak for the threshing floor--1 inch and a quarter pine plank for the lower floor of the graineries--other directions for construction--Mr. Stuart and the making of bricks--asks of the character of the carpenter who built Mrs. Peak's barn--honey locust plants--speaks of a book which contains information on these--Pekan or Illinois nut-plants sent by a gentleman from Jamaica--Doctor Craik--Cooper Jack.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.05.31 RM-490-F; MS-4008
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 May 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Crops in need of rain--plenty of rain in Philadelphia--need for bread in Europe will raise wheat prices--wants to plant a good many potatoes--buck wheat--white homony bean is very productive--corn--cutting the forward wheat in good season--Dr. Stuart-transplanting the honey locust--speaks of a disorder in the horses.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1796.02.07 folder: OUT A-508.2
    Letter, to David Stuart
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington encloses an advertisement which he plans to put in various gazettes and newspapers -- he confides in secrecy his plan to rent his farms & the dower slaves -- he may even interest associations in England or Scotland in farms through advertisements in gazettes -- the intermarriage of dower negroes with others and those on neighboring farms will cause affecting & trying consequences, so Washington cautions Stuart to make no mention of the plan for the present -- he doesn't care to rent farms to "our country farmers" because they wear out the land and little else -- he wants Stuart ask in confidence British merchants in Alexandria and Dumfries about the scheme -- Washington mentions Eliza ("Betsy") Custis's marriage and gives his evaluation of the groom, Mr. Thomas Law -- thinking of G.W.P. Custiss interests, Washington asks Stuart whether there might have been an erroneous division of negroes for Mr. Thomas Peter for his wife's (Martha Custis's) share.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.06.07 RM-490-F; MS-4009
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 June 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Details on the shingles--additional directions for the barn--removal of all the cabins at River and Union farms--wants to punish the thief who robbed the meat house at Mt. Vernon--Nathan suspected of this sort formerly--Postilion Joe has been caught in similar practices--Sam would not be restrained if he saw an opening to do the like.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.06.14 RM-490-F; MS-4010
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 June 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington hopes that it rained at Mt. Vernon--insect--distemper among horses--selling hay in Alexandria--Mr. Halley--reducing a lot in Alexandria for an allay--enclosed a newspaper containing some ideas on the culture of potatoes--making them into bread--James Butler--the Academy in Alexandria--Rev. Mr. Muir.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.06.15 2020-SC-023
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    1 pages 38 x 22 cm
    1795 June 15English.
  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.06.21 RM-490-F; MS-4011
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 June 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Speaks of rains which brought disasters--young mule killed--shells gathered for lime--filling between the logs of the cabins with clay--wheat--the scab--the rust--gullies at the Mansion house.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.07.05 RM-490-F; MS-4012
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 July 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington plans to come to Mt. Vernon about the middle of the month--dormant windows on each side of the pediment--front side of the stable--Donaldson--grain and hay--Davy's lost lambs--very suspicious appearance--he has some sly, cunning and roguish negroes under him--asks how Ben at the mill is employed--Ruth and Ben at the River farm--both Pearce and Groves are ill.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.07.27 W-432
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    1795 July 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington asks Lewis whether he has purchased any of the Berckley or Frederick leases--is he going to?--directs him to send money collected and names of persons as "I am in want, and have only deprived myself of the use of it from the hope of its laying the foundation of a batter annuity; which my heavy expenditures very much need." "Unless business should require my attendance at the Seat of government sooner it is probable I shall remain at this place until the end of September-".

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.08.09 RM-490-F; MS-4013
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 August 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Discusses second wheat field at Davy's field on Dogue-run farm--directions for plowing-destruction by storms in GW's locale-chance for wheat next year in Davy's field is hurt by corn-plowing green buck wheat, then sowing wheat thereon immediately, for an experiment-collect money due for flour sold.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.08.12 RM-490-F; MS-4014
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 August 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Saving sufficient clover seed--sowing wheat as soon as ground is in order--requests the length and breadth of the two pavements between the steps of the middle door and those of the end doors of the Mansion house.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.08.16 RM-490-F; MS-4015
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 August 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Frequent and hard rains--effect on the forward corn--all the wheats and oats are in--Washington wishes the hay was in also--Donaldson is leaving--requests that Pearce hire the carpenter recommended by Col. William Washington (Washington's nephew)--John Neale can have Donaldson's house and garden.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.08.23 RM-490-F; MS-4016
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 August 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Plowing Davy's field at Dogue-run--clover being well turned in by good plows and good plowmen--same with the buck wheat--taking the worker force and applying it to another farm that is ready for plowing--barley--Washington asks about the wheat which has already been threshed--asks Pearce to send two bushels of the early wheat to him--Mr. Kitt--900 bushels of oats for sale--Pearce has sold 300--overseers for Union and Dogue-run farms.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.08.28 RM-490-F; MS-4017
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 August 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Miss Betsy Custis--an enclosed letter for her--a cover letter.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.08.30 RM-490-F; MS-4018
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 August 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sowing wheat in ground that is not ready for its reception--sowing the lot by the spring, where potatoes are growing, with lucern--abuse of plows--checked by the overseers--constant repair by Isaac--character of Mr. Neale.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.09.06 RM-490-F; MS-4019
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 September 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pearce has recommenced seeding--more favorable weather--all the wheat, sowed by the middle of the month, should be in the ground in good season--Washington fears that Davy's field, at Dogue-run, was too wet to sow--such land as [his], when plowed wet, always bakes hard--expects to set out in two or three days for Mt. Vernon.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.09.23 A-301.50
    Letter, to John Page
    1795 September 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington asks Page's advice on what should be done about renting or selling land and in working with the writer of a letter Washington encloses--desires to sell share in Dismal Swamp--it is more expensive than productive. This draft written in the hand of secretary Bartholomew Dandridge, with additions by Washington.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.10.19 RM-490-F; MS-4020
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 October 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Postilion Joe--Washington does not expect to reach Philadelphia before Tuesday afternoon--wheat would be a heavy loss should the weavil get into it--let no time be lost in getting it out of the straw and ground up as fast as the mill is able to do it--take the corn out of the field as soon as it can be safely done--gathering white thorn berries--the sooner the potatoes are up and secured the better--trimming the Lombardy Poplar and the Yellow Willow.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.10.25 RM-490-F; MS-4022
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 October 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pearce had been sick, but has since recovered--fly is found in the wheat--expresses disappointment with the Englishman overseer--a certificate for Donaldson--hedging--Washington suspects that Pearce can have no dependence on the berry of the white thorn from his friend in Newcastle--after viewing the hedges from Christiana to Wilmington, Washington does not believe that a gallon of seed could be gathered--pamphlet on the subject of manures--death of the trusty old negro Jack--replacing him--Allison.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.11.22 RM-490-F; MS-4023
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 November 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington wants to enclose all his crops with live fences--asks that Pearce attend to them with as much care as a field of Indian corn--wants to tend less ground--manure and cultivate the smaller quantity higher--English thorn--honey locust--cedar hedge--directions on hedging--Lombardy poplar--Capt. Ellwood--Mr. Hartshorn or Col. Gilpins--has sent 28 1/2 pounds of chiccory seed--directions for sowing--enclosed a small sketch showing the course of a new road--asks Pearce to urge the miller to grind the wheat as fast as he can--inquires about the look of the growing crops and if an overseer for Union farm has been acquired.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.11.29 RM-490-F; MS-4024
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 November 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sickness among the negroes--diminishing prospect of a good crop of corn--breaking up the fields for the ensuing crop--preparing the shelters--for the horses at River farm--asks about Neale--list of work for the carpenters--Isaac and Joe--enclosed copy of the invoices of the oznabrigs and blankets--seine twine--payment of Pearce and the overseers--Peter.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.12.03 A-750.25
    Letter, to Robert Morris
    1795 December 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington says he knows nothing further on subject of extract on other side [which is not on our copy]--asks Morris to let him know what answer to give Commissioners of Federal City--"Their credit I know has been stretched to its utmost limits in order to keep the wheels moving even in the slow & unprofitable manner in which they have turned."

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.12.06 RM-490-F; MS-4025
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 December 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Materials for hedging--cedar berries--explains his opinion of tilling less land and increasing the quality of the crops--manure--growing grain looks well--hogs put up for porke.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.12.13 RM-490-F; MS-4026
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991795 December 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    The sickness at Mt. Vernon is abating-tells Pearce to encourage Cyrus to persevere-he is to use money from last year's flour and corn to pay any debts-good price for wheat in Philadelphia-seine twine-Peter choosing two more mules.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.12.20 RM-490-F; MS-4027
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1795 December 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington fears Pearce is unwell--price of flour is good--Washington can buy twine in Philadelphia, but no vessel is bound for the Potomack before the river closes--gives some suggestions (including hiring the landing out) should Pearce not be able to get twine from Alexandria in time.

  • Text box: 10 folder: 1795.12.26 A-301.51
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1795 December 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington introduces Capt. Myers to Lear--wants to know if Myers will be employed as engineer and superintendent for lock navigation by the Directors of the Potomac Company--Lear can determine whether his testimonials as architect and knowledge of locks, etc. is sufficient.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.00.00 W-812/a
    Memorandum, New Room chimney and Piazza windows
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796English.
    Scope and Contents

    Memorandum in the hand of George Washington with dimensions of architecdtural details in and around the house -- piazza at west door: brick pavement between the tiles 5 feet 3 inches by 9 feet 6 inches; tiles are 12" square; stone margin around them of 6" on outer edge, 9" on inner next the house. --gives measurements of windows in the new room; the Venetian window is given in exact detail; the two smaller (or end windows); the dimensions of the chimney in the new room in detail.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.00.00 W-812/b-d
    Notes, dimensions of rooms at Mount Vernon
    Pearce, William (Farm manager)1796English.
    Scope and Contents

    The Mount Vernon farm manager, William Pearce, sends President Washington a memorandum listing some of the room dimensions in the Mansion. Specifically, he includes "The hight of the Rooms up staires & garrett; the blue room; room over the small dining room; the room the Marques Delafiat [Marquis de Lafayette] Lodged In; the Yellow room; garret rooms; garden gate; gate front of lawn; kitching [kitchen] garden gate; cellar windows." Docketed "Dimentions [Dimensions] of the Rooms upstairs and the Gates and the cellar windows". A second memorandum, possibly in the hand of Tobias Lear. Notes include - of the two sides; That side which fronts the grotto 31' long, distance between corners and window; length of window; hgt of window; the chimney side, height of door, width of wall between door andchimney, sides of chimneys, height of mantle piece; ends 23 ft. wide, doors & windows; list of dimensions. Third document included shows height of Mr. W.'s room, size of windows, upper windows west side of M[ansion] house, size of New Room chimney, the windows on west side of cellar. Autograph document, 2 page, in hand of William Pearce (?) docketed "The Sizes of the windows & C."

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.01.01 RM-1109; MS-5792
    Invitation, to Mr. Gilbert
    1796 January 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Partially printed invitation from President of the United States to dine at 4 pm.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.01.03 RM-490-F; MS-4028
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 January 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pearce has met with a supply of twine in Alexandria--Washington is not disposed to sell his flour for anything less than it sells in Philadelphia--Davenport should hasten the grinding--suspects that his letter to Pearce must have been opened before it reached Mt. Vernon--by persons looking for bank and post notes.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.01.07 RM-490-F; MS-4029
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 January 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Davenport is ill--decline in price of flour--price of fish--fallen timbers to the Waggoners--honey locust--inquires of the standing of the winter grain--grubbing--new road--Allison--salary to Mr. Davis--Mr. Herbert--new race at the mill.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1795.01.25 RM-490-F; MS-4030
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 January 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Speaks of a certain letter that accompanies two parcels of rice--gives all the information respecting their cultivation--reminds Pearce to document the time and place of the rice being put into the ground.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1799.01.31 RM-490-F; MS-4031
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 January 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sickness is prevelant among the people--inquires if the grain has been covered with snow--death of Davenport--search for a replacement--Ben at the mill is sick also--salary for Mr. Davis--Mr. Herbert.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.02.07 RM-490-F; MS-4033
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pearce has listed Dower Negroes for Washington--asks for a list of all the remaining negroes on the estate--if a replacement for the miller cannot be had, the mill can be rented on advantages terms--hopes to determine the whole amount of last year's wheat--price--repairing the Mansion house--Washington will have Venetian blinds made--Dr. Stuart--Peter--Pearce is to aid Mrs. Davenport should she decide to move to Norfolk--mentions advertisement for determining the possibility of renting the farms.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.02.07 A-508
    Letter, to David Stewart
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington encloses an advertisement which he plans to put in various gazettes and newspapers--he confides in secrecy his plan to rent his farms and the dower slaves--he may even interest associations in England or Scotland in farms through advertisements in gazettes--the intermarriage of dower negroes with others and those on neighboring farms will cause affecting and trying consequences, so Washington cautions Stuart to make no mention of the plan for the present--he doesn't care to rent farms to "our country farmers" because they wear out the land and little else--he wants Stuart to ask in confidence British merchants in Alexandria and Dumfries about the scheme--Washington mentions Eliza ("Betsy") Custis's marriage and gives his evaluation of the groom, Mr. Thomas Law--thinking of G.W.P. Custis's interests, Washington asks Stuart whether there might have been an erroneous division of negroes for Mr. Thomas Peter for his wife's (Martha Custis's) share .

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.02.10 MS-5864
    Letter, to Thomas Law
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 February 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    On February 10, 1796, upon learning of his eldest step-granddaughter's engagement to Thomas Law, George Washington writes this letter of congratulations to him. Washington's fatherly interest in the betrothal of Eliza "Betsey" Parke Custis is apparent. He expresses surprise, gives his blessing, and invites the couple to visit Philadelphia after the ceremony. Thomas Law earned his fortune in India and met Washington's step-granddaughter shortly after his arrival in America. The couple was married the following month, on March 21, 1796.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.02.21 RM-490-F; MS-4034
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 February 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington is under no apprehension of falling price of flour--wishes to rent the mill after the current crop of wheat is manufactured--250 dollars is not sufficient rent--Mr. Digges--Col. Fitzgerald--tenants near Mrs. French's must pay more than 20/. rent for every acre of tillable land--printer in Alexandria does not have enough types for the advertisement--repairs to the north end of the Mansion--Caesar has been absent six days--renting the farms--Pearce is entertaining doubts of remaining another year.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.03.09 RM-490-F; MS-4035
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 March 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington has sent by Capt. Hand, a cask of clove seed and a small box of Apple graffs--apples are of a most extraordinary size--purchasing shares in the Bank of Alexandria.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.03.13 RM-490-F; MS-4036
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 March 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Scarcity of corn and its high price--new ground at Mansion house--trimming the trees--price of flour and calculations when to sell--renting the mill--100 pounds per year would fall far short--Mrs. French--frost and the look of the winter grain--Allison--Col. Ball--Mr. Robert Lewis--sending out the jacks--Thomas Allison--winter has been open and mild-selling hay.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.03.16 RM-253; MS-2750
    Letter, to Anne Willing Bingham
    1796 March 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    President Washington presents a small color minature bust portrait of himself by the Marchioness de Brehan, with his compliments, to Anne Willing Bingham, the wife of Senator William Bingham. "Not for the representation.--Not for the value;-- but as the production of a fair hand the offering is made and the acceptan[ce] of it is requested.--".

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.03.27 RM-490-F; MS-4037
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 March 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter regarding plantation management.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.03 RM-490-F; MS-4038
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 April 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    On the Commerce, Washington will send eight bushels of field pea, chiccory and eight bushels of winter vetch--directions for the cultivation--wind blowing down trees--selling the flour--Mr. Minor has recommended a Mr. Darnes as a tenant--Mr. Gill and renting the mill--inquires of the dimensions and details on the chimney in the new room at the Mansion.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.04 RM-490-F; MS-4039
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 April 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Informs Pearce of Sarah Green's distress--if she is in real distress, Pearce should afford her some relief--do not send her money--Washington suspects she may be rigging herself rather than obtaining necessaries for her family--if she cannot support her children, she should bind them to good masters and mistresses who will teach them a trade.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.10 RM-490-F; MS-4040
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 April 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Lear--price of Pease (flour) due to European accounts--Mr. Smith--tells Pearce to sell all wheat including midlings and ship stuff--high winds destroying the fences--renting jacks--Peter--Mr. Lewis--hopes the gardener tried the apples graffs--bad season at the fishery.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.17 2017-SC-001-004
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 April 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington to his nephew, Robert Lewis regarding his method of collecting rents. He also mentions that he tries to avoid litigation, when speaking of a land dispute between neighbors Ariss and McCormick and himself. He ends with a note about his "Jack" or donkey, explaining it was too late to send out for breeding this season.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.17 RM-490-F; MS-4041
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 April 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Maria and Charles Washington are unwell--Dr. Craik--since the wheat crop was so bad, it would be unlucky to have also missed the best market for flour--asks Pearce to inquire to Mr. Christie of the character of Mr. Joseph Gallop and his brothers--renting River farm--repairs to the Mansion--Mr. Robert Lewis.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.24 W-51
    Letter, to Burwell Bassett
    1796 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes his condolences on the death of Bassett's sister, Fanny Bassett Washington Lear--Tobias Lear recently met in Philadelphia with Washington--they discussed, and now Washington writes about, disposition of the children [of Fanny B. Washington and G.A. Washington]--Washington always intended to take Fayette under his care but now decided it better to keep Fanny's children together--final decision to be postponed "until I bid adieu to public life"--children are all now at Mount Vernon. [Tobias Lear's wife, Fanny Bassett Washington Lear, has died, leaving 3 children by her 1st husband G.A. Washington. These were Anna Maria, George Fayette and Charles Augustine Washington. Lear himself had one son, Benjamin Lincoln Lear by his first wife.]

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.24 RM-490-F; MS-4042
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Drought continues--the prospect for good crops of small grains is unpromising--Washington wishes the loss in grain may be made up in fishing--fall in the price of flour--Mr. Robert Lewis--Mr. Hughes--Joseph Gallop--renting River farm--inquires of the prospect of fruit--lucern seed--chiccory and clover--Maria and Charles have got well again.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.04.24 RM-490-RM-530; MS-4500
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1796 April 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington sends invoice and bill of lading "for the long expected Seeds (which by the bye have cost me at least four times as much as I expected)." Requests Lear to forward the seeds to his Mount Vernon manager William Pearce, "the season for sowing the Peas and succory being already far advanced."

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1796.05.01 RM-1210
    Letter, to Edward Carrington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 May 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Between April and May of 1796, George Washington exchanged letters with Virginia statesman Edward Carrington about the context and expectations set forth by the Constitution. After much political debate, the Jay treaty had been approved by the Senate, but the House of Representatives was withholding funding. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were setting the stage for the next presidential election and it was a time of intense discussions about politics and the public good.

    Understanding that these discussions were an important step in the relationship between the government and the citizens, Washington wrote to Carrington explaining his perspective on these issues: "Whatever my own opinion may be on this, or any other subject, interesting to the Community at large, it always has been, and will continue to be, my earnest desire to learn, and to comply, as far as is consistent, with the public sentiment; but it is on great occasions only, and after time has been given for cool and deliberate reflection, that the real voice of the people can be known."

    Washington reflected on the fact that the current debates were not about the Treaty itself, but whether or not there should be a treaty. He wrote a similar letter to Maryland statesman, Charles Carroll on the same day.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.01 A-301.52
    Letter, to Charles Carroll
    1796 May 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington will give the application of Mr. Thomas Freeman the same impartial consideration as other applicants for job of surveyor of western boundaries under new treaties--he mentions the election of Mr. Thomas Sprigg as representative from Maryland--Washington makes a lengthy discussion of opposition in House of Representatives to the Jay Treaty--he opines that the country must stay out of European wars in order first to build up its strength and become a 1st rate power.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.01 RM-490-F; MS-4043
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 May 1The Jay Treaty was a topic of great discussion, the effects of which had a significant impact on Washington's public responsibilities as well as his private dealings. In this letter, also written on 1 May 1796, Washington wrote to his farm manager about the current price of flour, "I am sorry to find that flour continues to depreciate in price; but the present cause for this is, the dispute in the House of Representatives respecting the provisions for carrying the British Treaty into effect; which has, for sometime past, occasioned a suspension in purchasing, shipping, & the Insurance of all sorts of property: but as the discussion is now brought to a close, it is to be hoped, and expected, that matters will recover their former tone again."English.
    Scope and Contents

    Drought still continues--has had good rain in Philadelphia--grain and grass in [those] parts look well--Pearce is near the completion of corn--planting--sowing peas and chiccory--winter vetch carefully preserved until Autumn--depreciation of flour price--result of House of Representatives--Mr. Robert Lewis--Messers Bennett and Watts--Washington has sent two dozen Windsor chairs for the new room.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.08 RM-490-F; MS-4044
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 May 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rain has fallen, but cold and drying winds have reduced its effect--frosts injuring the fruit--clover seed perished as a result of the drought--need for the crop and high price of seed--constructing a lane at Dogue-run next to the overseer's house--receipts for fish--an account kept of the times the Coach Mares go the jacks.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.15 RM-490-F; MS-4045
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 May 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington is glad to hear that Pearce has sold all the flour--more rain in Philadelphia than at Mt. Vernon--getting supplied with good rams--Mr. Gough--Mr. Darnes--Davis raising the walls of the barn at River farm--repairing the house in the upper garden, called the School house--Paschal is reported sick six days in the week.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.22 RM-490-F; MS-4046
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 May 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Weather has been seasonable of late, however, the grain and grass have received--transplanting cedar--damage of the family piece of Marquis de la Fayette, sustained as a result of the sun--Peter--the well house from the Mansion has been carried to Union farm.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.25 RM-491: MS-4067
    Letter, to Gustavus Scott
    1796 May 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Interest in the progress toward creating the new Federal City. Refers to the duties of 3 commissioners who were appointed by the Continental Congress--Thomas Johnson, Daniel Carroll and David Stewart.

  • Text box: 11 folder: 1796.05.29 RM-490-F: MS-4047
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    A pipe of wine and a box of tea sent from Philadelphia--Windsor chairs--Mr. Aimes travelling to the federal city--Mr. Lear will show him the way to Mt. Vernon--inquires of Maria and the two boys--early wheat and other snall grains, peas and grasses--India hemp--expects to have many respectable visitors during his stay at Mt. Vernon, and hopes to find everything in good order.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.06.05 RM-490-F; MS-4048
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 June 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    It is not likely that Washington will be at Mt. Vernon before the 20th--everything about the houses should be got in clean and nice order--Neal--Caroline--cleaning servants quarters--abundant supply of meat--inquires of the venetian blinds and the dormant windows in the stables--insists that Pearce mention these and the like in his reports--keep a sufficiency of oats for Washington's horses and those of his visitors--keep the grain and hay harvests from interfering with each other--Miss Nelly Custis.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.06.01 A-156
    Bond, with Matthew Ritchie
    1796 June 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Copy in Washington's hand - Bond Matthew Ritchie to George Washington 1st June 1796 For payment of $8,820 with interest by Installments - viz. 3469.20 1st June 1797 3292.80. 1 June 1798 and 3116.40. 1 June 1799. The original, of which this is a copy, was on the 22d. of January 1798 enclosed to the Honble. James Ross of Pittsburgh, to be deposited in the Bank of Pennsylvania for Collection agreeably to the tenor thereof - (Signed) G. Washington".

    Bond to pay $17,000 if he fails to pay $3469.20 on June 1, [1797], $3292.80 on June 1, 1798, & $3116.40 on June 1, 1799.

    Signed by Matthew Ritchie.

    Witnessed by James Ross and John Ritchie.

    Receipted June 6, 1797 for $3,469.20 by G. Washington.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.09.05 A-283.108
    Letter, to James Anderson
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 September 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that since Anderson didn't answer many of his queries, nothing can be decided about his employment until Washington can see him, which will be at Mt. Vernon at end of month--Washington expected him to speak with candor about his qualifications, although he is "sensible it is not a pleasant thing for any man to speak of himself"--as Washington will reside on the estate from now on, much work will be taken off superintendant's shoulders--Washington describes the writing of the weekly farm reports, etc. that should take only a few hours each week--he sees no need for assistant--Fredericksburg mails made up every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday evening.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.05.09 RM-490-F; MS-4049
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 September 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Weather has been extremely wet--seeding must have gone slowly--Washington Custis writes that Mr. Stuart was very ill of a fever--Scoon--Violet--Cash--weavil is very much in Stuart's wheat.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.09.11 RM-490-F; MS-4050
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 September 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington wishes that the wheat be sown as soon as possible--Mr. Lewis--sowing the winter vetch in proper season--rape seed--inquires if Pearce received any benefit from Dr. Perkin's metallic application--search for new overseers.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.10.14 RM-88; MS-2236
    Letter, to Bartholomew Dandridge
    1796 October 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Re: Impending trip to Philadelphia. Requests house be ready, especially painting done. George and Martha have been ill with colds. Mrs. Stuart was very ill, now better.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.10.26 RM-490-F; MS-4051
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 October 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Cyrus--Mr. Frestal and Mr. Lafayette--Mrs. Washington--some butter left in the cellar and some beef in a tub--James--Pearce is to clean out Washington's study and get their baggage and James on the first vessel bound for Philadelphia--Pearce's family is moving to the Mansion house--Dinah--Mr. Blagden to examine the quarry--mules for Washington's carriage.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.11.14 RM-490-F; MS-4053
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 November 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    James Wilkes--Mr. Law--Mr. Alexander Smith is not able to take up his note--Pearce is to make arrangements for Smith's repaying, including interest from the time the note comes due--security of payment--Richmond made an example for the robbery he committed--severe drought--difficulty with wheat--quarters at River and Muddy-hole farms--venetian blinds--dimensions of the window frames.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.11.14 W-421 & RM-18; MS-2020
    Letter, to William A. Washington
    1796 November 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Forwarded William A. Washington's letters to Mr. Philips of Andover and sends him the answers--received in years past from Sir Isaac Heard, Garter and principal king at arms, the (Washington) armorial--George Washington at the time sent him his best knowledge of Washington progenitors since their arrival in America--gave all information he possessed on subject, but knows nothing of Lawrence Washington's descendants--asks William A. Washington to give any help he can, from old papers he might have and inscriptions on tombs at old family vault at Bridge-Creek, part William's estate--"Although I have not the least solicitude to trace our Ancestry, yet as this Gentleman (Heard) appears to interest himself in the research common civility requires that he should obtain the aids he asks ...". Includes letterpress copy

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.11.20 RM-490-F; MS-4054
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 November 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Drought continues--Egyptian wheat--causey--new road--Davy and Mr. [James] Anderson--scarcity of oznabrigs in Alexandria--paints and oils--Mr. Lear--Mr. Alexander Smith--Pearce is to measure Mrs. Washington's Bed Chamber--dimensions of the chimney in the new dining room--Peter--wants the size of the blue room.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.11.25 RM-530; MS-4501
    Letter, to Tobias Lear
    1796 November 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Regarding Maria Washington, Lear's step-daughter. Washington asks Lear to set a date with Mr. Van Vleck, principal of a school for young ladies in Bethlehem, Penn., for Maria's arrival at the school. Wn. proposes that "... if we were to reduce our cultivation [of wheat] ... to half the present quantity, and manure and till that half well ... our profits would be greater while the other half would be improving."

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.11.26 RM-490-F; MS-4055
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 November 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Lear-Mr. Smith's debt is to stand upon the security Pearce has placed it-inquires of the look of the winter grain and vetches--the yield of the wheat and corn-Pearce has recovered eleven dollars of James Kirk's money.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.12.04 RM-490-F; MS-4056
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 December 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he received no letter from Pearce which leads him to conclude that something more than common has happened--on board of Capt. Ellwood are oil, paint and oznabrigs--directions for distributing and cutting oznabrigs--dependence of the gardener's wife and Allison's wife-planting shrubs--Mr. Anderson--Washington expresses his wishes to have an icehouse prepared when ice forms--hopes Frank has taken care of the tarriers [terriers]--female in heat.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.12.11 RM-490-F; MS-4057
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1796 December 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Wheat is beginning to heat--floor of the barn at Dogue-run has already given way--Pearce must kill and salt the pork before he leaves--also, tend to the ice house--Mr. Anderson--trimming trees--Mr. Smith--Gray the weaver--hopes the shelters for the cattle are up--Mr. Craik--Clark, an overseer prospect--Washington will send a certificate of his satisfaction in Pearce's services as a manager.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.12.18 RM-490-F; MS-4058
    Letter, to William Pearce
    Washington, George, 1732-17991796 December 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lack of rain--Mr. Alexander Smith--Mr. Lear--the ground, where ivy and wild honey suckle are to be planted, is not to be plowed beforehand--Frank, Hercules, and Cyrus--Allison--Washington is displeased with his conduct--would like the new road completed before spring--Mr. Neal continues indisposed and the carpenters do nothing--Sall, Mima and Dick are regularly returned sick--Mr. Anderson expects to arrive by the 27th--clover grass seeds.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.12.18 RM-490-F; MS-4059
    Letter, Recommendation for William Pearce
    1796 December 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pearce's conduct during his three years has given Washington entire satisfaction--reluctantly parts with him, on account of a rheumatic affection--knowledge in farming and mode of managing [GW's] business--Washington has great confidence in Pearce's honesty, sobriety, industry and skill.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.12.27 W-692
    Document, to the General Assembly of Virginia
    1796 December 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington acknowledges the General Assembly's vote of thanks--he declares that his "highest ambition has been, by faithfully and zealously serving my country to the utmost of my abilities, in all the public employments of my life, to merit the approbation of my fellow citizens."--he now looks forward to his return to "private occupation in the shades of rural retirement."

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.01.15 A-301.53
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1797 January 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes a long letter to his new manager--he has received Anderson's letter and reports--intends separating old and new cattle, etc.--approves killing old bulls--"... it has always been my custom to supply [my table] with the best [meat]"--permission to purchase hogs and cattle--distillery, "the place for, and means of conducting it, is left entirely to yourself"--cutting down trees in front of house--"I never expected that that ground [in front of house] would give corn in proportion to the labour I meant to bestow on it--the primary objects of the cultivation are to cleanse it thoroughly of the undergrowth, and to lay it down (as mentioned in my Memorandums) to grass for Pasture, or pleasure grounds, and in order that it may be well worked and prepared for these ..."--don't finish new road at sacrifice of crops--mill race--wants ditch and fence along this road from Mansion House enclosure to Muddy Hole to be woodland pasture for brood mares--barn floor at Dogue Run--new mill race will avoid high land, which caused leak--boats and seines to be put in order for fishing season--iron for wheel bands--raising turnips, especially Swedish--potatoes--rotation of crops--potatoes planted between corn rows--evaluation of Mr. Pearce's work--filling ice house--fear of fire at Mount Vernon, "there is nothing that fills my mind with more apprehension when I am from home"--encloses grape seeds and eggs of silkworm to give gardener--Mrs. Washington requests to pay particular attention to the [Bacon (?)].

