A Guide to the Virginia Geological Survey, Records, 1834-1903 Geological Survey, Virginia, Records, 1834-1903 24815

A Guide to the Virginia Geological Survey, Records, 1834-1903

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 24815


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Library of Virginia

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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: John Salmon

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
24815
Title
Records, 1834-1903
Physical Characteristics
3.45 cubic feet [10 boxes]
Creator
Virginia Geological Survey.
Physical Location
State Government Records Collection, Virginia Geological Survey (Record Group 51)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia Geological Survey, Records, 1834-1903. Accession 24815, State Government Records Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Emma Savage Rogers, May 10, 1903.

Biographical/Historical Information

The Geological Survey of Virginia was conducted in two phases. First, under an act passed by the General Assembly on March 6, 1835, a geological reconnaissance of the state was made to compile data of a general nature on geological features, and chemical compositions of soils, minerals and mineral waters for a report to the next session of the General Assembly.

Then the geological survey itself, which was devoted to a more detailed study than the reconnaissance, was established by an act of the General Assembly on February 26, 1836. This survey was to provide a careful and accurate chemical examination and analysis of various soils, and principal ores, marls, saline and mineral waters. Other goals of the survey were to determine the height of principal mountains, construct a complete geological map of the state for engraving, and to collect and catalog specimens of rocks, fossils, ores, mineral, compounds, and organic remains, so that there would be a sufficient amount to distribute to institutions of higher learning. Both acts called for the appointment of a geologist by the Board of Public Works, and in each case Professor William Barton Rogers of the University of Virginia was appointed. He was responsible for supervising the survey, submitting annual reports on its progress, rendering geological sections and a geological map of the state, analyzing minerals and waters for their chemical content, and distilling all the collected data into a final report at the conclusion of the survey. Members of his staff included William A.E. Aikin, George W. Boyd, Caleb Briggs, Jr., Charles B. Hayden, James Rogers and Israel Slade.

William Barton Rogers was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 7, 1804, the son of a professor of physical sciences. He attended the College of William and Mary in 1820 and 1821, taught school at Windsor, Maryland, in 1826, was appointed a lecturer at the Maryland Institute in Baltimore in 1827, and succeeded his father in 1828 as professor of chemistry and physics at the College of William and Mary. On February 9, 1835, when enthusiasm for a geological survey of Virginia was running strong in the General Assembly where a bill had been introduced, Rogers appeared before a House committee appointed to study the matter and drafted the committee's report to the House of Delegates recommending the establishment of the survey. The next evening, February 10, 1835, Rogers delivered an extemporaneous address to a joint session of the House and Senate describing the benefits of a geological survey to the state. As a result of Rogers's efforts, the General Assembly passed a bill on March 6, 1835, authorizing the Board of Public Works "to appoint a suitable person to make a geological reconnaissance of the state, with a view to the general geological features of our territory . . . and to report to the next general assembly a plan for the prosecution of a geological survey of the state." The board appointed William B. Rogers to the position on March 25, and he accepted it on April 2. His brother Henry Darwin Rogers was appointed as his assistant.

The geological survey was continued by annual appropriations of state funds until 1842, when the General Assembly terminated the project because of a financial recession. In 1844 Rogers engaged Russell Smith, a Pennsylvania artist, to draw sketches and sections for the final report. Unfortunately, the money necessary to complete the report was never authorized by the General Assembly, although Rogers continued to hold the records of the survey until his death in the hope of receiving funds.

Rogers spent the summer of 1835 in the field, making notes for his report, collecting samples of rocks, ores, and mineral waters for chemical analysis, and compiling data for geological sections of the state to show the different mineral strata. In August he accepted a call to the chair of natural philosophy at the University of Virginia. The first half of the school year was employed in teaching and in drawing sections, analyzing specimens, and drafting his report to the General Assembly. The report was submitted to the House of Delegates by Governor Littleton W. Tazewell as president of the Board of Public Works on January 11, 1836. The report met with the approval of the General Assembly, which passed an act on February 29, 1836. Rogers was expected to make annual reports on the progress of the survey, as well as a final report when the survey was completed.

In the spring Rogers gave his assistants their orders for the season, pointing out particular areas for investigation. Until the school year ended Rogers was confined to the University, maintaining contact with his assistants in the field through the unreliable mail system. The assistants tried their best to keep Rogers informed as to their activities and whereabouts, their problems with sick horses, broken instruments, and lack of funds. As soon as he could, Rogers took to the field himself, visiting his assistants, conducting his own investigations and traveling to other states to study and compare the geology of Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New England. When the University reconvened Rogers returned to Charlottesville, once again relying on the mails to communicate with his assistants. As winter approached the assistants visited Rogers on their way to their homes, turning reports and specimens over to him for study during the winter. By the first of the new year Rogers had prepared his annual report for the General Assembly and was making plans for the ensuing season. After the Panic of 1837, Rogers was forced to worry each year about whether the survey would be continued for another year.

In 1853 Rogers resigned his position at the University of Virginia, wishing to move to Boston, Massachusetts, to work with his brother Henry. Before leaving Virginia, however, Rogers spent almost three months in early 1853 in Richmond, in a last, futile attempt to persuade the General Assembly to fund the final report. On March 8, 1854, Rogers left Virginia for Boston and a new career as a founder and first president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Even after he left Virginia, Rogers continued to seek funding for the final report, but did not succeed. On May 30, 1882, as he was delivering a commencement address at MIT, Rogers collapsed and died.

Rogers's widow, Emma Savage Rogers, began a time consuming project of sifting through her husband's papers, selecting some for publication and destroying others. She presented the surviving papers to the Virginia State Library in two lots, the first about 1900 and the second on May 10, 1903. At first the papers were supposed to be the personal papers of William B. Rogers and were so described. However, the Archives staff came to realize that the documents were in fact state records which Rogers kept in his possession pending the writing of his final report. Accordingly, the records are now regarded as a subgroup within the records of the Board of Public Works. Records primarily concerned with the administration of the funds for the survey by the second auditor and the Board of Public Works have been described already by John S. Salmon, comp., in Board of Public Works Inventory (Richmond: Virginia State Library, 1978), entry 21, "Geological Survey."

William E. A. Aikin, of Maryland, appointed assistant geologist effective June 1, 1837. Resigned April 13, 1839. Was teaching at the Baltimore Medical School in 1873; George W. Boyd, of New York, appointed assistant geologist on May 1, 1838. He died of asthma on September 23, 1840, in the home of William B. Rogers at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; Caleb Briggs, Jr., of New York, appointed assistant geologist on June 1, 1839. He was paid for his services to July 1, 1842; Charles B. Hayden (January 22, 1817-January 28, 1883), of Connecticut, attended the College of William and Mary, and probably was a student of William B. Rogers, 1834-1835. Appointed assistant geologist effective April 1, 1837. Board of Public Works received notice that he had "retired from the service" on June 11, 1840. He taught school in Smithfield, Virginia, and later became a lawyer; Samuel Lewis, appointed assistant geologist effective June 1, 1840. He was paid for his services to March 1, 1841; Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., appointed assistant geologist on April 15, 1840. He was paid for his services to June 2, 1842; Henry Darwin Rogers (August 1, 1808-May 29, 1866), of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, appointed assistant geologist on April 2, 1836. Resignation received by the Board of Public Works on May 8, 1837. Directed New Jersey and Pennsylvania state geological surveys, later collaborated with William B. Rogers on a paper concerning mountain elevation; James Blythe Rogers (February 11, 1802-June 15, 1852), of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, appointed assistant geologist in May 1837. Resignation received by the Board of Public Works on April 15, 1840. Reappointed assistant geologist on May 1, 1841. He was paid for his services to August 1, 1842. The major contribution of his career was the development of methods of chemical analysis.

Robert Empie Rogers (March 29, 1813-September 6, 1884), of Baltimore, Maryland. He was a chemist with the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and was professor of chemistry at the University of Virginia, where he collaborated with William B. Rogers, and at the University of Pennsylvania; Israel Slade, of Pittstown, New York. Employed by William B. Rogers (accepted offer on April 16, 1838) who paid him with his own funds. Appointed assistant geologist on April 15, 1840. He was paid for his services to July 1, 1842; A Maxwell Walker, appointed topographical surveyor on May 5, 1836. His resignation was received by the Board of Public Works on March 11, 1837; William Thompson Russell Smith (April 26, 1812-November 8, 1896), known as Russell Smith, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, but moved to Pennsylvania in 1819 with his parents. The family eventually settled in Pittsburgh, where Smith became interested in painting and drama. He combined the two interests by painting scenery for the stage, and had a successful career that took him eventually to Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. It was probably while he lived in Milestown near Philadelphia during the late 1830's and early 1840's that Smith became acquainted with William B. Rogers on one of the geologist's visits to the area. Rogers engaged Smith to execute a series of drawings of significant geological formations in Virginia for use in Rogers's projected final report on the state geological survey. Smith travelled to Charlottesville in June 1844, and from July to September he and Rogers explored western Virginia. Smith used the resulting sketches for his own benefit as well as for Rogers's, making them the basis for oil landscapes for exhibition. Eventually he mailed the sketches to Rogers for him to keep.

Scope and Content Information

The records are divided into three series: Series I: Correspondence of William B. Rogers, 1836-1903; Series II: Reports, sections, lists, and field notes, 1834-1884; and Series III: Drawings of Russell Smith, c. 1844.

Series I: The correspondence to Rogers was primarily from his assistants. Also included are letters from George W. Summers, member of the House of Delegates, and James Brown, Jr., Second Auditor of Virginia. There were also letters from Rogers and a letter from Emma Rogers, his wife, to William W. Scott, Librarian of the State Library.

Series II: The field notes and reports are from 1834 to 1884. William B. Rogers was one of four brothers, all of whom were noted chemists and geologists. Two brothers, Henry Darwin Rogers and James Blythe Rogers, served as his assistants at different times during the conduct of the survey, while the third, Robert Empie Rogers, contributed his observations on the geology of the Northern Neck. Rogers's other assistants, appointed by the Board of Public Works, were: William E. A. Aikin, George W. Boyd, Caleb Briggs, Jr., Charles B. Hayden, Samuel Lewis, Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., Henry Darwin Rogers, James Blythe Rogers, Robert Empie Rogers, Israel Slade and A. Maxwell Walker. In the spring, Rogers gave his assistants their orders for the season, pointing out particular areas for investigation, and as winter approached the assistants gave him reports on the geological, chemical and topographical discoveries which they had made.

Series III: Rogers personally hired a Pennsylvania artist, Russell Smith, to make drawings for the final report; Smith and Rogers spent most of the summer of 1844 afield for this purpose. The 52 sketches depict geographical features and are done on paper and cardboard, in ink, pencil, pastels, oils and watercolor.

Organization

Organized into the following three (3) series: I. Correspondence of William B. Rogers from 1836 to 1903; II. Field notes and reports from 1834 to 1884; and III. Drawings of Russell Smith, c. 1844.

Contents List

Series I: Correspondence of William B. Rogers, 1836-1903

The correspondence to Rogers was primarily from his assistants. Also included are letters from George W. Summers, member of the House of Delegates, and James Brown, Jr., Second Auditor of Virginia. There were also letters from Rogers and a letter from Emma Rogers his wife, to William W. Scott, Librarian of the State Library.

Arranged chronologically.

