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Inventory of the Jonathan Boucher Papers, 1759-1803 Boucher, Jonathan, Papers 93 B66

Inventory of the Jonathan Boucher Papers, 1759-1803

A Collection in the
Manuscripts and Rare Books Department
Collection Number 93 B66


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Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary

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Earl Gregg Swem Library
College of William and Mary
Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8794
USA
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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary
Accession number
93 B66
Title
Jonathan Boucher Papers 1759-1803
Physical Characteristics
228 items.
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Jonathan Boucher Papers, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary.


Biographical/Historical Information

Jonathan Boucher (1738-1804) was an Anglican clergyman in Virginia, Maryland, and England. He was one of the most prominent ejected loyalists of the American Revolution, and later a prominent figure in the conservative faction of the Church of England. He authored two books, A View of the Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution and A Glossary of Archaic and Provincial Words.

Scope and Content

Correspondence of Jonathan Boucher, Anglican clergyman of Virginia, Maryland, and England. He was a prominent loyalist during the American Revolution and later a prominent figure among conservatives in the Anglican church in England. His principle correspondents in this collection include John James, James Maury, Charles Daubeny, Sir Frederick Morton Eden, William Knox, and William Stevens.

The principle subjects covered by this collection include Virginia social customs and politics between the years 1759 and 1771, Boucher's experiences in, and views of, the American Revolution, Boucher's role in the struggle for unity in the Scottish Anglican Church, and his concern with schism and dissent in the Church of England. Cite as: Jonathan Boucher Papers, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary.

Access Terms

  • Author: Daubeny, Charles, 1745-1827.
  • Author: Eden, Frederick Morton, Sir, 1766-1809.
  • Author: James, John 1729-1785.
  • Author: Knox, William, 1732-1810.
  • Author: Maury, James, 1718-1769.
  • Author: Stevens, William, 1732-1807.
  • Indexes: Inventory available in library: item level control.
  • Publications: Zimmer, Anne W., Jonathan Boucher, Loyalist in Exile, Wayne State University Press, (1978).
  • Subject: American loyalists--Maryland.
  • Subject: Church and state--Great Britain.
  • Subject: Dissenters, Religious--England.
  • Subject: Manners and customs--Virginia.
  • Subject: United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783.
  • Subject: United States--Politics and government--1775-1783.
  • Subject: United States--Politics and government--To 1775.

Contents List

Letters from the Rev. Jonathan Boucher to the Rev. John James [1729-85; D.N.B.; Headmaster of St. Bees School, Whitehaven, Cumberland; from 1771, Rector of Arthuret and Kirk Andrews.]
  • Box-folder 1:1
    [Jonathan] Boucher, Port Royal, Virginia to [John] James, at St. Bees, near Whitehaven, England 7 Aug[ust] 1759
    3 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/1).

    Reflections on tedious voyage and on American society; condemns levity and bad language of Americans. The countryside of Virginia and the dress of the colonists. Plans to start a school may turn out better than expected, though he has heard of few pupils yet. The James' child and a visit by the commissary.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    [Jonathan] Boucher, Port Royal, Virginia to [John] James, Whitehaven, [Eng.] 19 August 1759
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/2).

    Effects of Virginia weather on the constitution of individuals. He complains of the temptations of American hospitality and the impropriety of their conversation. Is sending pickled Indian corn for Mrs. James. Plans to send Mr. James some "dry'd apples and "preserv'd fruit" in fall.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    [Jonathan] Boucher, Port Royal, Virginia to [John] James, at St. Bees near Whitehaven, Cumberland [Co.], England 14 [Septem]ber 1759
    3 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/3).

    Americans have no notion of the Art of letter writing to preserve friendship. Has started his school and foresees no lack of pupils, although their dispositions are unpleasing. Account of Mr. Giberne, a clergyman [Rector of Hanover Parish, King George's County]. His attendance at a horserace and the balls following. Asks for mathematical books.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    . [Jonathan] Boucher, Port Royal, Virginia to [John] James, at St. Bees, near Whitehaven, [Eng] Jan[ua]ry 1760
    3 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/4).

    Proposes to give up teaching and the church in favour of running a store which is to be set up by Mr. Younger [whose sons he accompanied to America as tutor], confessing that he has long been conscious of his unworthiness for his present occupation. Clergy in Virginia poor in quality. Asks James to advise his brother, who seems inclined to come out to Virginia; he should persevere in his attempt to take orders, in which case Boucher may, if he prospers, be able to get him preferment.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    . [Jonathan] Boucher, P[or]t Royal, Virginia to [John] James, Whitehaven, England Feb[rua]ry 1760
    3 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/5).

    A short study of the uniqueness of the character of Virginians. Intention of becoming a merchant may surprise James. He doubts the wisdom of his brother's coming to America in the hope of succeeding him at the school at Port Royal; Captain Dixon [Mr. Younger's agent] although a worthy man, and the company he keeps in America, would not appeal to his brother. Repeats his request to assist Mr. Younger in recommending an usher to succeed him at Port Royal. Requests James to mark his recommendations in a book catalogue he has ordered.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    [Jonathan] Boucher, [Port Royal, Va.] to [[John] James, Whitehaven, Eng] 5 Aug[us]t 1762
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/6).

    Announces his safe arrival in America after a tedious voyage. An embargo imposed by the proconsul on all homeward bound vessels until a man of war may escort them may delay letter. Has been slandered in his absence by Captain Dixon and Mr. Giberne, who has threatened a duel; his prospects of a school have been destroyed for the present by his calumniators.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Jonathan Boucher, Virginia to [John] James, [Whitehaven, Eng.] 10 Sept[embe]r 1763
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/7).

    Has made the acquaintance of James Maury, a fellow clergyman [see letters from James Maury to Boucher]. Sends sermon in shorthand. Financial position poor; Americans live on credit. Preached sermon on the Peace [of Paris]. Sends £5 to his parents. It is all he can give because he is in debt. Lonely, has received one letter from James in two years.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Jonathan Boucher, Virg[ini]a to [John] James, at St. Bees, near Whitehaven, [Eng.] 23 Nov[embe]r 1763
    2 pp. ALS. (A/1/8).

    Has not heard from Mr. & Mrs. James for two years; urges them to write; is discouraged by the loneliness of his life and the unprofitableness of the school which he would resign if he were free of debt. Has turned author of anonymous pamphlets in a dispute between "some overbearing Colonels" and the clergy. [Parson's Clause].

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Jonathan Boucher, Virg[ini]a to [John] James, at St. Bees, near Whitehaven [Eng.] 2 Sept[embe]r 1764
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/9).

    Is recovering from a severe attack of fever which has affected his eyesight. Ideas of romantic bliss have been blighted. Recommends to Mr. James the sons of Mr. Robert Jackson, a businessman of Fredericksburg and a friend of his, who has lately died; the elder of the boys has been taught by himself and Mr. Maury, and they are both to go to James' school at St. Bees.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Jonathan Boucher, St. Mary's Parish [Caroline Co., Va.] to [John] James, at St. Bees, Whitehaven [Eng.] 19 July 1765
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/10).

    Mr. Bulman, recommended by Boucher's father, declined the post of usher; asks if James can find a suitable man; there are now 15 boys in his school. News of Mr. Maury who rode 80 miles to see him.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    [Jonathan] Boucher, St. Mary's, [Parish, Caroline Co., Va.] to [John] James, [Whitehaven, Eng.] 9 Dec. 1765
    4 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/11).

    Urges James to write. Maury is seriously ill. Disturbance over the terrible Stamp Act which is "oppressive, impolitic and illegal;" Parliament has not right to impose it upon us; he also grieves at Government's policy in India. Asks James to help him find an usher, though his school is still in rather a precarious position. Expresses sorrow at the death of his elder brother and wishes to know if he succeeds to the Blencogo estate. Now has respect for Americans and does not intend to settle in England again. Reason for declining grammar master place at William and Mary.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Virg[ini]a to [John] James, at St. Bees, near Whitehaven, [Eng.] 18 June 1766
    3 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/12).

    Thanks him for his letter and makes renewed professions of friendship. Wishes to resign from irksome employment of teaching; if it were possible, he would like to settle in Cumberland, for which he feels a special attachment. Correspondent in Glasgow has sent him two parcels of books. His brother's widow has recommended her unborn child to his care and he asks James to help him with this charge. Sends a cask of snake root.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    [Jonathan] Boucher, St. Mary's [Parish], Caroline [County, Va.] to [Rev. John James, Whitehaven, Eng.] 9 March 1767
    8 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/13).

    His return to England is not yet likely; his school is flourishing with 17 boys at £20 p.a. for board and education. Contrasts situation and methods of presentment of the clergy in Virginia and Maryland in favour of the latter, but hopes of preferment there have been spoiled by arrival of Rev. Benedict Allen and "a lady he calls his sister"; American clergy, especially converted Scotch Presbyterians, are in bad repute. Expresses his admiration for "our airy American girls" and his hopes of marrying Mrs. Judith Chase, a young widow of respectable fortune. Accounts of his friends Mr. Addison [Rev. Henry Addison of Prince George's County, Maryland] and Mr. Maury, whose scheme to settle in the West was put a stop to by the unjust and impolitic Royal Proclamation against further settlements. Thanks him for "Friendly Intentions" toward his sister-in-law. Asks his reaction to the "Demise of Dr. Brown."

  • Box-folder 1:3
    [Jonathan] Boucher to [John] James, at St. Bees, near Whitehaven, [Eng.] 22 June 1767
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/14).

    This letter will be delivered by his sister Jinny [who came out to America in 1761]. Wishes he could return to England, even to poverty. Mrs. Chase is having doubts about marrying "so unsettled, giddy and fickle a man." Had a discussion with Colonel Thornton concerning the Jackson boys.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, St. Mary's [Parish Caroline County, Va.] to John James, Whitehaven, [Eng.] 4 July 1767
    1 pp. ALS. Bears seal of Boucher. Medium oversize file. (A/1/15).

    Encloses a bill to await the arrival of his sister. Mr. Cooper, President of the College of New York [see B/2], has been sounding out the clergy on the scheme of a bishop's coming to America, but has met with little encouragement. Asks information on the Rev. Benedict Allen. Hopes of preferment in Maryland.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[onathan] Boucher, St. Mary's [Parish, Caroline Co., Va.] to [John James, Whitehaven, Eng.] 28 Nov[embe]r 1767
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/16).