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.01.20 RM-685; MS-4663
    Letter, to John Greenwood
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    2 pages
    1797 January 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerning a troublesome set of false teeth that Washington was returning for repair.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.01.22 A-301.54
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1797 January 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes detailed instructions about the management of his farms--he has received Anderson's reports and inventory--approves placement of distillery at mill as temporary measure--discusses a new road--the dry well in cellar at north end of house to be filled with ice, leaving it open--it melted before, because it was not done correctly--pork is kept there now--he sends new red clover seed discovered by farmer in Jerseys, also potato seeds--Washington will write Landon Carter about sending peas--Anderson should exercise his own judgment on cutting back thorn hedges to thicken them--Washington mentions that Anderson's inventory indicates the loss of a large boat, which would be the second of his fishing boats to have gone missing--he notes in the Alexandria store accounts the great number of spades, etc., carpenters tools, charged to him, and he fears embezzlement--things are to be bought from merchants only on written order from Anderson, as was done in the past--ends by asking Anderson how the grain and vetch are doing.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.01.22 A-301.55
    Letter, to Landon Carter
    1797 January 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes his thanks for Carter's answers to queries--he will respond when he is not so "occupied with the duties of my public station"--he asks Carter to let manager, James Anderson, know whether he can get 30 bushels of peas from him, as soon as possible, because Washington always likes to have his seed on hand before he begins to prepare the ground--Washington will pay Carter as soon as delivered.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.02.06 RM-1070; MS-5712
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 February 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington sells his presidential horses to Elizabeth Powel.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.02.20 A-301.56
    Letter, to James Anderson
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 February 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington acknowledges receipt of Andersons reports & letter -- Andersons opinion of the overseers is no doubt correct, and "if the Negroes will not do their duty by fair means, they must be compelled to do it" -- despite Washingtons policy of feeding, clothing, and caring for the slaves, they will try to shirk their work with feigned sickness especially after night walking, and must be examined promptly when claiming sickness.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.02.27 A-301.57
    Letter, to Landon Carter
    1797 February 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to ask Carter to inform James Anderson when peas will be delivered--he affirms Anderson's suggestion that Carter send the order by wagon to the Potomac where Washington's boat can carry it to Mount Vernon--the roads from Stafford Court House to Occoquon are in terrible shape, making this plan the most expedient--Washington will, of course, pay for the use of Carter's wagon--the matter rests between Carter and Anderson.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.02.27 A-301.58
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1797 February 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he had received Anderson's letter with reports--as "the public business presses me" and as he expects to be at Mount Vernon shortly, he tells Anderson to carry on--enclosed is a letter from Landon Carter about peas he is to furnish, but as it is unintelligible to Washington, he also encloses his reply to Carter so Anderson can read about the transportation plans and forward the letter--Washington adds a comment about wheat.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.03.06 A-417.33-.34
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1797 March 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he sends the purchased coach horses to her--he hopes they will be treated well as they have been by him--"as taking formal leave is not among the most pleasant circumstances of one's life" he bids her adieu by letter until they see each other at Mt. Vernon--his remaining time in city will be taken up in packing--Nelly and Mrs. Washington join him in saying farewell.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.03.06 A-417.35
    Receipt, to Elizabeth Powel
    1797 March 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington's receipt to Powel for $1000 paid upon delivery to her of his "Town Coach horses".

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.03.26 A-417.39
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1797 March 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington responds to Powel's letter teasing him about finding Martha Washington's letters in the writing desk [see letter Elizabeth Powel to George Washington, Mar. 11, 1797]--"But admitting that they had fallen into more inquisitive hands, the correspondence would, I am persuaded, have been found to be more fraught with expressions of friendship, than of enamoured love, and consequently, if the ideas of the possessor of them, with respect to the latter passion, should have been of the Romantic order to have given them the warmth, which was not inherent, they might have been committed to the flames."--he hopes to see Powel in Virginia--gives her names of recommended taverns and inns and distances from Philadelphia to Mt. Vernon--roads in fairly good shape--much repair work to do around Mt. Vernon, "we are like the beginners of a new establishment, having everything in a manner to do."

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.04.10 W-685/A
    Receipt, to George Ball
    1797 April 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Receipt for £200 Virginia Currency, part payment for 400 acres of land in Gloucester County, the land Washington had purchased from Mr. John Dandridge, Aug. 1, 1789; land to be conveyed to George Ball when he pays £300 more in cash and executes a mortgage for two additional payments, totaling £800. Interest 6% per annum. Signed by George Washington. Memorandum: first payment £3 short, signed George Ball. Second payment to be made before April 10, 1798--signed by Washington and Ball. Under date 1805 Nov. 3, George Ball gives permission for sale and transfer of land by George Washington's executors to Burwell Bassett. Witnessed by Wm. Wirt."

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.04.30 RM-870; MS-5330
    Letter, to John Howard
    1797 April 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington thanks Howard for inquiring of Henry Gough the price of cattle. GW thinks the price of $200 for "a bull calf of nine months old" too high. However, he will ask his manager if "a calf of this Spring" is worth $100, he may consider pursuing it.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.05.00 W-796
    Note, List of artwork and instructions for whitewashing
    1797 MayEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    List of pictures with their dimensions:Cupid's pastime, Sunrising, Do setting, the Cottage, The Herdsman, Young Herdsmn, the Flight, Evening, Morning, Nymphs Bathg, the Storm, The good Sqr, four Gibralter pictures, Jones and Pearson, Quebec & dervelast, Prospects, four of them, Thunderstorm, Storm with lights, Moonlight, A Storm, Davis's Streights, The Greenland Fishery, Hunting piece, Portrait of Dogs, Foundg Hospital, From a Picture, 2 landscapes. Reverse side contains instructions for white-washing the garret rooms, painting three of them and the cupulo and roof, painting the Piazza outside and inside, above and below.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.05.01 W-724
    Letter, to Mrs. Mary White Morris
    1797 May 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington presents Mrs. Robert Morris with the lustre which hung in the large drawing room in Philadelphia--it came by mistake to Alexandria--he had left the furniture in the two largest rooms of the house they were renting from the Morris family in case President Adams wanted it--parts of it Washington intended to sell, parts to dispose of in other ways--but except for the pictures, he left it all and offered it to Adams for "reduced prices"--Adams declined and it was left for Mr. Lear and Mr. Dandridge to dispose of them--this explains why the lustre was packed up and sent to Alexandria--Washington sends it back unopened and hopes it will be received without injury--he sends his regards to Bishop White [her brother]--Nelly Custis and her brother [G.W.P. Custis] are in the Federal City.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.05.06 W-814
    Document, List of suits
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 May 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dated at the top, the list of 11 suits includes: "1 Full Suit of Regimentals;" ditto half; and suits of Spanish cloth; olive colour; dark brown; lighter brown; half mourning; raven grey; black; then under the heading "Velvet - Silk - & Cassimer" 1 full Suit – Velvet, 1 Uncut.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.05.07 RM-652; MS-4584
    Letter, to James McAlpin
    1797 May 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Regarding an order for clothes and a delinquent order for nankeens.

  • Text box: 12 folder: 1797.05.22 A417.41
    Letter cover, to Elizabeth Powel
    1797 May 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Postmarked by hand "Alex 22 May," franked by Washington, excellent black seal with Washington's family seal imprinted, Washington's watermark (incomplete).

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.06.08 RM-731; MS-4918
    Letter, to Clement Biddle
    1797 June 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Writing to his agent in Philadelphia, Washington asks him to inform John Aitken, Philadelphia cabinetmaker, that no keys came for the secretary (writing desk) and the side table [sideboard].

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.06.18 A-301.59
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1797 June 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington expresses his opinions on Anderson's "Memorial" to him on proposed plan of work at Mt. Vernon -- agrees substantially with his principles for conducting the different farms & modes of carrying them into effect

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.06.18 A-301.59
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1797 June 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington expresses his opinions on Anderson's "Memorial" to him on proposed plan of work at Mt. Vernon--agrees substantially with his principles for conducting the different farms and modes of carrying them into effect--some minor modifications may be necessary--overseers don't need to know anything except to obey orders without question--comments on specifics in Anderson's Memorial--grass and oat fields at Mt. Vernon--farm and woodland pastures--"Although there will be little or no cultivation at the Mansion House after the year 1798, yet keeping up the fences - getting fuel and performing other multifarious jobs" make it difficult to predict force necessary to work it--grass at River Farm--Muddy Hole, Dogue Run, Union Farm turned more to meadows--wishes new mill race to be completed because he wishes to keep mill busy through the season by purchasing wheat to grind--approves Anderson's plan of a distillery to make profit, and will put carpenters to it as soon as possible--is not inclined to place Anderson's compensation for running the distillery and other business on footing Anderson suggests [Washington and Anderson to share the profits from distillery] but prefers to pay a standing wage--Washington gives his reasons, and will pay £140 to him and if he establishes the distillery which answers purposes, he will increase the salary in appreciation--will also hire a clerk if necessary--but if River Farm is rented, won't increase his wages at all--no overseer necessary for Mansion House, Will can do the work--Washington doesn't want one overseer overlooking both Union and Dogue Run because he has "always found, however, that Negroes will either idle or slight their work if they are not closely attended to."

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.07.17 RM-490-F; MS-4060
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1797 July 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Asks if there is anyone Pearce can recommend as an overseer of Union farm--the dairies and fowls being attended by the overseer's wife--Washington hopes Pearce's crops have been good--his are as good as can be expected--hessian fly--inquires to the possibility of purchasing 3 or 4 hundred bushels of rye in Pearce's neighborhood.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.07.24 RM-249; MS-2746
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1797 July 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington extends an invitation to Bushrod and wife. Will send a chariot to Colchester to meet them. Will not expect them for dinner which is at 3 O'Clock. With Mrs. Washington (Martha) he extends his best regards and compliments to Col. Blackburn & family.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.07.28 A-301.60
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 July 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that Rufus King, the American Minister in London, had the decree of Virginia's High Court of Chancery published in London Gazette for 2 successive months--King sent copies of the paper to Washington, who forwards one to Bushrod and quotes from King's letter about publishing the decree.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.08.04 A-301.61 ; RM-568 ; MS-4244
    Letter, to Lawrence Lewis
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 August 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington commiserates with Lewis over his runaway slave ("the loss of your Servant") -- this will become more frequent -- "I wish from my Soul that the Legislature of this State could see the policy of the gradual abolition of Slavery. It might prevt. much future mischief." -- writes about Lewis coming to make his home at Mt. Vernon -- Lewis will be treated as a member of the family, and not paid -- his duties will be to entertain guests and visitors after the Washington retires to bed or study, & also to record a few papers at times -- Lewis can take advantage of his library ("I have a great many instructive Books, on many subjects, as well as amusing ones") -- he can perhaps also gain some knowledge from observing management of the farms by Anderson.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.07.14 RM-490-F; MS-4061
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1797 August 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Discussion of William Pearce's employment at Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.09.15 RM-1122; MS-5806
    Document, Plan for garret chamber
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 September 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Manuscript Architectural Plan of a room in the garret of Mount Vernon sent from George Washington to Clement Biddle when purchasing a stove for the room.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.09.15 W-668
    Document, Plan for garret chamber
    1797 September 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Notes and measured drawing in Washington's hand, specifying how a stove could be installed in a corner of one of the garret or attic bedrooms at Mount Vernon. Drawn at "a scale of a foot to an inch" Washington remarks that "every part of it may be exactly measured and perfectly understood by any workman." While not dated (but on paper watermarked 1795, and therefore possibly as early as that), the drawing appears to be either a draft or Washington's file copy of a similar plan sent to Clement Biddle on 15 September 1797, cf. RM-1122.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.09.15 A-301.62
    Letter, to Clement Biddle
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 September 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to Biddle to note that the picture frames arrived unbroken--asks Biddle to send 4 gilt frames without glass for paintings, giving measurements for these--also gives corrected dimensions for stove ordered earlier--encloses autograph plan of the room for which it is intended [see drawing under same date]--the new quarter's interest on his certificates will pay for these things--asks Biddle to insert enclosed advertisement, and to send the history of the United States by author unknown but "which contains Nos. 5 and 6 alluded to in Col. Hamilton's late pamphlet".

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.10.08 A-301.63
    Letter, to Elizabeth Washington
    1797 October 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he will write to Bushrod Washington for papers mentioned in her memorandum--says that "Having had as little to do with Lawyers as any man of my age I pretend not to be a competent judge of" the lawyer Swan's claims--claims not to know much about the case at hand [a suit being brought by heirs of Simon Pearson against George Washington, Triplett and others who purchased land from Pearson in 1763; Washington later selling his portion to Lund Washington to make up part of Hayfield farm where Elizabeth resided] but shares what he knows of the merits, possible expense, and prospects of the matter.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.10.09 A-301.64
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 October 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to Bushrod about the suit of Thomas Pearson, heir entail to his brother Simon Pearson for lands sold by latter to George Washington, William Triplett, and George Johnson--Washington had later sold his portion to Lund Washington, making it part of the Hayfield farm now occupied by Lund's widow Elizabeth--the suit is founded on some supposed irregularity in last proceedings of the time--Washington asks Bushrod's opinion on certain points of the case.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.10.14 RM-1203
    Letter, to William Stowry [Stoy]
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 October 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington's letter to William Stoy references medical treatment requested for Christopher, Washington's body servant, who had been bitten by a dog with rabies. Stoy was a minister of the German Reformed Church in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. He discovered a "cure" for hydrophobia and Stoy's Drops, a popular cure-all medicine. Celebrated for curing person bit by 'Mad animals,' Stoy successfully treats Christopher.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.10.23 A-415
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 October 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington inquires about the character, etc. of a Mrs. Forbes living in Richmond, recommended by John Brooke to be housekeeper at Mt. Vernon--Mrs. Washington "is exceedingly fatigued & distressed for want of a good housekeeper"--mentions the Pearson suit.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.10.30 A-301.65
    Letter, to Daniel McCarty
    1797 October 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes McCarty a counter-proposal for a possible exchange of lands (5664 acres of McCarty's Sugar Land holdings in Loudoun County, Virginia, for 12,226 acres of Washington's on the Kanawha and Cole Rivers)--Washington makes a new proposition in the unsuccessful negotiation--he insists his lands on the Kanawha will become more valuable soon--a restored peace in Europe would increase immigration to America--Washington wants no legal difficulties resulting from any entail of McCarty's land.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.10.30 A-301.66
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1797 October 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he has received Bushrod's letters and the copy of the deed to William Williams for 589 acres of land, but finds it "singular" that the writ docking entail of land cannot be located in the court records--he sends Bushrod further information from his own files to aid the further search in this matter of the Pearson suit.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.11.03 A-301.67
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1797 November 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington agrees to high wages demanded by Mrs. Forbes, because of desperate need of a housekeeper at Mt. Vernon--asks Bushrod to make further enquiries concerning Mrs. Forbes and her habits, listing questions of interest--she will not eat at same table with the family, "for if this was once admitted no line satisfactory to either party, perhaps, could be drawn thereafter"--he wants Bushrod to ask Mrs. Forbes about hiring or buying a good Negro cook. Letterpress copy

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.11.03 A-366.56
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 November 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington agrees to high wages demanded by Mrs. Forbes, because of desperate need of a housekeeper at Mt. Vernon--asks Bushrod to make further enquiries concerning Mrs. Forbes and her habits, listing questions of interest--she will not eat at same table with the family, "for if this was once admitted no line satisfactory to either party, perhaps, could be drawn thereafter"--he wants Bushrod to ask Mrs. Forbes about hiring or buying a good Negro cook--the postscript (which is not in the letterpress copy, but present here) inquires about legal practices that could impinge on the Pearson suit.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.11.11 A-168; W-1083
    Check, to Gideon Worth
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 November 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    A printed bank check, completed in George Washingtons hand, made out to Gideon Worth in the amount of $103 and drawn on the Bank of Alexandria.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.11.22 A-301.68
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991797 November 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes of the order for the settlement of Colville estate, and Mr. Keith's queries regarding how to publish it--there is no word of Mrs. Forbes--Washington rehashes the correspondence regarding Mrs. Forbes and thinks that the conduct of Robert Brooke "has been very ungenteel" in not answering letters concerning Mrs. Forbes, unless the letters somehow miscarried.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.11.28 RM-914; MS-5445
    Letter, to Richard Parkinson
    1797 November 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington proposing that Mr. Parkinson lease one of his farms and agreeing to allow him to come over from England to see farm.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1797.12.25 W-551
    Letter, to Thomas Law
    1797 December 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that Law's pointer shall be taken care of at Mt. Vernon until he sends for him--pleasing to hear that Maryland to aid "important objects on this River"; hopes Virginia legislature will too--returns letter from the Marquis Cornwallis and other recent enclosures from Law--"To stand high in the estimation of so respectable a character as Lord Cornwallis is a circumstance which must be as pleasing as it is honourable to you."--the Washingtons are glad to hear Mrs. Law and child are well--"we remain in statu quo"--compliments of season.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1798.01.10 RM-305; MS-2951
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1798 January 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Taxes due on Kanhawa County land. Requests General Lee's original deed of conveyance for Kentucky land.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1798.02.26 RM-1217.002
    Letter, to David Stuart
    Washington, George, 1732-17991798 February 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Three page letter written from Mount Vernon that shows Washington's frustration with his adopted grandson.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1798.03.01 A-301.69
    Letter, to Alexander White
    Washington, George, 1732-17991798 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to White to thank him for passing on information about the memorial before Congress and debates concerning the "disgraceful topic" occupying House of Representatives [Representative Matthew Lyon's attack on Rep. Roger Griswold]--he decries party feuds--mentions trouble with France and how he had hoped they would unify Congress--asks White what the general opinion of Col. Monroe's "view of the Conduct of the Executive of the United States" is.

  • Text box: 13 folder: 1798.05.06 RM-490-F; MS-4062
    Letter, to William Pearce
    1798 May 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Some accounts have been sent to Washington, left from Pearce's time at Mt. Vernon--Mr. Lear--Messers Fosters and May--in craddling the wheat, Washington wishes to catch it in the hand--inquires of the possibility of obtaining someone on the Eastern Shore, who understands the business--scythes--Mr. Stuart.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.06.17 RM-138; MS-2384
    Letter, to Samuel Chase
    1798 June 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington encloses an extract from Rev. Belknap in order to enlist the aid of Chase in answering the questions. Washington wants to encourage Belknap whom he believes to be a man of merit and scholarship.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.06.12 folder: OUT RM-1017; MS-5644
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1798 June 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington expresses his opinions on Anderson's "Memorial" to him on proposed plan of work at Mt. Vernon -- agrees substantially with his principles for conducting the different farms & modes of carrying them into effect -- some minor modifications may be necessary -- overseers don't need to know anything except to obey orders without question -- comments on specifics in Anderson's Memorial -- grass & oat fields at Mt. Vernon -- farm & woodland pastures -- "Although there will be little or no cultivation at the Mansion House after the year 1798, yet keeping up the fences - getting fuel and performing other multifarious jobs" make it difficult to predict force necessary to work it -- grass at River Farm -- Muddy Hole, Dogue Run, Union Farm turned more to meadows -- wishes new mill race to be completed because he wishes to keep mill busy through the season by purchasing wheat to grind -- approves Andersons plan of a distillery to make profit, and will put carpenters to it as soon as possible -- Washington is not inclined to place Andersons compensation for running the distillery & other business on footing Anderson suggests [Washington and Anderson to share the profits from distillery] but prefers to pay a standing wage -- Washington gives his reasons, and will pay £140 to him & if he establishes the distillery which answers purposes, he will increase the salary in appreciation -- will also hire a clerk if necessary -- but if River Farm is rented, won't increase his wages at all -- no overseer necessary for Mansion House, Will can do the work -- Washington doesn't want one overseer overlooking both Union and Dogue Run because he has "always found, however, that Negroes will either idle or slight their work if they are not closely attended to."

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.06.26 RM-735; MS-4963
    Letter, to William Augustine Washington
    1798 June 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to his nephew about contracting for a supply of corn for his distillery at Mount Vernon; mentions his manager Mr. Anderson.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.07.08 MSS-253
    Letter, to Thomas Peter
    1798 July 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses 3 tobacco notes--requests Peter to dispose of them "in safe hands" for what they will bring--60 or 120 days credit make little difference.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.07.13 RM-1017; MS-5644
    Broadside, to John Adams
    1798 July 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington responds to Adams on accepting the appointment of Lieutenant General and Commander in Chief of the American Armies.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.08.12 MSS-254
    Letter, to Thomas Peter
    1798 August 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Transmit receipt for tobacco note sent by Peter--"I am ignorant of the principles, on which I am called upon to pay for picking a Tenants tobacco; but presuming it was proper, I thank you for having done it"--deposit tobacco in hands of Mr. Peter, "your father" to be disposed of by him--encloses postnote for $100, deduct what is owned him and return balance.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.09.01 A-333.1
    Letter, to Thomas Peter
    1798 September 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he prefers to take a chance on shipping tobacco to foreign markets rather than accept low prices in this country--he desires to know if any foreign bound ships in Georgetown will accept it on consignment, though, before making a final decision--"I am gathering strength."

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.09.03 MS-5831 & MS-5832
    Document, Invitation to Edmund Lee
    1798 September 3English.
  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.09.16 W-918
    Letter, to John Francis
    1798 September 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he intends to build 2 houses not far from Capital, but not as large as Francis imagined--he expects to complete them before Congress "as I am never long in executing a measure I have once resolved on."--the plans are in the hands of Mr. White or Dr. Thornton, and Francis can decide himself how many boarders they will accommodate--there will be three flush stories in each building and garret rooms for servants--if these buildings will suit, they will be ready in time.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.09.16 A-301.70
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1798 September 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dated "16th September 1798 at Night" Washington writes that he is too busy to answer lengthy letters of remonstrance or complaints when a short conversation on the road or any of farms would be far more satisfactory--he will never hesitate to express opinion on his own affairs, and resents the implication that he will not listen to Anderson's criticisms and suggestions--gives instructions in planting of different farms--denies he suspects Anderson of unfairness in his accounts--Washington tells him not to buy wheat too fast but adjust it to the market for flour--he won't go into such lengthy correspondence again since he sees Anderson every day--Washington opines that he cannot open his lips to ask question of overseer or make suggestion without hurting Anderson's feelings--"It must be obvious to yourself, that it is by my Rents, and the Sales of my lands that I have been enabled to get along & to support the expence of this house. The Farms do little more than support themselves, and those who overlook them."--Washington writes "I will, once for all, Mr. Anderson, say (and I never profess what I do not feel) that I have an esteem, regard & friendship for you; but I shall repeat that this will never prevent me from expressing my mind fully and freely in all matters relative to my business."–he is also sorry Anderson's son has suddenly decided to quit, but hopes Anderson can quickly find a substitute for him at the distillery.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.00 RM-770; MS-5082
    Notes, Deer park wall
    Washington, George, 1732-17991798 OctoberEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    George Washington's deer park declined while he was away serving as president. In 1792 he replaced its fence with a ha-ha or walled ditch, drawn here in black. Six years later, he planned a new course for the ha-ha, represented by the dotted line following "the natural shape of the hill."

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.08 W-948
    Letter, to Marquis de Lafayette
    Washington, George, 1732-17991798 October 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington sends this letter to Lafayette by his son--he expresses sympathy for Lafayette's sufferings, and joy at hearing of his release from prison--he explains why G.W. Lafayette did not come to live with him immediately on his arrival in America, the "delicate and responsible situation in which I stood as a public officer"--young Lafayette's conduct has been exemplary--filial affection made him impatient to return to France as soon as he heard of his father's release--Mr. Felix Frestel has been like a father to the boy--Lafayette has never stood higher in the affection of the people of America--Washington writes "I have once more retreated to the shades of my own Vine and Fig tree, where I shall remain with best vows for the prosperity of that country for whose happiness I have toiled many years , to establish its Independence—Constitution—& Laws—and for the good of mankind in general, until the days of my sojournment, which cannot be many, are accomplished."--young George will tell Lafayette of affairs in America and politics.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.18 RM-245; MS-2745
    Letter, to Mildred Washington
    1798 October 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    The entire letter has to do with the financial problems of the Charles Washington's, and George Washington's offer of One Thousand dollars. Washington shows great displeasure in the families "deplorable" state of affairs.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.24 RM-309; MS-2966
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    1798 October 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Pres. Adams had just appointed the 36 year old nephew of Gen. Washington to the Supreme Court of the United States. Gen. Washington indicates his approval of Pres. Adams' choice as well as his awareness of the difficulties Bushrod can expect to encounter as Associate Justice.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.24 RM-309; MS-2966/a+b
    Letter, to Bushrod Washington
    Washington, George, 1732-17991798 October 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    President John Adams had just appointed Bushrod to the Supreme Court of the United States. George Washington indicates his approval of Adams' choice as well as his awareness of the difficulties Bushrod can expect to encounter as Associate Justice.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.24 RM-1071; MS-5713
    Letter, to G.W. Snyder
    1798 October 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Final letter of response confirming that he had received the book "Proofs of a Conspiracy" by John Robison-a Baravarian member of the Illuminati. Washington reassures Snyder that he is aware of the Illuminati's objective to overturn ... "all Government and all Religion ..." but he does not believe these tenets were being propagated by the Freemasonry in America. Washington comments he has no time to read being preoccupied with Mt. Vernon repairs.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.10.25 RM-788; MS-5185
    Letter, to Charles Carter
    1798 October 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington congratulates the Carters on the anticipated birth of their 12th child. Washington has "abundant reason to be thankful for my own recovery" from a fever which "deprived me of 20 lbs of my weight; which ... is nearly restored."

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.11.17 A-417.42
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1798 November 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that, despite what she had heard, he has not been suffering from the "desolating fever"--he dines at Mr. Willing's (Powel's brother) this day and will have tea with Powel afterward.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.11.20 A-301.71
    Letter, to Isaiah and Alex Thomas
    1798 November 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    In the hand and signed by Tobias Lear or Alexander Hamilton, on Washington's watermarked paper. Washington writes in answer to the firm's letter of 24 October that he does not, as a rule, accept gifts such as their offered literary and miscellaneous paper--however because he does like to support such "publications which may be useful & beneficial to our country" he wishes to enter a subscription for it, if they will forward terms.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.11.20 A-301.72
    Letter, to Anna Young
    1798 November 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    In the hand of and signed "G. Washington" Tobias Lear or Alexander Hamilton, Washington writes that, as he has no experience with claims such as hers, he must refer her to Gov. Trumbull or members of Congress for information on how to go about applying for half pay due her on behalf of late father Col. John Durkee.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.12.01 A-417.43
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1798 December 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he will breakfast with Mrs. Powel "tomorrow at her usual hour, if named to him."

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.12.04 A-417.44
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1798 December 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes his thanks to Powel for her help in selecting and securing presents for Washington's family members in Virginia--in particular, for the prints and for her offer to choose something handsome to present Eleanor P. Custis--he considers muslin the best gift--asks her to locate some memento for Mrs. Washington--and asks her "to procure the second edition" of the present which she intends for Eliza Law lest there be "a contest ... in which an innocent Babe may become the victim of strife"--he hopes to leave town Friday or Saturday, but will call on her before going.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.12.07 A-417.45
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    1798 December 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to Powel expressing his gratitude for the articles she sent and her assistance in selecting them--he encloses $75 in payment--he will deliver her letter to Mrs. [Eliza Custis] Law and give the doll to Eliza.

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.12.20 W-1370
    Letter, to William Thornton
    1798 December 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to send a $500 check drawn on the Bank of Alexandria so Mr. Blagden can proceed laying in materials to build Washington's houses in the Federal City--he briefly describes a building he saw in Philadelphia like what he wants built and "if this is not incongruous with the rules of architecture, I should be glad to have my two houses executed in this style."

  • Text box: 14 folder: 1798.12.30 W-435
    Letter, to David Stuart
    1798 December 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to Stuart that he was pleased to find in Philadelphia recently that so many "Gentlemen of family fortune & high expectations" seek commissions in army--this, and the vain attempt to keep him to any literary pursuits, gave Washington idea to get Washington Custis a commission as Cornet--he also has the conviction that if real danger threatened the country "no young man ought to be an idle spectator of its defence;"--this would also divert Custis's attention from thoughts of marriage--Washington wanted to consult Mrs. Stuart and Martha before offering it, but Mr. Lear wrote to Custis about it and concealment of the idea is now impossible--Custis is now a cornet in the troop commanded by Lawrence Lewis--the Lieutenant is Lawrence Washington, Junr. of Chotanck--the matter still must be approved by the President and Senate, of course so it should not to be talked of publicly till then--Mrs. Washington consents but it must have Mrs. Stuart's permission--Washington's caution is because Custis is an only son, the only male of his great great grandfather's family--Providence will protect Custis in camp or field of battle as it would in domestic life.

  • Text Box 15 folder: 1799.00.00 MSS-291
    Memorandum, of Land and Dogue Run Hands
    Washington, George, 1732-17991799English.
    Scope and Contents

    This memorandum includes totals of the land to be cultivated and that in woods, waste, etc., probably all on Dogue Run farm--list of hands on Dogue Run with their [Ages?, probably drawn up with idea of renting the farm.] Also contains statements that wheat and cattle can be had also at reasonable valuation.