  • Box 1Folder 1
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1836
    • George W. Summers, Richmond, to [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, February 15, 1836
      George W. Summers, Richmond, to [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, notifying him that the bill providing for a geological survey has passed the House of Delegates and is expected to pass the Senate easily; also discussing the printing of Rogers's geological report by order of the General Assembly. 2 pp. with address leaf. Summers was a member of the House of Delegates from Kanawha County in 1836.
    • J[ames]Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 5, 1836
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, enclosing a copy of the act providing for a geological survey of Virginia; informing him that the Board of Public Works had, on April 2, 1836, appointed him geologist; and asking for a written proposal of how he intended to carny out the intentions of the Act. 1 p. with address leaf. James Brown, Jr. (June 1780-January 3, 1859) was Second Auditor of Virginia from March 1, 1823, to December 31, 1852, and Secretary of the Board of Public Works from March 1, 1823, to March 31, 1851.
    • James E. Heath, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 6, 1836
      James E. Heath, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning a check written for Rogers on the Bank of Virginia and the safe arrival of some geological profiles for the engraver; also mentioning "the pleasure afforded me" in meeting "Mr. Bancroft," to whom he showed some of "our ancient state records." 2 pp. with address leaf. James E. Heath (July 8, 1792-June 28, 1862) was First Auditor of Virginia from January 8, 1820, to February 28, 1850. George Bancroft (October 8, 1800-January 17, 1891), American historian and diplomat, author of a ten-volume History of the United States.
    • R[obert] E[mpie] R[ogers], Westmoreland Courthouse, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 24, 1836
      R[obert] E[mpie] R[ogers], Westmoreland Courthouse, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his observations of the geology of the Fredericksburg--King George--Westmoreland area, particularly in regard to the Stratford cliffs on the Potomac River, where he found fossil vertebra and ribs. 4 pp. Robert Empie Rogers (March 29, 1813-September 6, 1884), chemist and geologist, was a brother of William Barton Rogers.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 28, 1836
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the bad weather, his lack of clean clothes, observations of a geological nature, and his plans for travel. 3 pp. with address leaf. Charles B. Hayden was appointed assistant geologist by the Board of Public Works on May 4, 1837, to be effective retroactively to April 1, 1837. A Charles B. Hayden was a student at the College of William and Mary during the 1834-1835 session while William Barton Rogers taught there.
    • A. M[axwell] Walker, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 11, 1836
      A. M[axwell] Walker, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, giving his address as "Mr. Duvals Powhatan House," and discussing his progress in drawing maps. 2 pp. with address leaf. Walker was appointed topographical surveyor by the Board of Public Works on May 5, 1836. His resignation was received by the Board on March 11, 1837.
  • Box 1Folder 2
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1837
    • Hezekiah Daggs, Botetourt Springs, to Professor [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, March 23, 1837
      Hezekiah Daggs, Botetourt Springs, to Professor [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, sending him five bottles of sulphur water, a sample of limestone, and a piece of shale; describing the strata encountered in sinking his shafts; asking whether Rogers thinks he will strike coal; and inviting Rogers to stay at his house if he visits Botetourt Springs in the summer. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Smithfield, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 6, 1837
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Smithfield, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his plans to survey the branches of Pagan Creek for blue marl; complaining of the difficulty of making adequate notes on such small maps as he has to use; and commenting on the general business of the survey. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 9, 1837
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, correcting an error in his previous letter to Rogers concerning the salaries of Rogers and his assistants, and acknowledging with regrets the receipt of Henry Rogers's resignation as assistant geologist. 1 p. with address leaf. Henry Darwin Rogers (August 1, 1808-May 29, 1866), geologist, was best known for his 1858 report on the geological survey of Pennsylvania. Brother of William Barton Rogers. He was appointed assistant geologist for the Virginia geological survey on April 2, 1836.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Hot Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 9, 1837
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Hot Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the lack of mail from his family and reporting on his progress in examining Dibbrell's, Sweet, and other springs in the region near Covington. 3 pp. with address leaf.
  • Box 1Folder 3
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1838
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 20, 1838
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him of the Board of Public Works's approval of his plans for the ensuing season and reviewing matters concerning Rogers's expense account. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • Timothy Taylor, Jr., Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 22, 1838
      Timothy Taylor, Jr., Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for an analysis of a sample of limestone which Taylor had given Rogers for James McIlhaney. 1 p. with address leaf. Timothy Taylor was a member of the House of Delegates from Loudoun County in 1838. James McIlhaney had been a State Senator representing Loudoun and Fairfax counties and again held that office during the 1839-1840 session.
    • V.[two initials illegible] Alexander, Baltimore, Maryland, to Dr. W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Charlottesville, April 7, 1838
      V.[two initials illegible] Alexander, Baltimore, Maryland, to Dr. W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Charlottesville, recommending Septimus Norris of Havre de Grace, Maryland, formerly employed by Benjamin Henry Latrobe, for any position which might be available with the Virginia Geological Survey. 1 p. with address leaf. William E. A. Aikin was appointed an assistant geologist by the Board of Public Works effective June 1, 1837. Benjamin Henry Latrobe, Jr. (December 19, 1806-October 19, 1878), son of the architect and engineer, was assistant engineer for the construction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1838.
    • Judge J. M. Allen, Syracuse, New York, to William Taylor, Washington, D. C., April 9, 1838
      Judge J. M. Allen, Syracuse, New York, to William Taylor, Washington, D. C., asking Taylor to obtain a copy of William Barton Rogers's report on the geological survey of Virginia, or that part of it dealing with "Brine Springs, and the manufacture of Salt"; offering to reciprocate the favor by sending Rogers any geological reports he might want; and reviewing a report on salt he had just obtained. 1 p. with address leaf. William Taylor (October 12, 1791-September 16, 1865)was a physician as well as a member of the U. S. House of Representatives, March 4, 1833-March 3, 1839, from Onondaga County.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 14, 1838
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, accepting his offer of a position as assistant geologist with the geological survey of Virginia; desiring a change in the terms of employment with regard to travel expenses and servants; stressing that his geological experience has not included minerals of the tertiary region; describing his immediate travel plans; and enclosing letters of recommendation from James Renwick and John Torrey. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • James Renwick, Columbia College, New York, to W. B. Rogers, Charlottesville, April 14, 1838
      James Renwick, Columbia College, New York, to W. B. Rogers, Charlottesville, recommending George W. Boyd for the position of assistant geologist. 1 p.
    • John Torrey, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, to W. B. Rogers, Charlottesville, April 14, 1838
      John Torrey, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, to W. B. Rogers, Charlottesville, recommending George W. Boyd for the position of assistant geologist. 1 p. with address leaf. George W. Boyd was appointed assistant geologist by the Board of Public Works on May 1, 1838. He died on September 23, 1840, at the home of William Barton Rogers in Charlottesville. James Renwick (May 30, 1792-January 12, 1863), a leading topographical engineer and chemist. John Torrey (August 1796-March 10, 1873), physician, chemist, and botanist whose naturalist system of classification had great influence on American botanists.
    • Israel Slade, Pittstowne, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 16, 1838
      Israel Slade, Pittstowne, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, accepting his offer of employment and expressing his gratitude. 2 pp. with address leaf. Israel Slade served as an assistant geologist and was paid in part by Rogers with his own personal funds.
    • John Sites, Rawley Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 16, 1838
      John Sites, Rawley Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for an analysis of Rawley Springs water and describing the characteristics of a new spring he had discovered last fall. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • E. Foreman, Baltimore, Maryland, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 16, 1838
      E. Foreman, Baltimore, Maryland, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for a response to his earlier letter seeking employment. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 18, 1838
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing amounts due and amounts already paid to Rogers and his assistants in salary and stating that only 1,000 copies of Rogers's report will be printed. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 24, 1838
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging his receipt of and response to a letter from Rogers and stating that he is prepared to accept Rogers's original offer of employment. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 30, 1838
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning letters which apparently crossed in the mail and repeating his acceptance of Rogers's original offer. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • Broadside. Medical College of Richmond, Virginia. Winter term of lectures, May 1, 1838
      Broadside. Medical College of Richmond, Virginia. Winter term of lectures ... [list of faculty and information on term to begin November 5, 1838, of the medical department of Hampden-Sydney College] Aug. L. Warner, M.D., Dean of the Faculty. 1 p. with address leaf to Dr. Rogers, University of Virginia.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 2, 1838
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letters of April 25 and 27, informing him that he will leave New York by May 6 and giving instructions as to where to direct mail to him in Virginia. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Hot Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 9, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Hot Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, thanking him for sending a check; discussing his financial needs; describing his geological observations in the neighborhood of Fincastle; and mentioning his plans to visit Catawba Iron Works. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • E[ben] N. Hosford (?), Troy, New York, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 14, 1838
      E[ben] N. Hosford (?), Troy, New York, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, referring to an earlier letter to Rogers seeking employment and to an expected response from Rogers which probably had miscarried and informing Rogers that since he has been induced to take the position in New York vacated by George W. Boyd, he will not be able to work with Rogers this summer but would like to be taken on the following summer if the opportunity is available. 2 pp. with address leaf. Eben Norton Horsford (?) (July 27, 1818-January 1, 1893), chemist, graduated from Rensselaer (?) Polytechnic Institute in 1838, then worked on the New York State Natural History Survey. After further study in Germany, 1844-1847, he introduced European chemical knowledge and methods to America at Harvard and later made a fortune in Rumford Chemical Company.
    • J[ames] Brown, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 18, 1838
      J[ames] Brown, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning amounts deposited in the Bank of Virginia to Rogers's and William E. A. Aikin's credit, describing the fiscal problems of the geological survey, and speculating upon the likelihood of the General Assembly's dropping the survey from the budget. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Lafayette, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 17, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Lafayette, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing a peculiar conglomerate found on McAfee's Knob on Catawba Mountain; mentioning a box of specimens he sent from Catawba Iron Works and a box of specimens from the foot of North Mountain; reporting on plaster dug near Buford's Gap; and outlining his plans to proceed through Salem, Lafayette, Montgomery Courthouse, and Christiansburg. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Sweet Springs, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 19, 1838
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Sweet Springs, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that he was unable to inspect a fault line because the letter from Rogers instructing him to do so arrived too late; describing his geological investigations around Covington and Callaghan's and Peters Mountain; discussing his plans to continue along the western side of Peters Mountain; and commenting on the general business of the survey and on his financial problems. 6 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Grey Sulphur, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 23, [1838]
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Grey Sulphur, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, stating his disappointment in finding no mail waiting for him; reporting on the geology of Peters Mountain; and announcing his plans to proceed to Callaghan's. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • John Sites, Rawley Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 26, 1838
      John Sites, Rawley Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for the analysis of the Rawley Springs water which he wants to publish. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • J. W. Dibrell, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 26, 1838
      J. W. Dibrell, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, giving a description of Daggers Springs in Botetourt County, their location, and several routes to get to them and complaining about his financial misfortunes. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Newbern, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 26, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Newbern, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his procedures and the results of his analysis of a sample of Yellow Springs water through evaporation and the collection of residue; mentioning a box of specimens sent to Lynchburg; describing plans to go to Wythe Courthouse by way of the Lead Mines; and complaining of financial problems. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 29, 1838
      J[ames] Brown, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning funds deposited to the account of James B. Rogers, and commenting on an address Rogers had given. 1 p. with address leaf. James Blythe Rogers (February 11, 1802-June 15, 1852), chemist, brother of William Barton Rogers, was best known for his contributions to the development of methods of chemical analysis. He was appointed assistant geologist by the Board of Public Works in May 1837. He resigned in April 1840 and was reappointed assistant geologist by the Board of Public Works on May 1, 1841.
    • William Seymour, Moorefield, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 30, 1838
      William Seymour, Moorefield, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for the results of the chemical analysis of water from Howard's Lick Spring. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • Samuel McCamant, Grayson Courthouse, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 3, 1838
      Samuel McCamant, Grayson Courthouse, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for the results of the chemical analysis of spring water for the Grayson Sulphur Springs Company. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Saltville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 11, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Saltville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the breaking down of his horses; describing the geology of the Macks Mountains and Dry Run Gap; discussing the contents of a specimen box; and mentioning the roads made almost impossible by rain. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Seyberts, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 17, [1838]
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Seyberts, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his recent travels; complaining of the lack of mail from Rogers; discussing his financial problems; and describing the geology around Augusta Springs. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, White Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 20, 1838
      James B. Rogers, White Sulphur [Springs], Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, explaining the problems resulting from his having forgotten some weights for use in chemical analysis; giving the analysis of some spring water and describing the methods used to obtain it; mentioning plans to depart for the Blue Sulphur Springs; discussing the geology of Augusta Springs; describing a meeting with Dr. Daubeny; and referring to the state of his own health. 3 pp. with address leaf. Charles Giles Bridle Daubeny (February 11, 1795-December 13, 1867), M.D., F.R.S., was professor of chemistry and botany at Oxford University.
    • James B. Rogers, Blue Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 26, 1838
      James B. Rogers, Blue Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, expressing his concern about not receiving a letter from him; giving an analysis of Blue Sulphur Springs water; asking for instructions on how to proceed at the Salt and Red Sulphur Springs and a question about sandstone found on Muddy Creek Mountain; and stating his immediate plans for collecting samples. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Tazewell Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 27, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Tazewell Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his travels of the last ten days in eastern Tazewell County, in particular the geology of Abbs Valley; outlining his plans to proceed to Russell County in hope of meeting with General Johnson there; and mentioning financial matters. 4 pp.
    • William Robertson, Jr., Salt Sulphur Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 3, 1838
      William Robertson, Jr., Salt Sulphur Springs, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing a new spring opened by Erskine and Caruthers, informing him of the imminent arrival of a sample of water from it; and requesting an analysis as soon as convenient. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • Stephen Grubs, Nineveh, Frederick previous hitCounty next hit, to James B. Rogers, University of [Virginia], July 7, 1838
      Stephen Grubs, Nineveh, Frederick County, to James B. Rogers, University of [Virginia], writing Rogers to call upon him on his next trip to the area, as he knows more about minerals in the area and has more samples in his possession than anyone else in the vicinity. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, Blue Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, July 9, 1838