    Gives his opinions on buying of preferment; sees no "moral turpitude in this terrible crime of Simony"; pluralism is forbidden in Maryland; hopes for preferment, calls America "the country for me"; very little official supervision of the clergy. Advises James to buy a map of Maryland and Virginia.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Jonathan] Boucher, Caroline, [Co., Va.] to [John] James, St. Bees, Whitehaven, Cumberland, [Eng.] 26 Nov[embe]r 1768
    ALS. (A/1/17).

    Jinny Boucher has been seriously ill but is now recovered; Boucher attributes his lack of success in gaining preferment to "that Arch Rascal Allen" who has abused him in public papers. The new Governor of Maryland is Mr. Eden [later Sir Robert Eden, brother of Lord Auckland]. Asks James for assistance in obtaining a letter of recommendation. Information on [Benedict] Allen's conduct and family. Asks James' kindness for son of Mr. Maury who is visiting England.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Jonathan Boucher, Virginia] to [John James, Whitehaven, Eng.] 25 July 1769
    6 pp. ALS. (A/1/18).

    Is giving James plenary powers to see his father's debts are settled and legacies paid, and to deal with Blencogo affairs. Has a low opinion of his sister's husband [Isaac Tordiff] and of her "dolefull, unintelligible letters". Relates how he visited Maury on his death bed. People in England are ill- informed on American affairs; his sympathy is with the Americans, whose opposition is "most warrantable, generous and manly".

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Jonathan] Boucher, St. Mary's Parish, Caroline County, Va.] to [Rev. John] James, [Whitehaven, Eng.] 25 July 1769
    4 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/19).

    Although he applied to the new Governor [Robert Eden] before his coming out to Maryland, as Mr. Addison and the Dulaneys advised, he has failed to secure preferment and Mr. Magowan, his own protege, has been successful. He would like to buy a living in England and could raise £1000. Asks James to look for a curate for Mr. Addison and an usher for his own school. Sends thanks to Mr. Denton for his letter of recommendation.

  • Box-folder 1:5
    [Jonathan] Boucher, Caroline, [County, Va.] to [John James, Whitehaven, Eng.] 29 Sep[tembe]r 1769
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/20).

    Apologizes for the trouble his sister [Mary Tordiff] is giving James. Prospects of preferment in Maryland are, at present, very poor but "this winter may possibly carry off some of the older fellows". Electrical shock treatment, as described by Mr. Franklin, might benefit Mr. Grayson [James' father-in-law]. A comet was seen in August and was followed by a hurricane. Gives a detailed list of books required.

  • Box-folder 1:5
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Annap[oli]s, [Md.] to [John James, Whitehaven, Eng.] 8 June 1772
    ALS. (A/1/21).

    The Governor has appointed him to the parish of St. Anne's, Annapolis, Maryland, a living of £250 p.a.; hopes to retain both livings though they are over 1200 miles apart, with five rivers to cross. Post offices are tolerably run all over the continent [of America]. Power of Attorney from America good in any court in England. Mr. Addison is still waiting for a curate to be found.

  • Box-folder 1:5
    J[onathan] Boucher, Annapolis, [Md.] to [John] James, [Whitehaven, Eng.] 25 Aug[us]t 1770
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/22).

    Payment of clergy in Maryland and Virginia is in tobacco; those who do not grow it have been allowed to pay at a scale now far below the current price; he is vigorously opposing a law which would allow all to pay at this rate. The new Governor is a "hearty, rattling, wild young dog of an officer" who seems to regard Boucher highly. Subscription controversy. Ill opinion of ubiquitous Scottish authors. Received two essays and a drawing of James' son. Well regarded by a printer in Annapolis [Charles Willson Peale]. Remarks on Blencogo affairs. Mr. Addison stills requires a curate.

  • Box-folder 1:5
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Annapolis, [Md.] to [John] James, Kendall, Westmoreland [Co., Eng.] 4 April 1771
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/23).

    Possibility of his accompanying one of his pupils to England, but his habits of expense make it impossible for him to live on the income of an English living. Intends to tour the Northern colonies. The College of New York has offered him a Master's Degree [conferred in 1774]. His effort towards promotion of an American episcopate have made him very unpopular with the Dissenters in the North. Cannot make remittances yet because the move to Annapolis has disordered his finances.

  • Box-folder 1:6
    [Jonathan] Boucher, Prince George's County, Patuxent River, Maryland to [John James, Netherby, Eng.] 10 July 1772
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/24).

    James's move to Netherby. Boucher has married Miss Nelly Addison, niece of Rev. Mr. Addison, whose ancestors came from Cumberland; he has moved to a living worth £300-400 p.a. and intends to buy a plantation.

  • Box-folder 1:6
    J[onathan] Boucher, Prince George's County, Maryland to [John James, Netherby, Eng.] 16 Nov[embe]r 1773
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/25).

    Hopes to pay his debts to James as soon as possible but his financial position is difficult as his stipend has not been paid for two years; church affairs deteriorate and the bulk of the people are dissenters and republicans. Student address at College of Princeton on government. Persuaded by Dr. Cooper to visit Philadelphia, the "London of America." Sees Pennsylvania and Philadelphia as much resembling England. Hopes to accompany him on a tour of the whole continent; is making notes which he might use for a book on America. Has read widely on America and has yet to see a decent book.

  • Box-folder 1:6
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, London, [Eng.] to [John] James 31 Oct[obe]r 1775
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/26).

    He has left America with his wife, her uncle, Rev. Mr. Addison, and Addison's son; his difficult position was made worse by his opposition to a Fast proclaimed by the Congress; after defending himself before a committee he was barred from his own church by 200 armed men but escaped, thanks to his pistols; on the issue of a Test requiring every man to testify his approbation of opposition by arms, he decided to leave America rather than make "shipwreck of his conscience". Has come with letters of recommendation from the Governor [Eden] but is afraid of being lost in the crowd. Account of their passage and illness.

  • Box-folder 1:6
    Jonathan Boucher, London, [Eng.] to [John James] 7 Jan[ua]ry 1776
    4 pp. ALS. Medium oversize file. (A/1/27).

    He believes that the present troubles in America are due less to the Stamp Act and Duties on tea than to a "principle of revolt innate in all colonies"; the British constitution is not well adapted to the ruling of colonies, but as colonies are so important to Britain, she should profit by past errors; any accommodation reached must be of a permanent nature; American institutions cherish Republicanism but various English men from Chatham to Priestley have helped kindle this flame; in America, members of the Church of England, particularly the clergy, have remained loyal in spite of persecution.

  • Box-folder 1:6
    [Jonathan Boucher], London, [Eng.] to [John James] 8 Jan[ua]ry 1776
    4 pp. AL. Medium oversize file. (A/1/28).

    He regrets leaving America, but he could not have remained there with safety; his friend the Governor of Maryland has written to recommend him to the Earl of Dartmouth, the Bishop of London, his brother-in-law the Bishop of Bangor [John Moore 1730-1805], and his brother the Under Secretary of State [William Eden, 1st Lord Auckland 1744-1814]. Boucher has discussed America with Lord George Germain, the new American Secretary. The large numbers of American refugees make it difficult to obtain preferment, but Dr. Cooper [see B/2] has given up his curacy of Paddington, worth £70 p.a. to Boucher; Boucher has left lands and slaves in America worth £5000 and has brought only £200 with him; he will find it difficult to support the orphans at Blencogo [possibly Kitty and Betty Strange who appear in later letters as protegees of Boucher]. Problems with repaying his debt to James. Asks to raise debt to £200.

  • Box-folder 1:7
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James] 5 and 22 March 1776
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/29).

    Grieved at the cutting tone of James' last letter. Is negotiating a mortgage on his Cumberland property; he sends this letter by Mr. Troutbeck, a refugee clergyman, who, with his wife, has suffered much in the American troubles; he doubts if he can help James' son [Thomas] find employment in the mercantile way unless James would let him begin as a clerk. He disapproves of a pamphlet on the American troubles by Dr. [Richard] Price [D.N.B.] and hopes this may be answered by Dr. [Josiah] Tucker [D.N.B.] to whom he has been introduced. Was informed by Gov. [Thomas] Hutchison [of Massachusetts] that Dr. Tucker along with [Joseph] Priestly are the principals in the Monthly Review.

  • Box-folder 1:7
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James] 6 Ap[ri]l 1776
    (A/1/30).

    Unless the war in America is prosecuted with vigour, it will soon be over with England; the Americans' quarrel is with the constitution itself. Letter from Virginia says that Governor [Eden] had been forced from his government. Hopes for preferment as he lives expensively.

  • Box-folder 1:7
    Jonathan Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James 28 Ap[ri]l 1776
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/31).

    The business of the mortgage is going forward; Boucher's sister [Mary Tordiff] and her husband have not paid their rent; he asks James to speak to them explaining the financial situation; The American frenzy seems to be abating; Maryland does not want separation from Britain. Disapproves of Gibbon's History for the aspersions cast on the Venerable Fathers. Opinions of books. Mr. [Henry] Addison's tour of [Great Britain] and Addison's hope that Boucher will meet him if possible at James'.

  • Box-folder 1:7
    [tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James, Arthuret, near Carlisle, Cumberland [County, Eng.] 13 June 1776
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/32).

    Sorry to hear of the return of James' gout; is sending some burdock seeds and the recipe for a nostrum which has helped Mrs. Boucher's rheumatism. Reflections on the weak character of Mrs. [?Judith] Chase who claimed that Boucher owed her money. His sister and her husband appear to be involved in a law suit. Good news from America; he is thinking of publishing a series of letters received from America.

  • Box-folder 1:7
    Jonathan Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James, Arthuret, Cumberland, [Eng.]. 10 July 1776
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/33).

    Tories are encouraged by news from Quebec; if British forces are in earnest, the Americans will be defeated but a settlement will be very difficult. Account of [Edward] Gibbon whom he thinks sour, unsocial & disagreeable. John Shebbeare's answer to Dr. Price is "offensively in the right"; an execrably wicked pamphlet called Common Sense has appeared which proves that Americans are against the constitution; it was written by Dr. Franklin although the ostensible author is a Mr. Payne. Comments on books, writings he has read. Says Common Sense has a "boldness and originality of thinking." Compares the present constitutional struggle to one of a century ago.

  • Box-folder 1:8
    Unflattering portrait of the character of a lady [perhaps of Mrs. Chase]; [see A/1/32] [Boucher to James, 13 June 1776]. 6 Sept[embe]r 1776
    AMS. (A/1/34).
  • Box-folder 1:8
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James, Arthuret, near Carlisle, Cumberland, [Eng.] 23 Oct[obe]r 1776
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/35).