  • Text Box 15 folder: 1799.01.23 RM-1188.002
    Letter, to Lawrence Lewis
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    2 pages
    1799 January 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes in response to his nephew's query about the offer to become the 'Guardian of Nelly' so as to authorize a license for Lawrence and Nelly to marry. He also encourages Lawrence to acknowledge the Secretary of War's offered military commission and either accept or decline the appointment. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.02.06 W-423
    Letter, to Jonathan Trumbull
    1799 February 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received 4 copies of prints of deaths of Montgomery and Warren [done by John Trumbull]--cannot remember price on subscription lists, so asks T. to let him know the amount and also whether he can receive remittances for his brother in this county--doesn't know whether he paid in advance--papers from Philadelphia have not been unpacked yet--paper accompanying prints says rest of proposed design has been abandoned, due to "peculiarity of the times"--coming marriage of Nelly Custis and [Lawrence] Lewis.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.03.02 A-301.73
    Letter, to Elijah Brainerd
    1799 March 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to Brainerd that he sympathizes with his calamities, but cannot give him pecuniary aid--has had difficulty collecting rents due him and adds that "the income of my estate does not at this time hardly meet my current expenses"--further, he believes in helping his friends and neighbors first, and that is all he has the means of doing.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.02.10 W-412
    Letter, to James McAlpin
    1799 February 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    In a former letter Washington had ordered a uniform to be made as instructed by Secretary of War to be ready by Feb. 22 -- here he suggests sending it by way of Judge Bushrod Washington, who should be leaving Philadelphia for Mount Vernon shortly -- Washington wants the goods packed in a custom-built portmanteau of stiff thick leather, 2 feet long and 2 ft. 9 in round with a flap for brushes, blacking, and so on, with an iron bar running through staples, and a good lock -- he says an able craftsman would have no trouble building one from that description.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.04.15 W-809/B
    Survey, Four Mile Run
    1799 April 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Contains Washington's survey of land purchased from George and James Mercer in the neighborhood of Four Mile Run in Arlington, County, Va., known as the Washington['s] Forest tract--Second page shows comparison of three surveys: Gray's & Adams Patents 1724 & 1730; Jn. Houghs, Nov. 1766; Washington's April 3 and 4, 1799. Does not include a map.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.05.12 W-413
    Letter, to James McAlpin
    1799 May 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington inquires about the uniform he ordered, saying that the last delay was supposed to have been the gold thread which was expected in spring shipping--he requests no further unnecessary delay--asks McAlpin to send it in a portmanteau mentioned earlier and by some person coming through to Alexandria to be left at Post office or stage office there.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.06.22 A-301.74
    Letter, to Elias Boudinot
    1799 June 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington follows up on last winter's conversation in Philadelphia, and accepts Boudinot's offer of some of his wine, since his (Washington's) letters seem to have miscarried and a new order will reach Mr. Pintard in Madeira only after his stock is almost exhausted--Biddle will handle the transaction on his behalf.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.07.14 W-414
    Letter, to James McAplin
    1799 July 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he has received McAlpins letters of the 24th and 27th -- he thanks McAlpin for his efforts in furnishing uniform coat although he failed -- he mentions Mr. Bahr in New York, a tailor who embroidered a cloak for Washington when the capital was in New York, and suggests asking him -- if this fails and the coat has not been sent to Europe yet, he asks McAlpin to keep it and inform him of its state and what can be done with it.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.07.18 A-333.2
    Letter, to Thomas Peter
    1799 July 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington encloses notes for 2 hogsheads of tobacco, and asks Peter to try to sell them in Georgetown or get credit for them--Washington plans to be in Georgetown for a meeting of the Potomac Company on the 5th of August.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1799.08.04 2018-SC-068
    Letter, to John Beale Bordley
    Washington, George, 1732-1799
    1 pages 25 x 19 cm
    1799 August 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph letter signed. George Washington acknowledges and thanks John Beale Bordley for presenting him with a copy of Bordley's recently published book, Essays and Notes on Husbandry and Rural Affairs. The book was delivered to Mount Vernon by Secretary of War James McHenry.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.08.11 A-301.75
    Letter, to Burwell Bassett
    Washington, George, 1732-17991799 August 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Some time ago a mulatto girl, body servant to Mrs. Washington, ran away--she was found in Portsmouth, N.H.--asks Bassett that since he is going to Portsmouth, would he take steps to send her back--a Frenchman enticed her away but has left her--if she causes no further trouble, she won't be punished--Washington doesn't wish him to do anything "unpleasant, or troublesome" to bring her back.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.08.17 A-734.3
    Letter, to Robert Lewis
    Washington, George, 1732-17991799 August 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    In this letter George Washington writes to Lewis about the rent and value of his various properties along with the slaves that work on those properties, although he writes about his aversion "to sell the over-plus [of negroes] I cannot because I am principled against this kind of traffic in the human species. - To hire them out, is almost as bad, because they could not be disposed of in families to any advantage, and to disperse the families I have an aversion."

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.08.28 RM-186; MS-2574
    Letter, to Commissioners of the Federal City
    1799 August 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington takes the liberty of transmitting a letter from Colonel Pickering to the Commissioners of the Federal City for their consideration.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.09.07 A-366.64
    Letter, to Thomas Peter
    Washington, George, 1732-17991799 September 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Carriage is sent as Mrs. P. requested--expects to see them about 3:00--Mrs. W. has been very ill--sent for Dr. Craik at midnight--"Hers has been a kind of Ague & fever - the latter never entirely, intermitting until now. - I sent for the Doctor to her on Sunday last, but she could not, until he came the second time - yesterday morning - be prevailed upon to take anything to arrest them." On outside of cover Washington has added that since sealing the letter her fever has returned--please inform Mrs. [Eliza P.C.] Law.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.09.08 A-301.76
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1799 September 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. Washington is taking bark for fever and doing better--Washington will have Dr. Craik look at Roberts--if Roberts cannot do the work at the mill, Washington will have to employ another in order not to lose Fall business there--fears Anderson's health won't stand more attention to his work, either--will discuss his ideas on this later.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.09.08 A-301.77
    Letter, to Edward Rutledge
    1799 September 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he had received by Gen. William Washington the model of the improved gun carriage--he approves of new carriage and thinks that it will be much easier to introduce "valuable improvements" of this kind at the beginning of military exercises than after people become accustomed to the old.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.09.16 A-301.78
    Letter, to James Anderson
    1799 September 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that business, many guests, and Mrs. Washington's illness have delayed his answer to Anderson--"Health, being amongst, (if not the most) precious gift of Heaven; without which, we are but little capable of business, or enjoyment" so, since Anderson feels he and family can't be healthy where they live, Washington cannot expect them to live there a year longer--he feels he will have no difficulty superintending his farms himself "on the plain, simple, & regular system I am resolved, undeviatingly to pursue"--he will rent the landing at the ferry, and will try to rent mill and distillery too--the purpose of this letter is to relieve Anderson from embarrassment arising from their bargain on one hand and his desire to leave because of health on the other--Washington reiterates that he has nobody else in mind to replace Anderson and intends to take over farm management himself should Anderson have to step down--he would take $500 per year for mill; Anderson knows better than he what the distillery should rent for--discusses terms for renting the distillery and mill.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.09.22 A-301.79
    Letter, William Augustine Washington
    1799 September 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that he was disappointed in their not being able to visit, but invites him and his wife to Mount Vernon in the Spring--he asks whether there is any wheat available for sale--Washington wants to keep his millers employed but his more alert neighbors bought up local wheat early--Mrs. Washington is still very unwell--he heard of the death of Charles Washington, his brother, in Berkeley, just the previous night.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.10.07 folder: OUT A-301.80
    Letter, to William Augustine Washington
    1799 October 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes that delays in privately delivered mail caused his nephew's requests not to be fulfilled--no whiskey sent--rye from James Digges Dishman and from William Augustine will be gladly accepted if it is still available, and given gallon for bushel--Washington sends a 5 October 1799 price list of wheat in Alexandria [here separately cataloged].

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.10.21 W-599
    Promissory note, to William Herbert
    1799 October 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington signed this sixty day note for $1500, dated at Alexandria, Va. 21 October 1799. On the reverse it is endorsed: "This note was renewed on the 16th Decem. 1799 by Lawrence Lewis's note being discounted for the same Sum, which has been since paid ...", endorsed by Herbert, also "1500 -495 G. Washington Dec. 20."

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.10.20 RM-752; MS-4998
    Letter, to Elizabeth Dandridge Henley with enclosure from Benjamin Stodent
    1799 October 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to Martha Washington's sister informing her of her son John's appointment as a midshipman in the U.S. Navy. On the verso is Washington's draft of a response letter from John Henley to Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Stoddert for young Henley to copy. Enclosure: see October 16, 1799.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.10.27 RM-1069; MS-5711
    Fragment, Distillery and Fisheries Ledger
    1799 October 27Mount Vernon acquired at auction in 2003 a manuscript fragment with the date October 27, 1799 and George Washington's signature. It was described in the auction catalogue as having been removed from a ledger book. But it was a librarian here at Mount Vernon that discovered this fragment matched a missing piece from our bound Distillery Ledger which was acquired several years earlier. This fragment is a wonderful example of just how meticulous Washington was in reviewing the accounts. The account noted that the balance in favor of GW is 395.40. Washington added a note "Error this balance is only 375.40."English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington states he has examined and approved accounts of ledger.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.11.02 W-420
    Letter, to Leven Powell
    1799 November 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington has heard about Powell using a cutting box of new construction, better and simpler than the common kind--asks Powell to get him one and forward it to Col. Gilpin in Alexandria for him, if he is himself entirely pleased with it. (May refer to a "chaff cutter" or "chaff box" used for cutting straw chaff, hay, and oats into small pieces to facilitate mixing it with other forage.)

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.11.12 A-301.81
    Letter, Managers of Alexandria Dance Company
    Washington, George, 1732-17991799 November 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to offer his thanks for their invitation to attend assemblies, but "alas! our dancing days are no more."

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.11.18 A-301.82
    Letter, to Ralph Wormeley
    1799 November 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes the rumor of his having been in Norfolk is false--"I have never been farther from home since I left the Chair of Government, than the Federal city except when I was called to Philadelphia by the Secretary of War"--extends his thanks for invitation to visit at Rosegill, however.

  • Text box: 15 folder: 1799.12.12 A-301.83
    Letter, to Charles Alder
    Washington, George, 1732-17991799 December 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington writes to inform Alder that the wine sent by him from Madeira after the order sent through Pintard arrived in good condition will be paid for directly. (Written in Lear's hand, but speaks of him in the third person.)

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND1 A-417.50
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND2 A-417.51
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND3 A-417.52
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND4 A-417.53
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND5 A-417.55
    Letter, to Samuel Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND6 A-417.56
    Letter cover, to Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND7 A-417.57
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND8 A-417.58
    Letter, to Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND9 A-417.59
    Letter, to Samuel and Elizabeth Powel
    probably 1782 February 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Are invited to dine with Mr. Jacob Morris on Saturday,"... where, in the conformity to custom, they will be obliged to drink Tea, and consequently must be deprived of the pleasure intended them by Mr. & Mrs. Powell".

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND10 A-301.290
    Notes, queries on wheat, land, and taxes
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND11 W-498
    Plan, Piazza flooring
    Washington, George, 1732-1799undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    The plan below, is supposed to represent the Piaza [Piazza] – The black describes the Tile which it is supposed remains uninjured - & the white stone, which will be necessary to replace the Tile that has been damaged by the Frost – If this mode will answer and Knowles [John Knowles] -or Harry [Henry] Young can be engaged – the work might be set about.

    An indentured bricklayer and laborer, John Knowles worked at Mount Vernon from 1773 until 1784, as well as from 1786 until 1790. An indentured stonemason, Henry Young worked at Mount Vernon from 1774 until 1781, with an interruption in his services from 1776 until 1778.

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND12 W-426
    Letter cover, to David Stuart
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND13 W-791/B
    Fragment, clipped Washington signature and title cover
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND14 W-809/a
    Survey
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Docketed "Rough field Notes taken by George Washington in running the courses of the Land bot. from George & Jas. Mercer."

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND15 A-516
    Fragment, letter cover to Edward Carrington
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph document, half of a cover, franked by George Washington [only part of a signature remains], broken black seal with George Washington's initials, laminated.

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND16 MSS-472
    Fragment, letter cover to to Frances Dandridge Henley
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND17 A-813
    Notes, on trees, shrubs, and walks
    Washington, George, 1732-1799undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Notes on best methods of planting and transplanting various kinds of trees and bushes, including a notation of the agricultural authority, Langley or Miller, from whom he got information. Also a notation on walks -- should be of gravel or Sand and winding and private -- the sides should be lined with Honey suckles -- sweetbrier-, and many other flowering shrubs.

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND18 RM-864; MS-5322
    Fragment, letter cover to Governor Caesar Rodney
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Address leaf to Caesar Rodney, (the Governor of Delaware), signed by George Washington. Franked "Public Service."

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND19 RM-490-F; MS-4065
    Plat
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Plat of unidentified farmland. Field with 4 plots. Acreage and brief description.

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND20 RM-490-F; MS-4064
    Memorandum, "Rotations of crops for Dogue Run Farm"
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Description of rotation schedule for Dogue-run and the other farms--7 field plan.

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND 21 W-827.1
    Invitation
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Engraved invitation from plate used by President and Mrs. Washington.

  • Text box: 16 folder: ND22 A-680
    Cover, Clifton vs. Carroll
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 16 folder: ND23 W-1189
    Fragment, Nelly Custis
    undatedEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Fragment, likely from letter cover, "Nelly Custis" written by George Washington

Series 2. To George Washington
1755 January 22 - 1799 December 9English.
  • Text box: 17 folder: 1755.01.22 RM-1068; MS-5710
    Receipt, from Adam Stephen
    Washington, George, 1732-17991755 January 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for blacksmithing tools, GW writes out entire receipt and has vendor, Adam Stephen sign it. Tools listed: bellows, tongs, etc. Autograph document, folio, signed by Adam Stephen.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1755.01.22 MSS-790
    Account, from Adam Stephen
    1755 January 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    "[Ledger A, folio 13, Jan. 25, 1755 ""By 6 black Walnut Chairs ... £3.15;"" folio 19, Jan. 22, 1755 ""By [Col. Stephen] for 6 leather bottomed Chairs ... £3.15""]. £3.15.0 for six common black walnut chairs to be delivered to his order."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1756.04.18 RM-926; MS-5465
    Letter, from William Stark
    1756 April 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Sir - The purp. of this is to aquaint you of an Engagement we had with the Indians late this afternoon. Three of our men going out on pretense of looking after some horses met with a party of Indians within sight of the Fort, two of which escaped and alarm'd us; we immediately pursued them with a party of between fourty & fifty men undr command of Capt. Mercer, Lieut. Williams, Ensn. Carten, Ensign McCarty, Lt. Lemen & myself - after following them about a mile & an half, on rising a mountain we were fired on very smartly which we warmly returned ...."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1757.02.15 RM-1176; MS-5913
    Receipt, for James (enslaved carpenter)
    1757 February 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    An early receipt regarding a slave at Mount Vernon, docketed by George Washington. The receipts reads "Colo. George Washington, for the Hire of Carpenter James [and] Cr. by 5 yds of Negroes Cotton." Carpenter James was likely a slave carpenter hired to work on the renovation of Mount Vernon. The reverse contains a partial notation by Charles Washington, youngest brother of George, dated 23 April 1759.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1757.12.20 W-407
    Bond, from Sampson Darril
    1757 December 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bond for one thousand pounds Virginia currency--for 350£ given by G.W. he has sold two tracts of land, one of 200 acres on Dogue Run, originally granted to 1st S. Darrell in 1794, and the other 300 acres on little Hunting Creek, originally part of tract granted to Matthew Thompson.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1760.03.00 RM-493; MS-4072
    Letter, from Augustine Washington
    Washington, Augustine, 1718?-17621760 MarchEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Invitation to his half-brother to stop for a visit on his way to Williamsburg. Accounts with Mr. Carlyle not settled. Advice on the purchase of Clifton's land.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1760.04.26 RM-309; MS-2967
    Bill, from Valentine Crawford
    1760 April 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill for butter. Note at the bottom by Washington indicating an error of £1.0.0. Washington's endorsement on verso, Oct. 1761.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1760.06.04 A-680.5
    Letter, from William Digges
    1760 June 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    [William Digges of Warburton Manor, Prince Geo. Co. Md. Washington's neighbor, was one of those named in Clifton's suit against Carroll and other.] In this letter he annouces willingness to receive money due and "wash my hands of ye troublesome affr."--also details on exchange of vinegar and other commodities.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1763.01.04 W-597
    Receipt, from Valentine Crawford
    1763 January 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    "For carrying 4 hhds tobacco and for kegs of butter. Receipted by Crawford."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1765.04.13 A-516.2
    Receipt, from John West, Jr. re. Muster Fine
    1765 April 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    "To ""George Washington Esqr. a soldier in Capt. Jno Dalton's Company for being absent from Muster ..."" Teste copy signed by clerk, John West junr."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1766.04.02 A-366.5
    Letter, from Scot Pringle Cheap & Co.
    1766 April 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Document signed, partly printed, signed by Jno. Montgomery [Capt.].Bill for freight charges on one butt of wine shipped on "Alexandria."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1766.08.02 A-366.6
    Bill, from John Montgomery
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Montgomery, John1766 August 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill for freight charges on one butt of wine shipped on "Alexandria."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1767.03.22 A-283.119
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961767 March 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report on farming, etc. wheat very poor, gave a very small amount of flour--ground has been either very wet or frozen since Washington's departure, thus holding up the plowing--mention of a good slave whom Mr. Adam will not sell for £50.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1767.03.30 RM-1064; MS-5704
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-1796Washington, Martha, 1731-18021767 March 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes about crops and planting. Washington in Williamsburg at Burgess meeting, then onto Dismal Swamp. Martha includes a postscript at the end of the letter. One of only two extant examples of correspondence from Martha Washington to George Washington, Martha penned this six line postscript with news and greetings on the second page of a letter from Lund Washington to George on March 30, 1767.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1767.04.24 A-366
    Letter, from Henry Lee and Daniel Payne
    1767 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter pertains to the estate of the Rev. Charles Green. (See letter of Wm. Savage to George Washington & George Wm Fairfax, 1767 April 24).

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1767.08.17 RM-780; MS-5170
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961767 August 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account of weather and activities at Mt. Vernon. "The carpenters are laying the barn floor in the Neck." Waiting for the brickmaker's arrival, "The negroes are all well. Bishop has sowed half his field in wheat and made two casks of cider." Expecting a "great crop of corn." "The Children are very well & were yesterday at Alexandria Church ..."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1767.08.22 A-283.1
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961767 August 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Condition of crops, wheat and corn--sowing--ditchers--several of the Negroes lately sick--Alton's Morris', Cleveland's and Bishops farms--brickmaker failed to report for work--timothy and lucerne--Cleveland's barn floor finished--compliments to Mrs. Washington, her children are well and send love, also their love to Coll. Wm. Fairfax and his lady.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1767.09.05 A-283.2
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961767 September 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington's lost horses have not returned to Mt. Vernon--the corn crop--ditchers--sowing wheat and making cider--Price (brickmaker) has returned because they could get no other--none available in Mr. Piper's shipload of servants--milldam--how to get brickwood across creek?--half planks for Morris' barn floor--children are well--glad Mrs. W. has benefited from springs.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1768.06.02 W-797
    Receipt, from John Stadler
    1768 June 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for £12.18 for teaching Miss [Martha Parke] Custis music "ending in April last."

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1770.00.00 A-366.16
    Account, from Robert W. McMickan
    1770-1771English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Sales of 69 Barrels Herrings on Acct. of George Washington Esqr of Virginia."--Charges for freight commission, etc.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1771.05.12 A-283.120
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961771 May 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Deals with mill and farm affairs--"Our mill is once more in a bad way"--wall of water pit falling down."--" ... give yourself no uneasiness or anxiety about the mill, you may depend I will use every precaution to prevent further damages."--sale of flour--wheat fields look promising--all are well.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1771.03.29 A-366.17
    Letter, from Robert W. McMickan
    1771 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses sales of herring and current account owed them--market for herring and flour low at present.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1773.01.20 A-238
    Receipt, from Joseph Warren
    1773 January 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for £3.15 for freight on 300 bushels oats.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1773.08.16 A-366.21
    Letter, from Francis Willis
    Willis, Francis (1745-1829)1773 August 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Expects he has "hird" from Col. Fairfax in re selling furniture at Belvoir--asks him to set a date and advertise sale and he will attend--needs 100 bushels of wheat, 20 barrells of corn and money for management of Fairfaxes Berkeley plantation--hopes he won't think him troublesome, but Fairfax has left him in great confusion--asks him to inform W. Peyton if account delivered Peyton by Willis will not be received by Washington in settlement with Peyton.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1773.09.00 A-366.24
    Bill, from Thomas Jett
    1773 SeptemberEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Balance due, plus interest accrued from Oct. 4, 1771 - to Miss Janny Washington.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1773.09.17 A-366.22
    Letter, from Francis Willis
    Willis, Francis (1745-1829)1773 September 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Possibly may object to his paying £7 to overseers, but this worked out with Col. Fairfax since four overseers to settle in woods and raise only corn--land nearly worn out, explains his system of crop rotation.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1773.10.17 A-366.23
    Letter, from Francis Willis
    Willis, Francis (1745-1829)1773 October 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    West as far as Goose Creek on way to Mt. Vernon but indisposed and could not go further--needs £50 for management Fairfax estates, if convenient send £10 by bearer and he will get rest when next rides to Belvoir--asks to trouble him with business at General Court--i.e. encloses letter to Augustine Willis for collection of £250, if he gets this will not need the money from Washington.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1773.12.22 A-366.25
    Letter, from Francis Willis
    Willis, Francis (1745-1829)1773 December 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks Washington for the money which enabled him to send 5 or 6 hands to Red Stone--understands Mr. Thruston is very much pleased with this country, particularly Washngton's property there--his brother to leave for there soon--does not approve of renting Belvoir "for so short a time"--will try to see Mr. Delany soon--please pay Mr. Moore the £40 or £60.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.02.12 A-366.33
    Letter, from Samuel Athawes
    1774 February 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Writes of Fairfaxes arrival in England, both are pretty well recovered--acknowledges receipt of Washington letters and packages forwarded to Fairfaxes at York--let him know if he can do any favour for the "Neptune" this year--Rev. Bumaly pleased to hear of Washington's health, admires him much.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.04.27 A-366.34
    Letter, from Craven Peyton
    Peyton, Craven1774 April 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has collected rents according to promise--forgot to give him tobacco he had in his pocket, what should he do with it?

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.06.02 A-366.35
    Letter, Francis Willis
    Willis, Francis (1745-1829)1774 June 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Disagrees with Fairfax on renting raccoon branch to highest bidder--thinks should keep fisheries to encourage sale of whole property--minor tenant problems discussed--Daniel Stone wants refusal of west point fishery and 200 acres at £20--if convenient hopes can have sale before harvest as it would be difficult for him to attend then.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.11.28 A-366.36
    Letter, from Craven Peyton
    Peyton, Craven1774 November 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bearer Richard Butcher wants to sell bills of exchange--asks approval on bills for Colo. Fairfax.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.12.06 A-366.37
    Letter, from Francis Willis
    Willis, Francis (1745-1829)1774 December 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests instructions for bond to be drawn for tenant, Mr. Morton--bond for things purchased at sale [of Belvoir items]--asks for enough bags for 50 bushels of wheat.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.12.17 A366.38
    Letter, from Mr. Morton
    1774 December 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Explains reason for delay of his bond because one person he wanted for bondsman has been abroad--now has Mayor Lowry as security and will get one other before taking over the premises.

  • Text box: 17 folder: 1774.05.18 folder: OUT W-1310a.17
    Receipt, from Robert Broom
    1774 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for 18 shillings for one pound of Hyson Tea.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.02.01 A-366.39
    Letter, from A. Morton
    1775 February 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has arrived at Belvoir with bond unexecuted--since he had intimations from Washington that his own settlement at Belvoir would be disagreeable to Washington and not wanting to give offense, decided he would be content to hold the place for only a year--at end of the time, hopes all prejudices and difficulties will be ironed out.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.02.22 A-366.40
    Letter, from John Tayloe
    1775 February 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Reference to sale of Mercer's estate--reports he has regained his health by disuse of coffee--announces the death of Philip Ludwell Lee.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.03.08 A-415
    Letter, from Fielding Lewis
    1775 March 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Request on behalf of local committee to see if Washington could furnish them ten barrells of powder for use of county--heard he had imported more than necessary--if he can get it to Malborough his scyths can be sent at same time--Mr. Fitzhugh informs him he will have the pleasure of Washington's company Friday night on way to meeting of the Delegates.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.04.12 A-420
    Bill, from Thomas Contee
    1775 April 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Draft for £40 on Mr. William Molleson, Merchant, London.

    Signed over to Wm. Fairfax account by G.W. on reverse and later docketed to that effect.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.09.29 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 September 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will let Col. Simpson have money, but had difficulty in selling bill of exchange for continental money -- no word of escaped painter Cleveland -- work on store house and wash house [office] -- John [Broad] and negroes sick -- wet weather and wheat sowing -- scarcity of spinning wheels -- Lanphier supposed to repair old ones -- Committee has made choice of officers for militia -- "the remains of our company" to form company and ask Committee of Safety for commissions for officers -- Mrs. Washington to pick up Mrs. [Eleanor] Custis at Mr. B[enedict] Calvert's and go "down the country" -- the "Stoco man" still working on dining room and Sears on chimney -- fears George Washington mistaken about draught of chimney piece -- wash house [office] to have two front doors.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.10.05 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 October 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meeting Mrs. W. at Mr. Digges across river--thinks Mr. Harrison will accept W-n's offer--Alexa. & Loudon people worried about Mrs. W.'s presence at Mt. V.--he thinks there's no danger--"her old acquaintance the attorney" wouldn't permit Lord Dunmore to come up river & take her--if necessary he can get her away quickly--she leaves soon for "down the country" with son and daughter-[in-law]--he writes G.W. weekly--rain prevents sowing wheat--repairing tumbling dam--work on wash or servent & store houses--bricklayers working on garden wall--John [Broad] sick--Sears sick--stucco work & chimney piece in dining room unfinished--bill of exchange--no word from [James] Cleveland or Simpson on western lands--John West wants money owed him--will pay Custis' bond from money of [Jenifer] Adams' bond--what to do with [Jenifer] Adams' land in Md.?--hopes to see G.W. in winter "for whether things are made up or not I suppose you can leave the army in winter."--painter still absent.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.10.22 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 October 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. W. & Mr. & Mrs. John Parke Custis stop a few days in Fredericksburg on way to Col. Bassett's--mill dam repair completed--too wet to plow--John Knowles (bricklayer) sick--John Broad back at work--Judge the taylor & Sears sick--stucco man at work on dining room--carpenters on wash house [office]--letters by Constitutional post most reliable--kept in Alexandria by Mr. Hendricks.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.10.29 A-283.39
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 October 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sent word to Mrs. W. at New Kent informing her to come to camp--expect her here immediately--discussion by Md. and Alex. residents of plan to blocade river--Indian Head best place--"Captn Boucher [said] he woud undertake with 3 ships [sunk] to stop the Channel so that no ship of Force coud get up the River ..."--Mrs. W. packed his papers in a trunk to be sent to Capt. McCarty's for safe keeping--she gave him key to G.W.'s study but he won't touch anything there except in emergency--what to do with Col. Mercer's papers?--John West, Mr. Harper, Mr. Wilson ask for money owed them--Bishop needs money--Dr. Crail's negro came with news from over the mountains--Val Crawford comes, feels it useless to keep building on G.W.'s land there because of danger of British burning everything--should he grind wheat?--Jenifer Adams offers to rent Md. land--Col. Mason very ill since convention--Lund thinks Mt. V. very easily defended by 50 men--will consider making salt peter--Custis and wife with Mrs. W. in New Kent--Knowles is well, Webster sick, John Barry dead.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.11.05 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 November 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enclosed letter probably tells of Mrs. W's coming to camp--her long stay in New Kent after being sent for is ill-judged--nothing done about blocade of Potomac River--why he had to pay Mercer money--difficulties of paying in paper money--"John Lowe the Barber says you owe him 7/6 for a false tale for your hair"--James Cleveland came with certificates of improvements on Great Kanawa & Ohio land--settlers there left and went to Wheeling because of Indian attacks--won't return--G.W.'s servants sold and negroes left with Will Crawford--Stephens stayed, will get mill going there--work on dining room continues--little chance of getting absent painter from Lord Dunmore--will plant Bosenberries--difficulties in acquiring spinning wheels--expects another new one, "so that we shall then have 7 ..."--wash house [office] chimneys being set up--considers changing door plan, but hesitates altering G.W.'s plans--Skirmish at Hampton--next letter will be by Mrs. W. when she goes to camp.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.11.12 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 November 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dining room almost finished--"the Stucco Man agrees the ceilg. is a handsomer one than any of Colo. Lewises altho not half the work in it it was a plan recommen'd by Sears."--too late to turf the Ha Ha's--what proportions to use on gateways?--Lanphier no help on this or anything else--let him know in Spring what brick work to do after building the underpining & chimney to the house that will be placed opposite the store house--will plaster wash house or Servt's house [office] this winter--"I suppose there is a wall to be built in the new garden next the Quarter I think I have heard you say you'd designd to have a House Built the whole length for Negroes ..."--miller's time wasted with no wheat to grind--coopers work on mill dam & fencing--unable to buy slave--Lund goes to Stafford to settle mother's estate--will send his own negroes "over the mountain" for lack of anything to do in east--announces his intention to defend Mt. V. property against British--.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.11.14 A-283.34
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 November 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account of money since Washington left, together with money to and from Mrs. Washington--all were bills contracted before he left--Washington's mother wrote asking for "linnen" not obtainable there and other trifles--explains accounts paid--will try to raise stone out of banks for chimney tops to be put up this winter, for kitchen, storehouse and other house to be built opp.--painting kitchen, storehouse, and house--corn crop--if Washington approves will put up a strong house at Morrises for wine, rum, etc.--Comm. sent to sound the river decided channel too wide and therefore plan [to block river] impracticable or very expensive--so must defend plantations on Potomac with muskets--attitudes of people about defending property in area--sales of wheat--will forward spinning--problems and process of making salt peter--Mrs. Washington does not approve leaving Mrs. Barnes as housekeeper in her absence, so Lund will do housekeeping--house has been crowded with company since Mrs. Washington's return.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.11.24 A-283.40
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 November 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will transplant cherry trees, but thinks they will die--also plant vinyards and clean Hell Hole--much farm work to be done--shortage of help--illness--plasterer still here and Mrs. Washington has decided to have stucco in her room plain--wash house shingled and weather boarded but chimneys not up--report on timothy and other crops--has written every week--payment for sale of Col. Mercer's estate and letter in re. sale to Col. Tayloe--negro quarters need mending--difficulty of getting silver money--will try to collect rents--bull gored a wagon horse--Mrs. Barnes at Mt. Vernon--doesn't believe war ships will come up river this year--shortage of salt in area--his greetings to Mrs. Washington if she gets to camp before his letter--local militia officers.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.12.01 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 December 1English.
  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.12.03 A-283.33
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 December 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will alter servants hall since it is not intended for a wash house--thinks Jennifer Adams has not made a deed for his land unless very recently--Adams wanted to clear himself on charges of cutting timber--will try to get Washington out of bargain with Adams--run-away slave--thinks there will be no action on stopping navigation of Potomac or erecting batteries--will talk to Col. [Geo.] Mason about it--Mason ill--Committee for county chosen recently, lists names--Connelly [Tory] captured while going disguised through Md.--minute scheme for area not up to Conventions expectations--painter [run-away slave calling self Joseph Wilson] among prisoners taken at Hampton, does not want to return--Dunmore proclamation to free all indentured servants and slaves that go over to British--thinks white servants more likely to cause trouble--reviews servant situation, miller being paid and sitting idle--will grind 100 barrels of flour, possibly for export in exchange for arms--promises constant attention to Genl. Washington's affairs.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.12.03 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 December 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Examination of [James] Cleveland re certificates of improvements on G.W.'s western lands--pd. Tho. Lawson for iron--Jennifer Adams' land--negro won't return to Va. from Adam's; should he be sold?--Col. [George] Mercer's & Col. [Geo. Wm.] Fairfax's estates--Bryan Fairfax's peculiar religious behavior--report of Dunmore attacking 100 men "this side of the great Bridge ..."--convention to raise 4000 men--Dunmore's negro troops--desires privateers to come and take Dunmore's squadron--negroes ill--Col. George Mason getting well--hopes for gunpowder--proposed Potomac battery--Sears still here painting new room and dining room--he has picture frames to make yet--altered wash house (servt. quarters)--Knowles not recovered [from bull's goring].