      James B. Rogers, Blue Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, giving an analysis of old and new springs there; describing the geology of the Crows Ferry-Sweet Springs region; and asking for information concerning his family. 4 pp.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Russell Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 10, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Russell Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, thanking him for his recent letters; discussing their proposed excursion down Guyandotte River; complaining about the local food; and mentioning samples sent by way of Lynchburg. 4 pp.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Osborn's Ford, Scott previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 19, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Osborn's Ford, Scott County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of Russell County and his plan to explore Scott and Lee Counties. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, Pearisburg, to William B. Rogers, Fincastle, July 23, 1838
      James B. Rogers, Pearisburg, to William B. Rogers, Fincastle, describing the geology of the New River Gap and Peters Mountain area and hoping to see him in Fincastle. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • R. H. Toler, J. N. Brooks, and William S. Reid, Jr., Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, [Lynchburg], July 21, 1838
      R. H. Toler, J. N. Brooks, and William S. Reid, Jr., Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, [Lynchburg], thanking him on behalf of the Lynchburg Young Men's Society for the lecture "delivered before them this evening," and requesting a copy for publication. 1 pp. with address leaf.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Cove Creek, Scott previous hitCounty next hit, to [William B. Rogers], n.p., July 26, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Cove Creek, Scott County, to [William B. Rogers], n.p., expressing surprise that Rogers had not received his earlier letters; describing his work between New River and Cove Creek; outlining his plans for exploring Tazewell and Mercer counties and Abbs Valley; and discussing the geology of Little Stoney Creek, the Clinch Mountain area, and the Powell's Valley vicinity. 4 pp., incomplete.
    • [William B. Rogers], Fincastle, to "Dear Sir" [Lynchburg Young Men's Society, Lynchburg], July 27, 1838
      [William B. Rogers], Fincastle, to "Dear Sir" [Lynchburg Young Men's Society, Lynchburg], regretting that he left Lynchburg in such haste that he forgot to reply "in form" to the request of the society. 1 p., incomplete.
    • W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Scott Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 12, 1838
      W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, Scott Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his work in Scott and Washington counties and the family problems which will require him to return to Baltimore in mid-October; discussing the geology of Lee County; and mentioning his trouble with his horses and servant. 4 pp.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Hedgesville, Berkeley previous hitCounty next hit, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 25, 1838
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Hedgesville, Berkeley County, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing what remains to be done in the area; discussing the hot and bug-infested mountains; mentioning some varieties of slate he has seen; and disagreeing with Rogers about olive slate alleged to exist between Little and Big Timber Ridge. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Waynesboro, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 10, 1838
      George W. Boyd, Waynesboro, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letter of September 8 and presenting a day by day account of his travels and observations of the geology of the mountains around Lexington and the Tye River Gap. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Luray, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 19 and 20, 1838
      George W. Boyd, Luray, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his route from Waynesboro to Luray; mentioning a two to three week old forest fire still burning near Brown's Gap and his visit to the Shenandoah Iron Works; and charting the relationship between the temperature at which water boils and various altitudes in the Blue Ridge. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, University of Virginia, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 22, 1838
      George W. Boyd, University of Virginia, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning a visit to Blackford's iron furnace and describing a ride up Stony Manpeak and the greenstone and various minerals found there. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, University of Virginia, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 27, 1838
      George W. Boyd, University of Virginia, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, stating that he had left specimens under the dining room table in a champagne bucket and noting other details for Rogers's benefit in concluding the season's work on the survey. 1 pp. with address leaf.
  • Box 1Folder 4
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1839
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, February 3, 1839
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letters of January 13 and 29; discussing financial matters, particularly those of Dr. [William E. A.] Aikin; speculating on the possibility that the General Assembly will suspend the continuation of the survey, and giving Aikin's account current with the state and with Rogers. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 20, 1839
      George W. Boyd, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, relating that on his way north he had seen both Henry D. Rogers and Robert Rogers in Philadelphia; giving prices for certain chemicals; presenting his plans for returning to Virginia in April; discussing mineral specimens he plans to bring; reviewing sarcastically a recent article concerning red sandstone; and mentioning a new book on silurian rocks. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • William E. A. Aikin, Baltimore, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 13, 1839
      William E. A. Aikin, Baltimore, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that he must resign from the survey because he has been appointed Governor of the Infirmary at the University of Maryland, a position which requires his continuous presence. 2 pp.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, April 15, 1839
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning financial matters; informing him that his reports have been printed and are at hand; and a postscript expressing his regrets over Rogers's having been thrown from a carriage and urging him not to overwork. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • [William B. Rogers], University of Virginia, to "Dear Henry" [D. Robers], n.p., April 17, 1839
      [William B. Rogers], University of Virginia, to "Dear Henry" [D. Robers], n.p., reporting on the "results of my experiments in regard to the composition and hydraulic character of our secondary limestones ... with an account of the method [used to separate] the magnesia and lime." 3 pp., incomplete [draft].
    • James B. Rogers, Millborough, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 15, 1838
      James B. Rogers, Millborough, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, referring to his lame horse; describing the geology of Panther Gap and Buffalo Gap; detailing his plans to proceed through Clifton Forge to the vicinity of Rich Patch; and discussing his need of a dentist. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • [William B. Rogers], University of Virginia, to [Caleb Briggs], n.p., April 20, 1839
      [William B. Rogers], University of Virginia, to [Caleb Briggs], n.p., offering him a position as assistant geologist, in place of Aikin, and describing the requirements of the job. 3 pp., incomplete.
    • George W. Boyd, Scottsville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 28, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Scottsville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the country between Charlottesville and Scottsville and between Scottsville and Warren along the James River and Kanawha Canal; reporting on some durable sandstone found at Green Mountain twelve miles west of Scottsville; and mentioning iron ore found at Scottsville. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 28, 1839
      Caleb Briggs, Jr., New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, accepting the offer of the position of assistant geologist; explaining the necessity of his visiting Boston and Ohio before coming to Virginia; stating his experience as head of the chemistry and natural history department at Rensellaer (sp.?) Polytechnic Institute and as assistant geologist on the geological surveys of New York and Ohio; and inquiring about a position on the faculty of Emory and Henry College. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 12, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his travels and the geology of the country between Scottsville and New Market, in the vicinity of New Market, between New Market and Warminster, and between Warminster and Maysville. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Maysville, Buckingham previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 19, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Maysville, Buckingham County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the country between Maysville and Lynchburg and discussing the Buckingham County gold mines. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Wythe previous hitCounty next hit, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 21 and 22, 1839
      I[srael] Slade, Wythe County, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning his analysis of the limestone of Blacksburg, Christiansburg, Newbern, Robison's Tract, and Little Walkers Mountain and asking for further instructions. 7 pp. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, White Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 23, 1838
      James B. Rogers, White Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning his lame horse, Dragon, and accusing William E. A. Aikin of mistreating him; presenting extracts from his notes describing Panther Gap, the gap at Clifton Forge, Brands Mountain, and Falling Spring Valley; and discussing the new construction at White Sulphur Springs. 8 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Albany, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 24, 1839
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Albany, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letter of May 13; enclosing a testimonial letter from Professor [Amos] Eaton [sent to Board of Public Works by Rogers and returned to Briggs on July 21, 1843, at his request]; and asking for further instructions. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Maysville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 26, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Maysville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the geology of Buckingham, Cumberland, and Prince Edward counties; discussing his lack of funds; and listing the contents of four boxes of specimens. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Broadside. Western Enquirer, Lewisburg, Virginia. To the Publick. White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier previous hitCounty next hit, Va. May 31, 1839
      Broadside. Western Enquirer, Lewisburg, Virginia. To the Publick. White Sulphur Springs, Greenbrier County, Va. [Testimonials as to the storage and keeping quality of water from the springs.] On reverse: Prof. Wm. B. Rogers, University, Va. 1 p.
    • George W. Boyd, Maysville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 2, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Maysville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of Buckingham, Cumberland, and Prince Edward counties. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, Frankfort, to [William B. Rogers, University of Virginia], June 4 and 5, 1839
      James B. Rogers, Frankfort, to [William B. Rogers, University of Virginia], giving him bad news of a broken down horse, bad weather, and a broken altitude thermometer; reporting on the geology of the Greenbrier River-Greenbrier Mountain area; discussing his plans to proceed toward New River; and mentioning his health. Attached is a section of the area described in the letter and a request for money and for a small pocket thermometer. 5 pp. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, White Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 5, 1839
      James B. Rogers, White Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his recent letter; answering questions posed about the geology of the mountains around Covington; commenting on Beard's Mountain and the new spring at White Sulphur Springs; asking for a new thermometer; and discussing the mail. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Columbus, [Ohio], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 6, 1839
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Columbus, [Ohio], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing Rogers that he had sent him a letter [on May 24] enclosing a testimonial from Professor Eaton, which he feared had miscarried, and asking if his presence on the survey was still desired. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Wythe Court House, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 8, [1839]
      I[srael] Slade, Wythe Court House, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letter of May 28; describing his suffering resulting from a piece of rock imbedding itself in his eye; and discussing the geology of Lick Mountain, New River, and Iron Mountain. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 10, 1839
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that the Board of Public Works had that day confirmed Rogers's appointment of Caleb Briggs as assistant geologist; discussing financial matters; and rendering an account of contingent expenses due Rogers. 1 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 10, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the geology of Amherst County, especially in the vicinity of Buffalo Ridge, White's Gap, Cold Mountain, Mount Pleasant, and Long Mountain; mentioning various persons he encountered on his way; outlining his plans to travel through Bedford, Campbell, Charlotte, Franklin, and Pittsylvania counties to Halifax County; hoping Rogers can join him; and discussing financial matters. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, Blue Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 14 and 15, 1839
      James B. Rogers, Blue Sulphur [Springs], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the area of Frankfort, the Great Levels, Culbertsons Creek, Brushy Ridge, Sinking Creek, and Greenbrier Mountain; including a section of the same area; including a section of the same area; and discussing the Blue Sulphur Springs. 4 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, Liberty, Bedford previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 17, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Liberty, Bedford County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the affliction of his horse, Dragon, and how he treated it and listing the contents of two sample boxes. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Wythe C[ourt] House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 20, 1839
      I[srael] Slade, Wythe C[ourt] House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, complaining that his trunk has been lost; discussing his problems with horses; mentioning his plans to examine Little Walkers Mountain; and describing the geology of the area around Walkers Creek, Burk's Garden, and Brushy Mountain. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Campbell Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 22, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Campbell Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing minerals found in Beford and Campbell counties. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Charlotte Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 26, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Charlotte Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of June 13; describing his plans to proceed to Danville, Leaksville, and back to Lynchburg to spend a few days drawing sections; and asking that his quarter's salary be sent to Lynchburg. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • James B. Rogers, Millers Locust Grove, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 27 and 28, 1839
      James B. Rogers, Millers Locust Grove, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the lameness of his horse, Billy, and describing the geology of Muddy Creek Mountain, Meadow Mountain, Guinn's Spring, the falls of New River, and the Little and Big Sewells. 4 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, Charlotte Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 27, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Charlotte Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of parts of Albemarle, Nelson, Buckingham, Cumberland, Amherst, Prince Edward, Bedford, Campbell, and Charlotte counties and describing what remained to be examined in those counties. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, Yellow Springs, Chester previous hitCounty next hit, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, Yellow Springs, Chester County, Pennsylvania, describing the geology of the areas around Leaksville, Smith River, White Oak Mountain, Pittsylvania Court House, Danville, and Campbell Court House. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[harles] B. Hayden, Woodstock, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, July 9, [1839]
      C[harles] B. Hayden, Woodstock, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, concerning his treatment of and recovery from a recent "digestive affection"; referring obscurely to the "Smoot affair," of which he took no "public notice;" and describing his plans to proceed to Strasburg, Martinsburg, and Winchester. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 11, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that he hoped Rogers could join him before September 1 and mentioning that he had visited Bedford and Franklin counties and planned to go to Patrick and Henry counties next. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Pittsylvania Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 1, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Pittsylvania Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the geology of Campbell, Bedford, Franklin, Pittsylvania, and Halifax counties; mentioning limestone used in Ross's new iron works and at the Rocky Mount furnace; commenting upon the proper stone to use as a hearthstone in an iron furnace; and mentioning the sections he had been drawing. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Marietta, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 3, 1839
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Marietta, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, regarding Rogers's trunk; describing coal beds along the Ohio River on the Virginia side; mentioning residents eager to render assistance to the geologists; and touching upon his health. 3 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Danville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 15, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Danville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, briefly describing limestone found in Patrick and Henry counties; mentioning an iron furnace and forge on Goblintown Creek in Patrick County; and noting globular greenstone found near Danville. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Wellsburg [Wellsville], Ohio, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 17, 1839
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Wellsburg [Wellsville], Ohio, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing limestone and coal ground near Wheeling, Virginia, and speculating on the extent of these seams and discussing an iron furnace and mines formerly in operation above Steubenville in Virginia. 4 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 22, 1839