    Knows most of the American generals, including Washington, but thinks rather poorly of them; their successes, which are probably exaggerated, are due to illmanagement by the British; Mrs. Boucher is worried about her brother, an officer in the Continental Service, who may have been at Long Island; the Governor of Maryland, now Sir Robert Eden, has come to England; Boucher has been hanged and shot in effigy in America, but his servants & slaves have remained loyal; he foresees difficulties in store for him when America has been reduced, but believes that his future lies there. A friend of his, a hosier who is "as good a scholar and theologist almost, as a Bishop", has written a pamphlet in answer to a Whiggish sermon of Dr. Watson of Cambridge [the hosier is Williams Stevens: see B/3)].

  • Box-folder 1:8
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James 21 Nov[embe]r 1776
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/36)

    Property of churchman in New York suffered in the fire but Dr. Cooper's College was not burned; Property of the [Anglican] Church and churchman expressly targeted; many of Boucher's rebellious Maryland parishioners have suffered in the war; no accommodation can be reached until the rebellion is crushed. Boucher has had some pecuniary reward from the Administration for various writings he has published but still hopes for preferment; offers board and lodging for the winter for one of James' sons; although his sister and her husband have not paid their rent, he does not wish the lease to be given to anyone else.

  • Box-folder 1:8
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James. 25 Jan[ua]ry 1777
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/37).

    His sister and her husband are still in financial difficulties but he wishes the lease renewed and is sending them £20 to buy new stock. He has completed a pamphlet on America and hopes the Government may reward him. The British in America seem irresolute and shilly-shallying. Both Clinton and the Howes have offered pardons to rebels; New Jersey regiment has taken offer. A horrid business at Bristol; suspicion fall on Americans & Patriots; Boucher blames "fanatical Republicans." Literary comments.

  • Box-folder 1:8
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James] 25 Feb[ruary] 1777
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/38).

    Is now resolved not to give a new lease to his brother-in-law; he has a very low opinion of him, and of his sister for marrying him. Has read a translation of the New Testament by Edward Harwood [D.N.B.] who is part of the Priestley, Price, Evans corps, but thinks it "coxcomical"; his own pamphlet needs rewriting. Dr. Cooper's Oxford sermon is excellent, and the new Archbishop of York [William Markham] has spoken out for the American church; advises James not to buy The Spirit of Athens a piece of nonsense by William Young [D.N.B.]. The American situation is not promising; "the check and defeat of the Hessians"; flight of [Rev.] Mr. [Henry] Addison's curate from Maryland; he is resigned to the loss of his property but fears for his friends.

  • Box-folder 1:8
    J[onathan] B[oucher], Paddington Green, [Eng.] to [John] James 8 Sept[embe]r 1777
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/39).
  • Box-folder 1:9
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to [John James] *[18 Oct. 1777]
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/40).

    The troubles of his sister and her husband, "two idle, lounging people", increase, but he cannot desert them. News from America is better, but had the war not been mismanaged, the Rebellion would have been crushed. Submission of counties in three states to the Kinn's law. He hopes to return; has seen his own library, valued at 1000, offered for sale in an American newspaper and notice of a call for a meeting at "Mr. Harrison's Chapel" formerly Boucher's in a Maryland paper.

  • Box-folder 1:9
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James]: 23 Dec[embe]r 1777 [tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James]
    8 pp. ALS. (A/1/41).

    Thanks James for his help in the Tordiffs' troubles which seem incomprehensible. The situation in America has deteriorated; the rebels are scoundrels, the Indians are more civilized; many of the leaders, and two- thirds of Washington's army are not Americans. The British Government is rotten at the core, and speeches in Parliament are seditious and treasonable. Is interested in the writing of local history of Cumberland and study of dialects; North America has a pure and uniform pronunciation of the English tongue; distress over Burgoyre's defeat [Saratoga].

  • Box-folder 1:9
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [Mr. John] James, Arthuret, [Eng.] 24 Nov[embe]r 1778
    3 pp. ALS. (A1/42).

    Has applied for post of Under Secretary of the Society for the Propogation of the Gospel [a post with £80 p.a. which he secured in 1779] and is being supported by Archbishop Cornwallis of Canterbury; praises James' second son John; invites James and his wife to stay with him; is unable to help James with newspapers; gives details of air pumps with cups and balls about which James was inquiring.

  • Box-folder 1:9
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to [John James] 11 Sept[embe]r 1779
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/43).

    A worthy lady of his acquaintance may take in Kitty Strange [a protegee of Boucher and James] when she comes to London. His school, for which he has little enthusiasm, has only nine pupils, when this number rises to twelve, he will call in an assistant, preferably John James, who has been helping to prepare some of his writings for publication. If the Bishop [of Carlisle, Edmund Law 1703-87] dies, does James think he will be succeeded by Dr. Graham?

  • Box-folder 1:9
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to [John James] [10 Nov 1779] (date in pencil)
    4 pp. ALS. (incomplete). (A/1/44).

    Refers once more to the project of John James' coming to help him at his school. He feels he has wasted his efforts writing "a thousand political squibs" and is considering publishing a book of sermons; asks James for some contributions. Mr. Bassenthwaite, who has a school and parish on the Island of Tortola, is looking for an assistant. Nelly's rheumatism is bad, but her physician Dr. Moore is hopeful. Boucher was unable to fore the result of the American war; "If the Rebels seem to have been more successful, they owe it not to their superior wisdom, but superior villainy. And yet, from Howe to Koppel, I firmly believe, all our misfortunes are owing to the incapacity of our Commanders . . . . . Thirteen Colonies, the majority of whose inhabitants wished not to be so lost, yet have been lost." Probably the French and certainly the Spanish have fared worse than Britain. His affairs in Maryland like the times have turned "Topsy Turvy."

  • Box-folder 1:10
    J[onathan] B[oucher], Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James] 12 Febr[uar]y 1780
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/45)

    Tom James, who has been ill, is now much better. Boucher believes that John James is profiting by his visits to his household; he has a very high opinion of his ability and hopes he may get a studentship at Christchurch; he intends to petition his Rector for this [Richard Browne, Rector of Paddington, Reglus Professor of Hebrew & Lord Almoner's Professor of Arabic]. He has met Kitty Strange and detects weakness of character. Has been advising Mr. Charles Daubeny, [see Charles Daubeny to Boucher] on a pamphlet he is writing, but fears he has done no good; he sends James some of the works of his friend Mr. Jones [William Jones of Nayland, D.N.B.]; illness among his scholars is causing him grave anxiety.

  • Box-folder 1:10
    J[onathan] Boucher, Paddington, Eng., to [John] James, Arthuret, near Carlisle, [Eng.] 8 March 1780
    2 pp. ALS. (A/1/46).

    His hopes of obtaining a studentship for John have failed; Dr. Browne has written a very curt refusal; he fears that John will be very disappointed and suggests applying to the Archbishop of York.

  • Box-folder 1:10
    J[onathan] Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James, Arthuret, near Carlisle, [Eng.] 18 March 1780
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/47).

    John has written a cheerful letter enclosing a list of the canons of Christchurch, and their connections, to whom applications might be made; Boucher himself could speak to the Archbishop of York, and the Bishop of London [Robert Lowth 1710-87]. He has recommended John to try for the Prize Poem. London has been in a panic about a change of ministry, which did not take place. "Daily waiting for great news from [Sir Henry] Clinton."

  • Box-folder 1:10
    J[onathan] Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John] James, Arthuret, near Carlisle, [Eng.] 27 Ap[ri]l 1780
    3 pp. ALS. (A/1/48).

    Dr. Browne [Rector of Paddington] is dead; with the help of the Bp. of Bangor [Robert Moore] Boucher wrote to the Bp. of London but the living had already been promised to Mr. Hayter, a scholar, nephew of a former Bp. of London. Boucher has been ill so he has not yet ordered the books on James' list; last week there was a sale of the books of the Dissenter Furneaux [D.N.B.] who is confined in a mad-house. Kitty Strange has a singular giddiness about her; he has not been able to find a place for her sister, Betty.

  • Box-folder 1:10
    J[onathan] B[oucher], [Paddington, Eng.] to [John James] 20 Jul[y 1780]
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/49).

    He and his wife are both in ill health; he hopes for preferment from the Bp. of London who lately recommended him as tutor to Lord Garlies, eldest son of the Earl of Galloway. Mr. Addison has unexpectedly decided to return to America and wants Boucher to lend him money.

  • Box-folder 1:10
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to [John James] Dec[em]b[e]r 1780
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/50).

    Tom is well though not very happy in his present employment. Boucher has heard Oxford news from the President of Magdalen [George Horne, later Bp. of Norwich, D.N.B.]; Oxford seems given over to frivolity; it may be very difficult to get a studentship for John at Christchurch. Jinny has taken charge of Betty Strange, who may be apprenticed to a mantua-maker; his opinion of Kitty has improved and he may employ her in his house. The situation in America now seems more hopeful. Prospect of Maryland being recovered because of quarrels amongst its leaders. Has received many letters favorable to his wishes concerning America. Washington has asked to be remembered to him, and a neighbour in Mayland is making overtures; the library of Tophan Beauclerk is to be sold, "it is said to be the largest and best ever exposed to sale"; catalogues will be printed and sold after Christmas. Boucher's school is diminishing, and will soon be reduced to eight pupils.

  • Box-folder 1:11
    J[onathan] B[oucher], Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James] Jan[ua]ry 1781
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/52)

    His school has lost three pupils but is to receive three more, including Mr. Ashley [later 6th Earl of Shaftesbury] his need for an assistant is urgent but he will be hard to please; John's friend Goldie [?Mr. Golding, Boucher's curate at Epsom] may be suitable, but not his friend Barrow. The Bouchers are moving to a larger house and will employ Kitty Strange as Upper Maid, though he dislikes the thought of having her a servant to him. He is sending James Knox's Essay on Education. Lord North forgot to ask the King for the Deanery of Bristol for Dr. Horne [later Bp. of Norwich], but the King says he shall have something as good, if not a little better.

  • Box-folder 1:11
    J[onathan] Boucher, Paddington, [England] to [John James] 15 March 1781
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/53).

    He is chilled by a pedantic letter from Mr. Lewis of Jesus, but may try him as an assistant. Betty Strange has written to Kitty that she likes her new place 'hugeously'; he believes he owes James £3 15s.4d. for the sisters' expenses. He intends to buy land to add to his Blencogo estate, and asks James to stand surety for him. Property in Maryland is still intact. Threatened but protected by his lawyer via a "sham sale." Admiral Rodney's success has not made him over optimistic; he wishes it had been the French, rather than the Dutch, that had been beaten. He has read a publication on the Sacrament by Dr. Bell [William Bell, D.N.B.] but finds it illogical.

  • Box-folder 1:11
    J[onathan] Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James], Arthuret, [Cumberland, Eng.] 9 Sept[embe]r 1781
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/51).