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.12.23 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 December 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mill swamp to be cleared for pasture--coopers cutting trees for staves--corn--several of Oliver Cleveland's people ill--plan for hedging and ditching--suggests fallowing land & putting into wheat, thus saving labor for ditching & hedging--briar hedge planted from mansion to Hell Hole eaten by cattle--cherry trees will not live--"I should be glad to be informd in what manner the House now Buildy. opposite the store House is to be divided into partitions--in one of your Letters you say it is intended for the sick - if so I woud make Three Rooms in it- 1/2 the House or more in the part next the Chimney the Remainder divided into two Rooms each of which will have a window in it - the Door in the gable end to be of no use but still to be there that it may in its outward appearance look like the Store ..."--Col. [George] Mercer's estate--[James] Cleveland's report on Kanawa lands-he will go to Fincastle & Bottetourt Courts to get evaluation of work--Wm. Stephens & Wm. Skilling here, say buildings on Ohio burnt by Indians--Mrs. Barnes and Milly Posey left today--Dunmore defeated again by Capt. Woodford.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1775.12.30 A-301.84
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961775 December 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Col. [George] Mercer's estate--difficulties in collecting rents in Loudon, no markets for crops, and men indicted there for spreading ideas that they should not be expected to pay--flower knots in garden to be leveled, flowers shrubs planted elsewhere--gravel sorted for walks--one of Cleveland's men left when hardships set in--Wm. Skilling will repair well--John Broad injured "playing Frolick"--wrote to Wmsbg. to sell the painter, now in jail there--believes Washington should accept wages as General.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.01.17 A-283.23
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 January 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    In this letter Lunds writes about trying to recover runaway negro from [Jennifer] Adams and rent from Adams along with affairs of other tenants, among other topics.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.01.25 A-283.25
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 January 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    River frozen--hasn't yet seen Mr. Marshall or Mr. Triplett about land exchange--thinks it bad scheme to raise hogs to take care of surplus corn--pork prices low--well keeps caving in, perhaps will have to ask instructions as to where to dig a new one--good negro shoemaker available from Adams--conduct of negroes--better sell bay or stop using him for breeding--hurts him to see miller and mill idle.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.01.29 W-1310/a.23
    Bill, from William Hartshorne
    1776 January 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Bill receipted. Bill for 1 set cart boxes."

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.01.31 A-283.26
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 January 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Exchange of Adams and Matthews land still not settled--much alarm in Alexandria, expecting an attack from 5 large ships reported to be off Cone [mouth of Potomac]--river now blocked with ice but women and children evacuating and moving goods--they will fight to defend town--he thinks the ships more apt to be oyster boats--packing Washington's china and glass into barrels and then would be able to move things at short notice to Mrs. Barnes and to Morris' barn--rum and wine to be moved too--everyone says they will come to help defend the Washington property--thinks 100 men could defend it against 1,000--Wm. Stevens paid for going out to [Washington's] Ohio lands--Cleveland--packing bacon--cannot sell flour--"I wish you had said how large you woud have the negro houses you speak of in your letter, or whether you woud have them built with or without sheds."--one piece of woolen cloth came from weavers--nine wheels at work spinning--John Broad cannot live--tell Mr. [John Parke] Custis cannot deliver letters to Mount Airy because of ice--Mrs. Chichester will stay in Fauquier Co., feels it unsafe in Alexandria--will send his furniture to another county if Washington thinks best, however doesn't believe there will be an attack on Alexandria since Lord Dunmore's troops are too trifling.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.02.08 A-283.27
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 February 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Several accounts are over-due, one to Lanphier--Mercer's estate--no one has applied for Col. Fairfax's bond--Lord Fairfax at present pretty well--will sell Adams' negro to someone Washington owes money to--problems of the mill [on Bulskin ?]--Simpson--French and Dulany land not settled--John Broad still alive but dying--the well will hold, must make top brick instead of stone--house opposite store framed but not raised--next will work on 2-family quarters in Muddy Hole--salting fish--letter from England by Capt. Kelso here.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.02.15 A-283.28
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 February 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Question of Lund's wages, he only brought it up because Washington had offered to pay him equal to what he had had in any former year--never expects to be rich--will serve him faithfully--Mr. Baily wants 10% to collect the rents, thinks 5% is enough--suggests he might collect them himself--Tayloe has instructed him to deliver the bonds to Col. Peyton--problems with Cleveland, who must be paid since he was acting as Washington's agent--John Broad still alive--Adams' land--Triplett questions boundary between Washington's land and his--Adams pressing him to buy 300 acres--John Stone offering 360 acres on river next to former Adams land--spinning of linen going on slowly--sorry to hear Mr. Custis not well--furniture still at Mt. Vernon, hopes to avoid a move if no attack--Col. West will order militia for defense of Mt. Vernon in event of attack.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.02.22 RM-106; MS-227.7
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 February 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Informing Washington of affairs at Mt. Vernon, the condition of the negroes, advising some improvements to Mt. Vernon, and information about the movements of the British.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.03.07 A-283.29
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961776 March 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dray colt--use of other horses--Stevens will not get to save the rest of Washington's lands [Kanawha] with only the negroes--he thinks it best to get two other white men and have them appointed by court to appraise work when done--if Washington thinks the upset times not enough excuse for failing to satisfy the legal requirements to save land from forfeiture must give Lund liberty to make best arrangement possible with man to go out--7,000 acres patented in Washington's name and Muse upon Pocatallico--Cleveland here and will record work in April when courts in Fincastle and Bottetourt--Cleveland says bottom lands on Kanawha very rich--packing furniture to move to Morris's barn--Cleveland's trial is Tues.--Cleveland claims his behaviour is not criminal and he has been misrepresented--has heard nothing from Milly Posey since Christmas.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.06.10 A-516.17
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-17811776 June 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. Washington can accompany the General anywhere now that she's gone thru smallpox [innoculation] successfully--expresses gratitude to Washington for his guardianship--"He deserves the Name of Father who acts the Part of one."

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1776.09.10 A-366.32
    Letter, from Joshua Davis
    1776 September 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Safe arrival Norwich with 2 mortars after long delay in Sound because of enemy and wind--better to continue by land--needs money to pay pilots and other expenses--send further orders--Capt. Burbeck with 18 of Gen. Lee's guards with him--believes this will be sufficient help--will send rest of troops on--hears of danger on road to New York--since no provisions, sending part of 130 men on--keeping or only sufficient to hoist mortar.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1777.02.01 A-750.6
    Letter, from Samuel B. Webb
    1777 February 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests Washington to write Gov. Trumbull to try to get some bounties for his men as for other Conn. battallions--he enlists men on that promise--has clothing for men, which is great inducement to enlist.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1777.02.17 A-750.7
    Letter, from Carpenter Wharton
    1777 February 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Supplies to be moved from Philadelphia to Milltown Yorktown and Lancaster--supplies being purchased--all necessaries for troops on march provided--defends conduct in not buying--there are two buyer in Philadelphia--sends 6 lemons raised near New York City.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1777.03.01 A-366.29
    Letter, from General Wooster
    1777 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Can't persuade troops to remain at New Rochelle in face of superior forces--troops not enlisting, army weak--few [English] troops left in New York--he holds two men who ran off to British, then came back to help a widow escape to New York.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1777.03.12 A-366.30
    Letter, from Charles Gordon
    1777 May 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Appeal by British prisoner of war to be exchanged or parolled for a few days to see his brother who has come from England on family business.

  • Text box: 18 folder: 1777.12.24 A-283.13
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961777 December 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Hopes Washington will come to Mt. Vernon while troops in winter quarters--no crop for sale this year--wheat destroyed, mill idle, short crop of corn--gives corn crop yields from each farm--many visiters and horses cause great use of crops--also 24 of own horses--wants to try making rum, sugar, and molasses from Indian corn stalk for money crop.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.01.28 RM--115; MS-2322
    Letter, from Walter Stewart
    1778 January 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Stewart is writing about the conduct of some of the soldiers and the need of supplies.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.01.28 A-283.22
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 January 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Trees to be planted--Triplett delays signing bond for land exchange with Washington--mentions Mr. McCarty, Massey and Chichester in relation to agreement--boundary disputes--inquire into purchase of Col. Stone's land--Beck's land sold--new covering horse--Col. Triplett accompanies Mrs. Washington across River today on way to camp--will question tenants.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.03.04 A-283.14
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 March 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Covering horse arrived--bond signed with Triplett for land below mill race--Robt. Adam pd. account--"I have a great mind to put the Money into the Continental Loan office, but perhaps it would be proper to get your approbation first"--[Mrs. Mary Washington] wants Silla sent to her, but Lund hates to part her from Jack--[Charles Washington] wrote for another hand but he didn't send one--tobacco land to be put to flax--pumpkin to be planted--per simmons for beer and spirits--mare sent by Col. Lewis sick--Lund's lip still sore.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.03.11 A-283.15
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 March 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rain and snow prevented his going up to see Washington--will leave for camp last of month--flour and corn for sale, had to sell to govt.--will sell barrels of pork and beef--difficulties getting salt--doubts Lanphier will come to work this spring--who to leave to manage housekeeping in his absence?--Bishop not trustworthy and Milly Posey away from home-will sell negroes at private sale--meeting among Loudon draftees--[John Parke] Custis not returned from Williamsburg--Mrs. Custis and children not heard from--sickness among people--Jack and Sylla distressed at parting--lambs died--mare sent by [Col.] Lewis still sick.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.03.18 A-283.17
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 March 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Persuaded Lanphier to work by promising him a portion of corn crop and wool in place of money--much plank wasted by his delay--difficulties of getting their privateer into action--difficulties with draft law in county [Fairfax]--volunteer scheme hasn't worked--reassures Washington he will not leave his employ or hold him for higher wages while he is away leading army--Custis returned from Williamsburg--feeling against R[ichard] H[enry] L[ee] for his supposed scheming against Washington--will make molasses, sugar, Rum from corn next fall-won't attempt tobacco--breeding mare.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.04.01 A-283.16
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 April 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Breeding mare--Weaver captured deserter, thus is exempt from serving in army, but he's been let go because of high wages demanded--bargain with Triplett--Blair's bond--money put in Continental Loan office--rents collected from tenants in Loudon and Fauquier--Sam[uel W-n] collected some in Westmoreland--will come to camp after shad is put up for coming year--will send Washington's accounts by Col. Fitzgerald if he leaves first--covering horse thin--progress made on privateer "General Washington"--Lund expresses his faith in the ship and encourages Washington to keep his share.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.04.08 A-283.19
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    1778 April 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received letter by Gen. Woodford--can't sell negroes with their consent--negroes from Crawford innoculated with smallpox--getting in shad--covering horses--[John Parke] Custis in New Kent for elections--if not elected He'll come to camp with Lund--corn to sell--money in Loan office--Mercer land and Blair's bond.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.04.22 A-283.18
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 April 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Blair's bond--he and Mr. Custis set out for camp next week--Custis elected in Fairfax county--Col. Bassett innoculated for smallpox--less shad put up than expected--stopped running early--"the Crabs, Thorns, Cedars &c which we planted this Spring for Hedges appear to be all living. The Locusts at the North End of the House are all putting out I believe not one of them are dead, the variety of Trees at the South End are also alive, most of them I hope will live ..."--ship "George Washington" launched--but in mud in Occoquan--loan office certificates--Lanphier worthless, refuses to work--"I wanted much to get the Window finish'd in the Pediment that I might have the garret Passage plaister'd & clean'd out before Mrs. Washington returns - beside this the scaffling in the Front of the House cannot be taken away before it is finished - This prevents me from putting up with the Steps to the great Front Door ..."--Sickness--will bring letter to Mrs. Washington.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.05.06 A-283.24
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 May 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rain and his indisposition prevented his going to camp by now--[John Parke] Custis not to go, must go to assembly--Capt. Triplett's health forces him to resign commission.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.05.29 RM-1218
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-17811778 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    John Parke Custis, stepson of George Washington, wrote to George Washington who was at Valley Forge about various aspects of the war. He notified him that the Virginia legislature passed bills to help raise troops, the arrival of a French ship carrying uniforms and military supplies, and a note to his mom. Docketed by George Washington. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.08.19 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 August 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    No word from G.W. in 2 posts--conditions of plantations under Davenport & Hill--breeding of cattle from Custis' English bull--wet summer--crops of corn, timothy and wheat--no workmen found but Lanphier & his man--making molasses from corn stalks--"old Billy Harding wants to rent part of the Land you Bought of Mercer on four mile Run ..."

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1778.09.02 A-283
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961778 September 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will try to buy Barry's and Marshall's land for G.W.--which negroes to sell?--sorry G.W. must forgo buying lands because of losses from farms under his (Lund's) management--wheat crop almost total loss--(the fly)--prepares to plant tobacco--ditching mill swamp--drowning in mill race of valuable slave Cooper James--Carpenter James injured with axe--received £200 from Capt. Lewis for Phaeton--sold flour to Boston for good price (scarsity there)--suggests G.W. speculate in wheat, sell flour at high prices--Wm. Roberts the miller, his merits & weaknesses for drink, & advises not to hire him again--mill race, tumbling dam at Piny & Dogue Run gate & dam which Roberts repaired or built--discusses building houses for prospective tobacco crop--campaign in Rhode Island & departure of Fr. admiral, Lord Howe & Johnstone--cleared money in pork--can't get workmen to assist Lanphier--" ... if so the coverd ways will not get done ... "--sickness among people--good pastures--took paper from G.W.'s trunk, can't get any in Alexa.--letter from Wm. Roberts enclosed.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.01.09 2020-SC-011
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-1781
    4 pages
    1779 January 9
    Scope and Contents

    Relays problems with recruiting for the army, currency depreciation and counterfeiting, land purchases in northern Virginia, and the management of Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.02.23 A-301.85
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1779 February 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Resigned commission because of ill health--also, "Would my health admit of my continueing in the Service, I could not Consistent with the Character of an Officer or Soldier by any Means Submit to have younger Officers placed over me."

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.02.16 2018-SC-035-001
    Receipt, from Caleb Gibbs for cask of wine sent to Head Quarters
    Gibbs, Caleb, 1755-1818
    1 pages
    1779 February 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter from Caleb Gibbs, commander of the Commander-in-Chief's Guard, to Royal Flint, assistant commissary of purchases, requesting a quarter cask of wine for His Excellency George Washington at Head Quarters. Signed by Gibbs with note that the cask of wine was received.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.03.04 MS-2065
    Letter, from Morgan Lewis
    1779 March 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerned with auditing of army accounts ... Lewis, informed of a balance in his favor, requests Washington to order the Paymaster Gen. to honor this balance ... nonpayment of debts will injure him as well as the Public Service …

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.03.18 A-301.86
    Invoice, "Sundries sent to Head Quarters"
    1779 March 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Invoice for beer, wine, bacon, sugar, and "1 box directed to Mrs. Washington," etc.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.06.03 A-366
    Letter, from John Neilson
    1779 June 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Military intelligence--reports movement of British fleet and army in New York.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.08.11 A-570
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-17811779 August 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests George Washington's advice whether to sell Eastern shore lands because of heavy taxes and can get no one to live there & work them--rumors of truce to be offered by British King--appreciates Washington's advice on draining low grounds [at Abingdon] to prevent tidal floods--poor corn crops and depreciation of paper money--everyone paying old debts in paper money--purchase of Alexander's land--army's success at Stony Point. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.10.07 RM-1188.005 ; RM-1188.006
    Letter, from John Parke Custis and 'A list of Cattle bought from Genl. Washington's Plantation'
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-1781
    6 pages
    1779 October 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    John Parke Custis writes to George Washington from his Abingdon regarding an offer of seventy five pounds for his property on the Eastern Shore of Virginia - is confident he can get more. Custis himself is considering purchasing Philip Alexander's land at a tempting price. Expresses his pleasure and congratulatory wishes on the arrival of Count d'Estaing's on the American coast. Custis reluctantly addresses a misunderstanding between himself and Colo. Bassett regarding the valuation and care of Washington's forty-seven head of cattle at Clairborne's plantation in King William County, Va. (part of Martha Washington's dower lands that Washington leased to John Parke Custis in 1778). Autograph letter signed, 4 pages.

    Scope and Contents

    List of cattle on George Washington's plantation in King George County in the hand of John Parke Custis. The front of the document lists forty-seven cattle including eighteen "Young Cows" of the "common breed & small," sixteen heifers of the "English Breed," three steers, and ten "best work Oxen." The reverse of the lists cattle valued by Colo. Bassett 'last fall.' Autograph document, 2 pages.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1779.12.12 W-1164
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-17811779 December 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    John writes how the new plantation needs constant attention, but would be "very advantageous to your Estate in the Neck, and will add much to the Prospect from the House."

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1780.03.26 A-516.6
    Letter, from Fielding Lewis
    1780 March 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enclosed is letter to Mr. Fras Gallibert, French merchant prisoner at N.Y., to be forwarded to him--his health improves, but George [Lewis'] is poor--George settles on Frederick cty. land; will Washington sell some of his land adjoining?--no news from Charles Town [Charleston, S.C.]--Gen. Woodford moving Va. troops there-"will not the Irish demands of a fair trade operate to our advantage?"

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1780.04.00 W-800
    Receipt, from James Nivison
    1780 AprilEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill addressed Master George Washington--total £297.6.0 Va. Curr.--bill for broadcloth, buttons, silk, thread, dressed leather for making coat and waistcoat.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1780.04.00 W-1310/a.26
    Bill, from Richard Kaddien
    1780 AprilEnglish.
  • Text box: 19 folder: 1780.04.12 MSS-698
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-17811780 April 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Showed Col. Bassett his letter, but doesn't know whether he's complied with it--concern over no news from Charlestown [S.C.]--feeling among gentry and people at large regarding congress's recommendation regarding currency--he and Col. Mason expect to be elected to assembly with no opposition.

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1780.10.25 A-366.26
    Letter, from Nathaniel Peabody
    1780 October 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Incloses Philadelphia paper announcing news of a victory in the south [King's Mountain ?].

  • Text box: 19 folder: 1780.12.23 A-301.87
    Letter, from Joseph Lewis
    1780 December 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipts and certificates collected for supplies and horses requisitioned last Jan.--Will Washington appoint someone to examine and approve them as per law of state of N.J. which he incloses?

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1781.03.26 MSS-699
    Letter, from John Parke Custis
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-17811781 March 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mortified at actions of [Va.] legislature--wishes to resign his public office but feels it his duty to continue in legislature to express his protests at their actions--emission of 10 million pounds immediately--action between Cornwallis and Genl. Greene--Greene has won universal esteem for his conduct.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1781.06.30 A-750.2
    Letter, from Joseph Webb
    1781 June 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends boots Washington ordered from his shoe factory--invites Washington to visit again--sorry to hear Mrs. Washington is ill--suggests she spend summer in Wethersfield rather than go back to Va.--hogshead of boots being sent to Col. Sheldon.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1781.07.11 RM-1188.003 ; RM-1188.004
    Letter, from John Parke Custis and Notice, John Parke Custis to "All Persons whom it may concern"
    Custis, John Parke, 1754-1781
    6 pages
    1781 July 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    John Parke Custis writes to Washington relieved to hear that his mother Martha Washington is back in good health. His family is suffering from an epidemic that his stricken many family members with his youngest son being dangerously ill. Custis apprises Washington of his current circumstances in dealing with a dispute of monies owed to Robert Alexander for land purchase includes a copy of a notice dates 26 May 1781 [see RM-1188.004]. Reports of damages by British troops to nearby neighbors properties including Colo. Bassett. Fortunately, Custis' home and property were unaffected. He is pleased to inform Washington of accounts of 'our Countrymen do not want Spirit or Inclination to join the Marquiss,' with forty-six men from the county volunteering for service. Custis himself has provided clothes and horses for two volunteers. Reports that Genl. Nelson was appointed governor with the assembly granting him very great powers to support the war. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages.

    Scope and Contents

    On 26 May 1781 John Parke Custis notifies "To All Persons whom it may concern" a dispute between Robert Alexander and himself regarding the purchase of land and monies owed by Custis to Alexander. Custis appoints Charles Simms as his lawful attorney in the matter. Custis proposes four options to rectify the dispute and if none are disagreeable, Custis' attorney will authorize a payment of forty eight thousand pounds current money. Autograph document, pages. Docketed in the hand of George Washington. Document included in Custis' 11 July 1781 letter.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1782.03.24 A-301.88
    Letter, from John Lewis
    Lewis, John, 1747-18251782 March 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Death of his father [Fielding Lewis]--father's will directs Dismal Swamp lands and others to be sold-estate in debt--give opinion on accepting credit and also description of land--mother [Betty Lewis] and family well--" ... as well as is the old Lady-forwards letter from Havana.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1782.11.20 A-283.10
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961782 November 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Detailed description of Dow's land on Cameron Run--Mrs. French will never consent to exchange land--G.W. anxious to have her land--Mrs. W. goes to Mr. Digges across river in company of Dr. Stewart (Stuart)--[Mrs. French's land is between Epsewasson and Little Hunting Creeks, part of Union Farm].

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1782.12.03 A-366.18
    Letter, from Major Murray
    1782 December 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received letters and will forward them to England--will forward Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd's letters under protection of Washington's.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1782.12.04 A-283.9
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961782 December 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund encloses [Benj.] Dulany's letter concerning Mrs. French's landand Mr. and Mrs. D. agrees to sale of land.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1782.12.11 A-283.8
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961782 December 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes about further efforts to exchange Dow and French lands, maybe Mrs. F. can be persuaded to trade Manley's land (adjoining French's), and has purchased Dow's land to bargain with Mrs. F along with a description of land.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.01.08 A-283.4
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961783 January 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes about how the sale of Custis horses didn't take place although Col. Dandridge offers both to G.W. in exchange for giving up two years payments from Dandridge's estate, both as covering horses may repay quickly and one may do for the turf.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.01.29 A-283.5
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961783 January 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes about how Dow wants payment for land made in Philadelphia and will try to collect rents to repay what G.W. has borrowed. He will also get Gilbert Simpson [on Washington's western lands] to try to get money and James Cleveland to collect debt for Col. Wm. Crawford.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.02.19 A-283.6
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961783 February 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes about various aspects of the family and the famrs including that he believes there is peace in King's speech to Parliament, horses suitable as chariot horses (will get horse [from Custis estate]), shoats only doubled in size, very disappointing, bank froze all winter, grapevinesand apple trees, someone cutting timber on G.W.'s land, Custis's legal title to Alexander's land [Abingdon], and that children at Abingdon are well, will come to Mt. V. to stay some time.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.03.12 A-283.7
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961783 March 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes on how the crops are short and other financial matters.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.04.23 A-283.11
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961783 April 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lund writes about the amount of wheat from each farm and how few will sell wheat, expecting price to go up because of the peace treaty with Britain.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.08.25 A-301.89
    Letter, from Betty Lewis
    1783 August 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter by Johnny Lewis--hurt at not hearing from him during afflictions--husband and Brother Sam died within 3 weeks of each other and she has been ill--" ... My Dear Brother was there not one half our you could spare to write a few lines to an only Sister whoe was laboring under so mutch affliction both of Body and mind ..."

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.10.01 A-283.12
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    Washington, Lund, 1737-17961783 October 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Unsuccessful in collecting rents--tenants over the ridge will pay as soon as specie is in circulation among them--they have good crops--Mr. Throckmorton undesirable tenant because he would put negroes and overseer on land, lowering quality--describes tenants and plantations--tenants on this side the ridge in bad shape, can't pay--new cook, Richard Burnett ill, very good industrious fellow, but complains of being lonely--refuses to mix with negroes--[Pitman] best kitchen gardner they've had--kiln for drying wheat--Dow's land--Washington's house in Alexandria--Dr. Stuart to build in Alexandria--got negro from Norfolk where he's been since seige of York.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1783.11.15 A-572
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    Powel, Elizabeth Willing, 1743-18301783 November 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends Washington a pamphlet lately out on a political issue--she recommends it as disinterested and sensible--"Some say there is no Cincinnatus in existence; I think there is."

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.00.00 MS-5902
    Drawing, Lowering and raising boats
    1784-1794English.
    Scope and Contents

    The drawing was known to George Washington who sent it to Tobias Lear on 22 December 1794, describing it as "the sketch which has been presented to me by Mr. Claiborn, of the new method of lowering and raising boats without locks." Washington had received a letter from Claiborne in 1784 in which he discussed navigable rivers to the west; whether Claiborne sent the drawing at that time is uncertain. It could also have been given to Washington in early December 1794 when he and Claiborne met together in Philadelphia, or sent in a follow-up letter Claiborne wrote on 16 December 1794.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.02.22 A-625
    Letter, from Fielding Lewis
    Lewis, Fielding, 1725-1781 or 17821784 February 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Inclosed I have Sent you my Fathers letters wharein you will See his intention Before his death, of releiving me out of my distressis, Occasioned by my Youthfull Folley"--requests a loan--now in jail.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.02.24 A-301.90
    Letter, from Thomas Lewis
    1784 February 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis, surveyer of Rockingham County, informs W. that he can find no record of registration of land on "Little Kanaway" by Col. [William] Crawford--lands on Ohio and Shurtee [Chartier] are regestered-Michl. Cresap disputes this--most of land in newly formed Mononghela county, should make inquiries there--receives condolences on death of brother [Gen. Andrew Lewis?]--death of Fielding Lewis--.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.04.27 A-301.91
    Letter, from John Lewis
    Lewis, John, 1747-18251784 April 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Little news regarding Washington's Ohio lands and plantations under Simpson--can't write what he heard in a letter--David Bradford, lawyer, has news of lands, enclosed copy of his letter--recommends Bradford as good agent for Washington's business there--people in Washington's Bottom on Ohio leaving after hearing he is to assert claim--rumor that Washington's land there has been recently surveyed among large tracts by Pa. People for sale in Philadelphia--people should be warned of a fraud--leaves west as soon as his [Lewis'] land is surveyed.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.05.28 A-366.15
    Letter, from Edmund Randolph
    Randolph, Edmund, 1753-18131784 May 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Incloses draft of a deed to be executed by Col. Bassett--will accomplish his business at next general court.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.08.01 A-301.92
    Letter, from Thornton Washington
    Washington, Thornton (1760-1787)1784 August 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Wishes to clear up title to land bought from father [Sam. Washington]--originally bought from Col. Phil. Pendleton, and title still in Washington's hand--will be at sweet springs when Washington visits his plantation.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.08.11 A-750.1
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931784 August 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Writes by naval officer going to Philadelphia--fatigues of passage to West Indies and here reduced health--hopes to benefit from more settled climate of this place--ships leaving--sends letters to Mrs. Washington and Fanny Bassett by ship for Norfolk.

  • Text box: 20 folder: 1784.08.26 A-366.7
    Letter, from Thomas Walker
    1784 August 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Affairs of Dismal Swamp Co.--letters from Mr. Jamason, chief manager--intends to advertise meeting in Richmond in Oct.--will Washington do this instead, for greater effect?--agrees to sale of their partnership lands.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.02.25 A-301.93
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931785 February 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    His are only letters which have "... communicated information of my friends."--hopes George Washington has recovered from reported sickness--was very ill after passage, and recovers slowly--Physician in Charleston will probably bleed him to relieve pain in head--will remain til April--always tries to act honorably--thanks for money--will return by water which is cheaper--gratitude to his uncle--can't procure acorns and seeds he wants as "they fall from the Trees early in November."--transplanted 50 or 60 of Magnolia and a number of the live Oak to bring with him--"Miller's description of the Magnolia cannot be two highly embellished--there is a Species of them called the bay Laurel but none that I have yet heard of under the denomination of the Umbrella, from the discription I have had of it, it will not answer Your purpose I presume, as it is said not to exceed the height of 6 or 7 feet--it may rather be considered a shrub."

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.04.21 A-414
    Letter, from William Washington
    Washington, William Augustine, 1757-18101785 April 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Major Washington has remained with them since January, and though he wishes he could say his health was improved by the Southern climate, he fears "his disorder is too inflexible to be remov'd by mere Change of Climate."

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.05.25 W-805
    Receipt, from John Tryford
    1785 May 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill for plank and shingles, total amount £87.9.0.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.07.10 RM-548; MS-4196
    Letter, from William Augustine Washington
    Washington, William Augustine, 1757-18101785 July 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Acknowledges receipt of a gross of bottles (probably rye whiskey) and discusses the purchasing of shares of Potomac Company stock.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.07.17 RM-1147; MS-5835
    Letter, from John Augustine Washington
    Washington, John Augustine, 1736-17871785 July 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    John informs George that during a recent visit to Mount Vernon a "great Coat of yours" and book became mixed-up with his own belongings. John then discusses one of George Washington's notable entrepreneurial activities - the breeding of mules. Seeking to emulate his brother, John suggests that George send one of his "Jack Asses" to Bushfield, John's plantation, to breed with his mares.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.07.17 RM-1035; MS-5672
    Letter, from Thomas Jefferson
    Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-18261785 July 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Jefferson requests information about David Bushnell's "submarine navigation" experiments during the American Revolution.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1785.12.18 RM-1144; MS-5830
    Letter, from William Washington
    Washington, William Augustine, 1757-18101785 December 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends him live oaks plants and acorns of live oak and water oak--also seeds and plants of laurel tree.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.00.00 W-1310/A.31
    Account, with James Craik
    Craik, James, 1730-18141786-1788English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account from April 1786 - Dec. 1788, for various medicines and spices.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.02.03 A-366.41
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931786 February 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Glad to receive news of Mt. Vernon--will enquire about a she-ass--the Secretary and General Nelson most likely to have one--Mr. Bassett gave him box to convey safely to Mt.Vernon--not finished copying letters--will return soon--thanks him for kind invitation [to live at Mt. Vernon as manager ?] and hopes he will be equal to the job-- "... my experience in business but illy qualifies me for embarking on it, but under Your direction and from your example I flatter myself I shall derive insight, and I must hope that my attention and integrity will in some degree make amends for my deficiencies."--wrote to inform him of act passed in Richmond to discharge interest certificates on all Loan office warrants issued by the state--Dr. Lamey [Le Mayeur?] to deliver this and shoes--lots in Fredericksbg not sold.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.03.20 W-696
    Invoice, from Washer Blount
    1786 March 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph document signed, fragment, endorsed "Rect. No. 149 Walker Blunt Block Maker".Bill for £1.3.0.Receipted on April 14, 1786 by Washer Blunt; Endorsed on back by [the officers of the Potomac Company] George Washington, John Fitzgerald and George Gilpin.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.06.06 A-301.17
    Letter, from Thornton Washington
    Washington, Thornton (1760-1787)1786 June 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thornton writes to request G.W. to send any papers dealing with Hight [Jost Hite] land, which he bought of his father [Sam. Washington] and is now up for litigation, if turned out, will have to move house he's begun to other of his lands adjoining this.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.10.18 2022-SC-001
    Document, Lease deed for Dogue Run Plantation and 23 named enslaved African Americans
    3 pages Three pages, bifolium. In good condition with some damange to first leaf that affects a few words of text and is repaired with laid paper. George Washington's edits and additions are interlineated on page 2, and the body of the document concludes with 18 lines of his writing. 37 x 23 cm
    1786 October 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    This agreement between George Washington and Penelope French secured for his use the last piece of property he added to his Mount Vernon estate, a parcel that would become part of Union Farm. French, who had a life in interest in the land and buildings, also leased to Washington the use of twenty-one enslaved people including "Will, Paschal, Paul, Abraham, Sabine, Rosanna, Daphne, Lucy, Delia, Grace, Tom, Isaac, Robert, Moses, Julius, Spencer, Nancy, Celia, Nell, Mitty, and Lett", and three young children not named. The agreement stipulated that Washington must ensure the enslaved were "clothed and fed in the same manner as slaves usually are within this commonwealth and shall not be removed and worked out of the said county of fairfax", and is "unreasonably worked or neglected in sickness or treated within humanity", they would be returned to French.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.10.25 A-750.10
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931786 October 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks to Washington for letter [offering him and Fanny a portion Mt. Vernon land and the stewardship of Mt. Vernon, thus relieving Washington of many duties]--"Both Fanny and myself are happier in this family than we could be in any other, or I am persuaded in a house of our own, ..."