      George W. Boyd, Lynchburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging Rogers's letter of September 7; describing a curious, large piece of sandstone with depressions like those caused by horses hooves near White Oak Mountain in Pittsylvania county and mentioning his plans to go by way of Amherst and Nelson counties to the University. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Middletown, Monongalia previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 14, 1839
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Middletown, Monongalia County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of Virginia along the Ohio River; presenting a table showing coal and other minerals found at various levels in the "Pittsburg Coal Series" near Wheeling; and mentioning his financial problems. 4 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 30, 1839
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing Rogers of his plans to proceed to Charlottesville because he has run out of money and discussing the problems of tracing the various "strata composing the Wheeling Series." 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, November 28, 1839
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the financial affairs of the survey and discussing the problems facing the General Assembly about to convene. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, December 7, 1839
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, regretting his leaving his section drawings and notes with Rogers when he had the means of working on them in New York and returning them to Virginia and proposing a four to six week visit to the University to catalog fossils. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, to W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, n.p., December 13, 1839
      William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, to W[illiam] E. A. Aikin, n.p., enclosing as much of the money demanded by Aikin as Rogers was able to procure and asking for a receipt; recalling his past liberality with Aikin in financial matters; reminding him that he was paid $200. more per year than any other assistant geologist; and stating that the amount and quality of work produced by Aikin was not worth the extra pay and the trouble he had caused Rogers. 2 pp., draft.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, December 19, 1839
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the financial affairs of the survey and predicting a great reduction of funds for the survey or its complete elimination as a result of economic conditions and the depleted state of the Treasury. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, December 26, 1839
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, wishing him "many happy returns of the season"; noting that he had received no response from Rogers to his letter of December 7; informing him that he had almost accompanied a friend to Trinidad; and saying that he planned to spend part of the winter in Charleston and Savannah and hoped to stop by Charlottesville on his way there. 1 p. with address leaf.
  • Box 1Folder 5
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1840
    • E. C. Howard, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, January 28, 1840
      E. C. Howard, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of January 23; referring to financial affairs; and telling him that James Brown, Jr., would have written Rogers himself if it were not for the press of business. 1 p. with address leaf. E. C. Howard was the second clerk in the Second Auditor's Office.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., University of Virginia, to William B. Rogers, Richmond, February 6, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., University of Virginia, to William B. Rogers, Richmond, describing specimens of limestones and including the amount of carb[olic?] acid found in each sample. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 19, 1840
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of March 16 and noting the deposit of funds to the credit of Rogers and Caleb Briggs, Jr.; wishing he would come to Richmond to settle his accounts for the year; and repeating what he had heard from members of the General Assembly: "that you will complete your duties during the year commencing 2d April next." 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 31, 1840
      George W. Boyd, New York, New York, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing Rogers that Henry D. Rogers's opinions of the Hudson River slates have been vindicated by New York geologists; presenting his plans to leave for Virginia on April 15 by way of Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Richmond; offering to take care of any business for Rogers that might need doing in those cities; and enclosing his account due April 1 (not found). 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 17, 1840
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letter of April 7; mentioning financial matters; informing him that the Board of Public Works had approved all of his plan of operation for the coming year except that part requesting an additional assistant; acknowledging receipt of James B. Roger's resignation and expressing his regrets; and expressing concern for his health. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Harrisonburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 19, [1840]
      I[srael] Slade, Harrisonburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the geology of Turk's Gap and Payne's Run and including rough pencil sketches of sections of the area described. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Robert Mills, Washington, D.C., to [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, April 25, 1840
      Robert Mills, Washington, D.C., to [William B.] Rogers, University of Virginia, asking for copies of Rogers's reports or other information pertaining to the geology of Jackson's River, in particular around Warm Springs and Hot Springs, and commenting on the importance of the survey and the mineral wealth of Virginia. 2 pp. with address leaf. Robert Mills (August 12, 1781-March 3, 1855), architect and engineer, was at this time Architect of Public Buildings for the federal government.
    • I[srael] Slade, Luray, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 28, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Luray, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the mountainous area around Luray. 4 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 3, 1840
      George W. Boyd, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology observed along the roads from Charlottesville to Richmond and mentioning repairs made to his buggy. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Cloverdale, to William Rogers, University of Virginia, May 5, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Cloverdale, to William Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning his baggage which had gone on the wrong stage and a $20 bank note which he had lost. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Culpeper Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 11, 1840
      George W. Boyd, Culpeper Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the geology along the roads from Richmond to Culpeper by way of Fredericksburg. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Front Royal, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 13, [1840]
      I[srael] Slade, Front Royal, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the charms of springtime in the mountains and describing the geology observed by taking different routes between Front Royal and Strasburg via Middletown. 4 pp.
    • I[srael] Slade, Snickers Ferry, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 20, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Snickers Ferry, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of May 4 and explaining why he must vary from Rogers's directions with regard to collecting specimens around Strasburg; discussing the geology of the country between Front Royal, Winchester, and Snickers Ferry; describing a sulphur spring at Fort Valley; and commenting on the state of his own and Rogers's health. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Israel Slade, Brocks Gap, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 23, [1840]
      Israel Slade, Brocks Gap, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the country around Hardy County, Virginia, including the Alleghany Mountain, the North Fork of the South Branch of the Potomac River, and various creeks. 4 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, Paris, Fauquier previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 24, 1840
      George W. Boyd, Paris, Fauquier County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the geology of the country along his route from Culpeper County through Fairfax to Fredericksburg and from there through Warrenton to Paris; stating his intention to travel to Alexandria, then up the Potomac River through Harper's Ferry; noting that some instruments he wanted had not yet arrived at Fredericksburg; and relating an encounter with a Louisa Railroad train in which his horse lay down with fright. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Marietta, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 28, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Marietta, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, stating that the horse and buggy arranged for him by Rogers had proved unsatisfactory and that he had to purchase new ones; asking for money for these purchases and for hiring a guide occasionally; and commenting on his health and the safe transportation of his boiling point thermometer. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Leesburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 7, 1840
      George W. Boyd, Leesburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning Boyd's health; giving an account of the geology encountered on his way around Upperville, Middleburg, Aldie, Leesburg, and Dranesville; and describing the superior qualities of a turnpike paved with serpentine instead of the usual greenstone and quartz. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 13, 1840
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of June 4; saying that $500 had been deposited to his credit; and warning him of a forthcoming request for additional explanations and vouchers before his expense account could be approved. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • George W. Boyd, Warrenton, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 14, 1840
      George W. Boyd, Warrenton, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning his geological observations in Loudoun County and along the Potomac River near Harper's Ferry. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Milford, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 16, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Milford, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, complaining of being delayed by a lame horse and discussing the geology around Harper's Ferry and Shanandale Springs. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Marietta, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 4, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Marietta, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, acknowledging receipt of his letters of June 4 and 21; discussing a check enclosed in the first letter and his concern over Rogers's health; concluding that there are no valuable coal beds along the Ohio River from Fishing Creek to Carr's River; describing the geology of the same area; and mentioning that he had recovered Rogers's trunk. 4 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Letart, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Letart, Ohio, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, acknowledging receipt of his recent letter; explaining why he could not follow Rogers's instructions with regard to the trunk; and describing the distribution of coal along the Ohio River above and below Parkersburg. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Carr's or Kerr's Run, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 18, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Carr's or Kerr's Run, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, stating that he had determined that the center of the coal basin lay somewhere between Big Mill Creek and Letart Falls and describing the geology of the area; giving an account of his recent illnesses; and answering, mostly in the negative, Rogers's inquiry as to the abundance of "fair ladies and interesting damsels" in western Virginia. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Point Pleasant, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 25, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Point Pleasant, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, hoping to meet with him soon to discuss matters pertaining to the geology of that part of the state; discussing the Carr's Run coal seam and the record of a boring for a salt well at the mouth of Leading Creek; and informing him of his plans to proceed to Guyandotte and his hopes of receiving a letter there. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Buchanan, to W. B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 29, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Buchanan, to W. B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, asking for a new thermometer to replace one which had been broken; describing the geology of Botetourt and Alleghany counties around Short Hill, Purgatory Mountain, Craig's Creek, Rich Patch Mountain, and Covington; discussing the lack of adequate maps and the difficulty of mapping the region; and mentioning the geology of the James River Gap. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Parkersburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 20, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Parkersburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning the length of time required to complete his survey of the Ohio River; discussing the coal seams in the region; mentioning a financial matter; giving news of his broken boiling point thermometer; and describing the sickness in the area which he had thus far escaped. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Christiansburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 26, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Christiansburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the intricate geology of the region from Buchanan to Christiansburg and asking for a letter and more detailed instructions as to what course to follow. 4 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, Warrenton, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 5, 1840
      George W. Boyd, Warrenton, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing his increasingly severe attacks of asthma, his attempts to carry on his work despite his health, and his hopes of joining Rogers at the University in a few days. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 8, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the difficulties encountered in making a section drawing of the strata along the Little Kanawha River and describing the geology of the region. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Wytheville, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 12, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Wytheville, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his two letters from White Sulphur Springs; outlining the difficulty of his work because of the rugged and wild terrain; and describing his route near New River. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Parkersburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 18, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Parkersburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing his work and the geology in the vicinity of Weston and Parkersburg and mentioning his plans for proceeding to Clarksburg and his need for money. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Israel Slade, Jeffersonville, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 27, [1840]
      I[srael] Slade, Jeffersonville, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the area around New River, East River, Mercer County, and Abbs Valley. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 28, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning the lack of mail; describing his work along the route of the North Western Turnpike; discussing his plans to proceed to Morgantown; and asking again for money. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Morgantown, to William B. Rogers, Richmond, October 8 and 10, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Morgantown, to William B. Rogers, Richmond, commiserating with him over the sickness and death of George W. Boyd; describing the geology of the country between Bridgeport and Morgantown; mentioning a map of a portion of Harrison County which he had drawn; and describing the coal beds found on Scot's Creek. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Scott Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 12, [1840]
      I[srael] Slade, Scott Court House, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his sufferings and those of his horse caused by the rough terrain between Tazewell Court House and Scott Court House and by the small amounts of food "served up in the most filthy and loathesome manner"; discussing the geology of Bear Town, Baptist Valley, and the Clinch River area; and mentioning a man he met named Wells who was examining coal seams and claimed to be employed by the state. 4 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Monongalia previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October [17], 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Monongalia County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing his exploration of Decker's Creek and the iron ores found there and revealing that he had hired Moses Wells, a resident of the area, to assist him. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Smithfield, Monongalia previous hitCounty next hit, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 29 and November 1, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Smithfield, Monongalia County, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning that he has completed a section drawing from Morgantown to the headwaters of Scots River; describing iron ore and coal seams found in the vicinity of Henry Clay Furnace and a forge near Ice's Ferry; stating that he has traced the strata of the area around White Day Creek; and telling of his need for more money and relief from foul weather. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Wytheville, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 31, 1840
      I[srael] Slade, Wytheville, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letter of September 28; answering, in response to Rogers's question, that he had filled almost five boxes full of specimens; and discussing the relative heights of Balsam Mountain and the Peaks of Otter and the cold weather. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Palatine Hill, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, November 14, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Palatine Hill, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing Rogers that he had gathered enough data for a section drawing of the Monongalia River region about 25 miles long and stating that the weather had turned so cold that he was about to start for the University but would need more money first. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, November 21, 1840
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letter of November 10 and the enclosed check and announcing his intention to complete the tracing of the Morgantown Coal Seam despite the increasingly disagreeable weather. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Charlottesville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, December 16, [1840]
      I[srael] Slade, Charlottesville, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, asking Rogers to make arrangements for him to draw his salary since deep mud on the road prevented Slade from coming himself. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, December 21, 1840
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of December 17 concerning Israel Slade's salary; expressing his regrets over Rogers's ill health; and voicing his fears of "great curtailments" in spending by the General Assembly. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, to Henry D. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1840