    Horseback riding and warm baths improve Nelly's health. Term begins again at his school and John James will be leaving [for Oxford]; Queen's is unfit to train him; Boucher would like him to accompany a young man of fortune on the Grand Tour, and to go more into company. Points out the advantages to James and his family in moving to London. Tom will send some of his sermons, concerning the American War, intended for publication, for James to read; will Mrs. James look out for a cook.

Boucher to John James, the younger [educated Queen's College, Oxford; assistant and partner at Boucher's school; 1785, Rector of Arthuret; died 1786 as the result of a riding accident.]
  • Box-folder 1:12
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to [John James, Jr.] 14 Aug[us]t 1780
    4 pp. ALS. (A/1/54).

    It is difficult to paint pure, perfect and unmingled beauty without a foil; Annapolis friend who drew his wife in the act of suckling her child which he found "inexpressibly pleasing". John should pour out his thoughts on papers. Boucher has read Thelyphthora, a book recommending polygamy by Madan, Chaplain of the Lock Hospital [D.N.B.]. Will John ask his mother to look out for a cook for his household. Mr. Addison and his son have sailed for America. Settlement with Mr. Addison. Remarks American affairs are sadly confused.

Boucher to Rev. Mr. Tickell, Rector of Trinity Parish, Louisa County
  • Box-folder 1:13
    Jonathan Bouche[r], P[or]t Royal, [Va.] to [Joseph] Tickell, Louisa County, [Va.] 16 Dec[embe]r 1762
    3 pp. ALS. (A/2/1).

    He reproaches Tickell for not answering his letter. A box containing letters to them both from home was on board the Welcome, which was lost in Spain; it falls to him to inform Tickell that his mother and his eldest sister are both dead. Boucher's friend Tom Robinson has been killed in Germany.

  • Box-folder 1:13
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, King George [Co., Va.] to [Joseph] Tickell, Trinity Parish, Louisa County, [Va.] 13 Jan[ua]ry 1764
    3 pp. ALS. (A/2/2).

    He urges Tickell to take better care of his health, and recommends cold baths; his own health is improved by the pure, thin air of Virginia. When their Indian neighbours have buried the hatchet, he and Tickell may be able to visit the famed springs of Augusta; they might then go on to visit Maury [see Boucher to Maury].

  • Box-folder 1:13
    Boucher, Port Royal, [Va.] to [Joseph Tickell] 28 Jan 1764
    1 p. ALS. (A/2/3).

    Joe Messenger of Park Gate, near Wigton, has bought some letters from home for Tickell. Messenger knows Greek, Latin and Figures and has been warmly recommended by Boucher's father & Mr. Blair; the good people of Cumberland seem to think a man may jump into preferment in America.

  • Box-folder 1:13
    [Jonathan] Boucher, St. Mary's [Parish, Carolina Co., Va.] to [Joseph] Tickell, Louisa [County, Va.] 22 Jan[ua]ry 1765
    3 pp. ALS. (A/2/4).

    He has been very busy; neither the weather nor his state of health have been able to rescue him from riding about on dirty errands. Tickells' former patron, Dr. Brown [John Brown, D.N.B.] has published some sermons. Boucher asks Tickell to recommend Mr. Messenger to Mr. Thomlinson as an assistant in Carolina. Has plans of becoming a planter.

Boucher to Sir Frederick Morton Eden [1766-1809; D.N.B.; son of Sir Robert Eden, former Governor of Maryland; author of The State of the Poor.]
(A/3).
  • Box-folder 1:14
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Frederick [Morton Eden] 3 Nov[embe]r 1786
    2 pp. ALS. (A/3/1).

    While Eden was in Paris, police discipline made him write, but since his return to England, Boucher has had no letter. He invites Eden and his friend Deverell of Oriel to spend Christmas with him. He has sent him a letter introducing Mr. Zimmermann of Brunswick.

  • Box-folder 1:14
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k M[orton] Eden, Christ Church, Oxford, [Eng.] 7 Febr[ua]ry 1787
    1 p. ALS. (A/3/2).

    He instructs Eden on the correct way to draw up a note of band. Mr. Watson [probably John, brother of Joshua Watson] is to go to University College.

  • Box-folder 1:14
    [tha]n Boucher to [Sir] Fred[eric]k M[orton] Eden 16 Sept[embe]r 1788
    1 p. ALS. (A/3/3).

    He is much shaken [by the death of his second wife on 14 Sep] and is to go to Carlisle for a month; as his servant John will now be out of a place, he suggests that Eden recommend him to Mrs. Moore [his aunt, wife of the Archbishop of Canterbury].

  • Box-folder 1:14
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Carlisle, [Eng.] to Sir Frederick M[orton] Eden, London, [Eng.] 16 Oct[obe]r 1793
    3 pp. ALS. (A/3/4).

    On his way to Edinburgh on horseback, he composed a series of epigrams on Scottish dress, churches, towns, etc., none of which impressed him favourably. He received a most flattering reception in Edinburgh, but will not yet disclose his reason for going there. [He had hopes of a Scottish bishopric.] He has visited Hawthornden where the poet Drummond lived. Suggests he and Eden take a tour of Scotland and publish a book to "bear our expences [sic]."

  • Box-folder 1:14
    [Jonathan Boucher], Epson, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k M[orton] Eden, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, [Eng.] 13 Nov[embe]r 1793
    3 pp. AL. (A/3/5).

    His journey from Carlisle took fifty-four hours. The Edinburgh scheme needs consideration and reflection before it is discussed at Lambeth; the Archbishop's approval is essential. He wishes to discuss Eden's future plans with him and warns him to "take care only to pass through life, as I have done, [without] ever finding out what I was fit for."

  • Box-folder 1:14
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k M[orton], Eden, at the Hon[ora]b[le] Lady Eden's in Queen's Square, Bath, [Eng.] [8 January 1794]
    3 pp. ALS. (A/3/6).

    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k M[orton], Eden, at the Hon[ora]b[le] Lady Eden's in Queen's Square, Bath, [Eng.]. He apologizes for breaking an appointment. Sir Frederick and Lady Eden now have it in their power to render him an essential piece of justice [probably refers to the heavy loss Boucher sustained when he stood security for Sir Robert Eden]. He foresees another Revolution in France against the Jacobins. Pitt will be severely badgered this session but though he dislikes the man, he dreads a change of ministry just now.

  • Box-folder 1:15
    Jona[tha]n Boucher to Sir Fred[eri]c[k] M[orton] Eden, London, [Eng.] 9 March 1794
    1 pp. ALS. (A/3/7).

    He is coming to town with Mr. Stevens [see B/3] on Tuesday and will dine with Eden. Requests a meeting with Capt[ai]n Eden "to settle everything" at Sir Frederick's house.

  • Box-folder 1:15
    Jona[tha]n Boucher to Sir Fred[eric]k M[orton] Eden, London, [Eng.] 20 March 1794
    2 pp. ALS. [pasted inside 9 March 1794.] (A/3/8).

    He has written to the Archbishop of Canterbury about the Edinburgh business. He is coming to town and will stay with the Edens, if convenient. Thanks the Edens for their "late kindness which will make me a free man for at least a year to come."

  • Box-folder 1:15
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k [Morton Eden] 23 Ap[ri]l 1794
    2 pp. ALS. (A/3/9).

    He is much grieved by the death of his sister [Jinny]. He is sorry that Eden is in difficulties over the house he bought, and suggests that he ask his father-in-law [James Paul Smith] for a loan, for which he will stand security.

  • Box-folder 1:15
    J[onathan] B[oucher], Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k M[orton] Eden, London, [Eng.] 13 July 1794
    3 pp. ALS. (A/3/10).

    He is glad that Eden's financial difficulties have been settled, but as his income is only £800 p.a. and his expenses at least £1000 p.a. he urges economy; however, he should remain hopeful about the future. Comments on a business arrangement with Messrs Whites in Fleet Street. He sends his good wishes to Eden's wife, who is pregnant.

  • Box-folder 1:15
    J[onathan] B[oucher], Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Frederick M[orton] Eden, on the Northern Circuit 14 Aug[us]t 1794
    3 pp. ALS. (A/3/11).

    He hopes that Eden, who is on the Northern Circuit, has made some gleanings for is Magnum Opus [The State of the Poor]; if he is near Carlisle, he should meet Mr. Houseman who has traversed Cumberland to make agricultural reports and who is making out for Boucher an account of land in that county belonging to absentees, and of tillage etc. Boucher has estimated the Poor Rate for his own native village [Blencogo] at sixpence in the pound. He has had an agreeable visit from the Rev. Mr. Herbert Croft [later Sir Herbert Croft, D.N.B.] a fellow lexicographer. Comments that a book on "The Present State of France" is ill written and badly translated.

  • Box-folder 1:15
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to Sir Frederick [Morton] Eden, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, [Eng.] [May 1796]
    2 pp. ALS. (A/3/12).

    He declines an invitation to visit Eden until he has got through "A" [of his Glossary]. He considers Pitt's Bill [to change the Poor Law] paltry and impracticable.

  • Box-folder 1:16
    . J[onathan] B[oucher] to Sir Frederick [Morton] Eden, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, England 16 June 1796
    1 p. ALS. (A3/13).

    He is sending some notes which Eden may be able to use in his book. Buried a Miss Boucher whose brother "wants to make it out that they & I are related."

  • Box-folder 1:16
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Fred[eric]k [Morton] Eden, London, [Eng.] 17 June 1796
    2 pp. ALS. (A/3/14).

    The bearer of this letter is Mr. Robert Jamieson, a young Scot, proficient in Gaelic, Latin & Greek, who wishes to become a bookseller; he asks Eden to speak to Messrs. Whites, the booksellers, about him.

  • Box-folder 1:16
    J[onathan] Boucher], Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir Frederick [Morton] Eden, London, [Eng.]. 21 July 1796
    1 p. ALS. (A/3/15).

    He encloses a letter containing some reflections about Pitt's Bill; Eden's book will be referred to when this Bill and the author of it are gone. Also enclosed is an account of the population of Carlisle.

  • Box-folder 1:16
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to Sir Frederick [Morton Eden] 26 Oct. 1796
    3 pp. ALS. (A/3/16).

    He has read through the papers sent to him by Eden but does not agree with his views on education, which resemble those of Dr. Priestley; he fears they may expose the whole work to censure and so, though diffident about putting forward his own notions, he has re-written this section; Eden must decide which version to use; he has also softened the critique on Mr. Pitt. He wonders what effect Burke's pamphlet [probably Letters on a Regicide Peace] will have on the public mind; the "speechifyings" in Parliament have been very poor - "this is not an age of great men."