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1786.11.09 A-366.44
    Letter, from Will Deakins, Jr.
    1786 November 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends wagon down with spelts [wheat-like grain]--one bag spilled-rest sent to care of Wm. Hartshorn in Alexandria--has engaged part of the Poland oats Washington wants and will procure more.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.02.28 A-625
    Letter, from Fielding Lewis
    Lewis, Fielding, 1725-1781 or 17821787 February 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks for timber near Rectertown--unable to come see him because of "distressed situation"--clear of debts in Fairfax--sends son with letter--can Washington employ him (son) or get him into business?

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.03.02 A-301.94
    Letter, from George S. Washington
    1787 March 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concern over Washington's letter--insists he realizes importance of good education and strives for it--never lets dress or pleasure intervene--does not intend to follow example of his brother Ferdinand.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.05.29 RM-115; MS-2314
    Bond, with John Williams
    1787 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Williams' bond is counter-signed by William Kerchival. Latter part of document tells of the seizing of Williams' property by the deputy sheriff for not paying rent as bound.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.07.16 W-1310/A.33
    Bill, from Thomas Craig
    Washington, George, 1732-17991787 July 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for £13.2.6 on July 16, 1787 in Washington's hand, signed by Craig. Bill for 6 weeks board for two servants at 25/ each, plus balance of old account--total £13.15.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.07.25 W-1310/A.34
    Letter, from Samuel Powel
    Powel, Samuel, 1738-17931787 July 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has seen coach painter and quotes prices for painting, gilding, etc. the chariot--this is for varnishing coach body and surface polished, with no varnish to be added later--a cheaper mode is painting first and varnishing later--work will take 4-5 weeks--has made no contract with him, nor mentioned names--cannot give price of lining since coach-maker is away--a postscript gives price of lining as £3 exclusive of cloth and lace--quotes price and yardage of lace and cloth.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.09.08 MS-5500
    Receipt, from Richard Sprigg
    1787 September 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Invoice to George Washington from R. Sprigg. Receipted for stud fees of mules.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1787.12.15 A-301.95
    Letter, from John Lewis
    1787 December 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Incloses copy of account requested--will send account from Mr. Payne--is looking for father's [Fielding Lewis] paper of money payable and receivable from Washington--wants lands sold which father owned with Washington--if possible before he goes west this summer--how much can he get for shares in Dismal Swamp Co.?--has Washington heard of plan to drain it?

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.04.27 A-366.46
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
    1788 April 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lt. [Bezaleel] How[e], who intends to enter an enterprize to some part of the Spanish settlements on the shores of [So?] America, desires a letter from Washington, stating he was an officer of the New Hampshire line and in the Guards--Trumbull recommends him to be a man "of probity & honor".

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.06.20 A-301.96
    Letter, from George Washington, of North Carolina
    1788 June 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Begs financial aid--unfortunate marriage ruined him--married again, but can't get wife's inheritance yet--father refuses to help--rented a house in Greensvill "in this state" and has to keep a poor tavern--asks for land in Dismal Swamp to live on--will take care of Washington's business there.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.08.27 A-301.97
    Letter, from Thomas Lewis
    1788 August 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter discussing Washington's previous note inquiring if Thomas Lewis would serve as his land agent.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.10.28 A-366.45
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
    Trumbull, Jonathan, 1740-18091788 October 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Political situation in Conn.--Gen'l Assembly of Conn. passing resolves for organizing Congress under new constitution--will appoint electors in Jan., "this appointment the Assembly have retained in their own power - thinkg it more likely to be exercised with judgment & discretion than it would be to be entrusted in the hands of the people at large"--Senators elected--Representatives to be chosen by people--mentions circular letter from N.Y. state convention--few discordant notes in Conn. assembly--no disagreement over president, but over vice-president--desires Bowdoin for office, since Adams is talked of for Supreme Court--asks after [David] Humphreys.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.11.09 A-301.98
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1788 November 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Asks Washington's advice and aid--his father's estate [John A. Washington] is in danger of being sued by Dr. Stewart for nonpayment of a bond--this was given to aid uncle Sam [Washington] and now Charles, [Sam's executor] won't pay--doesn't want to sue uncle Chas.--Nancy [Anne Blackburn, his wife] sends love--mares being brought down, will pay for season.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.11.20 A-301.99
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    Washington, Bushrod, 1762-18291788 November 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod to move to Alexandria--can't keep up plantation and practice law too--prefers law--can sell land and negroes to discharge debts due from his father's estate--has rented his land on advantageous terms--Mother will remain at Bushfield--desires Washington's approval--bearer, Mr. Packet goes to Alexandria to inquire about rent of houses.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.12.03 RM-873; MS-5336
    Invoice, from Philip Conn
    1788 December 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Conn requests that Washington pay the bearer (John Middleton) 3 pounds "which the Revd Mr. D. Griffith subscribed for you towards repairing the Church etc." Receipted and witnessed by Ricahrd Burnet Walker on verso.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.12.07 A-301.100
    Letter, from John Lewis
    1788 December 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses Mr. Cowper's letter respecting N. Carolina land--Mr. Cowper only one who wants land and can pay for it--desires Washington to agree to sell to Cowper because estate of [Fielding Lewis] needs money from sale of lands to pay debts--he leaves for Kentucky next week, and cannot bargain further--has found bill for £50 drawn by executors of Wm. Armistead.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.12.12 A-301.101
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1788 December 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Declines with thanks Washington's offer of a house rent free [in Alexandria ?]--has no office or outbuildings--might be unhealthy--glad Washington approves of decision to give up farming--conscious of competition legal in Alexandria--he and Nancy [Ann, wife] will be at Mt. Vernon after Christmas.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.12.13 A-301.102
    Letter, from John Lewis
    1788 December 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Armistead's Bill of exchange--made no fixed price in offer of Carolina land to Mr. Cowper--asked what it is worth--has heard land is in bad shape and may be sold for taxes--Mr. Riddick and Mr. Godwin attend to paying this--other land bought not assessed--maybe hard to find land in Kentucky--will give Washington best intelligence of it he can.

  • Text box: 21 folder: 1788.12.18 A-516.12
    Bond, from Henry Lee
    1788 December 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bond of £1000 for 5000 acres of land in Kentucky.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.00.00 A-238.5
    Invoice, from Peter Poole
    1789English.
    Scope and Contents

    "For putting in Buckwheat. Receipted by Peter Pool with an ""X"" mark."

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.00.00 RM-683; MS-4660
    Petition, from Margaret Stone
    1789-1797English.
    Scope and Contents

    This is a petition to George Washington requesting a pardon of Margaret Stone. Citing the facts that Stone is about forty years old, mother of seven children, and it is her first offense, the undersigned [including Lund Washington and Peyton Randolph] request a pardon.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.01.18 A-301.103
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1789 January 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks for kind offer, but had already rented an office--will repair [Washington's] stable for use--accepts offer of hay--hard to get it and expensive in [Alexandria].

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.02.19 A-301.104
    Letter, from George Steptoe Washington
    1789 February 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Expresses thanks for Washington's goodness--realizes bad condition of their estate--great need for clothes--have a servant stop by Mr. Hanson's for some things to be repaired.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.02.22 A-301.105
    Letter, from Alexander Donald
    1789 February 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks for unmerited kindness and attention--will pay respects at Mt. Vernon before Washington leaves for N.Y.--sure he will accept the presidency despite preference for Mt. Vernon--"... it is the general opinion of the Friends to the New Government, that if you decline being at the head of it, It never can, or will take effect"--returns to London in a few months where he does business under the firm of Donald & Burton.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.03.01 A-301.106
    Letter, from Warner Lewis
    1789 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Explains inability to answer sooner--will see the land he mentions and give his idea of its value. [This is probably land Washington was considering buying from John Dandridge in Gloucester County.]

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.03.06 A-283.44
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    1789 March 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Reports that his nephew Lund Washington, heard in Stafford County that people were saying "we shoud have a very pretty President at the head of our new Government one who had pd of his Debts within the time of the war with paper money altho it had been lent to him in specia."--Col. [George] Mason responsible--believes Mason's son-in-law started it.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.03.11 A-301.107
    Letter and enclosure, from Warner Lewis
    1789 March 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington's letter to him delayed--Gen. Nelson's illness--has seen land Washington is interested in buying--encloses sketch of it taken from old survey--description of land--4 mi. from Gloucester C.H.--"a good, not a fine piece of land"--[Sketch of land is enclosed].

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.03.11 A-301.108
    Letter and enclosure, from Warner Lewis
    1789 March 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    2 copies - one retained copy in Warner Lewis' hand. Another contemporary copy in another hand with the docket, "From Warner Lewis Esqr. 11 March 1789 (Copy). Original sent to John Dandridge Esqr. 26th March 1789".

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.03.11 A-301.109
    Letter, from Warner Lewis
    1789 March 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    2 copies - one retained copy in Warner Lewis' hand. Another contemporary copy in another hand with the docket, "From Warner Lewis Esqr. 11 March 1789 (Copy). Original sent to John Dandridge Esqr. 26th March 1789".

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.03.28 H-1199/A
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1789 March 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    In answer to letter of 26th Inst, mentions caution regarding getting ready--is prepared to go with mother and Mrs. Willis on Thurs, or Fri. to Mt. Vernon--remains there till the horses return for his Aunt--hopes to find him at Mt. Vernon when he arrives.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.04.00 A-301.110
    Letter, from John Lewis
    Lewis, John, 1747-18251789 AprilEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Unable as yet to get information on lands Washington is interested in--goes to New Orleans in 2 weeks--"I have seen a very extrordinary publication in a Fredericksburg Paper wherin mention is made of Gen. W-ks-n [James Wilkinson ?] having prepared a fleet of 25 Boats some of them armed with three Pounders and maned with 150 men who intend fighting their way down the Mississippi into the Gulph of Mexico. It is very extrordinary how such a report coud have taken its rise as Ge. W-ks-n is now here and intends down the River at the same time as I do, with only five or six Tobacco [ ] instead of 25 armed Boats."--sends some "pecaun" nuts from New Orleans--Indians doing mischief--but lands settling fast despite scalpings--price of corn--returns to Mt. Vernon in August.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.04.14 A-301.111
    Letter, from William Hickman, Jr.
    1789 April 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Solicits money from Washington for erection of a Methodist Episcopal church in Alexandria--contributions have been slow--names prominent Alexandrians who have contributed--wishes him a good journey to the north.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.04.30 2018-SC-040
    Accounts with Pope and Cadle
    Pope and Cadle
    1 pages
    1789 April 30-May 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    PA list of accounts addressed to His Excellency Gen. Washington Esq. from the firm of Pope and Cadle, who sold lace, silk, and other hosiery at 12 William Street, New York. The document shows that on April 30, the day of his inauguration, Washington purchased 3 hat tassels. In May, he purchased 3 pairs of white silk hose and 28 yards livery lace. A note at the bottom states that one pair of hose was for Tobias Lear, who paid for them separately.

    It is likely that the hat tassels purchased on Inauguration Day were for Giles and Paris, enslaved men who rode and drove the horses that pulled Washington's carriage.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.05.03 A-301.112
    Letter, from William Heth
    1789 May 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Delivered his letter and package to Mrs. Washington--has arranged for Mrs. Washington's trip to N.Y.--hired [Gabriel] Van Horn & Co. to drive her--tries to allay her fears at driving with strange horses and coachman--gives charges for trip.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.06 A-301.113
    Letter, from Stephen Gregory
    1789 July 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mr. Fenwick, bears a gift of a small 2-deck ship which will act as a chimney piece of a large room before a looking glass.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.08 A-301.114
    Letter, from Samuel Langdon
    1789 July 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    He is sending a sermon preached a year ago which is appropriate today--"When you removed from my house, your goodness allowed me to be conversant in your family as a domestic for some months, before the College was removed to Concord".--lauds Washington's religious attitudes and Christian behavior.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.10 RM-1009; MS-5635
    Receipt, from John Marshall
    1789 July 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for inoculating fruit trees.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.15 A-301.115
    Letter, from James Dunlope
    1789 July 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    According to Washington's directions he has pd. Col. Hooe £700 in part of debt due heirs of Co. Colville by Th. Montgomerie, Adam Stewart and Cumberland Wilson--will make payments of £500 and £250 soon--"The Laws both of Maryland & Virginia authorized me to pay current money at the par of exchange in discharge of Sterling Debts and in the manner Col. Hooe received his money."

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.20 A-301.116
    Letter, from Richard Graham
    1789 July 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    He has been down the Ohio--found a settlement on the Kanawa under James Neal of Frederick County, who patented 2200 A.--he persuaded them they had no right to the land, since it was in center of land surveyed for officers of Washington's old Va. regt. [Fr. & Ind. War]--they agree to buy it cheap if it will be sold, because their settlement has increased value greatly of land--people won't settle unless there's a settlement already there--he has power of attorney to make a settlement for Neal.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.21 A-301.117
    Letter, from Abraham Hunt
    1789 July 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mares such as Washington wants can be had for £25 specie--doesn't know cost of sending them to Virginia--his commission for procuring them would be 10%.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.07.27 A-301.118
    Letter, from Leonard Henley, Jr.
    1789 July 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests loan of about £300 to pay outstanding debts on estate of Mr. Aylett, his wife's first husband [she was Elizabeth Dandridge Aylett Henley, Mrs. Martha Washington's sister]--will give land and negroes as security.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.08.10 A-301.119
    Letter, from Henry Hill
    1789 August 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Expresses gratitude for "your powerful friendship" in appointment of Mr. Meredith.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.08.31 A-301.120
    Letter, from Major W. Jackson
    1789 August 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received intimation this morning from Gen. Lincoln, so renewed request made in Philadelphia.

  • Text box: 22 folder: 1789.09.00 A-238.4
    Account, with George Cliland
    1789 September-DecemberEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    £11.5.0 for shoeing horses, "a new handel & ring for a fork," and "to drogs an doctren the whet hors head".

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.01 A-301.121
    Letter, from Betty Lewis
    1789 October 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    George, Bushrod and Corbin are there--Bushrod says she's to have no part of the slaves [of Mary Washington's estate]--division of her property--doctor's bills high--Col. Ball thinks crops will pay off debts of estate.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.01 A-750.12
    Letter, from Thomas Lowrey
    1789 October 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has purchased 2 bay mares for Washington--sends them down next week--with good care, they will be satisfactory next year.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.05 A-301.122
    Letter, from William Dawson
    1789 October 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    He was manager for Col. George Mercer's estate in Frederick County when it was sold by Washington--Jas. Mercer kept scolding him and complaining of bad management of farms--Mr. Snickers had written letter to Jas. Mercer maligning his conduct--Capt. Ed. Snickers nailed up his cornhouse door and threatened to serve a writ on him--he was going to bring suit against Mr. Mercer for this treatment, but the war intervened--before war, tried to settle dispute but Mercer refused and he brought suit--sends Washington copy of affadavit--Washington, he is informed, means to bring suit against him for damage--lists a number of questions, seeking testimony of Washington in the suit against Mercer.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.08 A-750.13
    Letter, from John Dandridge
    1789 October 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has recorded deed of the land in Gloucester to Washington for the £800 offered.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.26 A-301.123
    Letter and enclosure, from Warner Lewis
    1789 October 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Waited until recess of Congress to bother Washngton with another letter--the Gloucester county land, is not worth £800--John Nicholson of Gloucester is interested in leasing the land on back creek [sic]--Nicholson has asked several questions about the land so passes them on to Washington.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.26 A-301.148
    Letter, from Warner Lewis
    1789 October 26English.
  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.10.27 RM-115; MS-2323
    Letter, from unknown person
    1789 October 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Written at Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The letter expresses the author's laudatory and religious feelings about Washington. This letter was presumably once in the Washington papers.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.11.04 A-301.124
    Letter, from William Dawson
    1789 November 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Seeks settlement for payment for his services as manager of Col. George Mercer's plantations in Frederick County--will acceed to arbitration--puts queries to Washington on his management of the farms, the answers will be put as proof--claims Col. Ed. Snickers cast aspersions on his character--sends letter to Clerk of district court of Fredericksburg.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.11.18 A-301.125
    Letter, from Thomasin Gordon
    1789 November 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    She is sick in strange city and begs food for self and fatherless child--late husband (Col. John White's) acct. can't be settled until Congress meets--Col. Alexander Hamilton knows her character and situation.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.12.00 A-301.126
    Letter, from Thomasin Gordon
    1789 DecemberEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    She suffers in prison without heat or bed, with her child, Kitty White--deceased husband's (Col. John White's) daughter has had her imprisoned to give an account of his property which wouldn't pay his debts--she cannot give security until she can write to Georgia and explain the business.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.12.02 A-750.14
    Letter, from Thomas Hartley
    1789 December 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Glad he's returned safely from eastern tour--breeding mares extremely hard to come by--only the wealthy have them and they prize them highly--Adam Reigart is looking in Lancaster Cty, Mr. Baltzer Spangler searching in the county--will try to send mares to Mt. Vernon before Jan.--compliments to Mr. Lewis and rest of family.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.12.05 2018-SC-029
    Fenwick Mason, Bordeaux, to George Washington
    Mason, Fenwick and Company
    2 pages
    1789 December 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter signed by Fenwick Mason and addressed to His Excellency George Washington Esq. President of the United States of America. It refers to various wines ordered by the President for entertaining, including "26 dozen claret and 12 dozen vins de grave."

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.12.06 A-516.13
    Document, Bill of landing from Fenwick Mason & Co.
    1789 December 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    For "dix huit Caisses de Vin en bouteille"--shipped aboard the ship "Le Jean Jacques de St. Malo," captain Le Grand.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.12.07 A-301.127
    Letter, from Thomas Hartley
    1789 December 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses a copy of letter from Adam Reigart--sorry so many difficulties have been encountered in finding mares--Mr. Spangler's report not favorable either--has engaged another man--will remain at home 3 or 4 weeks--will write Mr. Miller, mentioned in Reigart's letter--Mrs. Reigart's death and daughter's illness.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1789.12.27 A-301.128
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1789 December 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Explains why his brother wrote Washington twice on same subject--he [brother] goes to Berkeley to try to discover documents to defend title to his land--Bushrod apologizes for not writing, but injured his hand badly--apologizes for applying for federal job [district attorney of Va.], had thought Supreme Court made nominations, not the president, and he realizes position Washington was put in--congratulations of the season.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.01.00 A-238.17
    Account, with George Cliland
    1790 January-JuneEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Bill for shoeing horses and for bottles of ointment during period Jan. 11-June 15 1790.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.02.18 A-301.129
    Letter, from Warner Lewis
    1790 February 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    At Mr. Nicholson's request, Warner sends a copy of a letter he wrote several months ago, supposing the first was lost in the mail.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.02.21 A-283.65
    Weekly Report, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 February 21-27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meteorological account--work done on each farm, giving division of labor--work days lost by sickness--stock on each farm--work of ditchers, coopers, and joiners and carpenters--amount of grain ground at mill. Includes putting up post and rail fence around the vineyard.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.03.04 W-1310/A
    Invoice, from LePrince
    Washington, George, 1732-1799Moustier, Eléonore-François-Elie, marquis de, 1751-18171790 March 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    A list of furniture, including sofas, mirrors, chairs, draperies, miscellaneous small furnishings, lamps, china (Sevres). Used in the New York house; total £665.14.6.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.03.05 A-301.130
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    1790 March 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    [John?] Fairfax wants higher wages than £25 per annum [as overseer]--will probably leave at end of year--difficulty in finding reliable overseers for the salary--thinks Mr. [James] Bloxham's wages (£40) too high--he's not any better than any overseer in the country--suspects him of embezzling funds from ferriages--Fairfax would like to have Bloxham's job at the high salary, but G.A.W. has discouraged him--but he's a good overseer--recommends removing James from carpentering house to act as an overseer--white overseers expensive--remove Davy to Dogue Run and Will to Muddy Hole--hasn't told the Farmer [Bloxham] yet of plans to oust him--G.A.W. goes to Berkeley for his health--wheat and tobacco crops--flour ground and the prices it will bring--new bolting cloth in place, will enable superfine flour to be made--Mr. Wilson to send his corn to the mill--prices in Alexandria high--will increase crops of pease, potatoes, carrots as Washington desires--Ehler appears industrious and able [German gardner]--"I have replaced in the Shrubberies the Dogwood Red Bud Sasafrass Laurel and Crabapples - the Ivy have almost entirely died under both walls - among the shrubs some of these shall be interspersed"--Muse's account with Washington--very cold weather endangers grain crops--barley has suffered much.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.03.08 A-238.16
    Receipt, from Richard Colles
    1790 March 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    For colouring and bordering 2 rooms and mending one room £8.5.0.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.03.14 A-283.69
    Weekly Report, from George A. Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 March 14-20
    Conservation Courtesy of Mrs. Roslyn D. Young, Jr. Conserved November/December 2005 by the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (Philadelphia, PA) - Surfaced cleaned, reduced discoloration and acidity, flattened, tears were mended and losses filled in with Japanese paper and wheat starch paste.
    English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meteorological Account--work done on each farm, giving division of labor--work days lost by sickness--stock increase and decrease for each farm--work of ditchers, coopers, joiners and carpenters--amount of grains ground at mill. Includes "lathing and shingling the shed of the Barn Yard."

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.03.26 A-301.131
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 March 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Paid account to Porter & Ingraham, after satisfying himself they were valid--will no more let mares or jennets be taken away from Mt. Vernon before being paid for breeding with Jacks--rest of mares from Mr. Zantzinger have come--encloses his letters [see letters of March 9 & 14, P. Zantzinger to G.A.W.]--is making inquiries for person to take Fairfax's place as overseer--son of James DeNeil is no good in job at Dr. Stuart's--Mr. Gevins is good, but wants his own plantation when Fitzhugh lets him go--has had application from Anthony Whiting, an Englishman, who seems to know the whole business but wants 40 Guineas--gave Gen. Cadwallader as reference--has given Mr. Bloxham his notice and he wants to leave immediately--Davy doesn't want to go to Dogue Run as overseer--pleads his recent jaundiced condition as reason--Will not as good as Davy, but considers him for Muddy Hole--gives number of hogsheads of tobacco prized--Gardener [Ehler] laments no cabbage seed came with other seeds and buckwheat from Biddle--he's fond of flowers but promises to attend to more practical things--"The posts which stood against the Barn, at the Mansion house I had put within shortly after you left Home."--too wet to complete fencing at Deep Run--when Bishop Green went away, secured the house--they are living at place of Col. McCarty's where Mrs. Barnes formerly lived--dampness delays and hampers sowing--a severe sickness among horses and mules--fluctuating wheat prices--sold all on hand, gives prices taken.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.04.02 A-301.132
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1790 April 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Hasn't written him since he left because he's so busy--asks her uncle to please send her a guitar ["gettar"], as all the young ladies are learning music, and it is very simple to learn--a man named Tracy teaches the gettar and harpsichord lessons--hears he and aunt are coming home this summer.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.04.15 2018-SC-041
    Account with Joseph Corre
    Corre, Joseph
    1 pages
    1790 April 15-July 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    One page of accounts between the President's household in New York and local confectioner Joseph Corre. Includes purchases of macaroni, bitter almonds, caraway seed, and ice cream. On April 15, the President's household purchased "dinner drest," when John and Abigail Adams, John Jay, and Thomas Jefferson dined with him. "Dinner drest" was ordered again on April 29 when Washington dined with a group of senators.

    Signed by Joseph Corre and docketed on verso.

  • Text box: 23 folder: 1790.04.28 A-283.71
    Letter, from Lund Washington
    1790 April 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received his assent to agreement between Dr. Stuart and Alexander on Custis estate--glad it's to be compromised even if injurious to Custis estate--had Custis paid in legal currency, transaction would have been legal--high court of chancery may put price anywhere from £48,000 to £8,000--if the higher figure, would ruin the estate for the Custis children--Col. George Mason considers his appointment an insult, because he never approved of the govt.--but Mr. Hector Ross thinks Mason's acrimony against the Constitution is much abated--Mason dislikes "pomp & parade" in N.Y.--" ... swearing by G-d that if the President was not an uncommon Man we should soon have the Devil to pay. but hoped & indeed did not fear so long as it pleased God to keep him at the Head - but it would be out of the power of those Damnd monarchical fellows with the Vice president, & the Women to ruin the nation."--prices high in Alexandria and farmers making money--law passed moving court from Alexandria but another to be passed moving it back--Roger West thrown out of Assembly--Lund's eyes very bad--snowing hard now--wheat crops looking good--describes Washington's stand of wheat at field at Morris, Frenches and the Ferry--hopes to see Washington and Mrs. Washington in summer at Mt. Vernon--"No person has an idea but that you must remain at the head of the Government so long as you Live. Which I pray God may be with some degree of Comfort and satisfaction to yourself, for I have no doubt but your fatigue, trouble & vexation is very great."

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.05.18 RM-493; MS-4070
    Letter, from Betty Washington Lewis
    1790 May 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of the death of her son Lawrence's first wife (Susannah Edmundson) in child-birth. Settlement of Mary Ball Washington's estate. Asks about her son, Robert, who was serving as Washington's personal secretary.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.07.12 W-778
    Bill, from George Cliland
    1790 July 12-September 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Blacksmith's bill for shoeing General Washington's horses and making a bolt for a [coach]--part itemized, part lumped together: "To shoeing & repairing shoes &c of 11 horses for 2 months ... "--included are "Two charges for shoeing a gray mare not entered ... being for T. Lear." Receipted by Cliland on September 27.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.08.14 folder: OUT A-301.133
    Document, Weekly Report, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 August 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of work done on each farm during the week, including report of amount of grain ground at mill, sickness among negroes, increase and decrease in cattle, work of ditchers. Autograph document, 4 pages, in hand of G. A. Washington, docketed by George Washington, "From Maj. Geo. A. Washington 20th Aug. 1790," docketed in another hand "Report Aug. 1790 Mt. Vernon," laminated, watermark (F. Hayes & crown over encircled heraldic device).

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.08.20 A-301.134
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 August 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Safe arrival of Will--expected him home at Mt. Vernon sooner--his great anxiety to do right in Washington's affairs--considering moving Anthony Whiting to place occupied by Fairfax when he goes--estimate of Whiting's capabilities and character--Garner [Wm. Gardener, overseer of the River Plantation?] is leaving too, wants higher wages--Mr. Gwin in Alexandria has recommended a young boy of respectable family to take Garner's place--he has had no experience--no family--George A. Washington disagrees with Washington's theory of having all married men--cheaper to have single one--work terms of new overseer--wheat and buckwheat--corn seed sent from New York good--corn crop--"... a piece of wood of the kind and dimensions you denoted shall be prepared ..."--very little ice left--Peter and Godfrey busy with small odd jobs--mares in pasture are mischievous and troublesome--terrible rain storm and winds delay work--corn broken down--weather warm until yesterday--very cool--red corn George Washington sent destroyed by insects, dying in the hill--pumpkin seed from Col. Platt's prizes he thinks will flourish.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.09.02 A-238.9
    Bill, from Childs & Swaine
    1790 September 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    For a newspaper subscription--"To Sub to Daily Advn. from the 1st May 17[illegible] [to] this day is 1 Year & 4 months @48[illegible] To Advr [illegible] £4.[illegible]."

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.09.05 A.283.76
    Document, Farm Report
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 September 5-11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meteorological account -- work done on each farm, giving division of labor -- work days lost by sickness -- stock increase and decrease -- work of ditchers, coopers, joiners and carpenters -- amount of grain ground at mill. Includes work on new barn and stables at Mansion House.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.09.12 A-283.79
    Document, Farm Report
    Washington, George Augustine, approximately 1759-17931790 September 12-18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meteorological account -- work done on each farm, giving division of labor -- work days lost by sickness -- stock increase and decrease -- work of ditchers, coopers, joiners and carpenters -- amount of grain ground at mill. Includes work on new barn and stables at Mansion House.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.09.16 RM-703; MS-4756
    Letter, from Betty Washington Lewis
    1790 September 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington's sister mentions his recent trip to Rhode Island, inquires about his health, and reports her health problems. She would like to visit Mount Vernon before the Washingtons return to Philadelphia; invites them to visit her. Mentions items left to Washington in their mother's will; the accounts of the estate will be settled soon.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.12.05 A-283.89
    Document, Farm Report
    1790 December 5-11English.
    Scope and Contents

    In hand of George Augustine Washington and includes; Meteorological account--work done on each farm giving division of labor--work days lost by sickness--stock increase and decrease--work of ditchers and coopers, joiners and carpenters--amount of grain ground at mill. Mentions making stalls in the sheds of the new barn; also, putting up a post and rail fence to enclose cow-house.