      William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, to Henry D. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, informing him that Israel Slade is about to leave for Philadelphia with iron ore samples for analysis, that Slade is highly nervous and needs adequate space in which to work, and that their brother Robert Rogers might "understand best how to get along with him"; wishing James or Robert Rogers might aid in the analysis; commenting on the coal fields near Richmond; noting that he always fretted over observations omitted by his assistants in the field and felt that he could satisfy his mind more with one week of his own field work than with "months" of that done by his assistants; worrying about the lack of news from Richmond on the fate of the survey in the General Assembly; and referring to family matters. 4 pp. [draft or copy?]
  • Box 1Folder 6
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1841
    • W. H. Brown, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 13, 1841
      W. H. Brown, Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, advising him that before the Board of Public Works can pay the amount due Rogers as administrator of George W. Boyd's estate, he must submit an affidavit as to the date of Boyd's death; stating that the health of Brown's farther (James Brown, Jr.) is improving; and informing him that the survey survived for another year by a close vote in the House of Delegates, but that it had not yet passed in the Senate. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • Temple Gwathmey, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 19, 1841
      Temple Gwathmey, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, saying that he had heard that Rogers's report concerning the coal of Chesterfield County placed the coal taken from Mr. Heth's deep mine in a category inferior to any other south side coal; that it was the impression in Richmond that Heth's coal was in fact superior rather than inferior; that there may have been an error in the Printing of Rogers's report; that if such was the case it should be corrected through early publication in the newspapers; and that Gwathmey would be glad to see to this correction for Rogers. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, Pittstown, New York, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, March 20, 1841
      I[srael] Slade, Pittstown, New York, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the rigors of winter in upstate New York and believing that spring was well advanced in Virginia; revealing that he had spent so much time in the company of his friends over the winter that he had hardly thought of geology; and regretting that the snow has prevented him from examining the strata in his neighborhood. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., McGee's Inn, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, April 29, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., McGee's Inn, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning a letter he forgot to mail and asking for a copy of Rogers's report for 1837-1838. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • Evan T. Ellicott, Monogalia Iron Works near Morgantown, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 1, 1841
      Evan T. Ellicott, Monogalia Iron Works near Morgantown, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, stating that he had read Rogers's last report and found it of great practical interest since he is engaged in iron manufacturing; that Caleb Briggs, Jr., had examined the area near the iron works last season; that a vein of hematite ore had been found on a hill near the Henry Clay furnace; that he would like to have a geologist come to examine the cleft in Laurel Mountain made by Cheat River, while Ellicott was at the iron works; and offering to send a sample of the hematite ore to Rogers. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 3, 1841
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that his and Israel Slade's claims had been allowed and the money deposited and that his brother James B. Rogers had been appointed assistant geologist effective May 1. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • I[srael] Slade, N. W. Turnpike at Kuykendall's, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 8, 1841
      I[srael] Slade, N. W. Turnpike at Kuykendall's, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, giving an account of the observations made by Slade and Caleb Briggs, Jr., on their route from Massanutten Mountain through Winchester to Kuykendall's. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, May 16, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, mentioning his journey from Winchester to Clarksburg in the rain and giving an account of the production of a salt well near Cheat River Bridge. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 1, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of May 20; informing him that he had completed the tracing of the Morgantown and Clarksburg coal seam; discussing a fossil stratum which he had traced last season; mentioning his plans to proceed to Morgantown, hire Moses Wells again, and visit Evan T. Ellicott; and expressing his need for another boiling point thermometer and an efficient assistant. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Israel Slade, Williamsport, Maryland, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 4, 1841
      Israel Slade, Williamsport, Maryland, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of May 17; replying, in answer to Rogers's question, that he had written Rogers twice in May; stating that he had visited the Massanutten Range; describing the mountains around Harpers' Ferry in both Virginia and Maryland; and informing Rogers that he had lost his letter of May 17 and asking him to repeat his instructions concerning the work to be done around Woodstock. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 8, 1841
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of May 28, and informing him that he had deposited the salaries of Caleb Briggs, Jr., and Samuel Lewis in the Bank of Virginia; and adding a personal note concerning Brown's recent illness, Rogers's health, and the approach of the raspberry season, and urging Rogers to come to Richmond and visit him there. 2 pp. with address leaf. Samuel Lewis was appointed by the Board of Public Works on July 11, 1840, to be assistant geologist in the room of Charles B. Hayden, effective June 1, 1840.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 15, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Clarksburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that he had completed his survey along Cheat River near Ellicott's iron works and that he had hired Moses Wells as a guide; noting that he hoped to complete the work in Lewis and Randolph counties within six seeks; and givinig Rogers directions for joining him in Clarksburg. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Israel Slade, Strasburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 21, 1841
      Israel Slade, Strasburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, complaining about the heat and describing the geology of the country between Williamsport, Maryland, and Strasburg. 4 pp.
    • Thomas Ridgeway, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 27, 1841
      Thomas Ridgeway, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, stating that he had broken his boiling point thermometer by setting it down next to a hornet's nest on a bank of the Monongahela River, then upsetting it when he was stung on the ear; asking Rogers to bring a new one if he came to join them; and requesting more money. 2 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 27, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, seconding Ridgeway's request for another boiling point thermometer; suggesting places for a rendezvous; and describing the coal seam at Weston. 1 p. with address leaf. Thomas Ridgeway, Jr., was appointed assistant geologist on April 15, 1840, in the room of Israel Slade, who had been appointed to the assistantship resigned by James B. Rogers.
    • Israel Slade, Woodstock, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 1, 1841
      Israel Slade, Woodstock, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that he had finished his survey of Cedar Creek and had boxed the fossils and other specimens for shipment; describing the geology of the area, some iron ore seen and collected, and the beauty of the country; and asking for more money. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Beverly, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 14, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Beverly, to William B. Rogers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, acknowledging receipt of Rogers's letters of June 27 and July 5; giving a detailed analysis of the geology found between Clarksburg and Beverly; and noting that Moses Wells will soon be leaving him to attend to urgent business. 6 pp. with address leaf.
    • Israel Slade, Beverly, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 19, 1841
      Israel Slade, Beverly, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, concerning the safe arrival of the new thermometer and discussing the geology of the Little North Mountain range. 2 pp.
    • T[homas] Ridgeway, Jr., [Beverly], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 19, 1841
      T[homas] Ridgeway, Jr., [Beverly], to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, thanking him for sending the thermometer and mentioning his plan to obtain a letter waiting for him at Weston. 2 pp.
    • Israel Slade, Bath previous hitCounty next hit, on Bull Pasture [River], to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July 31, [1841]
      Israel Slade, Bath County, on Bull Pasture [River], to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the country between Tygart's Valley and Bath County; mentioning a climb to the top of some perpendicular rocks overlooking Seneca River; and noting the inaccuracy of current maps in delineating the topography of the Crab Bottom region. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Beverly and Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, July [26] and August 1, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Beverly and Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of July 12; reporting that contrary to what Rogers supposed, the survey of Randolph and Lewis counties had not been completed, due to Moses Wells's leaving the survey; describing what remained to be done; and discussing his illness and his plans for completing the work remaining. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 8, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Weston, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that he had almost completely recovered from his illness; presenting the points which must yet be examined in order to complete the survey of western Virginia; and suggesting a program to accomplish this. 4 pp.
    • Israel Slade, Panther Gap, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 16, 1841
      Israel Slade, Panther Gap, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the country between Bull Pasture River and Staunton and the difficulties he encountered in trying to observe the strata between Great Cow Pasture Mountain and Jennings Gap; acknowledging receipt of his letter in Staunton; discussing the hospitality of some gentlemen in the neighborhood of Staunton who would like Rogers to come give a lecture on geology to them; and presenting a request form Mr. Dudley, tavern keeper at Jennings Gap, that he be paid for the use of a horse by James B. Rogers over a year earlier. 4 pp.
    • Israel Slade, Callahan's, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, August 30, 1841
      Israel Slade, Callahan's, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, discussing the structure of Mill, Sideling, Walker's and Chestnut Ridge mountains near Cow Pasture River and describing the geology of the mountains and valleys between Panther Gap and Callahan's. 4 pp.
    • Israel Slade, Monroe previous hitCounty next hit, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 2, 1841
      Israel Slade, Monroe County, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, enclosing residue obtained by evaporating crimson sulphur water which Mr. John Mahon of Union would like for Rogers to analyze. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Lewisport, N. W. Turnpike, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 9, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Lewisport, N. W. Turnpike, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, announcing that he had completed the survey of the region; stating that almost all the area near Elk River had been examined and what remains will be inspected by Wells and Ridgeway; complaining that his health had been almost ruined by the hard labor in the field; mentioning the coal measures in Preston and Monongalia counties having been traced; and noting that he planned to write Rogers again in a few days. 3 pp. with address leaf.
    • Israel Slade, Parisburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 13, 1841
      Israel Slade, Parisburg, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing the geology of the country between Callaghan's and Parisburg. 4 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Guyandotte, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, September 25, 1841 P.M.
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Guyandotte, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter of September 14; outlining his plans for Wells and Ridgeway to join him in examining the country around Guyandotte River, Logan Court House, Pigeon Creek, Charleston, Summersville, Point Ridge, the Falls of the Kanawha, and Lewisburg; mentioning the geology observed on the Little Kanawha and Elk rivers; asking for more money; considering having Wells examine a narrow coal basin in his travels; and giving news of Rogers's friends in the vicinity. 4 pp.
    • C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Lewisburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, October 17, 1841
      C[aleb] Briggs, Jr., Lewisburg, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, acknowledging receipt of his letter containing a check for $75.; describing the travels of Wells, Ridgeway, and himself as outlined in his letter of September 25; and hoping to return to the University about November 1. 3 pp. with address leaf.
  • Box 1Folder 7
    Correspondence to William B. Rogers, 1844-1903
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, January 23, 1844
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Second Auditor's Office, Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, recalling that Rogers had planned to communicate to the legislature his views concerning the final report on the geological survey; informing him that several prominent members of the legislature had approached him on that subject; and urging Rogers to leave "your darling University" for a few days as soon as possible to come to Richmond for a personal conversation with the members. 1 p. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, February 25, 1845
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, informing him that the bill before the General Assembly for publication of his final report on the geological survey died for want of zealous support and giving news of the Brown family. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • J[ames] Brown, Jr., Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, February 17, 1849
      J[ames] Brown, Jr., Richmond, to William B. Rogers, University of Virginia, inquiring after his health; informing him that some members of the legislature might attempt to provide for the publication of his geological report and that he doubted there would be concerted opposition, especially if Rogers would come to Richmond and speak to the members, as there were only a few of them who even recalled that there had been a geological survey made; asking him that if he could not come himself, to send Brown such published reports as he could spare and a brief sketch of his plans for a final report so that Brown might argue in his favor. 2 pp. with address leaf.
    • [William B. Rogers], University of Virginia, to James Brown, Jr., [Richmond], February 25, 1849
      [William B. Rogers], University of Virginia, to James Brown, Jr., [Richmond], mentioning a separate bundle of reports sent to Brown; enclosing a copy of his geological map which had excited much favorable comment when it was shown at the British Association, the Royal Geological Society, and the French Academy by Henry D. Rogers; stating that a "nervous debility" prevented him from speaking to the General Assembly, but that he would speak to a few members if Brown thought it needful; and presenting an elaborate outline of the proposed report, consisting of a map, section drawings, and illustrations to exhibit the "geological anatomy" of the state, and a text describing the various regions in detail, with chemical analyses of the ores, minerals, and waters. 6 pp., incomplete draft.
    • [William B. Rogers], Boston, Massachusetts, to [Josiah Parsons Cooke, Harvard University], December 26, 1853
      [William B. Rogers], Boston, Massachusetts, to [Josiah Parsons Cooke, Harvard University], declaring his intention of returning briefly to Virginia to reorganize the geological survey and provide for the publication of the final report in response to a query from Cooke about organizing and supervising a geological survey of Massachusetts; cautioning supporters of the survey from exaggerating the immediate economic benefits of such a survey; stressing the importance of looking to the long, rather than short, term value of the survey; and outlining in seven points the long term benefits which would result from the survey to the advantage of the entire state and her citizens. 5 pp., incomplete draft. Josiah Parsons Cooke (October 12, 1827-September 3, 1894), founder of the department of chemistry at Harvard in 1850 at the age of 23 and later president of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
    • [William B. Rogers], Boston, Massachusetts, to Frank G. Ruffin, n.p., December 27, 1853
      [William B. Rogers], Boston, Massachusetts, to Frank G. Ruffin, n.p., acknowledging receipt of his letter of December 6; expressing his gratitude for the interest displayed by Ruffin and the Agricultural Society in Rogers's geological map and planned report; informing Ruffin of his intention to ask the General Assembly for funds to revise the map and publish his report and of his plans to visit Richmond during the session; declaring that while he appreciates the interest and ehop of anone so inclined, he prefers that his work stand on its own merits and on his reputation, rather than depending upon the testimony of some foreign expert for it s success or failure in the legislature; and discussing the pros and cons of proposed county geological maps and of a scientific department Ruffin was interested in organizing. 7 pp., typescript. Frank Gildart Ruffin (December 1, 1816-June 4, 1892), was at this time editor of the Southern Planter magazine and served as Second Auditor of Virginia from January 1, 1884, until his death.
    • W. B. Rogers, Boston, Massachusetts, to F[rank] G. Ruffin, n.p., December 29, 1853
      W. B. Rogers, Boston, Massachusetts, to F[rank] G. Ruffin, n.p., acknowledging receipt of his letter of December 25; mentioning Rogers's lengthy reply on December 27; saying that one reason he left his teaching post at the University of Virginia was so he might concentrate on having his report published; advising Ruffin's society not to attempt too much; and agreeing in principle to Ruffin's request that he give some lectures when in Virginia. 2 pp., typescript.
    • D. T. Bisbie, previous hitMecklenburg next hit previous hitCounty next hit, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, June 15, 1854
      D. T. Bisbie, Mecklenburg County, to W. B. Rogers, University of Virginia, describing a copper mine "in an adjoining County" which he and some other men own; giving an unsubstantiated report of an analysis of the ore; and asking for an opinion, based on his description, as to whether the geological indications point to yellow pyrites or sulphuret. 3 pp. with address leaf, torn.
    • Emma Rogers (Mrs. W. B. Rogers), Boston, Massachusetts, to W[illiam] W. Scott, Librarian of State Library, Richmond, May 10, 1903
      Emma Rogers (Mrs. W. B. Rogers), Boston, Massachusetts, to W[illiam] W. Scott, enclosing letters relating to the geological survey of Virginia, to be placed with similar material sent by her to the library two or more years earlier. 2 pp. William Wallace Scott (1845-1929) was acting state librarian in 1903. He resigned to become state law librarian in that year.
Series II: Reports, sections, lists and field notes, 1834-1884