  • Box-folder 1:16
    J[onathan] Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Sir F[rederick] M[orton] E[den] n.d. [ca. 1793?] Thurs. Evening
    2 pp. ALS. (A/3/17).

    He has read through the papers concerning the uncancelled bond; as Eden cannot prove there was ever any intention of cancelling it, he has no case in a common law court, but Boucher believes he has strong enough grounds to take the case to Chancery. He is forwarding a letter from Mr. Addison to Mr. Watson. Eden's play is not to go to Sheridan who is "as little worthy to be trusted with a new play, as with money, or anything else", or to Grubb, but to young Banister; Boucher is not optimistic as to its success.

  • Box-folder 1:16
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to Sir Fred[erick] M[orton] Eden n.d. Wed A.M.
    1 p. ALS. (A/3/18).

    He is in poor health, with rheumatism, a headache and a slight fever.

  • Box-folder 1:16
    J[onathan] B[oucher] to Sir F[rederik Morton] Eden n.d. Thursday A.M.
    1 p. ALS. (A/3/19).

    He thanks Eden for his kind hospitality. He intends to write a tactful letter to Lady Eden [Sir Frederick's mother].

Boucher to ?William Knox [D.N.B.; Undersecretary of State for America]
  • Box-folder 1:17
    Jonathan Boucher to William Knox (?) 27 Nov. 1775
    Copy letter. The original was formerly in the Stopford Sackville collection, H.M.C. Stopford Sackville II, 19-20; now at William L. Clements Library, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 8 pp. CY of ALS. (A/4/1).

    There is a principle of revolt in all colonies which stems from a lack of foresight in colony administration; the subduing of the rebellion in America is of secondary importance to the new-modelling of its Government. Says focus of the war should be placed on New England. Decisive action against Washington is imperative to the British cause. New York is well- disposed and would make a good base for the King's troops. Advocates control of New York from New York City to Albany to split the northern colonies from the southern. Pennsylvania has made no overt act of treason nor raised any troops; the Carolinias, Virginia and Maryland are too busy with internal problems, i.e. Indians and slaves, to seek regular troops in a hostile way; the white servants would certainly enlist with the King's troops, Baltimore and Annapolis contain many such men; trade embargos should be sufficient to deal with these colonies. Washington shows extraordinary coolness and caution but has very little personal experience; the first general action against him must be decisive.

Letters from the Rev. Jonathan Boucher to William Eden [D.N.B., Undersecretary of State]
  • Box-folder 1:18
    [Rev] Jonathan Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] to W[illia]m Eden, Undersecretary of State 27 June 1776
    Copy; original in Public Record Office. 4 pp. CY of ALS. (A/4/2a).

    As it is difficult for a gentleman who has been used to better circumstances to learn to live on £70 p.a., he solicits Eden's good offices with Lord George [Germain] for a further supply of money. He claims no special merit for his actions in America, but others who have done less have received pensions. He would like to be commended to Lord Dartmouth, the Abp. of Canterbury and the Bps. of London and Bangor, and hopes that Eden may be able to help him to preferment in America when a settlement is reached.

Letters from William Eden to Mr. Pownall, Secretary to Board of Trade
  • Box-folder 1:19
    W[illia]m Eden, Downing Street, [London, Eng.] to Mr. Pownall, Secretary to Board of Trade 4 July 1776
    Copy; original in Public Record Office. 2 pp. CY of ALS. (A/4/2b).

    He encloses Boucher's letter and recommends that something be done for him. He wishes one of the King's ships on the Southern Station to be directed to call in at Annapolis to take letters to his brother [Robert Eden, Governor of Maryland].

Letters from he Rev. Jonathan Boucher to Elizabeth Hodgson [see family table]
  • Box-folder 1:20
    Jona[tha]n Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.], to Elizabeth Hodgson 28 Febr[ua]ry 1784
    3 pp. ALS. (A/4/3).

    He offers her re-assurance and encouragement on her forthcoming marriage to his friend [John James, the younger], and assures her that she will find herself among friends in his house.

Letters from the Rev. Jonathan Boucher to Dr. John Douglas, Bp. of Salisbury [D.N.B.]
  • Box-folder 1:21
    Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Dr. John Douglas, Bishop of Salisbury, [London, Eng.] 9 Feb. 1800
    Copy; orig. in B.M., Egerton MSS. 2186 f. 110. 4 pp. CY of ALS. (A/4a).

    He has declined position of Principal Minister of the English Episcopal Chapel in Edinburgh because the Scottish Anglicans refuse to render obedience to the Scottish bishops; he asks the Bishop to assist the cause of Scottish Union which he has so long supported. Edinburgh is captivated with popular preaching; even Bp. Abernethy Drummond stipulates that the English assistant he requires must be a good preacher. Cautioned Bp. Drummond to be cautious in his choice because his mitre might well come down to his chosen person.

  • Box-folder 1:21
    Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] to Dr. John Douglas, Bishop of Salisbury, London, [Eng.] 26 Feb. 1800
    Copy; original in British Museum, Egerton MSS. 2186 f. 112. 5 pp. CY of ALS. (A/4b).

    He does not expect Douglas, in his present state of health, to play any active part in promoting Scottish Union, but he might certainly use his influence to remove prejudice. He has advised Bp. Drummond, who is apt to be intemperate in his zeal, and Bp. Skinner [of Aberdeen] to write an address to the English Bishops, and he suggests that Douglas should write to the Episcopal Congregations of Edinburgh. The obstacle of the Abjuration Oath will soon be removed as it will doubtless be repealed on the death of the Cardinal of New York, which may be daily expected.

Letters to the Rev. Jonathan Boucher from the Rev. James Maury [educated William and Mary College, Virginia; tutor to Thomas Jefferson; died 1769.]
  • Box-folder 2:1
    James Maury, Frederi[ck]sville Parish, Albemarle County, [Va.], to Jonathan Boucher [15 April 1763]
    Letter mounted on paper with pencil notes including passage on friendship from letter of 20 Feb., 1764, not in this collection. Medium oversize file. (B/1/1).

    As mutual friends give him a good account of Boucher's taste, openness of temper and goodness of heart, and he has seen and admired part of a letter written to Mr. Tickell [see Boucher letters to Tickell], he is eager to be placed among his correspondents and friends.

  • Box-folder 2:1
    [James Maury], Albemarle [Co.], [Va.], to [Jonathan] Boucher 22 Nov. 1763
    7 pp. AL. (B/1/2).

    Detailed consideration of a poetical letter by Boucher which is to published by Royle; Boreas Self bowing to publish an article through the Maryland Gazette which vindicated the Virginia House of Burgesses voting an award of £2500 to Mr. Randolph for defending the House's opposition to the Governor's demand for a pistole for every land patent he signed because the Virginia presses did not wish to offend the Governor and his council. Boucher need not fear to be discovered as the author, as it will recommend him to the most sensible, equitable, and honest part of the Clergy and Laity. Maury comments extensively on his regard for Boucher. Boucher should get Mr. Jackson's opinion of the work. Tickell is to accompany Maury to Hanover Court where his case is to be heard.

  • Box-folder 2:1
    Narrative of the determination of a suit between the Minister of Fredericksville, plaintiff, and the collectors of the said parish, defendants, for arrears of salary, in Hanover Court, November and December 1763 n.d. [1763?]
    In the hand of the Rev. James Maury. AMS. (B/1/3).

    [In 1760, the Crown had disallowed an Act passed by the Virginia Assembly to prevent clergy of the Established Church, whose salaries had hitherto been calculated in tobacco, from profiting by a heavy rise in its price. Patrick Henry began his political career by opposing Maury's claim for arrears in the "Parson's Cause".] The jury was not of persons of rank and understanding, and although the verdict was in favour of the plaintiff, only one penny damages was awarded; the Jury had been harangued by one of the Defendant's lawyers [Patrick Henry] who asserted "that the King, by annulling and disallowing laws of so salutary a nature [the Two Penny Act of 1758], from being the Father of his people, degenerates into a tyrant and forfeits all right to his subjects' obedience;" at which there were cries of Treason! The road to popularity here is to trample underfoot the Interests of Religion, the Rights of the Church, and the Prorogative of the Crown.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    James Maury to [Jonathan] Boucher 7 July 1764
    4 pp. ALS. (B/1/4).

    He apologizes for not having written since he had the pleasure of seeing Boucher. The death of Mr. [Robert] Jackson is their common loss. He hears Boucher is taking on the glebe of St. Mary's, and wishes him success. Comments that he thinks Boucher told him his sister is living with him.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    [James] Maury, Albemarle [Co., Va.], to [Jonathan] Boucher 30 Aug[ust] 1764
    4 pp. ALS. (B/1/5).

    He asks Boucher to make some inquiries on his behalf to help him recover a debt for an old friend of his. He apologizes for defects in the composition of his letters, saying he writes "piping hot from the heart." Tickell is travelling in Carolina; Maury is considering moving there, but awaits information from Tickell about patronage, salaries, etc.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    [James] Maury, Albemarle [Co., Va.], to [Jonathan] Boucher 1 Mar[ch] 1766
    4 pp. ALS. (B/1/6).

    He thanks Boucher for his friendly injunctions to take care of his health, and for the help he has given him in correcting his verses. His son will not be able to assist Boucher in his school as he intends to go to Carolina with his father.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    [James] Maury to [Jonathan] Boucher 3 Oct[ober] 1767
    1 p. ALS. (B/1/7).

    He has answered Boucher's enquiries with regard to Mr. Messenger in a previous letter. Tickell has long since returned but he has not seen or heard from him. He urges Boucher to visit him.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    [James] Maury, Fred[ericks]ville [Parish, Albemarle County, Va.], to [Jonathan] Boucher 25 Nov[embe]r 1767
    1 p. ALS. (B/1/8).

    He has been ill since returning from his journey. He returns some papers which Boucher lent him and sends some of his own for Boucher's use.

  • Box-folder 2:3
    J[ames] Maury, Albemarle [Co., Va.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 29 Aug[ust] 1768
    2 pp. ALS. (B/1/9).

    Tickell will attend the Treaty at Chiswell's mines with Boucher, if possible; the Indians may, however, insist on the Commissioners meeting them around the boundaries of the lands to be sold. Maury has been asked to preach in a remote corner of his parish to some of his parishioners who "are perpetually attacked by Childs [or Chiles] and his brother enthusiasts." He asks Boucher to return the sermon he lent to him.

  • Box-folder 2:3
    [James] Maury to [Jonathan] Boucher [19 Dec. 1768]
    3 pp. ALS. (B/1/10).