    Conservation

    Conserved November/December 2005 by the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (Philadelphia, PA) - Surfaced cleaned, reduced discoloration and acidity, flattened, tears were mended and losses filled in with Japanese paper and wheat starch paste, and finally put together as a folio instead of folded into eight sections.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1790.12.14 A-301.135
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    1790 December 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    George A. Washington writes about how he didn't write sooner because George Washington had just left Mt. Vernon -- will be more prompt with reports hereafter -- unable to complete the barn for the stock because of many other jobs for Carpenters & their illness -- some progress made on barn.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.00.00 A-238.11
    Account, from David Clark
    1791-1793English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account with David Clark in Philadelphia for repairing the coach, harnesses, halters, and reins over a period of several years.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.01.17 W-1310/A.59
    Receipt, from Charles Lee
    1791 January 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipt for £50 from George Washington by George [Augustine] Washington's hands--for his donation for year 1790 to school in the Alexandria Academy.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.02.00 folder: OUT W-1310/a
    Receipt, from James Barnes
    1791 February-AprilEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipted [April] 12 by John Barnes. Account for Feb. 21 and April 2 for Best Bourbon Coffee, amounting to £8.15.4.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.03.21 R-180; MSS-752
    Bond, from John Joseph De Barth
    1791 March 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    A bond detailing a loan agreement between De Barth and Washington. Signed by Washington, De Barth, Peter Miller, and Tobias Lear.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.03.23 A-1310/A.63
    Account, from William Burgess
    1791 May 23-27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Receipted on [June 2] by H. Burgess. Account includes cotton, linens, gause, etc., amounting to £6.19.1.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.10.24 A-301.136
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1791 October 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Writes to know if Washington arrived safe in Philadelphia--weather has been miserable since he left--Mrs. Stuart here at Mount Vernon, waiting to go over the river--Mr. and Mrs. Lund Washington here yesterday--he is worse--veal lights, supposed to help his eyes, have made them worse.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.11.14 RM-873; MS-5334
    Invoice, for services provided by James Craik
    Craik, James, 1730-18141791 November 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    This document is an account of medical calls and treatments at Mount Vernon, mostly to slaves, from 8 March 1791 - 4 Nov. 1791. "Paid in full." Part of account, which should begin 17 March 1789, is missing.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.11.28 A-301.137
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1791 November 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Harriot thanks her uncle, George Washington, for his letter with advice, and she will heed it--always grateful to him for his care and attention--Cousin [Fanny B. Washington ?] and Major are going down in country and she will stay with Cousin Lee--when Cousin returns Harriot will help her keep house--Mrs. Stuart still here.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.12.08 A-301.72
    Document, List of rentals from Robert Lewis
    1791 December 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    This document consists of a listing of the various tenements in Berkeley, Frederick, Fauquier, and Loudon Counties, the location of them, the present tenants, length of lease, and whether tenants were paid up.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1791.12.25 A-283.88
    Document, List of rentals from Robert Lewis
    1791 December 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Gives partial list of Washington's tenants in Fauquier County with detailed description of status of land they lease, plus amount collected for rent due Dec. 25, 1791.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.02.01 A-301.138
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1792 February 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Respecting trespass on Washington's property--Col. Little detected man loading his wagon with hoop poles and discovered many thousands cut--the trespasser is an overseer to Chas. Alexander--probably much trespass on Washington's lands far from eyes of those who care for his land--discusses legal action against them--"it requires the eyes of Argus to protect property in this neighborhood"--enclosure to Mrs. Powell [Elizabeth Willing Powel].

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.02.07 A-301.139
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1792 February 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received letter and expresses thanks for appointment--noted contents of letter to Mr. Muse and received from him all the blank leases and ones already executed with precise accounting of the rents due--great difficulty in collecting rents in Fauquier and Loudon Counties, Virginia--few improvements made there--Berkeley tenants paid rents quickly and have made many improvements--"Most of those who hold Leases for lives have satisfied me that the lives are still in existance - Others again are uncertain, and say the lives are in Kentucky or Georgia - They have all agree'd to produce certificates of this truth from respectable authority."--Amount of rental exceeds what G.A. Washington led him to expect--10% will amply repay him for services--should finish rental rolls shortly--deep snow has prevented communication between Alexandria and this County--Mrs. Lewis has been ill--late fright caused "premature increase of our family".

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.02.22 A-543.8
    Poem, from Elizabeth Powel
    Powel, Elizabeth Willing, 1743-18301792 February 22English.
  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.05.28 A-301.140
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1792 May 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Harriot hopes he arrived safely in Philadelphia--she desires a guitar ("guittar") preferably one with keys and strings both--"they are easier to learn to play on, and not so easy to be out of order, but if one with keys is dearer than without, I shall be much obleiged to you for one with strings."--will be easy to learn to play--Mrs. Bushrod Washington has offered to teach her.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.05.29 A-371.2
    Bill, from Inskeep & Co.
    1792 May 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    For the carriage of a trunk by stage to Philadelphia 12/.

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.07.07 A-301.141
    Letter, from George Augustine Washington
    1792 July 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has decided to try the water at the springs and delay his return to Mt. Vernon a fortnight in struggle to regain his health, unless he hears something unfavorable from Mount Vernon--physician in the county doubts that he is consumptive--his head very disordered by rheumatic or nervous complaints--sends the letter by gentleman to Frederick Town [Winchester].

  • Text box: 24 folder: 1792.07.24 A-301.142
    Letter, from John Lewis
    1792 July 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received his favor by Howell--deep apologies for not sending his share of money from Mr. Cowper--Lewis used it to extricate himself from difficulties brought about by a bond he signed, but has now the money to send George Washington--will give Howell the money and give account of sale of land--denies he meant to go to Kentucky without paying money.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1792.09.25 A-301.143
    Letter, from Betty Washington Lewis
    1792 September 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has been indisposed--will take Harriot Washington to live with her this winter if she comes well supplied with clothes--last time she was there, Harriot often couldn't appear in public because of a lack of clothes--she (Betty) cannot advance any to her because she is supporting 3 grandchildren and may have more--Fielding very distressed--"his children would go naked if it was not for the assistance I give him"--her family has been very sickly this fall--goes to visit daughter Betty Carter in Albemarle--change of air may help--will return in a few weeks.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1792.10.03 A-301.144
    Letter, from John Lewis
    1792 October 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends copy of Mr. Cowper's account--payments not up to date--had expected to have Howell bring Washington full amount of money due him, but was disappointed in sum promised by Col. Fontain--will send it all within a few weeks--Howell brings £212.6.5 1/2--will substitute another bond for one of Dr. French's on which payment not received.

  • Text box: 37 folder: 1792.11.04 A-543.10
    Elizabeth Willing Powel to George Washington
    Powel, Elizabeth Willing, 1743-18301792 November 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    On the subject of George Washington's resignation and whether he really would be as happy in retirement as doing good for his country.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1792.11.11 RM-530; MS-4498
    Letter, from George Clendinen
    Clendenin, George, 1746-17971792 November 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Clendinen introduces, to Washington, King Dequen, leader of the Kascashas, and expresses the chief's intent to prevail "upon the Chiefs of Many [Indian] Nations to Travel with him to you,... Hoping that we may all become the Same people. Firmly United to Each Others Interests."

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1792.12.25 A-301.5
    Document, List of rentals from Robert Lewis
    1792 December 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rental for 1792 on lands in Berkeley, Frederick, Loudoun and Fauquier Counties,--lists tenants and amounts paid--arrearages for years 1791 & 1792--a note by Lewis explains "The above arrearages have been collected by the Sheriffs and no Executions returned. I have had them fined, and am to have a final settlement of accounts this week."

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1792.12.25 A-468
    Document, Rental Accounts in hand of Robert Lewis
    1792 December 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    This documents records the accounts of tenants in Berkley, Frederick, and Fauquier Counties.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.04 A-301.145
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1793 January 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Will leave tomorrow to carry out Washington's instructions regarding purchasing Major Harrison's land in Fairfax County adjoining the mill tract--doesn't think the land is very valuable--thanks Washington for horse.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.09 A-301.146
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1793 January 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Major Harrison of Loudon now has decided not to sell land--seems an honest man--he will get rid of tenants, but must wait until next Fall--title is not clear and he refuses general warrantee--he wants 40 shillings per acre--wants to wait until Congress adjourns in the Spring and Washington comes to Virginia, for Harrison believes that Washington knows more about the title than he does.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.12 A-283.96
    Document, Farm Report
    Whitting, Anthony, -17931793 January 6-12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Autograph document, in hand of Anthony Whitting, docketed by G.W., laminated, (not examined for watermark).Papers of George Washington - Reel#2. Meteorological account -- work done on each farm, giving division of labor -- work days lost by sickness -- stock increase and decrease -- work of ditchers and coopers -- amount of grain ground at mill. Also a list of the weights of River plantation hogs and remaining mill hogs. A-283.96 ; A-283.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.12 a-283.90
    Document, Gardener's Report
    1793 January 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    A report of recent work done at Washington's Mount Vernon estate: Digging and planting, cuttings of weeping willow, cleaning and leveling nursery in vineyard, planting fruit trees and leveling gravel walk, gathering haws [red berries of hawthorn].

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.12 A-283.91
    Document, Spinning Report
    1793 January 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    This document is a report of the recent work done at George Washington's Mount Vernon estate: Spinning, yarn and stocking yarn, making shirts, stockings. Work done by 10 women, all named.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.13 A-283.90
    Document, Carpenter's Report
    1793 January 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report on recent work done at George Washington's Mount Vernon estate: Framing and raising corn house, drawing shingles, making brackets, putting axle tree to carts, mending flax brake and hemp brake -- jointing shingles, making pins, painting, etc. Fragment, docketed by George Washington.A note at end of report, "I will answer your letter by my nex Report."

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.16 A-301.147
    Letter, from Anthony Whiting
    Whitting, Anthony, -17931793 January 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington's farm manager reports the bad conduct of Thos. Green, carpenter -- will not use delegated authority concerning Green, because realizes he is necessary -- good men are hard to come by -- suggests an addition of carpenters, or estate will be a long time in improving -- mentions all the buildings that need to be built or repaired -- wishes farms to look neat -- will put up fences and gates -- suggests moving post and rail fence at Dogue Run to make meadow correspond to fields -- new corn house going up at River farm -- will move Rich's house to Muddy Hole, for David's house likely to be blown down by high wind -- engaged planks and scantling for [Dogue Run] barn from Mr. Kenzie -- Green keeps sawyers about the corn house -- poor Maj. Washington cannot recover, but he doesn't consider himself fatally ill -- G.A. Washington desires him to continue building on his house -- has treated Whitting like a brother -- will keep carpenters on G.A. Washington's house until they run out of work and he will order no more scantling -- has planted hedges of honey locust, French furz, and cedar berries, but sheep eat them -- need nettle fences on each side of hedge to enable it to grow -- hedges must be given much care to grow -- advises English thorn imported for live fences and estimates cost -- Lombardy and weeping willow cuttings planted about the Mansion house fences -- River plantation will be hard to fence -- Mr. Stuart advises water fences there -- a batteau is needed for this -- should it be built in Alexandria or by one of carpenters? -- Mr. Butler and he can carry on the hedging and fencing, including the night work -- grubbing proceeds to line of locust trees below Vineyard -- will make it a year of fencing -- little wool to spin -- spinning sewing thread and candlewick of tow -- Caroline unwell -- bled her -- trouble with Charlotte -- whipped and refuses to work -- claims she hasn't been whipped for 14 years -- will try to make seine twine -- deer destroying trees at mansion house, especially mulberry -- ice house not filled -- Dr. Stuart and young man managing Custis estates take plough to White House to use as pattern -- Mr. Ring present manager -- shorts from mill can be ground over as ship stuff or fed to cattle -- high price of flour in Alexandria.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.01.29 RM-545; MS-4192
    Letter, from Betty Washington Lewis
    1793 January 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerning her sons Robert and Howell who were with the President in Philadelphia, and her niece, Harriot, who was living with her in Fredericksburg. Also inquires about the price of wheat.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.02.10 folder: OUT A-301.12
    Document, Farm Report
    Whitting, Anthony, -17931793 February 10-16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meteorological account of weather at Mount Vernon -- work done on each farm, giving division of labor -- work days lost by sickness -- stock increase and decrease -- work of ditchers, and coopers -- amount of grain ground at mill -- Also, "clearing the second Vista." -- At end in hand of George Washington is an itemized account of sheep and lambs at each farm. Autograph document, in hand of Anthony Whitting, laminated, 4 pages, docketed by George Washington, watermark.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.02.16 folder: OUT A-283.94
    Document, Gardener's Report
    1793 February 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of recent work done at Mount Vernon by 4 men in the gardens: Wheeling gravel and dung into the garden; cutting wood lost by snow; dressing hemp.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.02.16 A-283.95
    Document, Spinning Report
    1793 February 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of work recently accomplished at Mount Vernon by 8 named women: Spinning hemp, stocking yarn and shoe thread; making shirts, sheets and shift, knitting stockings. Fragment, docketed by George Washington.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.02.16 A-283.95
    Document, Spinning Report
    1793 February 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of work recently accomplished at Mount Vernon by 8 named women: Spinning hemp, stocking yarn and shoe thread; making shirts, sheets and shift, knitting stockings.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.02.17 A-283.93
    Document, Carpenter's Report
    Green, Thomas (Carpenter)1793 February 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of recent carpentry work done at Mount Vernon: Getting new logs & gutter piece & shingles for roof & chimney of overseers house at Muddy Hole -- "straching" the well rope & fixing it to well -- preparing plow -- "to drawing the brick kill at dogue Runn" -- mending shoes -- drawing and jointing shingles -- "to trying up stuff for Bench plains."

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.02.20 A-301.188
    Letter, from Anthony Whitting
    Whitting, Anthony, -17931793 February 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Drenching rains, fields flooded, mill race broke again, roads almost impassable--Tayler little to be confided in, has kept horse since the Major is away--mill has plenty of wheat--will try to straighten fence from Manley Bridge to the Mill--snows gone, wheat not damaged, but freezing would cause covering of ice--fences and gates can't go in such wet ground--too wet to paint buildings--mixing paints--will let Green have corn--asks whether to continue work on Major Washington's building--Burwell Bassett says Mrs. Fanny Washington will not go to housekeeping--two ships just passed, will probably take flour from Alexandria--Charles' toe may have to be taken off--has called for Dr. Craik--Caroline made a shift for Sarah Flatfoot--2 sheets cut from Oznaburgh linen for there is no change of them while washing.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.03.01 A-301.231
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1793 March 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Just returned from Westmoreland--denies neglect of Washington's business--would have written had there been further developments in the case--Mr. Lee informed Mr. Hooe of judgement, but no injunction has been applied for--concludes with greetings from Nancy.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.03.23 A-283.97
    Document, Farm Report
    Whitting, Anthony, -17931793 March 17-23English.
    Scope and Contents

    In hand of Anthony Whitting, docketed by George Washington including; Report on recent work done at Mount Vernon's several farms: Work done on each farm, giving division of labor -- work days lost by sickness -- stock increase and decrease -- work of ditchers and coopers -- amount of grain ground at mill.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.03.23 A-283.98
    Document, Carpenter's Report
    Green, Thomas (Carpenter)1793 March 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report on recent work done at Mount Vernon by 9 men and 3 boys: Hanging a gate, repairing fishing boat, dressing timber, giving sizes and amounts of timber -- sawing timber, hauling timber, digging brick earth and making brick yard -- painting -- making a batto [batteaux] for fishing.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.03.23 A-283.99
    Document, Gardener's Report
    1793 March 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    This report is on recent work done at Mount Vernon by 4 men: Planting evergreen, cleaning, digging, sowing and planting.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.03.23 A-283.100
    Document, Spinning Report
    1793 March 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of recent work done at George Washington's Mount Vernon estate by 8 women: Spinning tow, "sown shoe maker Thread," stocking yarn, winding twine for seine maker, a shift & knitting stockings, "making 13 bax" [bags?].

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.03.28 A-516
    Letter, from Frances Bassett Washington
    1793 March 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letters were delayed--will meet them at Mt. Vernon early next month--estate in good condition--outstanding debts small--property in Berkeley under ignorant overseer and may have suffered--he hasn't sold the crops there yet--overseer on Fairfax property taking liberties--he has a boat and seine for fishing--Dr. Craik's account discharged by corn and wheat Taylor had for sale--desires to live in Alexandria to enable her children to get better education, but looks to Mr. and Mrs. Washington for the guidance to do this or accept their offer to remain at Mt. Vernon--will continue Mt. Vernon chariot in her service, at their suggestion--"My dear little Fayette shall be given up to your kind patronage whenever you think proper ..."--sorry to hear of poor Mr. Anthony Whitting's sickness--will leave April 1 for Mt. Vernon--requests permission to leave Harriot Washington with Mrs. Betty Lewis while she takes a trip to Berkeley--brothers are busy so she will be accompanied to Mt. Vernon by Mr. Joe Foster.

  • Text box: 25 folder: 1793.04.08 A-415
    Letter, from Betty Washington Lewis
    1793 April 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter with advertisement came late but will go in next week's paper--intended to write by Cousin Washington [Fanny Bassett] but her stay was short--Harriot needs hat, gloves, and shoes--keeps exact account of everything bought and will send it to Washington--money sent from Philadelphia bought Harriot a dress for the Birthnight, "it must of appeard particular had I refused to let her go, and her having nothing fit for that Purpose ..."--requests a ticket to the Washington lottery.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.05.31 A-301.181
    Letter, from Warner Washington, Jr.
    1793 May 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Hasn't heard from home in 5 months, and has contracted many debts--a Quaker has threatened to prosecute--is a student of medicine under Dr. Rush--has no dependence on anyone--asks for $300 until his father sends him money from Virginia--although he is unknown to George Washington, he believes Washington knew his grandfather (Washington's first cousin, Warner)--asks him not to make known his request.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.06.04 A-301.182
    Letter, from Warner Washington, Jr.
    1793 June 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks Washington for his offer to write his father--his father's allowance to him is adequate, but has had no remittance for 5 months--he isn't extravagant--encloses letter from man to whom he owes 5 months board.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.07.17 A-301.249
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1793 July 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sickness prevented his visiting Washington's lands on the Potomac and lots at Winchester and Bath--must stay to make harvest now--will inspect lands after sowing corn and wheat--Major Harrison has decided not to sell his lands--he thinks prices will rise--encloses draft on Philadelphia man given for rent by a tenant of Washington's--asks for letter giving information on lots in Winchester.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.08.10 A-283.104
    Document, Gardener's Report
    1793 August 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of recent work done in the gardens at the Mount Vernon estate by 4 men "Klening" in the yard, gardens and "winne Yart".

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.08.04 A-283.101
    Document, Weekly Report
    Lewis, Howell, 1771-18221793 August 4-10English.
    Scope and Contents

    This Farm Report (work done on Mount Vernon farms during the week Aug. 4-10) includes: Meteorological account -- work done on each farm, giving division of labor -- work days lost by sickness -- stock increase and decrease -- work of ditchers and coopers -- amount of grain ground at mill.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.08.10 A-283.102
    Document, Spinning Report
    1793 August 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Report of recent work done at Mount Vernon by 10 named women spinning yarn and stocking yarn, washing, sewing breeches, knitting stockings.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.08.11 A-283.105
    Document, Carpenter's Report
    Green, Thomas (Carpenter)1793 August 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Recent work at Mount Vernon by 9 men and 3 boys: Putting up bedstead and furniture for it, mending blinds in parlor and mending locks--mending "Dutch fan"--felling and flattening stocks--building walls at Dogue Run--"Plastering weightwashing & painting at ye Mansion House"--mending equipment.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.08.14 A-301.248
    Letter, from Howell Lewis
    1793 August 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received letter and bank note--recent rain great service to crops--wheat being sown--oxen and horses sick, cause shortage of plows--machine for gathering heads of clover for seed has been found--haying--planting grass-- sent Washington all pamphlets by Capt. Elwood found in his study.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.09.10 A-301.208
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1793 September 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks Washington for money he sent her--will buy nothing unnecessary--"Aunt Lewis has a very large family at present and a great deal of company, which makes my cloaths ware out much faster than if I was in the country where any thing would do to ware ..."--Aunt Betty Lewis sent letters to Bob Lewis--Cousin Lawrence [Lewis?] left to go to Bath.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.09.30 RM-1175; MS-5911
    Document, shipping bill for harpsichord
    1793 September 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    A stock printed shipping bill on which is recorded in manuscript the arrival from London on board the ship George Barclay, John Collet master, one case containing a harpsichord to be delivered to His Excellency General George Washington, President of the United States. The document is signed at the bottom by Bartholomew Dandridge, Jr., one of Washington's nephews and secretaries. Washington bought the instrument for his wife's granddaughter Nelly (Eleanor Parke Custis) who played it at their residence in the capital city and then later at Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.10.02 A-366
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
    1793 October 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Urges Washington to pick another city for session of Congress other than Philadelphia, where a fatal sickness rages [yellow fever]--suggests tentatively Baltimore or New York, especially the latter.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1796.10.23 A-283
    Letter, from Elizabeth Washington
    1793 October 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dr. Stuart's visit so short, she fears he may not have examined her husband [Lund Washington] well enough -- Lund doesn't want to go to Philadelphia for examinatin and treatment of cancer, for his eyesight is bad, and medicine affects nerves so he needs complete rest -- he is extremely ill.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.10.31 A-366
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
    1793 October 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    Assures Washington he has power to call legislative assembly in another city and at another time--quotes laws and Constitution--fears and jealousies in various quarters over a new meeting place--hears accounts that conditions are improving in Philadelphia now from yellow fever epidemic.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.11.02 A-381
    Letter, from Hannah Fairfax Washington
    Washington, Hannah Fairfax, 1742-1804Washington, George, 1732-17991793 November 2
    Scope and Contents

    A.L.S. 2 pages. Deals with legacy left her by brother George William Fairfax (d. 1787) -- declines to pay any debts against Mrs. Mildred Washington Bushrod's (d. 1785) estate -- her husband (Warner Washington, 1722-1790) was not a legatee -- her children were, but they are married. Autograph letter signed, incomplete watermark. Name on original manuscript appears as "H. Washington."

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.11.16 A-301.209
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1793 November 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Thanks her uncle for the money he sent--she goes to stay with cousin Betty Lewis Carter who has recently lost a child--Mrs. Lewis will come to get her if Mrs. Washington stays at Mt. Vernon this winter and wants her to come there.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.11.22 A-301.180
    Letter, from Frances Bassett Washington
    1793 November 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. Martha Washington is awaiting President's word to join him in Philadelphia--very apologetic for troubling him, but wonders can another story be added to the house in Alexandria which George Washington has so kindly put at her disposal?

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.12.23 A-283
    Letter, from Elizabeth Washington
    1793 December 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Expresses gratitude of herself and her husband Mr. Lund Washington for George Washington's part in getting Dr. Gates' opinion -- Gates hasn't arrived in Virginia yet -- Lund's condition growing worse all the time -- can only see light.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.00.00 A-301.267
    Document, Account of rentals from Robert Lewis
    1794English.
  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.01.00 A-301.210
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 JanuaryEnglish.
    Scope and Contents

    Has been in Culpeper all winter with Cousin Betty Lewis Carter--desires enough money for silk jacket and pair of shoes to wear to Birth Night Ball.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.02.05 A-301.250
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1794 February 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Enclosed is deed to be reacknowledged in presence of Mr. Rutherford, as the previous copy is now out of date due to the negligence of Dr. Stuart and Col. Ball--just returned from Berkeley County, seeing Washington's tenants and is on his way to Fauquier whence he will write more fully..

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.02.09 A-301.211
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 February 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends her thanks for the bundle containing such pretty things [probably silk jacket and shoes requested by Harriot in letter of 7 January 1794]--Cousin Bob [Robert] Lewis has lost his little boy [William Burnett Lewis, who had died at the end of November 1793].

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.02.09 A-301.166
    Letter, from Betty Lewis
    Lewis, Betty Washington, 1733-17971794 February 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Harriot is very pleased with things Washington sent to her from Philadelphia--she is very deserving and takes care of her things--two valuable Negro hands have run away, probably to Philadelphia to be free, and Betty asks her brother's advice in the matter--her next year's crops will be negligible unless they can be returned.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.02.13 A-301.232
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1794 February 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    With apologies for taking up his valuable time, Bushrod sends the draft of an answer on a question having to do with the estate of Mr. George William Fairfax. Bushrod is doing well in law practice in Richmond.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.03.05 A-301.212
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 March 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Desires linen and dimity to make petticoats and great coat-- her great coat is so small she can't get it on.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.03.24 A-301.214
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 March 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Sends her gratitude for package--wishes for money to make great coat, and for tape and thread for linen--would make coat herself but no tailor will cut it out unless he makes it too--Harriot had borrowed 24 shillings from Aunt Betty Lewis, and asks for Washington's help to repay her.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1793.04.03 A-301.169
    Letter, from Betty Lewis
    1794 April 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Has had a bad attack of ague and fever, but is now recovered--thanks Washington for present of a mule--heard news of some dying of yellow fever in Philadelphia again this spring--Harriot received money he had sent her.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.04.22 A-301.233
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1794 April 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod has word of an injunction against Washington in High Court of Chancery--his answer is needed quickly as the Court sits on 12 May--Bushrod will draw it up and send it to Washington to be sworn to. The injunction deals with suit by Henshaw, arising out of settlement of George Mercer's estate in Virginia.

  • Text box: 26 folder: 1794.04.27 A-301.234
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1794 April 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introduces Mr. Maund to Washington as carrier of this letter--Bushrod gently reminds the president of his recent letter (22 April) requesting an answer about the suit against him by Henshaw, dealing with estate of George Mercer.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.05.07 A-301.251
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1794 May 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Couldn't write to Washington before with information on his rents, tenants, etc. until High Sheriff of the county handed over rental money--they are enclosed herewith--breeding horses and mules--mentions Washington's lots in Winchester and Bath, and suggests exchange of one of Washington's lots on Potomac for one held by a tenant on the Bullskin in Berkeley--should buy out life leases there from tenant John Dimmett--Lewis fears he might lose land Washington gave him in Stafford because of no clear title.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.05.25 A-301.213
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 May 7-1794 May 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Washington's letter to Robert Lewis will be carried to him by Cousin [Betty?] Carter who travels to Fauquier--Harriot requests money for summer dresses, or as goods are cheaper in Philadelphia, she would be happy if he would buy them there for her--wants him to know that she does mend her clothing and wear it as long as possible.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.06.27 A-301.215
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 June 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Again requests some summer dresses--requests permission to go to Philadelphia to visit brother George Steptoe Washington--Aunt Betty Lewis has ague and fever--she and family go to Berkeley soon--wheat crop is bad in Fredericksburg.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.07.07 A-301.179
    Letter, from Lawrence Augustine Washington
    1794 July 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Requests Washington's permission to leave Philadelphia and study law in Berkeley--his actions there are always put under worst possible construction--is in debt now and knows Washington will advance him no more money--says his brother will send money to pay his debts and travel to Berkeley--expresses deep gratitude to Washington.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.07.10 A-301.216
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 July 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    She thanks Washington for money he sent her to buy summer dresses--and reports that all there are sorry to hear of Washington's accident on his way to Mt. Vernon--she hope he's recovered--Aunt Betty Lewis's family has been ill all summer.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.08.19 A-301.252
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1794 August 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Answers questions Washington raised in letters of 18 May and 18 July respecting his lands to be leased or sold--land on Potomac put up for rent--procured tenant for houses in Bath--rental of lot in Winchester--trouble in buying out leases of tenants in Berkeley--land on Difficult Run--Mr. Muse allowed transfers of leases--money for rents--use of rents to buy out leases of tenants.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.09.17 A-301.177
    Letter, from Frances Bassett Washington
    1794 September 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Happy to hear Washington is well and cancerous growth on his face is much improved--weather promises very good corn crop--she asks his permission to set her overseer and carpenters to build a corn house--not satisfied with school her children are in as it is too crowded--her son Fayette has been ill.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.09.23 RM-683; MS-4639
    Letter, from Lewis Nicolas
    Nicolas, Lewis1794 September 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes: "Casually going into a painter's shop yesterday I there saw some Tent Poles which I was told were for your" use. Since the usual complaint with these tents is that "the standards in the middle [are] of a great inconvenience," Nicola has submitted a sketch [included] of his own for Washington's consideration.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1794.10.12 A-301.217
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1794 October 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Writes by Mr. Madison [James ?]--left for Berkeley before receiving answer from Washington because of early conveyance there--has heard Aunt Lewis is ill, but can't go back until Brother George is well enough to take her--very much impressed with new sister [Geo. Steptoe Washington married Lucy Payne, sister of Dolly Payne Madison]--dined with Uncle Charles recently and he is in much better health--refused Mr. and Mrs. [James] Madison's invitation to Philadelphia for fear of angering her dear uncle--thinks Mrs. Madison a charming woman.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.01.04 A-301.218
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1795 January 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Begs Washington for money to buy a stuff skirt and a couple of dark calicoes--she left Berkeley a week ago--Aunt Betty Lewis has been very ill but it recovering.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.01.17 A-301.253
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1795 January 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes that the Berkeley and Frederick rents were easily collected because the lands there are productive--those in Fauquier County are hard to collect--deputy sheriffs won't turn over money that is collected--to Mrs. Haney, "a very genteel old lady" and cousin of Washington's (probably daughter of his mother's half sister Elizabeth Johnson), he has extended money on several occasions according to Washington's direction--has settled her and her teenage daughter on a tenement of his own, because those of Washington that were vacant will bring at least £30 each--it may be expensive to buy up life leases on tenements, but Lewis would recommend Washington do so because the money will be reimbursed by higher rent in 4 or 5 years.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.01.25 RM-115; MS2316
    Bond, from Hamilton Cooper
    1795 January 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    1 page each for the two copies which are slightly different. This bond is for rent and signed by Cooper and Robert Lewis, Washington's nephew and secretary.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.02.06 A-301.191
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1795 February 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received Washington's letter with 2 plats of land--he knows little of Washington's land in Kentucky on Rough Creek or of settlement there, but supposes there is some, as he believes Washington's land is near the small town of Hartford, some 18 miles from Vienna--Lewis goes to Kentucky again in April to view his own lands on Green River and will view Washington's at same time--his mother and Harriot send greetings.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.02.17 A-301.219
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1795 February 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    She received the money Washington sent--would have sent her thanks before, but was in Culpeper and kept there long by bad weather--Aunt Betty Lewis too busy to write by this post.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.04.24 RM-378; MS-2459
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1795 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Harriott addresses her "Honored" uncle with great humility and asks for a pair of stays, a hat "and a few other articles."

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.05.95 A-750
    Letter, from George Cabot
    1795 May 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Cabot has heard from Judge Phillips--and is happy to report that the young Lees and Brents mentioned in Washington's letters will probably attend academy at Andover, or else at Exeter.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.07.18 A-301.192
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1795 July 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis has just returned from Kentucky--he was unable to see either his own land or Washington's, despite his efforts--he did meet Gen. Spotswood who said he has bought the identical land from Gen. Harry Lee for 4 shillings per acre--Lewis believes it is worth at least twice that--the land has good settlement and a good iron bank on it--he cannot understand what Lee meant by selling it again--300 acres of Andrew Woodrow's should be purchased to improve value of Washington's land--he will purchase it if Washington agrees.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.08.08 A-366
    Letter, from William Augustine Washington
    1795 August 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Introduces [John Neale] whom he recommends to overlook the carpenters at Mt. Vernon--he made no definite agreement with him--encloses the agreement that Washington drew up for "former person"--he will accept £40--is married with children, which William Washington sees as an advantage because married men stick to their business better than single men.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.09.01 A-301.254
    Draft and letter, from Robert Lewis
    1795 September 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter and draft of his letter of the same date to Washington but with different closing paragraph. Lewis has purchased no leases because of high prices--he encloses rent roll for past year and has deposited £475.10.2 with his aunt--all above amount of rents to go to his account for 1793 rents sent to Philadelphia--finally got judgment for rents held by sheriff and hopes to pay Washington all arrearages owed--discusses lots in Berkeley--will eject several tenants next year from Frederick and make new leases with industrious farmers--apologizes for not staying at Mount Vernon until Washington arrives, but must see to planting wheat.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.12.25 A-301
    Document, account of rentals from Robert Lewis
    1795 December 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Account of land rents collected by Lewis for year 1795 on lands in Berkeley, Frederick, and Fauquier County, Virginia on behalf of George Washington. Shows description of land and remarks on land rented by William Collins, Henry Shover, and ___ McIntosh--amounts to £354.5.0.