The reports, sections, lists and field notes are from the geologists including William B. Rogers. Many are undated. Bound volumes are included.

Arranged by geologist.

  • Box 1Folder 8
    William E. A. Aikin, 1837
    • William E. A. Aikin, [1837]
      Report on the geology of Lee, Russell, Scott, and Washington Counties. 90 pp., incomplete.
    • William E. A. Aikin, [1837]
      Geological sections of Lee, Russell, Scott, and Washington counties, to accompany the report above. 19 parts, of which numbers 10 and 13 are missing.
  • Box 1Folder 9
    William E. A. Aikin, 1838
    • William E. A. Aikin, [1838]
      Report on the geology of Lee, Russell, Scott, and Washington Counties, intended in part as a revision of the report of 1837. 32 pp.
    • William E. A. Aikin, 1838
      Geological sections of Lee, Russell, Scott, and Washington counties, to accompany the report above. 13 parts.
  • Box 1Folder 10
    George W. Boyd, 1839-1840
    • George W. Boyd, 1839
      Field notes. Southern Primary Region. Volume I. 1 vol., 116 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, 1839
      Field notes. Southern Primary Region. Volume II. 1 vol., 42 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, 1840
      Field notes. Rough notes on geology of northern Virginia, April 28-September 19, 1840. 60 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, 1840
      Field notes. Northern Primary District. Finished transcription of rough notes above, covering same dates. Entries from September 11 through September 19 in the handwriting of James B. Rogers, June 24- August 14, 1841. 1 vol., 132 pp.
    • George W. Boyd, n.d.
      List. Fossils of Virginia. Arranged by strata, in the handwriting of George W. Boyd. 1 vol., 23 pp.
  • Box 2Folder 1
    Caleb Briggs, Jr., 1840
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., 1840
      List. Boxes [of specimens] collected by C. Briggs. Also contains notes by Charles B. Hayden on the geology of Hampshire County, n.d. 1 vol., 42 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      List. Catalogue of Rocks. 1 vol., 125 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      List. Catalogue of Rocks. Vol. IV. 1 vol., 163 pp.
  • Box 2Folder 2
    Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Valley River and Buffalo Creek Section. Includes sketch map of the area. 47 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. White Day Creek Section and Prickets Creek. Includes sketch map of the area. 28 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Geological Examinations on the Monongalia and its Tributaries, Deckers Creek and Scots Run. Includes sketch map of the area. 58 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Appendix to Notes. In vicinity of Cheat River. 3 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Of the Big Sandy Section. 20 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Clarksburg to Parkersburg. 46 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. North Western Turnpike. Cheat River to Clarksburg and the Head of Limestone Creek. 20 pp.
  • Box 2Folder 3
    Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Section from Beverly by Weston to Parkersburg. 33 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Section from the Rich Mountain by Bullstown to the Ohio at Parkersburg. 35 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Section from the North Fork of the South Branch of the Potomac by the way of Clarksburg to the Ohio River at the mouth of Fishing Creek. 41 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. [Geology of the Proctors Run-Fishing Creek area near the Ohio River]. 30 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Main Coal Seam, Upper Coal Series [near the Ohio River]. 30 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Valley of the Ohio. 44 pp.
    • Caleb Briggs, Jr., n.d.
      Report. Formation XII. Conglomerate on the Eastern Margin of the Ohio Basin. 25 pp.
  • Box 2Folder 4
    Charles B. Hayden, 1836-1837
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1836
      Field notes. No. 2. Gold Region [of Louisa and Buckingham Counties]. August 8-20. Some entries in the handwriting of William B. Rogers and A. Maxwell Walker. 1 vol., 68 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1836
      Field notes. Rappahannock. [Hanover County to Gloucester County.] September 12-October 29. Inverted and at back of volume: field notes of William B. Rogers, July-August 1838, on the geology observed in the vicinity of Lynchburg, Botetourt County, and Lexington. 1 vol., 136 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1836
      Field notes. Geology of the Shenandoah Valley region from Rockingham County to Harpers Ferry. September 15-October 3. 1 vol., 35 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1836?
      Field notes. Rough notes, undated, covering much the same territory as the volume immediately above. 1 vol., 46 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1837
      Field notes. Tertiary Region [of Tidewater Virginia near James River]. March-May. 1 vol., 132 pp.
  • Box 2Folder 5
    Charles B. Hayden, 1837
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1837
      Field notes. Continuation of volume immediately above. 1 vol., 28 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1837
      Field notes. Tertiary Region. Continuation of volume immediately above. 1 vol., 43 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1837
      Field notes. Geology of the Shenandoah Valley region from Augusta County to Jefferson County, and westward to Hampshire County. July. 1 vol., 84 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1837
      Field notes. Continuation of volume immediately above. 1 vol., 21 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1837
      Field notes. Springs. Charts showing date, time, and temperature for various hot springs in western Virginia. November. 1 vol., 21 pp.
  • Box 2Folder 6
    Charles B. Hayden, 1838-1839
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1838
      Report on the Northern District and the James River Tertiary. January. In two parts: Northern Appalachian Region, 54 pp., with 15 pp. of sections; on the country bordering on James River and its tributaries, 23 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1838
      Field notes. Appalachian Region [largely Hampshire and Frederick counties]. July-September. 1 vol., 112 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1838
      Field notes. Continuation of volume immediately above. Also contains April 1851, in handwriting of William B. Rogers, Trip to Rivanna Mills. 1 vol., 29 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1839
      Report. Pendleton and Bath counties. 22 pp.
    • Charles B. Hayden, 1839
      Report. Miocene Tertiary of the counties south of James River. 48 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 1
    Samuel Lewis, 1840
    • Samuel Lewis, 1840
      Field notes. Notes of Geological examinations in Virginia Commenced June 24, 1840, Chesterfield coal field. June 24-November 4. 2 vols., 179 and 47 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 2
    Samuel Lewis, 1840
    • Samuel Lewis, 1840
      Report. Report of Samuel Lewis, one of the assistant geologists of the State of Virginia for the year 1840, containing a brief account of his operations during the summer and fall seasons. November 9. 7 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 3
    A. McCall, n.d.
    • A. McCall, n.d.
      Report. Description of salt production, especially of William King's salt well, Washington County. See also letters of July 25, 1840, and May 16, 1841, for mention of other salt wells. 2 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 4
    Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1839-1840
    • Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1839
      Field notes. Geology of Bath and Highland counties. Also contains: notes on the rocks of the Potomac Coal Basin, in the handwriting of William B. Rogers, n.d.; notes on the geology of northwestern Virginia, primarily Hampshire and Preston counties, in the handwriting of Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., n.d.; Measurements of Rocks, in the handwriting of William B. Rogers, n.d.; Maatinal Series, in the handwriting of William B. Rogers, n.d,; and geological sections to accompany the notes on Bath and Highland counties first mentioned above, in the handwriting of Thomas S. Ridgeway, n.d. 1 vol., 239 pp.
    • Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1840
      Field notes. Coal Sections on Big Kanawha River. April 23- . 1 vol., 55 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 5
    Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1840-1841
    • Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1840
      Report. Description of a part of the section from Abbs Valley by Logan Court House to Guayandotte on the Ohio River. 3 pp.
    • Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1840
      Sections. (Nos. 1-5 filed in Box 6 -- oversized material). 1. Section at the Burning Spring on the Kanawha River. 1 p.; 2. Section at Mr. Joel Shrewsbury's Salt Works on the Kanawha River. 1 p.; 3. Section at Keller's Creek on the Kanawha river, 1 p.; 4. Section of Vineyard Hill. 1 p.; 5. Profile Section from Parkersburg along the Little Kanawha to Bulltown. 1 p.; 6. Profile Section from Round Bottom on Big Sandy along Tug Fork to Pigeon Creek. 1 p.
    • Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr., 1841
      Field notes. Notes of the Geological Survey conducted in the North Western District of Virginia. 1 vol., 48 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 6
    Henry D. Rogers, 1834-1836
    • Henry D. Rogers, 1834
      Field notes. Journey to the coal region [of Pennsylvania, from Philadelphia]. April 5-6. Also contains: Geological Rambles in New Jersey, May 3-28; Journey from Richmond to Fredericksburg, etc., to Philadelphia, n.d.; From New York to Albany, n.d.; notes of electrical experiments made in October 1833 with William B. Rogers, and in his handwriting; and notes on the geology of Pennsylvania in the vicinity of Harrisburg. 1 vol., 138 pp.
    • Henry D. Rogers, 1836?
      Field notes. Geology of the State of New Jersey, 1 vol., 150 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 7
    James B. Rogers, 1837-1838
    • James B. Rogers, 1837
      Field notes. Rough notes in handwriting of Charles B. Hayden on Tertiary Region of Tidewater Virginia near James River, May 26-27, 7 pp. Notes in handwriting of James B. Rogers on geology of Monroe and Giles counties, June 19- , 80 pp. Inverted at back of volume: geological sections and notes on vicinity of Bath County in handwriting of William B. Rogers, n.d., 38 pp. 1 vol.
    • James B. Rogers, 1837