    As an administrator, Boucher should know that, shortly before his death, Tickell sold a quantity of rum to Mr. Lewis, one half of which Maury bought; he paid Lewis, so Lewis should have settled for the whole. Maury asks Boucher to bid for Clarke's Sermons at the sale of Tickell's books. He is not optimistic about his chances of being appointed to Trinity Parish [?Louisa County - Tickell parish].

  • Box-folder 2:3
    [James Maury] to [Jonathan] Boucher, Caroline [Co., Va.] 19 Dec. 1768
    2 pp. ADS. (B/1/11).

    A list of books for which Maury wishes Boucher to send to Glasgow; religious works, Italian Grammar, Blackstone's Commentaries, Tristram Shandy and The Vicar of Wakefield.

  • Box-folder 2:3
    [James] Maury, Albemarle [Co., Va.], to Jonathan Boucher, Caroline [Co., Va.] 14 Feb[ruary] 1769
    3 pp. ALS. (B/1/12).

    Asks Boucher to return a sermon on Regeneration among Tickell's papers, and a discourse by Tickell on Unity. He is drawing up an address, which he hopes to publish, to combat the Anabaptists. He is at present unwell with "the blind piles and gout."

Letters to the Rev. Jonathan Boucher from the Rev. Myles Cooper [1737-85; President of King's College, New York; returned to England in 1775; curate of Paddington; rector of Sulhamstead.]
  • Box-folder 2:4
    M[yles] Cooper, Kings College, New York, to [Jonathan] Boucher, Upper Marlborough, Maryland 14 June 1773
    3 pp. ALS. (B/2).

    Washington has brought hm Boucher's letter; he urges him to come to New York. Mr. Custis [Washington's stepson and Boucher's former pupil] is to enjoy special privileges at King's College as he is older than the other boys. Congratulates Boucher on his victory over two lawyers. Deplores number of Dissenters in America and is glad to hear that Oxford is standing firm against them. He is looking for a place for Mr. Seabury, a worthy clergyman. A Mr. Smith of South Carolina is "pitched upon for an American Bishop."

Letters to the Rev. Jonathan Boucher from the Rev. William Stevens [1732-1807; D.N.B.; Treasurer of Queen Anne's Bounty; biographer of Jones of Nayland.]
  • Box-folder 2:5
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.] to John [Boucher] i.e., [Jonathan Boucher] 17 May 1777
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/1).

    There is to be a hurried meeting of the Committee. He has endeavored to make Boucher's peace with Dr. Glasse [Rev. Samuel Glasse; D.N.B.]. "No engagement that may not be postponed to Bishop-making."

  • Box-folder 2:5
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 17 June 1777
    1 p. ALS. singed with monogram. (B/3/2).

    He attended the Committee but there was no great business.

  • Box-folder 2:5
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 12 Sept[embe]r 1777
    1 p. ALS. singed with monogram. (B/3/3).

    Boucher and Mr. Addison are invited to the meeting at the Chaplain's Table tomorrow to drink Church and King like the Tories of old time.

  • Box-folder 2:5
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 24 September 1777
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/4).

    He invites Boucher to Broadstreet and will advise him if he really wishes it.

  • Box-folder 2:5
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 1 Dec. 1777
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/5).

    Enclosed is the fall of the Leaf [?]. Is Boucher continuing his Historico-Politico-Theological work?

  • Box-folder 2:6
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher 9 April 1778
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/6).

    Stevens will call on Boucher with the Rector of Otham [his cousin, William Horne].

  • Box-folder 2:6
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher He time is taken up by rival commitments; he wishes Boucher success with his school, and enquires after Nelly's health.
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/7).

    His time is taken up by rival commitments; he wishes Boucher success with his school, and enquires after Nelly's health.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, [London, Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 11 Nov. 1779
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/9).

    Hopes to see Boucher shortly to discuss the business of his previous letter.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 22 April 1780
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/9a).

    He is sorry to hear of Boucher's ill health.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    [William Stevens] to [Jonathan] Boucher 11 Jan[uar]y 1782
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/10).

    He has sent Boucher's bill for acceptance, but this cannot be done in time for his purposes. He has lent £200 to the Rector of Hanwell [Dr. Glasse]. He and Old Jones will visit Boucher on Sunday.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 17 April 1782
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/11).

    He hopes to see Boucher on Friday at Bow Church. He has heard that a legacy to a refugee American clergyman by a pious lady has been disputed by her relatives [probably a reference to the legacy left to Boucher by Miss Mary Barton, the daughter of a silk merchant, who died in 1782].

  • Box-folder 2:7
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Paddington, [Eng.] 13 June 1782
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/12).

    He intends to dine with Boucher on Friday.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Paddington Green, [Eng.] 26 May 1783
    2 pp. ALS. (B/3/13).

    He has read the Country Curate's Letter to the Bishop of Llandaff and wishes it success. The Board [? of Queen Anne's Bounty] is to meet and he has been asked to draw up detailed accounts.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 7 July 1784
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/14).

    Boucher's £100 annuity is bought for £1708 7s 6d.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Paddington Mid[dlese]x, [Eng.] 27 Aug. 1784
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/15).

    Stevens has visited Dr. Chandler [possibly Richard Chandler; D.N.B., classical antiquary]. Boucher is to visit Cardigan, Carmarthen and Cardiff. Stevens has not yet had Boucher's drafts accepted; he is going to Canterbury with Old Jones.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    W[illiam] [Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 15 Sept. 1784
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/16).

    He is directing this letter to Cyfarthfa where Boucher will be staying for two weeks; he hopes to see him in London on his return from Canterbury.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 26 Nov[embe]r 1784
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/17).

    Murder will out! He has been charged with the authorship of the Tract.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 30 Nov[embe]r 1784
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/18).

    He has been to Epsom and seen Boucher's patron and his patron's patron; he was obliged to leave Boucher's mare at Ewell.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    [William Stevens], Broadstreet, to [Jonathan] Boucher, Paddington Green, [Eng.] 11 March 1785
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/19).

    He and Boucher are invited to visit Sam Glasse [Vicar of Epsom, D.N.B.] on Saturday, but as his Audit is to take place on that day, he may not be able to come.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 6 Sept[embe]r 1785
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/20).

    He hopes this letter does not miss Boucher at Caen [Boucher had accompanied Lord Suffield's son to Brunswick, and was returning to England with Delves, son of Sir Thomas Broughton]; Dr. Morrice [probably Secretary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel] feels that Boucher slighted him in not telling him about his tour till the last possible moment. Mr. Parkhurst [partron of Boucher's now living of Epsom] says that the library is ready to receive his books.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Caen, Normandie, [France] 12 Sep 1785
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/21).

    He has received Boucher's letter from Rheims; Sir Thomas Broughton has not contacted him. Dr. Morrice insists he had no wish to be rid of Boucher; he has acted only in the interests of the Society. Stevens has seen the Archbishop [of Canterbury] who has hopes that Sir Guy Carleton, the new Commander-in-Chief in America, will restore order there. The publication of Johnson's Prayers and Meditations has re-opened the question of prayers for the dead, for which Boucher once pleaded.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 9 Dec[embe]r 1785
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/22).

    Stevens invites Boucher to dine with him on Monday and reminds him that he is to dine with Mr. Frere on Friday [John Frere, D.N.B., antiquary].

  • Box-folder 2:9
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 31 May 1786
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/23).

    He begs to be excused the task of finding lodgings for two single ladies. He is sorry to hear of the illness of John James [see A/1/54; he died 23rd Oct. 1786]. Old Jones is to preach at Shoreditch on Tuesday. Sam Glasse expects a letter from Boucher.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    Stevens, Otham, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 27 June 1786
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/24).

    He hopes Boucher managed to go to Bristol to visit the poor invalid [John James]. Darby Nyers is in financial trouble, but Stevens hopes that enough will be subscribed to avoid sequestration of his living. He invites Boucher to accompany him on a journey into Wales; he would be able to see John James again; indeed it might improve James' health to accompany them.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 25 July 1786
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/25).

    Boucher's friend and companion [?] was tried at the Old Bailey. Stevens has written to Lord Dunmore [1732-1809; former Governor of New York] but he has gone to Scotland. Stevens is to visit Wales with Crawshay [probably William Crawshay, a proprietor of Cyfarthfa ironworks] and hopes to see John James at Bristol.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, Newbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 10 Aug[ust] 1786
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/26).

    He stayed a week at Cyfarthfa examining books and settling accounts [? of the ironworks]; he stayed in Bristol but had no time for visiting. The Bishop of Connecticut has written about the state of his church which Stevens termed "not at all flattering" and intends to write to Boucher.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 22 Sept[embe]r 1786
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/27).

    Stevens and his cousin [George Horne, later Bp. of Norwich; D.N.B.] are going to Sussex for a few days but they hope to see Boucher at Otham on their return.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 17 June 1787
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/28).

    Stevens will not side with a lady against her husband and intends to decline the Trusteeship; but Boucher, who is a kind of relation, should do what he can for her.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 2 Nov[embe]r 1787
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/29).

    George Robinson [D.N.B.; bookseller] will not engage with Ogilvie [an author]. If Boucher wants a loan, it would be advisable to apply to Uncle [Charles Foreman] who would not charge interest. He hopes that Mrs. Boucher [Mary Elizabeth Foreman, died 14 Sep. 1788] is better.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 9 Feb. 1788
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/30).

    He asks for details of Boucher's visit to Lambeth. Boucher would appear to have written an injudicious letter to the Bp. of Carlisle [John Douglas, later Bp. of Salisbury; D.N.B.].

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 13 Feb[ruar]y 1788
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/31).

    He reassures Boucher that the Bp. of Carlisle did not resent his letter, and invites him to dine at Ewell.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher]. 26 June 1788
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/32).

    He does not intend to write an answer to the recently published Vindiciae Priestlianae but recommends Boucher to do so.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 11 July 1788
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/33).

    Boucher is invited to Mr. Frere's at Beddington, on his 20th wedding anniversary [John Frere was married to Jane Hookham, daughter of Steven's partner in the hosiery business]; if he comes in his carriage, Stevens will return with him to Epsom and stay till Tuesday.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], Ewell, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Long Town [Eng.] 4 Nov[embe]r 1788
    2 pp. ALS. (B/3/34).

    Stevens assures Boucher that to have known happier days is better than to have known nothing but misery. He is glad that Boucher will be returning from the North to pass the winter at Epsom. Mr. Foreman [uncle of Boucher's second wife] made a handsome profit on the hops he bought. Stevens is staying with the Dean of Canterbury [George Horne] who will look over Boucher's papers. The Dean wonders why Boucher would put "the history of the rebellion in sermon form."