  • Text box: 27 folder: 1795.12.26 A-366
    Letter, from James Maury
    1795 December 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Difficulty getting peas and vetches--has applied to Lords of Privy Council to permit officers of customs to admit it to entry to forestall another confiscation of American goods--sends along Chicorium Intybus [Intibus, or succory] and bill of lading--Captain Tuttel promises special care to this shipment.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.01.02 RM-460: MS-3562
    Letter, from Bartholomew Dandridge
    1796 January 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dandridge, employed at the time as personal secretary to the President, declares his intention to leave the official household and begin a commercial career in rural Virginia, having found city life in Philadelphia intolerable.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.08 A-301.221
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1796 February 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Harriot apologizes for asking for more money to buy hat and articles for Birth night so soon after having received "liberal presents"--she has been very ill, enough so to require a physician--Aunt Betty Lewis ill with ague and fever.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.17 A-301.255
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1796 February 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis reports that he met with unexpected success in rent collecting for Washington's properties "over the ridge and in this county"--few have made required improvements--he suggests the life leases be put into hands of lawyer to decide how to proceed--Mr. Muse says Col. Simm of Alexandria thinks leases badly drawn and ejectments won't be supported by court--reports repossession of lots in Frederick and Berkeley, and rental of some lots--difficulties in collecting from sheriffs--Lewis's late cousin Thornton Washington's estate has cut timber on 35 or 40 acres of Washington's prime reserve in Berkeley because of neglect by Mr. Muse in maintaining the lines (Thornton Washington, son of Samuel Washington, inherited rights to cut timber on Lawrence Washington's land, which bordered George Washington's)--Lewis is unable to rent poor land on Deep Run, and suggests procuring situation for sawmill there, for good pine timber on land--he must see Washington on next trip to Mount Vernon.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.22 RM-97; MS-2258
    Account, with James Maurey
    1796 February 22English.
  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.22 RM-115; MS-2313
    Account, with James Maurey
    1796 February 22English.
  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.23 RM-418; MS-3354
    Account, with James Maurey
    1796 February 23English.
  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.26 A-301.220
    Letter, from Harriot Washington
    Washington, Harriot1796 February 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Harriot reports that she is now at Matapony, where is seldom chance of sending mail--she sends her sincere thanks for money Washington sent her to buy articles for Birthnight.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.02.29 A-301.235
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1796 February 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod reports that he has received and will retain bundle of papers dealing with the [Thomas Colvill] estate settlement--he will ask for settlement as soon as possible, and explains some possible outstanding issues to Washington--Mr. Keith has furnished some information--has not yet received appraisement of estate--received hogs from Washington and thanks him for them.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.03.19 A-301.198
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1796 March 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis agrees that Washington is wise to wait until September, as described in the advertisement, to sell his land--Kentucky lands rising in value--he hears there was large emigration last year and some of it to Green River, which should help boost value of Washington's land--discusses military lands and state grant lands--land fever can make prices fluctuate--he was unable to purchase Woodrow's inholding within Washington's property yet--Lewis says that Col. Willis's and Gen. Spotswood's horses still for sale, may be at reduced price.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.03.21 RM-1178
    Letter, from Timothy Pickering
    1796 March 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerning "the claims of the Cohnawaga, or Seven Nations of Canada." The Seven Nations were an Indian confederacy of Mohawk, Abenaki, Huron, and Onodaga that supported the French during the French and Indian War, and later the British in the American Revolution.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.03.24 RM-1041; MS-5682
    Letter, from James Monroe
    Monroe, James, 1758-18311796 March 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    In cypher, Monroe alerts President to interception by French of Washington's letter re XYZ affair. Message also decoded.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.03.27 A-301.170
    Letter, from Betty Lewis
    1796 March 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Betty writes to Washington on Harriot's behalf, who wants to inform him that Andrew Parks, a merchant of Fredericksburg, has been courting her and she would like to marry him--Betty says that Parks is "very much respected by all his acquaintances ... a sober sedate young man and attentive to business"--she has left town for a healthier place which has the advantage of having a mill as well.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.04.06 A-301.266
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1796 April 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis blames delays in his letters on the fact that there are no post riders in this area--since his mother left Fredericksburg, Washington should direct letters to the attorney James Lewis there--he explains not paying Washington money collected so far from rentals--he had wanted to pay in lump sum, but will not remit it as he collects it--denies using funds for own use--Washington's advertisement posted at Court House--describes the property dispute between McCormick and Ariss, one of whom has encroached on Washington's property--it is too late in season to bring Jack to breed in Fauquier County--next season will do so--Mrs. Haney (or Haynie) [G.W.'s kinswoman, see letter of R. Lewis to G.W., Jan. 17, 1795 and R. Lewis's diary for that year] is dying of consumption.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.04.09 A-301.193
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1796 April 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis desires to know, because others have asked him, whether Washington will exchange western lands for some improved estates in this area which might be rented to advantage--he will pursue the purchase of Woodrow's inholding--Mrs. Lewis [Catherine Daingerfield Lewis] has been ill, and that will prevent his going to Kentucky this year.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.04.19 A-301.195
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1796 April 19English.
    Scope and Contents

    Mrs. Lewis's [his wife] illness had prevented him from retrieving Washington's letter before now--gives opinion of Andrew Parks as suitor for Harriot Washington--he is an industrious young man with good prospects, but considers their marriage at this time "madness in the extreme"--he advises any marriage be put off until Washington can come to Virginia and look into things himself--Washington's letter to his mother sent to Culpeper.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.04.05 A-301.196
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1796 May 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes that he forwarded to Howell Lewis, his brother, the papers from Washington concerning debt he owes--it should never have gone to Washington, and Howell considers it a "rude attempt" on the part of others to collect their money--they would have been paid had it been presented correctly to Howell--Mrs. Catherine Daingerfield Lewis still ill--they will go to Culpeper for change of air after court terminates in Fredericksburg.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.05.05 A-625
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1796 May 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes that he tried to obtain possession of land on Accokeek Run in Stafford County, Va. which Washington said (both in person and in a 29 April 1793 letter) he might have, but finds title belongs jointly to Washington and other heirs of his mother [Mary Washington]--Lewis will give up all efforts to obtain it--Mrs. Haney [Washington's cousin, Elizabeth Haynie] died of rapid consumption [see letter of Jan. 17, 1795]--her daughter Sally Ball Haynie cannot find employment because the people in the neighborhood "are uncommonly industrious and do every thing with in themselves."--Mrs. Lewis has taught Sally reading, writing, and useful needlework, etc.--she would make an extraordinary housekeeper for some genteel family--she is welcome to take her board in his house, but he defers to Washington's judgment--sister [Betty Lewis] Carter is delivered of a son [Charles E. Carter].

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.06.01 A-543
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    1796 June 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Powel writes that she cannot harbor resentment after all that passed yesterday, and is determined to dine with him tomorrow, "when I will endeavor to meet your Ideas with Fortitude".

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.07.03 A-301.236
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1796 July 3English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that he is grateful for Washington's bounty [see Writings, XXXV, 107-108 - Washington's offer of some lots he won in a lottery]--the Colville estate business is finally settled by County Court, but this not binding, so he will seek another settlement--Bushrod will take his wife, Anne ("Nancy") Blackburn Washington up to Berkeley Springs for her health--he encloses an order to be published in England.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.07.05 W-598
    Document, share of stock in Bank of Alexandria
    1796 July 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    One share (No. 1355) of augmented stock in the Bank of Alexandria. Endorsed on back, "The within Share was Transferred to Robert Beverley August 19th 1802. M. Sutton B.K.".

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.07.24 MS-246
    Letter, from Betty Washington Lewis
    1796 July 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Received the bills--Harriot [Washington] was married July 15, and has gone to her Brother's in Berkeley [Geo. Steptoe Washington]--expects to go to son Lawrence's in Frederick for her health--"My Dear Brother it is with Infinite Pleasure I here you intend to retire to your owne Home, there I hope you will Enjoy more statisfaction than you Possibly can do in Public Life ...".

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.08.01 A-301.196
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1796 August 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis encloses bill of $100. from his brother Howell--Howell is sorry his uncle should have been troubled by receiving the note for money due [See letter of May 4, 1796, George Lewis to George Washington].

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.08.07 A-301.197
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1796 August 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis notes Washington's acknowledgement of the bank note forwarded to him for Howell--he agrees that his brother should have considered interest on the principal--he will see his brother about this on the latter's return from "over the ridge" with his family [see letters of Aug. 1 and May 4, 1796].

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.08.18 A-301.227
    Letter, from Richard Meade
    1796 August 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Meade conveys to Washington a character reference for Mr. [James] Anderson from a Mr. Fitzhugh--Anderson is a man of industry and clever, but advanced in years.

  • Text box: 28 folder: 1796.08.28 A-283.107
    Letter, from James Anderson
    1796 August 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anderson writes from the Selden family's Salvington Plantation near Fredericksburg that he has received Washington's letter telling of William Pearce's advance of salary from £100 to 100 Guineas--he himself would accept 100 Guineas with house, garden, etc--Anderson believes Washington's superintendent should have an assistant to take over much of writing business inside--he hears that Washington's superintendent "has as much to do as any one man can execute"--describes his knowledge of farming and grazing as "two branches of the same business" that he "was bred to from my youth" in Scotland--he leaves his character reference to others.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1796.09.11 A-283.109
    Letter, from James Anderson
    Anderson, James, 1745-18071796 September 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anderson writes that his failure to answer Washington's earlier queries was not caused by deceit--he then relates his background and experience in farming north of Edinburgh, Scotland, in the English border lands, and in America--he came to U.S. in 1791--has seen Mt. Vernon estate--mentions the distillery he runs on Salvington plantation and that he thinks a properly conducted distillery of much gain to owner--mentions crop rotation and the use of manure as necessary components in improving the land--he is content in present situation with Mr. Cary Selden, but would delight in serving Washington if he can make it profitable for both.

    • Text box: 12 folder: 1796.09.11 A-283.109
      Letter, from James Anderson
      1796 September 11English.
      General

      Original Location: To GW Box 12

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1796.09.18 A-283.110
    Letter, from James Anderson
    1796 September 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anderson informs Washington that he sent a letter on 11th to Philadelphia--he will be glad to come to Mt. Vernon to see Washington at earliest opportunity.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1796.10.12 A-301
    Letter, from James Anderson
    1796 October 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anderson writes that he can procure good overseer with experience in "the management of Negroes" if Washington's current overseer is leaving--Anderson will shortly take measurements of John Francis Mercer's "thrashing machine", so that he can cut timber in winter for mounting one for Washington--suggests cost could be lowered by using Washington's own carpenters and a millwright.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.01.07 W-820
    Receipt, from Charles Lee (fragment)
    1797 January 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rec. No. 258 annotated by G.W. "School Alex £50.0.0--dated, addressed to Charles Lee Esq. in another hand.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.01.17 A-301.176
    Letter, from Hannah Fairfax Washington
    1797 January 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Hannah Washington writes to introduce her son Fairfax to George Washington, as he arrives in Philadelphia to study law under Charles Lee--Hannah asks whether Washington "would sometimes take the trouble to advise him in regard to his moral conduct, as he is much too young to be in such a city, without a guide & true friend."

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.01.21 A-301.245
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 January 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that he is just recovering from attack of pleurisy--the deed enclosed not recorded as prescribed by law--no news of Kanawa lands.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.02.06 A-543.14
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    1797 February 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Powel offers to pay Washington $1000 for his carriage horses, which she intends for the use of her nephew, on the condition that they are as she describes them--however, if Mr. Adams wants them and will pay full price, she will yield all claim.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.02.08 A-543.13
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    1797 February 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Powel writes that she would certainly like to purchase Washington's coach, but that since she doesn't buy his horses for herself, she has no use for the coach--her nephew prefers to follow fashion and wants a new carriage, though Washington's is a superb piece of workmanship and will outlast modern one--Washington's successor is to be legally announced today, and Powel believes that Adams should buy the coach--she will pay Washington cash for the carriage horses any time.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.03.06 A-543.15
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    1797 March 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Powel encloses her check for $1000 to pay for Washington's carriage horses, and indicates she does not wish to have them before he leaves Philadelphia.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.03.11 A-543.16
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    1797 March 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Powel teases Washington because he had "without design put into my possession the love letters of a lady addressed to you under the most solemn sanction"--these letters from Mrs. Washington were found in the writing desk she got from him--she tried to give them to Tobias Lear who was present when she discovered them, but as he refused, she sealed them up and will return them to Washington by whatever means he directs. Includes a self-deprecating note in which she promises to pay Lear $245 for the writing desk and praises Washington's "wise and peaceful administration for eight years."

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.03.15 RM-1116; MS-5799
    Letter, from Thomas Erskine
    1797 March 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Erskine writes Washington that he has used his name in a pamphlet he has written about the French Revolution entitled "Causes and Consequences of the war in France". He also expresses his great admiration for Washington.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.04.01 RM-266; MS-2779
    Invoice, from Joshua Humphreys
    1797 April 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Invoice for certain materials and labor used in the construction of a boat. At the bottom, Humphries has signed (in full) a receipt for the total sum of £55.16.3 ($148.83).

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.04.15 A-301.199
    Letter, from George Lewis
    1797 April 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis has made inquiries on Washington's behalf for a workman [housejoiner] desired by Washington, but can find none available now, neither among blacks (who are generally hired out a year at a time) nor among whites (who would come burdened with families to support)--he suggests that Col. Ball might have some such workman whom he will rent out--Mrs. Lewis's health has been bad for several years and growing worse, else they would have visited Mount Vernon already.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.04.22 A-283.111
    Letter, from Elizabeth Washington
    1797 April 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Elizabeth Washington writes that she has been informed that she cannot, as had been her custom, get herrings from George Washington's fishing landing--her hands at the ferry landing have only gotten 300 herring--it is too late to apply elsewhere--she asks the favor of 6 or 7000 herrings from Washington's seine.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.04.24 A-283.112
    Letter, from Elizabeth Washington
    1797 April 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Elizabeth Washington writes to protest that she only wanted justice done in getting her turn at the fishing landing--when she applied for fish there were two others before her, the fish did not run while her negroes were at the fishery, and then she heard that others were supplied out of order before her--she did not expect George Washington to "disfurnish" his own family of their herrings for her--[see letter of April 24, 1797]--can't come to Mt. Vernon to see Mrs. Washington because roads are impassable between Hayfield and Mount Vernon--and while writing the above she has just had word to send negroes down for fish--she thanks Washington for his intervention and says she is now sending the letter only to explain that she wanted nothing more "than what was the common rule of fishing landings, to have my turn."

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.07.29 A-301.178
    Letter, from Samuel Washington
    1797 July 29English.
    Scope and Contents

    Samuel Washington writes to express thanks to George Washington for advice ("there is no person fonder of receiving advice than what I am")--he states that the money he wants to borrow from his uncle is mainly to pay debts contracted by his father [Charles Washington], particularly to Dr. Stuart--he will come to Mount Vernon in few weeks--wife is expecting a little one at any time [Samuel T. Washington?].

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.08.25 H-1197
    Invoice, from James Craik
    Craik, James, 1730-18141797 August 25 - 1799 January 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dr. Craik's bill from Aug. 25, 1797 - June 14, 1799 for £ 97.11.9, for visits to & treatment of members of G.W.'s family and servants on all the farms--includes visits to attend Mr. Peter's child & "a visit to & attendce on yourself from 21st to 26th and prescription" £4.0.0--a dozen oranges--"Bleeding yourself ..."

    docketed by G.W. "Receipt Doct. Jas. Craik, Bal. $128.88 27 June 1799,"

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.09.13 W-798
    Receipt, from Samuel Washington
    1797 September 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Note for the sum of one thousand dollars, in George Washington's hand, signed by his nephew Samuel Washington.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.09 A-283
    Letter, from Elizabeth Washington
    1797 October 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Elizabeth Washington writes to George Washington to clarify her earlier remarks about William Triplett -- she refers to the suit by Thomas Pearson concerning land sold years earlier to George Washington and others by his brother Simon Pearson, some of which now makes up Hayfield farm on which she lives -- her nephew looks for papers relative to land in Stafford and Prince William.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.12 W-1310/A.71
    Bill, from John & Thomas Vowell
    1797 October 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Receipted Dec. 18, 1797 by John & Thos. Vowell. Bill for Shingles, amounting to £8.4.5."

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.13 A-301.230
    Letter, from Thomas Lewis
    1797 October 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes a recommendation for Thomas Alsbury, who formerly served Washington "in the wars with the savages" and "in your family"--Alsbury now wants to lease land from Washington on the Ohio or Kanawha Rivers.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.15 RM-340; MS-2327
    Letter, from Hannah Bushrod Washington
    1797 October 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    Regrets that she cannot visit Mt. Vernon at this time. Her grandsons, Augustine and Corbin, are sick. Must remain at Haywood. Promises to visit at first opportunity.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.20 A-301.237
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    Washington, Bushrod, 1762-18291797 October 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod Washington answers George Washington's legal queries dealing with Thomas Pearson's suit concerning land sold by his late brother Simon Pearson to Washington and others in 1763 [see letter, G.W. to Bushrod W., Oct. 9, 1797]--Bushrod will take the case should it go to a higher court--Gen. Marshall may know something further about the case, as Bushrod met a man named Pearson at Marshall's office recently.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.20 RM-259; MS-2758
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    Washington, Bushrod, 1762-18291797 October 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod records a legal opinion for Washington concerning a suit initiated by Thomas Pearson, against his late brother's estate (Simon Pearson). The suit involved a parcel of land which Washington purchased from Simon Pearson some thirty-five years earlier.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.25 A-301.239
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 October 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod sends his uncle a copy of grant requsted--he can't find the Inquisition, but has directed the clerk to continue his search for the document related to Pearson's suit.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.26 A-301.256
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1797 October 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis sends orchard-grass seed, a gift from Mr. Francis Whiting, after a 6 week delay for lack of transportation to Alexandria--Washington's tenant on his tract of land above Bath has removed to Kentucky, and the land is being denuded of its valuable timber by the neighboring "set of lawless rascals"--Lewis strongly suggests that the land should be rented out to protect the remaining timber--furthermore, Washington's land on Lost Mountain (then in Prince William County, now Fauquier County) is being stripped of bark by tanners working by moonlight on the pinnacle of the mountain--the perpetrators have been caught.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.27 A-301.238
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 October 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that he has investigated Mrs. Forbes and found her fully satisfactory for the job of housekeeper at Mt. Vernon--"She is honest, industrious, & well acquainted with nice as well as common cooking"--she never received letters from Washington, however--Bushrod will investigate at the post office--mentions having written earlier about the Pearson suit.

  • Text box: 29 folder: 1797.10.30 A-301.240
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 October 30English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that he has located and interviewed Mrs. Forbes, who says that her price is $150 a year--Bushrod thinks this is "extravagant" for a housekeeper at Mt. Vernon, but that he is persuaded she would do well--he asks Washington to advise him whether or not this will be satisfactory.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1797.11.08 A-301.241
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 November 8English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that he has talked with Mr. Brooke and received good references for Mrs. Forbes--he answers Washington's queries about her from his 3 November letter--there is good cook to be sold in Fredericksburg by Geo. Murray--he had cooked for Brooke who says his only fault is a fondness for liquor--Bushrod will ask Murray not to sell him until he hears from Washington--Mrs. Forbes is being directed to head for Mount Vernon as early as the next stage.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1797.11.13 A-301.242
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 November 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that, having examined the records in the General Court, he finds that surveys were rarely done in cases like Washington's and that he is therefore quite certain that the law is on side of Washington in the Pearson suit--he also encloses an order for settling Washington's accounts as executor of Thomas Colville.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1797.11.26 A-301.243
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1797 November 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that Mrs. Forbes' delay in leaving for Mt. Vernon was due to lack of funds--Mr. Brook owes her money but has been out of town--Bushrod will advance money to send Forbes to Mt. Vernon on the next day's stage--Mr. Brook has been very ill and now in back country for his health--Bushrod refers again to the settlement of the Colville estate--Mr. Keith advertises the decree in the Alexandria Gazette for 8 weeks.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.01.08 A-301.244
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 January 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes to Washington with a report of what he has discovered about taxes due on Washington's Kanawha land--lands in Kanawha and Berkeley to be forfeited unless back taxes are paid--he urges fast action to avoid having the land seized and sold.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.02.01 A-301.287
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 February 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that the auditor can find nothing further on taxes due on Washington's western lands along the Kanawha and Ohio rivers--the records are in poor shape and the auditor blames the inattention and inaccuracy of the commissioners in that part of the country--Bushrod gave him Washington's paper containing a list of his lands on the Ohio and Kanhawa to check more in detail--there are no other Washington lands returned for non-payment of taxes, and as Bushrod paid the arrearages Washington's property is clear for now.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.02.09 RM-683; MS-4644
    Letter, from John Parker
    1798 February 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Parker, who is "now engaged in [publishing] "The Journals of Congress" from the year 1775 to the present time, ..." asks Washington to patronize his work. "My undertaking has met with the encouragement of Mr. Jefferson & the Committee of Congress" assigned to this project, "... yet the honor of your name ... will be the greatest satisfaction I can feel."

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.03.13 RM-259; MS-2756
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 March 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod advises his uncle regarding several legal problems relating to taxes on Washington's western lands as well as a land title paper concerning a transaction between Generals Lee and Washington. Bushrod also explorers the circumstances of the "Langhorne Affair."

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.03.23 RM-548; MS-4197
    Letter, from William Augustine Washington
    1798 March 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Speaks of his recent loss (the death of his son Augustine). Agrees with Washington's advice to send his remaining children to public school. Corn crop will be low this year. Discusses his knowledge of Washington family genealogy.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.04.28 RM-356; MS-2358
    Letter, from William Augustine Washington
    1798 April 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter regarding agreement between George Washington and Wm. Washington whereby George Washington may purchase 500 barrels of corn annually from Wm. Washington Discussion of terms of sale.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.04.26 A-301.246
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 April 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes that he disapproves Washington's deed to General Lee, but has drawn a better one for him to follow--in order to avoid any possible confusion in the future the new one states that the original deed was not recorded in a timely fashion and that the present one is a replacement--they should check the boundaries to see if they are accurate.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.05.11 A-301.184
    Letter,from Bartholomew Dandridge
    1798 May 11English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dandridge writes that Washington's is first letter he's received from America except one of a few lines from G.W.P. Custis last fall--he knows Washington is busy repairing houses, farms, etc. at Mount Vernon--he has himself led a retired life in the Netherlands, going to no public entertainments except now and then to the theater, though he has been to Paris--his health has been poor--mentions Elbridge Gerry, Gen. Marshall, and Gen. Pinckney--he will try to procure a good joiner to send to Washington--many Germans go to Amsterdam to get employment or passage to America, and Dandridge has asked a "merchant of eminence" to assist in the search for a joiner among them with a good character reference--Dandridge gives his explanation of 1100 and odd dollars which was charged by him to Washington's account for "losses, errors &c" as having occurred not in a single year, but over the whole course of his employment by Washington--the 200 some dollars charged against Washington in April 1796 is a little harder to explain.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.05.23 A-301.257
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1798 May 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis writes that he encloses a draught on Mr. James Russell of Alexandria by Mr. Ariss for last year's rent (against Washington's usual practice) because Ariss had been infirm--if the funds are not immediately collectable, he asks Washington to return the draft so that he can follow up--a tenant on one of the Berkeley lots is unable to pay, so another was procured temporarily to take care of growing crop--he asks Washington's wishes about leasing that property--wheat crops in the area and up to the Blue Ridge are virtually destroyed by Hessian fly, there has also been a 5 week drought.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.07.16 A-301.186
    Letter, from Bartholomew Dandridge
    1798 July 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Dandridge writes that he had no success in finding a joiner to send to Washington, despite several applications and having others search for suitable candidates--the danger of war with U.S. leaves country in unsettled state--the Texel blockaded by British ships, and French privateers are swarming the Maese--preparations of U.S. for defense worry French government--Mr. Gerry leaving Paris soon--expectation is for war between France and America at any time--the Congress at Rastadt is dissolving--war on the Rhine expected--"we hold ourselves in readiness to march".

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.07.24 A-301.283
    Letter, from John Smith
    1798 July 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Smith writes that he desires to make a vitrified stained glass portrait of Washington like that of His Excellency the president [John Adams]--describes the long-lasting nature of such portraits.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.07.25 A-420
    Letter, from Charles Carter, Jr.
    1798 July 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Solicits for his brother William Champe Carter of Albemarle County a commission as Captain in the provisional army or as aide de camp to a general officer--suggests that it would be good to distribute commissions in that area of the state to counteract the attempts by "a certain character in his route from Philadelphia to Monticello" [i.e., Thomas Jefferson] to dampen patriotic ardor of people there--he and Mrs. Carter had wanted to visit last spring, but the loss of a carriage and horse is compelling them to postpone that until next Spring.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.08.04 A-301.203
    Letter, from Thomas Marshall, Jr.
    1798 August 4English.
    Scope and Contents

    Marshall writes that his father directed him to pay Washington's back taxes on his land on Rough Creek [Hardin County, Ky.]--discusses arrangements for reimbursing his father--Mr. Rawleigh Colston of Frederick authorized to draw upon Washington for the money--as Marshall's father is aged and infirm, Marshall himself can assist Washington in such matters in the future.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.08.07 RM-259; MS-2757
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 August 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod continue to keep his uncle informed about the circumstances of the "Langhorne Affair," and his own involvement as a "dignified observer." He assures the General that the man John Nicholas is of excellent character.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.08.09 A-301.204
    Letter, from James Welch
    1798 August 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Welch writes to Washington that he has surveyed the tract of Great Kanawha land of 10990 acres--it appears to be short 610 acres, so he is going to check it again--also surveyed Cole River tract--30 settlers on land are doing well--immigration is good, though the migrants themselves are poor--he expects many from Pennsylvania--people in the area all support existing constitution.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.08.20 A-301.185
    Letter, from Bartholomew Dandridge
    1798 August 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Original copy of this letter. Dandridge's poor health induces him to resign job of secretary to Mr. Murray, and since Washington helped him get the position, Dandridge wants to let him know--he seeks more a active life--he seeks a subaltern commission in the army of United States--Murray is writing to the President and Secretary of War on his behalf--Dandridge has still had no success in finding a joiner for Washington--"all communication from this country is quite at a stand except thro Hamburg and England".

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.08.20 A-301.247
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 August 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod writes his recommendation of Col. Heth as a friend of the government and a sober citizen--he mentions the fictitious John Langhorne [i.e., Peter Carr] letter and Nicholas--Gen. Marshall is anxious to visit Washington and Bushrod may accompany him.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.09.21 RM-493; MS-4071
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1798 September 21English.
    Scope and Contents

    Request that his uncle consider Thomas Turner and Capt. Blackburn for military commissions.

  • Text box: 30 folder: 1798.09.27 RM-212; MS-2676
    Letter, from A. Spotswood
    1798 September 27English.
    Scope and Contents

    Spotswood reports the results of his efforts in securing an overseer, a certain Mr. Garret, for Washington. "He would not determine whether to receive your offer or not until he returned home and consulted his wife - ".

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.10.01 A-301.190
    Letter, from G. W. Snyder
    Snyder, G. W.1798 October 1English.
    Scope and Contents

    Snyder writes that some weeks ago he had sent Washington a letter with Robison's Proof of a Conspiracy--since then, he is more confirmed in opinion that groups called "Illuminati—German Union—Reading Societies—and in France by that of the Jacobine-Club" are operating for overthrow of this government--many of these groups are of French sympathies and begin by trying to destroy all religion--prays that God, who set Washington "as a Deliverer of, and Father of his Country" may keep him safe until this crisis passes.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.10.06 A-836
    Letter, from Rawleigh Colston
    1798 October 6English.
    Scope and Contents

    Encloses letter from Mr. Thomas Marshall Jr. of Kentucky who wishes payment of small balance due his father Col. Marshall from Washington.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.10.17 A-301.189
    Letter, from G. W. Snyder
    1798 October 17English.
    Scope and Contents

    Snyder writes to apologize for having sent second letter on 1 October, but he received Washington's letter of 25 September only an hour after mailing his own--"I rejoice very much that you are recovered from your late Sickness"--he fears pernicious effects of "the illuminati" or Jacobinism on people of the United States--Snyder informs Washington that he recently wrote articles in gazettes under name of "Cicero" giving a compendium of extracts form "Robison's Proofs of Conspiracy".

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.10.18 A-301.207
    Letter, from George Blagdin
    1798 October 18English.
    Scope and Contents

    Blagdin writes that although Washington will provide glass, painting and ironmongering he cannot undertake to complete the work on Washington's buildings in Washington, DC for less than $11,000.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.11.07 A-301.175
    Letter, from Samuel Washington
    1798 November 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Samuel writes that he is distressed that his mother (Mildred Thornton Washington) wrote Washington asking for more money--all debts of his father (Washington's late brother Charles) and his estate lie on him now--he is sure he can pay by selling land, but nobody will buy land in these unsettled times, with war with France possible--he hopes to sell at better prices in the next year--Samuel refuses the $1000 Washington offered his mother because that would make creditors all come to him at once and ruin him, "Whereas if they come on gradually I can have a better chance."

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.11.14 A-750
    Letter, from John. B. Church
    1798 November 14English.
    Scope and Contents

    Church presents his son, Philip Church, who enters the army under his uncle's (probably Alexander Hamilton's) auspices-- hurch recommends him to Washington's protection.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.11.16 A-301.202
    Letter, from Philip Rootes
    1798 November 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Rootes writes that he had visited Mount Vernon, but not seen Washington--this follow-up letter requests a certificate from Washington that his late father, John Rootes, served as a captain in Col. William Byrd's regiment in the French and Indian wars--Rootes wants this in order to secure bounty land for his father's service, that his father never applied for.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.11.20 RM-165; MS-2466
    Letter, from Philip Schuyler
    1798 November 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Autograph letter signed, draft. First part of draft is a letter to General Washington of the same date introducing Church, his grandson. In the part of the draft addresssed to the grandson, Schuyler warns him how to approach the general as Church hopes to gain some military favors."

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.11.24 A-516
    Bill, from Joseph Anthony
    1798 November 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anthony bills Washington for a gold seal, 12 dollars; and repairing buttons, seal and chain, 2 dollars--total, 14 dollars. Receipted by Joseph Anthony.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.12.09 RM-115; MS-2293
    Letter, from Alexander Spotswood, Jr.
    1798 December 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Re: Spotswood's opinion of the Alien and Sedition Acts and A forgery of Spotswood's name in a previous letter to Washington. Docketed by Washington. Folio size.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.12.20 A-301.205
    Letter, from William Russell
    1798 December 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Russell writes to Washington that he was mortified to discover that all conveyances for bringing Washington's ram and straw machine from Middletown, Connecticut to Mount Vernon had failed and now that the river is frozen it will take until spring to deliver them--he looks forward to his friend's report on planting wheat in England which Washington procured for him--with the sheep and chaff Engine, Russell proposes sending a "Ground Borer" for digging fence post holes--it can also be of use in military operations where chevaux de fries are wanted.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1798.12.24 A-301.284
    Letter, from David Garland
    1798 December 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Garland writes to ask Washington for information on land set aside between Great Kanhawa and Sandy River as part "payment of some Officers and Soilders who was on an Expedition Against the Indians about or before Braddocks Campain."