      Field notes. Geology of Augusta, Bath, and Highland counties. July. 1 vol., 84 pp.
    • James B. Rogers, 1837
      Fragment of "A Map of the State of Virginia" by Herman Boye, 1827, showing part of southside Virginia, from Cumberland County south to Mecklenburg County, Mounted on linen and marked "JBR 1837."
    • James B. Rogers, 1838
      Report. On the Middle District. Part 1st. January. Geology of Augusta, Bath, and Highland, Pendleton, and Pocahontas counties. 35 pp.
  • Box 3Folder 8
    James B. Rogers, 1838-1841
    • James B. Rogers, 1838
      Field notes. Geology of the Warm Springs region, including Bath, Botetourt, Giles, and Monroe counties. April. 1 vol., 28 pp.
    • James B. Rogers, 1838
      Field notes. Geology of Alleghany, Bath, Craig, and Rockbridge counties, with particular attention to iron works. July-August. 1 vol., 63 pp.
    • James B. Rogers, 1838
      Field notes. Middle district. Geology of Alleghany, Augusta, Bath, Botetourt, and Rockbridge counties. August-September. 1 vol., 68 pp.
    • James B. Rogers, 1839
      Field notes. Geology of the region along the Jackson's, New, Gauley, Kanawha, and Elk rivers, with particular attention to coal seams. Includes instructions for the season in the handwriting of William B. Rogers. May. 1 vol., 130 pp.
    • James B. Rogers, 1839
      Geological sections of Greenbrier and Fayette counties. 10 parts.
    • James B. Rogers, 1841
      Field notes. Potomac Furnace to Leesburg, and then to Dranesville. August 4-7. 4 pp.
    • James B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. Geology of northern Virginia and Maryland between Frederick and Boonesboro. 1 vol., 31 pp.
  • Box 4Folder 1
    Robert E. Rogers, 1836
    • Robert E. Rogers, 1836
      Field notes. Northern Neck. April-June. Second volume also contains field notes in handwriting of William B. Rogers on geology from Charlottesville to Alleghany County, September 8-27. 2 vols., 232 pp.
    • Robert E. Rogers, 1836
      Field notes. Geology of Fairfax County and vicinity. August. Also contains "Journey from Luray across the Massanutten Mn." in the handwriting of James B. Rogers, n.d., and "Memoranda, January 1837" in the handwriting of William B. Rogers on a coal seam discovered near Leakesville, North Carolina. 1 vol., 38 pp.
    • Robert E. Rogers, 1836
      Field notes. Geology of northern Virginia, including Berkeley, Jefferson, Loudoun, and Morgan counties. September. 1 vol., 62 pp.
    • Robert E. Rogers, 1836
      Field notes. "Summary of Swift Run Gap." Also contains instructions for the season in the handwriting of William B. Rogers. 1 vol., 30 pp.
  • Box 4Folder 2
    William B. Rogers, 1835-1836
    • William B. Rogers, 1835
      Field notes. Geology of region along the Pamunkey River, including King William and Hanover counties. July. Also contains a list of "Rocks of the Blue Ridge," n.d., and "Minutes of Analysis of soils," November. 1 vol., 39 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1835
      Analyses of Marl, Sand, and Soils. 1 vol., 43 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1836
      Field notes. Geology of part of North Carolina, Carroll County, the lead mines in Wythe County, the coal seams of southwestern and northwestern Virginia, and coal mines of northwestern Virginia and Maryland in the vicinity of Westernport. 1 vol., 202 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1836
      Notes respecting the geology, etc., of the Miocene Marl region of Virginia [Tidewater]. 1 vol., 13 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1836
      Report. Lower Tertiary or eocene of the Pamunkey. 16 pp. See Report of the Geological Reconnaissance of the State of Virginia, 1836, pp. 38-43.
    • William B. Rogers, 1836
      Report. Materials collected for a detailed Report of the Survey in 1836: 1) Northern Neck and counties on south side of Rappahannock; 2) Coals of Chesterfield, etc., Analysis. 138 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1836
      List. Eocene and Miocene Marls [Tidewater Virginia, 1836-1837]. 1 vol., 218 pp.
  • Box 4Folder 3
    William B. Rogers, 1837
    • William B. Rogers, 1837
      Field notes. Geology of Mercer and Monroe counties in the southwest, and Shenandoah and Hampshire counties in the north. August. 1 vol., 78 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1837
      Field notes. Geology of Augusta, Bath, Hardy, Highland, and Pendleton counties. August. 1 vol., 100 pp.
  • Box 4Folder 4
    William B. Rogers, 1839
    • William B. Rogers, 1839
      Report. Drafts of Reports of the Progress of the Geological Survey of the State of Virginia for the year 1839, in the handwriting of William B. Rogers and Thomas S. Ridgeway, Jr. 78 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1839
      Field notes. Miscellaneous notes on rocks, slates, and coke. 4 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1839?
      Geological sections along Brandywine and Wissahickon creeks, Chester County, Pennsylvania. William B. Rogers visited this area in 1839. 7 parts.
    • William B. Rogers, 1839?
      Geological sections in Pennsylvania from Pottstown west in the general direction of Reading, in handwriting of Willliam B. Rogers, who visited this area in 1839. 1 part, incomplete.
  • Box 4Folder 5
    William B. Rogers, 1841-1844
    • William B. Rogers, 1841
      Field notes. Geology of New York and eastern Canada, by William B. Rogers and Henry D. Rogers, August. Also contains notes on the Tertiary near Richmond, July, and notes made on a "Journey from Baltimore to Harper's Ferry," n.d. First page contains a list of "Boxes of Minerals, 1840." 1 vol., 123 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1841?
      Field notes. Geology of western Virginia along the North Western Turnpike. 1 vol., 21 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1843
      Field notes. Geology of northwestern Virginia. June-August. 1 vol., 225 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1844
      Field notes. Geological Memoranda. Summer of 1843[4]. July-September. Concerns primarily the travels of William B. Rogers with the Pennsylvania artist Russell Smith, from Albemarle County to Alleghany County, then to Kanawha County, and returning by way of Highland County. Also contains expense accounts of Russell Smith, and lists of sketches made by him (see Oversize, Box 6).
  • Box 4Folder 6
    William B. Rogers, 1853-1877
    • William B. Rogers, 1853
      Field notes. Geology of route between Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland; the vicinity of Warrenton; near Bellona Arsenal in Chesterfield County; along the North Western Turnpike near Cheat River; and notes on fossil collections (1854). 1 vol., 134 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, 1877
      Field notes. Geology observed during train journey from Richmond to Philadelphia. April 18-22. 1 vol., 20 pp.
  • Box 5Folder 1
    William B. Rogers, n.d.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Report. "Copy of the Report made by Prof. Wm. B. Rogers relative to Walton's Gold Mine in Louisa Co., Virginia." Copied by Forrest Shepherd. 2 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. "Notes respecting Hot Springs and vicinity." 8 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. "Thickness of No. XI on the Potomac below Westernport." 1 p.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. Geology of Augusta Springs vicinity, Little Mountain on the Staunton and Parkersburg Road, and Backbone Mountain. 24 p.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. Vicinity of Sweet Springs, Monroe County. 8 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. "James and Appomattox Rivers in the vicinity of Richmond and Petersburg." 28 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. Geology of the western Virginia Appalachian region. 3 pp.
  • Box 5Folder 2
    William B. Rogers, n.d.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      Field notes. "From Richmond to Charlottesville by stage." Inverted and at back of book, notes on geology of Alleghany and Greenbrier counties. 1 vol., 58 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      List. "Register of Analysis" of minerals, and analyses not connected with the survey. 1 vol., 212 pp.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      List. "Levant Series" of rocks, including sections of western Virginia. 1 vol., 85 pp.
  • Box 5Folder 3
    William B. Rogers, n.d.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      List. Promedidicil, Levant, Matinal rocks. 1 vol., unnumbered.
  • Box 5Folder 4
    William B. Rogers, n.d.
    • William B. Rogers, n.d.
      List. "Matinal Rocks," including sections of the Valley of Virginia. 1 vol., pages unnumbered, 3/4 blank.
  • Box 5Folder 5
    Israel Slade, 1838
    • Israel Slade, 1838
      Field notes. "Notes on the Burkett's Hole Mountain," in Hardy and Pendleton counties. 19 pp.
  • Box 5Folder 6
    Israel Slade, 1840
    • Israel Slade, 1840
      Field notes. Observations along the mountains from Harpers Ferry to southwest Virginia. 3 vols. 1) Harpers Ferry to Wythe County. 158 pp. 2) Smyth and Wythe Counties. 68 pp. 3) Montgomery, Pulaski, Roanoke, Smyth, Tazewell, Washington, and Wythe Counties. 336 pp.
  • Box 5Folder 7
    Miscellaneous, 1850-1884
    • Miscellaneous, 1850?
      Photography of Thomas Jefferson Campbell (1786-April 13, 1850) of Tennessee, Clerk of United States House of Representatives, Thirtieth and Thirty-First Congresses (1847-1850).
    • Miscellaneous, 1852
      A description of Weyer's Cave in Augusta County, Virginia. 1 vol., 11 pp.
    • Miscellaneous, 1853-1854
      Thirty-eight annual report of the Board of Public Works to the General Assembly of Virginia, with the accompanying documents. January 28, 1854. 1 vol., 28 pp.
    • Miscellaneous, 185?
      Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Registry of Periodical Phenomena. Printed form, not filled in. 4 pp.
    • Miscellaneous, 1884?
      Typescripts of material excerpted from earlier records. 1) List of boxes put up by Dr. Jas. B. Rogers and G.W. Boyd, 1838. 1 p. (3 copies) 2) Boxes collected in 1839. 2 pp. (2 copies) 3) Analyses unconnected with the survey, 1836. 4 pp. (3 copies) 4) Section at Scholham taken by John Gebhard, Jr., 1839. 1 p. (3 copies) 5) Springs, 1839. 3 pp. (3 copies) 6) Matinal Series, Virginia, n.d. 1 p. (3 copies) 7) Envelope, n.d. 1 item.
    • Miscellaneous, n.d.
      Profile of the Works on Vein no. 4. Plate 2. Shows level of the Rappahannock River. 1 p.
    • Miscellaneous, n.d.
      Sketch map showing Monogahela, Cheat, and Youghogany rivers. Possibly by Charles B. Hayden. 2 pp.
    • Miscellaneous, n.d.
      Scrap of paper and cardboard, with notes in handwriting of William B. Rogers. 2 items.
Series III: Drawings of Russell Smith, c. 1844