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], Ewell, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 23 April 1789
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/35).

    He apologizes to Boucher for some words of his which upset him. If Boucher intends to go to St. James's, he will accompany him.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher], Kintbury near Newbury 19 Aug[us]t 1789
    19 Aug[us]t 1789

    Anthony Richardson's widow is in financial difficulties; Stevens is anxious to assist the family, as it was Richardson who helped him obtain the Treasurership [of Queen Anne's Bounty]. He has not heard from Old Jones, who has some mighty project in mind. He has been staying in the neighborhood of Bath, with Dr. and Mrs. Gunning, for whom he has a high regard.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 31 July 1790
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/38).

    He has heard that the living of Rochdale has been presented to one of his friends; can Boucher throw any light on this? He is going to stay with Dr. Gunning near Bath; should Boucher wish to go to Cyfarthfa, he would be tempted to accompany him.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 20 Aug[us]t 1790
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/39).

    He congratulates Boucher on the birth of a son, announced in his letter of 9 Aug. Dr. Drake was appointed to Rochdale, but Stevens does not yet know who is to have Hadley, for which Old Jones once applied. Boucher has, for once, been unsuccessful in his stockjobbing.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    [William Stevens to John Moore, Archbishop of Canterbury, draft] n.d. (1790?)
    1 p. Df. (B/3/40).

    He wishes to exchange his present post of Treasurer [of Queen Anne's Bounty] for that of Receiver of the Tenths, which is attended with less trouble and some additional profit.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 13 Octo[be]r 1790
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/41).

    He saw nothing ludicrous in his letter to the Archbishop; there will probably be another candidate, as John Bacon would prefer the Receivership of Tenths to that of First Fruits. He has had a letter from Bp. Skinner [Bp. of Aberdeen; D.N.B.] who desires to be remembered to honest Mr. Boucher. George Robinson desires to see Tom Payne's account.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 20 Octo[be]r 1790
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/42).

    His previous letters have not been answered. If Boucher intends to come to town this week, he may take Stevens to Ewell on Saturday.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    [William Stevens], Ewell, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 21 Nov. 1790
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/44).

    Stevens has had a letter from the Bishop [? of Norwich] whose health has improved.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 24 Nov[embe]r 1790
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/45).

    Stevens has had visits from Peter Francklyn and Peter Waldo; "Gib." whom he calls the "Marquis de Tobago", is pressing Mrs. Richardson to settle a debt or to make over her estates to him as a security.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    [William Stevens], Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 21 Dec[embe]r 1790
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/46).

    He is at Bath with the Bishop of Norwich [his cousin, George Horne], who is taking the waters. Mrs. Richardson shrinks from the West India voyage unless it is absolutely necessary; he asks Boucher to see Christopher Court [one of the Richardson creditors] to investigate matters a little.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    [William Stevens], Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan][Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 5 Jan[uar]y 1791
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/47).

    The Bishop's health is improving. Stevens has written to Mrs. Robinson about her proposed voyage to Dominica; he urges Boucher to see Court without waiting for his return. Mr. Harrison was to receive £100 p.a. until the Bankland Colliery was sold: he has put it up for sale to protect himself against insinuations about his motives for working it. Stevens will collect the money which is ready for him at the Exchequer, and lay it out in the funds.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    [William Stevens], Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 17 Jan[uar]y 1791
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/48).

    Uncle Charles [Foreman] has left Boucher a legacy. Stevens did not realize he was to pay the Tenths for Crosthwaite and Bromfield to the Receiver, or he would have added them to his list of annual payments. Old Jones accompanied Stevens to Bath after his short stay in town, and they found the Bishop in better health.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    [William Stevens], Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 10 July 1791
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/49).

    Stevens has lent money injudiciously and does not expect to see Principal or Interest. Boucher is to dine with Frere on Thursday, the National Assembly Day. Could he come to town on Friday to discuss [?Richardson] business with Brook Bridges [brother-in-law of Jones of Nayland].

  • Box-folder 2:13
    [William Stevens], Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 20 July 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/50).

    He commends Boucher's business ability in dealing with the Robinson affairs. Has he met with a pamphlet called The English Freeholder ?

  • Box-folder 2:13
    William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 27 July 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/51).

    He deplores his own lack of business ability; had he and Boucher trusted G.F. [unidentified] earlier, the Richardson business need not have gone to the lawyers; he asks Boucher's help in dealing with Christopher Court. The English Freeholder is well done. Does Boucher know anything about the author?

  • Box-folder 2:13
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 29 July 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/52).

    G.T. is ready to do everything he can for the widow but does not yet have the account. A meeting of the Richardson creditors might help to settle matters. Ideas on handling the Robinson affairs.

  • Box-folder 2:13
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 6 Aug[us]t 1791
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/53).

    Anthony Richardson [one of the widow's sons] has written to ask Stevens' and Boucher's sanction to deliver the account current, signed by his mother, to G.F.; Stevens asks Boucher's advice as he mistrusts G.F.'s motives, and dislikes doing any business with him; Anthony hopes that the money from the crops will be sufficient to pay the interest on the debts but Stevens is not so sanguine.

  • Box-folder 2:13
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher], Epsom, Surry, [Eng.] 16 Aug. 1791
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/54).

    Anthony Richardson is eager and importunate which makes him inconsiderate; he shows want of judgement in not releasing who his best friends are. G.F. is dogmatic, overbearing & cunning; he is forever boasting of his generosity towards the Richardsons, though Stevens sees little sign of it. Christopher Court will prudently look after his own interests. Wants to avoid trouble of bringing about a meeting of creditors which is Boucher's plan. Stevens is sorry to hear that Boucher is still harassed by Lewis's securityship.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 25 Aug[ust] 1791
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/55).

    He is returning to town, then to Otham. Frere writes that the Bishop [of Norwich] was well enough to preach the Infirmary Charity sermon. Stevens feels unequal to meeting the Richardson creditors without Boucher's support.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 1 Sept[embe]r 1791
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. ((B/3/56).

    He is leaving for Wales with Crawshay to find out why the last half year's balance [of the Cyfartha ironworks] was so bad. On his return, the Richardson creditors, whom he lists, would meet; G.F. will doubtless be ready to take the lead.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 28 Sept[embe]r 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/57).

    G.F. will accept to restraining clause in the account; there can be no agreement of the creditors without him. Anthony [Richardson] says the clause was G.F.'s own dictating. Anthony is to call upon him to discuss the matter.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] Octo[ber] 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/58).

    He congratulates Boucher on the birth of a child, and hopes to dine with him on Friday. He encloses a letter to Robert Smith [one of the Creditors] for Boucher to amend, and commends his letter to Anthony concerning G.F.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 19 Octo[ber 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/59).

    The Board [of the S.P.G.?] is to meet; Stevens is to attend but will contrive to meet Boucher at the Swan at two o'clock.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 27 Octo[ber] 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/60).

    He has heard nothing from Dr. Glasse. He is to visit Boucher again at Epsom. Robert Smith has written a most polite letter.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 9 Nov. 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/61).

    From G.F.'s letter, it appears he is determined wilfully to misunderstand their actions; Mr. [?Brook] Bridges will see him to talk the matter over. Stevens does not reccommend buying G.F. out because of a possible indebtedness to the Bacon estate.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 15 Nov. 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/62).

    Bridges thinks that G.F. is disposed to be more accommodating, and his letter to Mrs. Richardson bears this out; Anthony should let him know that he is going to the West Indies next week.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 17 Nov. 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/63).

    Boucher does not approve of Anthony's going out to the West Indies, but his passage is booked. Stevens thinks he will suppress a letter to G.F.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 9 Dec[embe]r 1791
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/64).

    He has seen the Archbishop [of Canterbury] who is going to Bath; he has a house in the same square as the Bishop of Norwich.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 21 Nov[embe]r 1792
    3 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/65).

    By the will of 'Old Burton', who died last Saturday, Stevens was appointed a Trustee [George Burton, the chronologer an uncle of Bp. Horne's wife]. Tom Richardson says that the Bill, which Anthony sent him, was for his mother's use; but he has had it in his possession for five months, and neither Tom nor Anthony has mentioned it before. He has discussed the [Monthly?] Review with Robinson who would accept articles and reviews from divines "sound in the faith"; the printing of the John Bull pamphlet would cost £2 per thousand copies.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 24 Nov[embe]r 1792
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/66).

    A parcel of Steven's shirts, shoes & stockings, sent from Epsom, has not yet arrived.

  • Box-folder 2:16
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 8 Feb[ruary] 1793
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/67).

    He does not think that he is qualified to look over Boucher's discourses. He has delivered Boucher's injunctions to Frere, and his answer to Dr. Morrice's invitation.

  • Box-folder 2:16
    . [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 11 Sept[embe]r 1793
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/68).

    He gives an account of his travels in Berkshire and Somerset. Old Jones is occupied with thoughts on the Bishop's life, but seems disposed to introduce extraneous matter [ Life of Bishop Horne, pub. 1795]. Stevens is sorry to hear that Boucher's business is going badly and that he has been disturbed by that most ungrateful scoundrel, Golding, for whom he recommends whipping and ducking. Boucher has left an estate in the North. Stevens approves of the scheme for Scottish Union, but it should take place gradually. [The scheme for union between Episcopalian Church; see also A/4].

  • Box-folder 2:16
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 21 Nov[embe]r 1793
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/69).

    Boucher is much in favour of Scottish Union. He advises him to leave the negotiations for the scheme to Sir William Forbes [D.N.B.] who is intimate with the Archbishop. [Bp. Skinner of Aberdeen hoped to assist the scheme for Scottish Union by the appointment of Boucher as Bishop of Edinburgh; Boucher visited Edinburgh in Oct. 1793 but the idea was abandoned largely owing to opposition from the Presbyterians.]

  • Box-folder 2:16
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 27 Nov[ember] 1793
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/70).

    Canon Holcombe owes him £18 6s 8d interest. His two "nephews", as Dr. Glasse calls them, visited him last night [probably two of the Richardson family]; the Richardson business now looks more hopeful; the estate may be rendered solvent.

  • Box-folder 2:16
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surry, [Eng.] 3 Oct. 1794
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/71).

    He has all the troubles of family man with none of the pleasures. Tom and John Richardson have been guilty of some financial misconduct in discharging the debts of the estate; Stevens has written a reproving letter to John [later Sir John Richardson, D.N.B.].

  • Box-folder 2:16
    William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 8 Octo[ber] 1794
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/72).