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.01.25 A-283.117
    Bill, from Cath. Roberts
    1799 January 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    For £ 1.5.0, or $3.33 for 1 bushel blue grass seed and a keg. Receipted by Samuel Simes for Cath. Roberts.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799-02-05 A-283.118
    Bill, from Isaac Parrish
    1799 February 5English.
    Scope and Contents

    This receipted bill charges Washington £6. for a cocked Beaver hat, a round white hat, and box. Marked "Recd. pay of C. Biddle for Isaac Parrish," by Joseph Parrish.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.02.13 A-301.258
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    Lewis, Robert, 1769-18291799 February 13English.
    Scope and Contents

    He writes that he received a copy of an earlier letter to Maj. Harrison [Nov. 4]--desires to take Young Royal Gift to his stable to stand--another Jack in Culpeper now will cut down profits of the stud service--collection of rents goes badly--plight of tenants pitiable--tenants in Frederick and Berkeley mostly paid up--he will come to Mt. Vernon to bring rents and attend the marriage of his brother Lawrence with Miss [Eleanor Parke] (Nelly) Custis.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.02.22 A-366
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull, Jr.
    Trumbull, Jonathan, 1740-18091799 February 22English.
    Scope and Contents

    Trumbull writes that he knows nothing of arrangements for paying amounts due on sets of prints ["Death of Warren," and "Death of Montgomery"] sent to Washington from London--he counsels don't send money to England--his brother John has agents (whom he names) handling affairs of the prints in the States--comments on "malign influence" in councils of state in Virginia--takes the opportunity of wishing Washington a happy birthday--extends his best wishes to Nelly Custis on her marriage to Lawrence Lewis.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.03.16 RM-707; MS-4850
    Letter, from Macleod & Lumsdon
    Macleod & Lumsdon1799 March 16English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerning Washington's recent order for English Crown glass from Alexandria merchants Macleod & Lumsdon. The glass was not available, and the merchants offered to order it for Washington.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.03.28 A-366
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull
    1799 March 24English.
    Scope and Contents

    Trumbull writes that he recently sent 4 pairs of his prints, which Washington had subscribed to, by way of the Nancy Davidson--most of the letter is political beginning with "I trust, Sir! that you are now destined to act a more important part, in this great Drama, than you have done in the former period of your Life: to save again your Country, and to establish her Security and Greatness upon a Basis broad and firm as is the Continent of which She forms a part."--he expresses opinions on political situations of Europe, especially England and France--fears French taking over Spanish and Portuguese colonies in America, thereby creating hazard to Americans--it is to America's interest to see that Spanish colonies are inculcated with true spirit of liberty and rational freedom--writes "that Europe is rotten to the Heart. and that, in Europe, America has not one friend, on whose support She can rely"--there is one year left in which to act--"I hope to have the happiness of seeing the Evening of your Life more useful and more glorious than its Noon, and of saluting you My dear Sir, not merely as the Father of the United States but of the United Empires of America.".

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.03.28 A-301.174
    Letter, from Samuel Washington
    1799 March 28English.
    Scope and Contents

    Samuel writes that the executions against him for £300 or 400 are beyond his power to pay, except by selling all his slaves, and then he would be unable to grow a crop which is all he has for the support of two families--if Washington can lend him the money, then Samuel will be enabled to get clear of debt and repay him in the fall by selling land--once free of the sheriff he intends never to go into debt again--his father [Charles Washington] has been very ill.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.04.10 A-301
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1799 April 10English.
  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.03.25 A-366
    Letter, from Samuel Washington
    1799 April 25English.
    Scope and Contents

    Samuel thanks his uncle for the letter telling of money to be loaned him, it was seriously delayed in the postal system -- he describes his difficulties in settling Uncle Samuel Washington's estate, as his own father and his uncle John both kept poor accounts -- Bushrod Washington won't help any, and Samuel mentions it hoping that Washington will speak to Bushrod this summer -- Samuel expects a bad wheat crop for the 4th straight year -- he intends to sell all his land & buy small amount in Culpeper County at low price -- his father Charles Washington is much improved.

  • Text box: 31 folder: 1799.04.26 A-301.248
    Letter, from Bushrod Washington
    1799 April 26English.
    Scope and Contents

    Bushrod encloses a deed from Washington to Gen. Lee, and tells him that Lees deed to Washington is being registered -- Washington should send the enclosed one to the clerk of General Court -- speaks of congressional elections in this district that will be close -- Jacobins & opponents of Federal government spread scandalous assertions against Gen. Lee, who is only recently "making great exertions" in his own behalf -- Mr. Tayloe will resign his army commission, and Mr. Thomas Turner has asked that Bushrod intervene with Washington about securing a commission in the cavalry.

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.05.02 RM-548; MS-4198
    Letter, from William Augustine Washington
    1799 May 2English.
    Scope and Contents

    Concerning a transaction of corn, whiskey and herrings. Congratulations on General Lee's and General Marshall's election to the Congress.

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.05.20 RM-548; MS-4199
    Letter, from William Augustine Washington
    1799 May 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Conveying 166 barrels of corn and discussing future corn transactions. Mentions his new (third) wife (Sarah Tayloe).

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.06.23 A-301.265
    Letter, from James Anderson
    1799 June 23English.
    Scope and Contents

    Anderson sets forth his new scheme for managing Washington's farms, to make more profit from them--he compares profits and loss for his new scheme and the older system, showing large edge of profit to new scheme, using the Union Farm as the example although the principles could apply to River Farm and Dogue Run with slight alterations--Muddy Hole should be planted in peach trees--Anderson advocates fewer workers on each, and a new system of crop rotation.

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.08.07 A-301.259
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    1799 August 7English.
    Scope and Contents

    Lewis sends Washington a draught for Mr. Ariss's rent--Ariss's infirmities make Lewis hesitate to be so rigid in collecting his rent, although he is always backward in paying--Lewis will send rents collected--he saw his brother Lawrence and his lady [Nelly Custis Lewis] at sister Carters--Lawrence has sulpher mud on his eye and drinking spring water improves him--this year's hay crop diminished by a monthlong drought in July--last fall's drought and Hessian fly deprived them of seed wheat--corn and tobacco good.

  • Text box: 32 folder: ND7 W-179
    Plan, Crop rotation for Ferry Farm
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.08.10 A-366
    Letter, from Jonathan Trumbull
    1799 August 10English.
    Scope and Contents

    Trumbull comments on the delays in post offices--"in too many instances there is not that punctual attention to their duty in our post offices which the Public have a right to expect"--he agrees with Washington's reply to Col. John Trumbull on a project of taking over South America (see letter of March 24, 1799, John Trumbull to Washington)--offers comments on a candidate for presidency--hints strongly that Washington is the only one to unite the party and win for Federalists--expresses his "hope and trust" that Washington's life will "be elongated beyond the term of three core and ten years"--offers comments on President John Adams. On letter from Timothy Pickering to Jonathan Trumbull, 29 July 1799

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.08.09 RM-418; MS-3353
    Account, with Josiah Conyton
    1799 August 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    $1.25 for repairing Mrs. Washington's watch.

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.08.12 A-366
    Letter, from William Smith
    1799 August 12English.
    Scope and Contents

    "Smith writes to Washington concerning claims of heirs of Robert Stobo to land on account of his services in French & Indian War--he asks Washington to help the family to get the land due under the claim--Stobo was with Washington at Fort Necessity and was surrendered to the French as a hostage--Smith transcribes a letter dated 19 March 1799 from Alexander McCaul to William Smith, saying land due Stobo can still be claimed. Encloses letter from Alex. McCaul to Wm. Smith, saying land due Stobo can still be claimed. [See letter dated Mar. 19, 1799]."

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.08.20 MS-255
    Letter, from Mr. Vans Murray
    1799 October 20English.
    Scope and Contents

    Belgium & "this Republic" seem to be fixed as heritage and satelite of french Republic--describes moves of British, Russian, French, & Austrian armies--Duke of York's inglorious evacuation of the Dutch Republic--this liberates all French troops for campaign on Rhine--will present G.W. a model of the Dutch water-throwing mill, or windmill, such as he sent rude sketches of last summer--may be applicable for draining Dismal [Swamp]--La fayette at Utrecht, won't go to U.S. this autumn.

  • Text box: 32 folder: 1799.12.09 MS-256
    Letter, from Mary, Sarah, & Hannah Washington
    1799 December 9English.
    Scope and Contents

    Letter from three orphaned children of Thomas Washington of [Nevis] Island in West Indies--17 yrs. ago a gentleman in Newcastle upon Tyne wrote G.W. & sent old papers belonging to them to determine whether they are any kin to him, but received no reply--father had son by 1st marriage, still living in [Nevis]--their mother and father died & left them destitute--were brought up as servants--asks some small relief, are all married to poor men [The truth of this letter sworn to by Chas. Charleton, Vicar, & Wm. Jowsey & Wm. Tayloe, Churchwardens of Parish of Tynemouth [Northumberland].

  • Text box: 32 folder: ND1 A-301
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 32 folder: ND2 A-625
    Letter, from Robert Lewis
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 32 folder: ND3 A-543.20
    Letter, from Elizabeth Powel
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 32 folder: ND4 A-366.72
    Letter fragment, from Jonathan Trumbull
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 32 folder: ND5 A-301.206
    Letter, from Fielding Lewis
    undatedEnglish.
  • Text box: 32 folder: ND6 RM-115; MS-2321
    Letter, from unknown sender
    undatedEnglish.
Series 3. Ledgers and Bound Manuscripts
English.
  • RM-737; MS-4966; MS-4967; MS-4968; MS-4969
    Bound Manuscript, Survey Notes, Grant, Letter, and Indenture
    Washington, George, 1732-17991762 November 4-528 November 16949 October 175919 May 1760English.
    Scope and Contents

    Four documents are bound together: Survey Notes, Washington's surveying notes on a portion of his Mount Vernon property that he has purchased from Sampson Darrell in 1757, 4-5 November 1762; Grant, to Sampson Darrell, 28 November 1694; Letter, Darrell Smith to George Washington, 9 October 1759; Indenture, from Sampson Darrell, 19 May 1760

  • AA-6; W-1171
    Book, Overseer's Account book
    1785-1798English.
    Scope and Contents

    This ledger includes a list of slaves at the Mount Vernon Plantations, clothing alloted to them each year, inventory of cattle, Nov. 15, 1785, accounts with the several plantations, accounts with shoemakers, overseers, and bricklayers. With other Accounts (including ones from George Augustine and Lawrence A. Washington, Tobias Lear, John and H. Fairfax, and Anthony Whiting).

  • W-1174
    Leaves, Record of Work Done on Mount Vernon Farms
    Washington, George, 1732-17991786-1787English.
    Scope and Contents

    This is a record of the work done at the various farms making up George Washington's Mount Vernon, reporting the number of hours worked by which workers, just what was being done on each farm during a particular week. Farms include Dogue Run, Ferry Plantation, Muddy Hole, River Plantation, and Frenchs Plantation (or Frenchs Quarter). Work by tailors, carpenters, shoemakers, coopers, ditchers, and millers are recorded separately. Includes "Fairfaxs Report on House People" for several weeks. Begins November 1786 and ends in April 1787. At the end of the volume there is a document titled "Memorandum of things delivered to the different Plantations from the 12th of Apl. 1786, 1786 April 12-August 31" that begins at the last page and works its way back toward the center of the volume. This used to be bound, but has since been unbound and is just leaves.

  • W-1208
    Two surveys bound together
    1788 November 15English.
    Scope and Contents

    These surveys seem to be concerned with a road from the Ferry to Cameron.

  • Text Shelf: F:4 W-676
    Mount Vernon Store Book
    1787 January 1-1787 December 31English.
    Scope and Contents

    This covers the period of the building of the Green house and the final stucco work and painting of the New Room.

    Includes "Skins put into the Vatts," "Articles received into the Store, Articles delivered out of the Store, Rum account of rum received & doled out (giving reasons in many cases for the dole).

    Existence and Location of Copies

    Papers of George Washington - Reel#6

  • RM-929; MS-5468
    Ledger, Mount Vernon distillery and fishery ledger
    Anderson, James, 1745-1807Lear, Tobias, 1762-18161799-1801English.
    Scope and Contents

    In the handwriting of Tobias Lear (1762-1816), Washington's private secretary, and James Anderson, Mount Vernon's farm and subsequent distillery manager from 1797 to the time of Washington's death in 1799. Washington endorsed the ledger twice and approved accounts for fisheries, whiskey, shad, and herring.

Series 4. Oversized
Text Shelf: Oversized English.
  • From George Washington
    1753 March-1799 December, undatedEnglish.
    • Text box: 33 folder: 1753.03.08 RM-736; MS-4964
      Document, "An Inventory of the Estate of Lawrence Washington Esqr. deceased, as Apprais'd by us the Subscribers..."
      Washington, George, 1732-17991753 March 7-8English.
      Scope and Contents

      Compiled by and entirely in the hand of George Washington, the inventory of his late elder half brother's estate lists, by room, furniture, books, and other household items in the Mansion as well as slaves, horses, livestock and other chattels.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1753.12.17 RM-726; MS-4912
      Indenture, with George and Ann Lee
      1753 December 17English.
      Scope and Contents

      Washington leased the two tracts of land that formed his late brother Lawrence's estate, and 18 slaves, from Lawrence's widow Ann and her new husband George Lee for an annual rent of 15 hogsheads of tobacco or the cash equivalent. Document is signed by GW and both Lees, and witnessed by William Fairfax, John Dalton, and Denis McCarty.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1754.12.17 RM-726; MS-4912
      Document, Indenture for the leasing of the Mount Vernon estate from George and Ann Lee to George Washington
      1754 December 17English.
      Scope and Contents

      In this document, Washington leased the two tracts of land that formed his late brother Lawrence's estate, and 18 slaves, from Lawrence's widow Ann and her new husband George Lee for an annual rent of 15 hogsheads of tobacco or the cash equivalent. Document is signed by GW and both Lees, and witnessed by William Fairfax, John Dalton, and Denis McCarty.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1757.03.10 2019-SC-014
      George Washington, Philadelphia, to Governor Robert Dinwiddie
      Washington, George, 1732-1799
      4 pages
      1757 March 10English.
      Scope and Contents

      Autograph letter signed. Washington writes about the service and loyalty of the Virginia Regiment during the French and Indian War.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1765.02.26 2018-SC-027
      Quit claim deed by John Carney to George Washington
      Washington, George, 1732-1799Washington, Lund, 1737-1796
      1 pages
      1765 February 26English.
      Scope and Contents

      Quit claim deed written on handmade laid paper in the hand of George Washington. The quit claim is by John Carney to George Washington for 200 acres of land at Cliftons, formerly Piscataway Neck, which later became part of the Mount Vernon River Farm. Signed by John Carney (his mark), Lund Washington, Walter Magowan, Eno Williams (his mark), and Thos. Bishop.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1767.12.01 2019-SC-016-001
      Survey of lands in Frederick County left to John Augustine Washington by Lawrence Washington
      Washington, George, 1732-1799Washington, John Augustine, 1736-1787
      2 pages
      1767 December 1English.
      Scope and Contents

      Autograph survey and plat signed "G. Washington." Docketed on verso by John Augustine Washington, "An Including survey of all the Lands left me in Frederick, by my brother Lawrence Washington, done by George Washington Esqr." A survey of four parcels of land in present-day Jefferson County, West Virginia.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1769.07.10 W-1096
      Plat, Mount Vernon tract
      Washington, George, 1732-17991769 July 10English.
      Scope and Contents

      Docketed on back "West v Posey Plat & Report", in G.W.'s hand, laminated, watermark (crown over heraldic device & motto, & crown over GR), oversize document. [This was part of the original grant to Spencer which George Washington purchased from Captain Posey to help cancel that gentleman's debt to him and others]. The plat showing survey lines is attached to the report. A cover is attached, docketed "Papers Relating To Mount Vernon Trace of Land."

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1770.00.00 RM-93; MS-2241
      Survey, Fairfax County
      1770English.
      Scope and Contents

      Original; docketed on reverse in Washington's handwriting, as follows: "Plats of Sundry Tracts of Land Belonging & Adjoining those of George Washington Fairfax County.".

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1772.06.10 RM-1155; MS-5874
      Indenture, to John Posey
      Washington, George, 1732-17991772 June 10English.
      Scope and Contents

      This indenture is the purchase agreement by which George Washington acquired six acres of land from John Posey. This tract of land was situated along the Potomac River between the mouths of Little Hunting Creek and Dogue Creek. The document is partially printed and filled out by George Washington in his own hand on June 10, 1772. Washington signed his name five times within the text, and Posey signed it at the conclusion. Witnesses John Parke Custis, Jonathan Palmer, Thomas Bishop and another individual, whose autograph is indecipherable, all signed that this document was sealed and delivered in their presence. An inscription at the bottom of the document states that on October 19, 1772, court was held for the County of Fairfax and this lease was proved by the oaths of the witnesses to be the deed of John Posey. The acquisition of this document by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association closes the circle on this important story and piece of Mount Vernon land which is approximately where the wharf of today is located. It is the third in a series of documents between John Posey and George Washington. The first two documents, GEORGE WASHINGTON'S SURVEY FOR JOHN POSEY, OCTOBER 10, 1769 (A-481.1) and LEASE FROM JOHN POSEY TO GEORGE WASHINGTON, APRIL 23, 1770 (RM-1022, MS-5650) already in Mount Vernon's possession, demonstrate Washington's longstanding interest in acquiring this tract of Posey's land. This third and final document, negotiating the sale of the property to Washington, tells the story of his eventual success in acquiring the land and expanding his Mount Vernon estate. Captain John Posey was a veteran of the French and Indian War, and George Washington's neighbor. John Posey's home, Rover's Delight, was just a mile downriver, southwest, of Mount Vernon. Posey farmed his plantation and operated a public ferry across the Potomac to Maryland. Posey was a friend of Washington's and often joined him in fox hunts and to play cards. John Posey suffered financial trouble throughout the 1760's and took loans from George Washington as well as other creditors. For example, on October 1, 1763, Washington took a £700 mortgage on Posey's property. Over the years the interest on Posey's debts grew and by October 1769 Posey's debt to Washington had grown to nearly 1,000 pounds Virginia currency. On October 10, 1769, George Washington surveyed the land later purchased in this agreement (see A-481.1). At that time this portion of land was under dispute between Posey and John West. As a result of the demands of Posey's many creditors, the remainder of Posey's Virginia property, which was not under dispute, was auctioned off under court order on October 23, 1769. With the 1769 sale, Washington was recompensed for his loans to Posey and Washington was able to acquire 200 acres of Posey's land. However, Washington also desired ownership of the small area of disputed land which contained Posey's ferry and fishery. Fortunately for Washington, Posey soon found himself back in debt. On April 23, 1770, George Washington began to lease from Posey the land which had been under dispute between Posey and John West. Washington was interested in leasing this land because it was located adjacent to Mount Vernon and on the Potomac River very close to his fishing and shipping operations. With this 1770 lease, Washington assumed the management of Posey's land and ferry. At some point during the following year, Posey resettled in Queenstown on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Washington continued to lease this land until finally acquiring it with this purchase document in 1772. THE PAPERS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON state that the eventual purchase of this tract of land took place on June 8, 1772, because a deed of release from Posey to Washington now in the Rosenbach Museum and Library in Philadelphia carries this date (Colonial Series Vol. 8 187). However, this official purchase agreement in the collection of Mount Vernon is dated June 10, 1772, and an inscription notes court was held on October 19, 1772. By the time Washington made this agreement Posey was so broke that Washington was able to acquire the land, as well as Posey's house, ferry and horse-all for 50 pounds (Rees 154). Witness Jonathan Palmer was George Washington's master carpenter. Once Washington began leasing Posey's land, Washington had Palmer and his family move into Posey's home. Washington records this in his diary on May 16, 1770. It is because of Palmer's place of residence and connection to Posey and Washington that Palmer was eventually selected as one of the witnesses to this purchase agreement.

      Conservation

      This document was conserved by Frank Mowery of the Folger Shakespeare Library on January 11, 2009. He described the document's condition, "This document was split into three pieces, with numerous tears at folds and along edges, with a few areas of loss at the corners and along the left margin and at the corners of folds." Mr. Mowery described his treatment, "The document was bathed in an ethanol and water bath to remove soluble acids. It was then extensively mended and the losses were filled with specially toned Japanese paper, adhered with zin shofu wheat starch paste. Mends were on the verso and were toned with pastel. It was deacidified and encapsulated in Mylar." For photographs of the document before and after this treatment see the object file.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1772.10.06 RM-490; MS-5518
      Survey, for Joseph Fox
      1772 October 6English.
      Scope and Contents

      Inscription with a date of 1774. Then Hanover Co. (now Louisa Co.) Virginia.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1772.10.28 W-1236
      Indenture, Deed of release, Charles West
      1772 October 28English.
      Scope and Contents

      Witnessed by G. Johnston, John Thornton, John Gunnell, Matthew Campbell.

      Proved at court 16 Nov. 1772, signed by P. Wagoner.

      Receipt for £605 on reverse signed by West and same witnesses.

      Docketed "West to Washington Release Nov. 1772 Nov. 18" etc.

      For 484 acres "Land lying in Fairfax County on the head of Dogues' creek", part of the tract West's wife Ann Brown inherited from her father who bought it from Zephaniah & Valinda Wade from the head of Dogue Run creek to W-n's stone mill house etc. for £605.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1774.08.15 RM-851 ; MS-5306
      Document, Sales of Furniture
      1774 August 15English.
      Scope and Contents

      When George William and Sally Fairfax moved to England before the Revolutionary War, they asked their neighbor and friend George Washington to help them rent their Belvoir estate and sell the mansion's furnishings. On August 15, 1774, Washington administered an auction of their furniture, utensils, and books and docketed this inventory titled Sales of Furniture at Belvoir. This document includes items listed for sale, their selling prices, and purchaser's totals. Purchasers listed include Washington and his stepson John Parke Custis. George Washington was the high bidder of the event, spending a grand total of £169.12.6, over half the total receipts. Autograph document, one-page folio, docketed by George Washington on the verso.

    • Text box: 33 folder: 1777.03.12 RM-1171; MS-5907
      Letter, to David Grier
      Washington, George, 1732-17991777 March 12English.
      Scope and Contents

      Letter, 1777 March 12, in Alexander Hamilton's hand, from George Washington, Morristown, N.J., to Lt. Col. David Grier of the 7th Pennsylvania Regiment ordering him to submit a complete return of his regiment and to take new recruits who have not had smallpox to Philadelphia where they would be inoculated against the disease.

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1783.00.00 W-179
      Plat, Ferry and French's farms
      Washington, George, 1732-17991783English.
      Scope and Contents

      Date on original catalog card appears [1783].

      Subdivisions of fields of Ferry and French's farm--on reverse is an explanation--in another hand, of the alterations in the arrangement of the field.

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1783.06.16 A-373.2
      Indenture, deed of William and Sarah Berry for Mount Vernon land
      1783 June 16English.
      Scope and Contents

      Signed by Wm. Barry and Sarah Barry. No witnesses.

      Receipts for money signed by Wm. Barry on reverse.

      Attested on reverse by P. Wagener, Comm. of Court.

      Deed for part of original Spencer grant, which had been sold to Zephaniah Wade & descended to William Barry--" ... William Barry and Sarah his wife for and in consideration of the Sum of three hundred and fifty pounds ... grant bargain ... unto the said George Washington ... all that moity of the remainder of the said five hundred acres of Land ... which upon the survey then made was found to contain one hundred and eighteen acres ..."

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1784.04.08 A-861
      Indenture, deed of lease, George and Elizabeth Muse
      1784 April 8English.
      Scope and Contents

      Printed mss., blanks filled in by G.W., laminated, oversize document, watermarks (armed figure, rampant lion with arrows, matto "Pro Patria").

      Signed by Geo. and Elizabeth Muse. Witnessed by Peyton Sterns, Jno. Hawkins, John Pendleton, Henry Pendleton & [J. Sims?].

      On reverse, in G.W.'s hand is Receipt for the £20 & "a Tract of Two thousand acres of Land lying in the county of Botetourt, on the River Kanhawa, which together is in full for the within mentioned Land." Singed by Geo. Muse.

      Proved on April 20, 1784, in Richmond by J. Brown, clerk.

      George Muse and wife Elizabeth "... for and in Consideration of the Sum of Twenty pounds Current Money of Virginia, and other valuable considerations ..." convey to George Washington "a certain tract of Land containing Three Thousand three hundred and twenty three acres in the County of Botetourt, on the East side of the Great Kanhawa River ..."

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1786.04.20 A-516.9
      Indenture, deed of lease, John Ariss
      1786 April 20English.
      Scope and Contents

      Signed by John Arris, Witnessed by John Gaunt, Edwd. McCormick & Francis Waller.

      George Washington's signature does not appear; probably clipped for autograph.

      On reverse, docketed twice, "John Ariss to George Washington 700 Acres rent £60 and to pay Land Taxes" in hand of [G.A. Washington ?].

      A grant "for and during the Lives of the said John Ariss and his present wife Elizabeth Ariss Seven hundred Acres of Land, lying in the County of Berkeley on the Waters of Bullskin being Part of Several Tracts had by Deeds from the Proprietor of the Northern Neck ..." for "Sixty Pounds...to be paid in specie on the Twenty Fifth day of December in Each and Every Year ..."--also contains specifications for concerving timber on the land & planting trees, grass, and building houses.

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1786.11.13 2017-SC-001-002
      List of workmen employed at the Great Falls for the Potomack Company
      Washington, George, 1732-1799Gilpin, George, 1740-1813Fitzgerald, John, -1799
      1 Sheets 108 x 21 cm
      1786 November 13-December 20English.
      Scope and Contents

      Document signed by George Washington, George Gilpin, and John Fitzgerald listing about 85 employees of the Potomac Company. The employees include 7 overseers, 2 borers, 2 carpenters, 2 blacksmiths, 1 coaler, and 68 laborers. There are three women on the list - Nurse Margaret Cosgrove, Cook Mary Twinch, and Washer Polly Firth.

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1787.00.00 RM-595; MS-4480
      Survey, partial, Ferry Farm with two crop rotation tables
      1787English.
      Scope and Contents

      Portion of a large folio document containing approximately half of a survey of Ferry Plantation and 2 crop rotation tables for 1787 and 1797, entirely in George Washington's hand.

    • Text box: 34 folder: 1787.03.01 RM-838; MS-5366
      Document, Society of the Cincinnati certificate for James Williams of Virginia
      Society of the Cincinnati1787 March 1English.
      Scope and Contents

      Engraved Society of the Cincinnati certificate for James William, Esquire of Virginia. As president of the Society, George Washington signs the document at Mount Vernon on March 1, 1787. The document is also signed by secretary Henry Knox. Certicate is mounted to a board and has some staining and a tear.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1787.04.11 RM-986; MS-5603
      Document, List of Workmen employed at the Great Falls
      1787 April 11-May 12English.
      Scope and Contents

      Columnar style. Includes names, occupation, number of days, rations and total amount due in Virginia currency.

      George Washington as an incorporator of the Potomac Company along with the signatures of John Fitzgerald and George Gilpin.

      List of workmen employed at the Great Falls by the Potomack Company digging the C&O Canal.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1788.00.00 W-370
      Survey, distances from Cameron to Colchester
      Washington, George, 1732-17991788English.
      Scope and Contents

      Survey by George Washington of distances from Cameron to Colchester.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1788.12.15 RM-389; MS-2491
      Document, Reference and Observations (notes on roads near Mount Vernon)
      1788 December 15English.
      Scope and Contents

      Key to accompany 1788 map of roads in MV area (also in MV collection) a summary of existing roads and recommendations for improving roads.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1793.10.25 RM-690; MS-4702
      Document, Articles of Agreement with Thomas Green
      1793 October 25English.
      Scope and Contents

      Document signed, docketed by Washington. Body of text in handwriting of Bartholomew Dandridge. Witnessed by Dandridge and signed by Green.

      Renewal of Green's yearly contract as overseer for the slave carpenters at Mount Vernon.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1794.03.00 RM-595; MS-4481
      Account, ledger account of kitchen staples
      1794 MarchEnglish.
      Scope and Contents

      Ledger account of kitchen staples purchased for the Presidential household in Phila. for Mar. 3-16, 1794, entirely in the hand of GW. A leaf from ledger in oversize manuscripts which begins Apr. 1794.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1794.04.00 W-678
      Account, ledger account of kitchen staples
      Washington, George, 1732-17991794 April-JuneEnglish.
      Scope and Contents

      Day by day account in G.W.'s hand, of amt. and price of each item of food bought during the period--for month of June, no day by day account is included, but a total of each thing for 30 days of June.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1795.06.27 RM-1223
      Document, three-language ship passport
      1795 June 27English.
    • Text box: 35 folder: 1796.02.01 RM-1108; MS-5788
      Broadside, Land to Rent and Sell
      1796 February 1English.
      Scope and Contents

      Printed Broadside.

      Signed in print by George Washington.

      Some of George Washington's land at Mount Vernon to be sold or rented.

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1799.07.00 A-366.65; W-1475
      Document, Slave Census
      Washington, George, 1732-17991799 JulyEnglish.
      Scope and Contents

      Lists Mount Vernon enslaved people, their relationships, occupations, and place of residence on the estate -- a list of "the negroes hired from Mrs. French." Autograph document, entirely in hand of George Washington, oversize document, laminated, George Washington's complete watermark. | Date on original catalog card appears [1799][July]. | [Probably prepared for information of his executors at the time he was drawing his will in July, 1799]. |

    • Text box: 35 folder: 1799.12.07 RM-648; MS-4579
      Letter, to Robert Lewis
      1799 December 7English.
      Scope and Contents

      Washington writes that the recent death of John Airess, who had leased one of the Shenandoah farms, may give Lewis an opportunity to take over the lease. This in turn would give Washington a chance to transfer some slaves from Mount Vernon. He mentions that "Mrs. Lewis has a girl born." See also GW to R. Lewis, 8/18/99.

    • Text box: 35 folder: ND1 RM-1156; MS-5875
      Document, rotation with annual plow schedule
      Washington, George, 1732-1799undatedEnglish.
      Scope and Contents

      Pair of plans for crop rotation and the plowings it required in the hand of George Washington. One plan is neatly headed "Rotation by AW with the Plowings necessary to carry it into effect." The initials may refer to John Augustine Washington (1736-1787), for whom this plan may have been devised. The second plan is similarly headed "Rotation by CW...," and was perhaps intended for Corbin Washington's use. Both plans are based on 75 acre plots of farmland. The number of days to plow or harrow the plot is carefully tabulated at the right of the list. In the lower part of each plan, Washington lists, month-by-month the sequence of plowings and harrowings, to calculate the labor needed.

    • Text box: 35 folder: ND2 W-515
      Survey, notes and plot of grounds in Northeast part of the pasture at Mount Vernon
      Washington, George, 1732-1799undatedEnglish.