Rogers engaged Smith to execute a series of drawings of significant geological formations in Virginia for use in Rogers's projected final report on the state geological survey. There are 52 sketches on paper and cardboard, in pencil, ink, watercolors, pastels and oils.

Arranged chronologically.

  • Box 6 Drawing 1
    Monticello and University Va. July 4th 1844. Ink. Also light pencil sketch of a fireplace and pencil sketch of U.Va. - Monticello on reverse. Albemarle, 1844.
  • Box 6 Drawing 2
    Turner's mountain in the extreme distance. High top of left. Pencil (Albemarle), undated.
  • Box 6 Drawing 3
    Interior of cavern, illuminated by torches, with "tourists." Oil., 1844.
  • Box 6 Drawing 4
    Distant Mt. Bull Pasture. Hills are Slate. "Foreground Paving Stones, grass and Accassia. Light from L.H." "Near Col. 'Bill' Dyer's." "1. White walnut. 2. Elm. 3. Buttonwood. 4. Elm. 5. Dark Linden. 6. Sycamore. 7. Water Willow." Ink., undated.
  • Box 6 Drawing 5
    View of valley through gap in mountains, possibly near Waynesboro? Ink., undated.
  • Box 6 Drawing 6
    Falls of the Kanowha. Russell Smith. Ink, 1844.
  • Box 6 Drawing 7
    View across valley to cultivated mountains in distance. Ink, undated.
  • Box 6 Drawing 8
    Brown's Gap. N.W. by W. Ink.(Albemarle Co., p. 113), undated.
  • Box 6 Drawing 9
    Looking NW. Bull Past. Mn. and Thorn Mn. No[rth] Fork Mn. Alleghany Mn. From top of Shen Mn. Dry River Gap, Ink, 1844.
  • Box 6 Drawing 10
    Pencil sketch of stream surrounded by trees, undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 11
    Piney Mtn. North of Charlottesville. Ink.(Albemarle Co.), undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 12
    Black Thorn Creek. Gag's Mill. South Branch Potomac. Pencil and Ink, undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 13
    From the house of Co. Jef. Randolph. Edgehill. July 9th/44. Notes locations of Monticello, Shadwell Hill, Rivanna River, and birthplace of T. J. Ink. (e. of Charlottesville), 1844.
  • Box 7 Drawing 14
    Callaghan's meadow. Pencil Shenandoah Co., p. 308), undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 15
    Cane Hill. Augusta Cy. VA. Ink, 1844.
  • Box 7 Drawing 16
    Pencil and Ink sketch of rock formation, undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 17
    Ink and watercolor. House in foreground, view across valley to mountains, undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 18
    Pencil sketch. River with log bridge in foreground, frame buildings on bank. Reverse: pencil portrait, woman's head and neck, undated.
  • Box 7 Drawing 19
    Devil's Backbone. Crab Bottom. July 1844. "South Branch of the Potomac, Va., 1844.
  • Box 7 Drawing 20
    Shenandoah mountains from Col. William Ayer's. Looking S.E. Ink, undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 21
    North Mtn. in distance. Piney Mtn. Looking S.E. from Kaisers. Pencil, undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 22
    South fork of the south Branch of the Potomac. Pencil. Notes on reverse: No. 1 and 2. Two very large tulip trees. No. 1 over 100 feet high. 3. Black walnut. 4. Sycamore. Color of Gold. 5. Decayed sycamore also very large. The two spots on Bullpasture mountain are smooth walls of light grey Rock. The River is low, leaving in the foreground pools of water with every variety of plants. The dark shadow on Mt. falls in beautifully with the tall dark poplar and spreads out up over the mountain to the night. The general tone is dark. Principal light high up in the sky and the 2nd on the shore. Sky Constable like or English like. From the presence of so much walnut and Sycamore I see none of the cold heavy greens noticed in Cole's 2nd picture of the "Voyage of life" but all is warm and harmonizing with the shadows., undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 23
    View of mountains, looking across valley. Stunted tree in foreground. Ink, undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 24
    Rocks at the Rawly Springs on Dry River. July 1844. Pencil, 1844.
  • Box 8 Drawing 25
    Pencil sketch of rock formation, undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 26
    Cliff at Callaghan's. Pencil, ink, and watercolor, undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 27
    Cliff at Callaghan's, Va.: Pencil, 1844.
  • Box 8 Drawing 28
    Cave Hill looking South West. Ink.(Page previous hitCounty next hit, Luray, pp. 409-414), undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 29
    Pencil and ink sketch of interior of cavern. Notes on reverse: Bright lights caused by lights reflected from the sky on wet leaves and pieces of wood; dry light in distance cool and comes over an irregular rocky surface. It only terminates in half lights at the lower left hand corner; some bright warm lights touching the edges and lower ends of the stalactites. They being wet give in places sharp lights. Brightest and warmest light to right of dark columns on right and on he roof above them., undated.
  • Box 8 Drawing 30
    View across farm lands to mountains. Ink., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 31
    Mass[anuten]Mountain from Miller's Iron Works near cave. Wheat field. Ink.(Page previous hitCounty, p. 408), undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 32
    Rock formation, fence and gate. Pencil and watercolor., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 33
    Stream and mountains from valley. Pencil., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 34a
    From Harsbergers [?] Jackson's River [?] and Rocks. Pencil; "Crab Bottom." Pencil., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 34b
    From Harsbergers [?] Jackson's River [?] and Rocks. Pencil; "Crab Bottom." Pencil., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 35
    Interior of cavern, with miscellaneous coloring notes. Watercolor., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 36
    Interior of cavern, with color key. Ink. Notes on reverse: the light and shadow of this piece is very broad and soft and the whole column is warm and rich. The middle tint is the most cool although not cold. A figure in white is necessary to produce a bright light. The celing [sic] is remarcably [sic] rich in fine stalictites [?] by small [?] of the most fantastic forms occasionally showing white cristals., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 37
    Interior of cavern. Pencil, ink, and watercolor., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 38
    Hillside rock formation. Pencil., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 39
    Rock formation on top of mountain, with view of valley. Ink., undated.
  • Box 9 Drawing 40
    Wooded, rocky glen with waterfall. Pencil. Notes on reverse: Water falls white and half light. Distant fall on the right hand little more than rain and of a grey colour. The rocks are of a grey yellowish colour but one [?] with light green vegetation all front of the falls. Where their have surface appears it is yellowish brown and very dark and rich in the shadows. The cliffs are grey, yellow, and slate colour. All left of the falls being light yellow and grey. That to the right is dark green and purpleish grey, almost black in places. The light is from the right and high. The trees are Buckeye, Sycamore, and Elm. Some with raies[?]. Although the work yellowish is used there is nothing yellow appearing in the whole ruin except the R.'s hat. Portions of the falls are shaded by tree tops and jutting rocks. Small portions received the sunlight and are of the brightest white., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 41
    Cascade near the Falls of the Kanawha. Ink and chalk., 1844.
  • Box 10 Drawing 42
    View from bottom of valley across cleared fields, forest, to mountains. Ink., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 43
    The Rivanna River looking S.E. from Col. Jefferson Randolph's. Pencil and ink. (Albemarle Co.), undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 44
    Falls or rapids, with building across river on right, mountains all around. Ink., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 45
    View of the Blue Ridge from the Mansion of Jno. C. Carter, Esqr. Albemarle Co. Virginia. Landmarks noted: "Buck's Elbow, Turk's Gap, Pasture Fence Mtn., Browns Cave." Ink. (1875-"Profitt's" on Pigeion Mtn.), .
  • Box 10 Drawing 46
    Continuation of same view, to right. Landmarks labeled: "Brown's Gap, Lemon's Gap." Ink. 45 and 46 together form panorama., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 47
    View across valley to mountains, portion of collonaded house in foreground. Ink., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 48
    View of University of Virginia and Monticello Mountain, taken from back and to the left of 1. Ink., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 49
    View across bottom to hills, with buildings, bridge. Pencil., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 50
    View of river or meadow, trees left and right, hills in background. Pencil., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 51
    Rocky, wooded, river gorge. Pencil., undated.
  • Box 10 Drawing 52
    Scene in Weyer's Cave looking toward the mouth. Watercolor., 1844.