    Stevens asks Boucher to write to Anthony Richardson telling him that he may draw on him [i.e. Stevens] to the amount of the bills, rather than delivering up the coffee on the island; he does this on the assumption that Tom Richardson will raise the money before the bills fall due; he is surprised that Anthony can upbraid him with not coming forward to help the family when they are already under such great obligations to him.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 15 Octo[ber] 1794
    1 p. ALS. (B/3/73).

    He has read and approved Boucher's letter to Anthony. He intends to visit him on Saturday, but unless his eyes recover from their complaint, he will have to travel by post chaise.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 25 Octo[ber] 1794
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/74).

    The state of his eyes is improving. Joshua [Watson; see Danberry to Boucher, 1798 May 7] called with melancholy account of the poor young man [?] about whom all his friends are so anxious. John Richardson will be returning to town tomorrow; he must have a gown to be admitted as a Law Student.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to Jonathan Bo[ucher] 26 Aug[ust] 1785
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/75).

    Both he and Boucher had incomes, adequate to all the purposes of comfort and convenience; their present troubles are the result of a lack of foresight.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to J[onathan] Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 5 Octo[ber] 1795
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/76).

    Stevens' landlord [his cousin, the Rector of Otham] is pleased that Boucher has him so much in remembrance. He is glad that Boucher approves "The Life" [Jones of Nayland's Life of Bishop Horne ] and asks him to review it for the Critical Review. Stevens has received some money for Boucher on Mrs. Chandler's account. If Dr.. Vyse and Dr. Benson, both of whom are ill, should die, the Archbishop will have some livings to dispose of.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 7 Aug[us]t 1796
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/77).

    He has dined with Lord Romney and has received a legacy of £690. He hopes Boucher's etymological work is proceeding but fears that he is too old to profit by it. He hopes that Mr. Parkhurst's health is improving.

  • Box-folder 2:18
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 25 Jan[uar]y 1798
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/78).

    However Miller Southgate may like the principles of Boucher's book, what will he think of his practices? He will probably expect to see a calf's head on the table at dinner.

  • Box-folder 2:18
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 5 Sept. 1798
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/79).

    He and Boucher are both wanderers, but Boucher prefers mountains. Boucher's work [A View of the Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution] has been well received by Lord Kenyon and the Archbishop of York. As he was "struck out of the Privy Council" after giving his opinion against accepting a mitre in the Scottish church, he had not heard that Boucher had taken a house at Carlisle and does not think it signifies anything whether he approves or not.

  • Box-folder 2:18
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 18 Oct[ober] 1799
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/80).

    He hopes that he will soon be able to talk to Boucher instead of writing to him. Boucher has had a misunderstanding over terms of printing with George Robinson.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 16 Jan[uary] 1800
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/81).

    As a tribute to Mr. Jones [Jones of Nayland, died 6 Jan.] he, Dr. Glasse, and Frank Randolph are to assist Mr. Gifford in publishing a biographical sketch; he asks Boucher to help them.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 21 April 1800
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/82).

    He thanks Boucher for his information about "Scots lords and German bears." Boucher takes too gloomy a view of his hopes and prospects; against his failure in his hopes of a Scottish Bishopric and the prospect of three pupils may be weighed the fortune bequeathed by Miss Barton [see B/3/11] and the thousands obtained with Miss Foreman [Boucher's second wife, whose fortune was £14,000]. The Rector of Otham [William Horne] sends his best respects and suggests Boucher try and live quiet and happy.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 26 April, 1800
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/83).

    Stevens' previous letter was delayed in the post. He reminds Boucher that he should send a receipt for the quarter year's allowance to Mrs. Chandler. He wishes him a successful journey.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to Jonathan [Boucher] 4 June 1800
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/84).

    He is convinced by Sir William Forbes' letter that the Archbishop [of Canterbury] was right in what he said to Lord Kinnoull and it is not his fault that the measure failed that Boucher wished to succeed. Prince and Gifford [John Gifford; D.N.B.] deserve to have their bones broken for what was written about Stevens' in the Anti-Jacobin . He feels that the writing of a life of Old Jones is beyond his powers.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    [William Stevens], Farmborough, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Rottingdean, Brighton, Sussex, [Eng.] 15 Aug[ust] 1800
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/85).

    Boucher's strict system of economy has been so ruinous that Stevens is determined to renounce economy altogether. He gives Boucher information about Mr. Post, a Gentleman of the law, for whom he has no high regard; Post has told Boucher that marriages have diminished, so Stevens was comforted for the future of the world when he found that bastardy increased in the same proportion. Boucher need not fear to be thought a Low Churchman and may sit on the right hand of Nobody at the next meeting [Nobody's club, founded in Stevens' honour in 1800, was known for its High Church principles]; but how can he think Lord Kinnoull a sensible honest man when he is no better than a Presbyterian? He hopes Boucher will see Anthony Richardson while he is in England. Sir Frederick [Eden] will be an excellent neighbour.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    [William Stevens], Otham, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Rottingdean, Brighton, [Eng.] Goose Eating Day 1800 [Michaelmas 29 Sept.]
    3 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/86).

    He contrasts his own apathy with Boucher's energy. He thanks Boucher for offering to write the biographical sketch of Old Jones, but he has, after much effort, written one of his own which he will show him in manuscript. Frank [Randolph] has published some sermons. He sees from the papers that Sir F. [Frederick Eden] is Chairman of the Flour Company. One of Stevens' brother-auditors has just died so he is now senior auditor. The Rector [of Otham] has made £400 from hops, the young Squire about £4000.

  • Box-folder 2:20
    [William Stevens], Kentbury, [Eng.], to Jon[athan] Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 1 Sept. 1801
    3 pp. AL. (B/3/87).

    He warns Boucher not to expect great things from his letters; he bears news of him through Tom Calverley and John Richardson; Boucher has been having trouble with his agent for his property in the North; it is surprising that he has not learned from experience. He is sorry to hear that Boucher has had trouble with his assistant; he hopes that the connection with Frere may take place [probably the position was offered to one of John Frere's sons]; he is glad that Boucher takes more kindly to "pupilizing" and suggests that he asks Tom Hooker, who has a school at Rottingdean, for recommendations. Has Boucher noticed the Bagdon business?

  • Box-folder 2:20
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 31 March 1803
    1 p. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/88).

    He has had a letter from Dr. Glasse who is satisfied with the care taken of his grandson at Epsom.

  • Box-folder 2:20
    [William Stevens], London, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 22 Dec. 1803
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/89).

    He is sorry to hear of Boucher's ill health and of the disappointment he has had over the withdrawal of a troublesome pupil. He had heard of Tom Hooker's death.

  • Box-folder 2:20
    [William Stevens] to [Jonathan Boucher] n.d.
    2 pp. ALS. signed with monogram. (B/3/90).

    He has made inquiries about Washington's letters; they are very well written (though he has heard Boucher say that Washington is no great clerk) but he believes them to be authentic as the sentiments expressed are in keeping with Boucher's account of him.

Sir Frederick Morton Eden [see A/3] to Boucher
  • Box-folder 2:21
    [Sir] Frederick Morton Eden, Ch[rist] Ch[urch], Oxford, [Eng], to Jon[athan] Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 8 Nov. 1786
    2 pp. ALS. bears seal. (B/4/1).

    He has been entertaining Mr. Zimmerman [see A/3/1] in Oxford. He agrees with Boucher on the subject of the Commercial Treaty with France and thinks that more might have been done. Problems with "Billy's Commission" by which he lost 6 months rank. Hopes to come to Epsom soon.

  • Box-folder 2:21
    [Sir] Frederick Morton Eden, Lambeth Palace, [Eng], to [Jonathan Boucher] 18 May 1787
    2 pp. ALS. (B/4/2).

    He cannot visit Boucher next week as Mrs. Moore [the Archbishop's wife, and Eden's aunt] has promised him a seat in the Prebend's Box, for the Abbey Commemoration. He hopes, however, to see Boucher at the end of the month and will be happy to be introduced to Mrs. Boucher.

  • Box-folder 2:21
    [Sir] Frederick Morton Eden, Lambeth Palace, [Eng], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 18 June 1787
    3 pp. ALS. (B/4/3).

    He is keeping this term at the Temple. Mr. Eden [his uncle, William Eden, later Earl of Auckland] is appointed as Ambassador to Spain. Everyone is sick at Lambeth; a fever has killed a number of children.

  • Box-folder 2:21
    [Sir] F[rederick] M[orton] Eden, Tunbridge Wells, [Eng], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 29 July 1788
    3 pp. ALS. bears a seal. (B/4/4).

    Tunbridge is full of old Dowagers of quality and discarded statesmen; he has dined with Lord North whose blindness has not affected his spirits. The Loyalists are still waiting for some compensation from the Government; he is less hopeful than his mother. He sends a curious inscription which he found on a gravestone in Kent.

  • Box-folder 2:21
    [Sir] F[rederick] M[orton] E[den], to Jon[athan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] n.d. [postmark 21 July 1791]
    1 p. ALS. (B/4/5).

    He is unable to dine with Boucher as he has to meet some lawyers who are going on the Northern Circuit. He has heard that Burke is producing a new pamphlet next week.

  • Box-folder 2:22
    [Sir] F[rederick] M[orton] E[den], Lincoln's Inn Fields, [England] to Jon[athan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 25 Jan. 1792
    3 pp. ALS. (B/4/6).

    His mother, Lady Eden, has been in poor health; his wife [daughter of James Paul Smith] is also unwell. The Chancellor has given him a Commissionership of Bankrupt [sic].

  • Box-folder 2:22
    [Sir] F[rederick] M[orton] Eden, No. 100 New Bond Street, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher], [Eden] 12 Nov. 1792
    3 pp. ALS. (B/4/7).

    He has been reading Necker [Jacques Necker, French minister and financier] but finds he takes too much for granted in his arguments. He quotes from Harrington's Oceana, written 1656, a prophetic passage about the future of France.

  • Box-folder 2:22
    [Sir] F[rederick] M[orton] E[den], London, [Eng.], to Jon[athan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 10 May 1743
    2 pp. ALS. (B/4/8).

    Boucher's partnership with Hutchinson [William Hutchinson; D.N.B.; topographer, to whose Cumberland Boucher had contributed articles] will be scarcely dissolved before, as his Prospectus announces, he begins under a new firm.

  • Box-folder 2:22
    [Sir] F[rederick M[orton] E[den] to [Jonathan] Boucher n.d. [fragment 1797?]
    1 p. ANS. (B/4/9).

    He has sent Boucher a questionnaire [perhaps to gather information for his book The State of the Poor ]. He joined in praise of Boucher's sermons at a large dinner.

  • Box-folder 2:22
    [Sir] F[rederick M[orton] E[den], Worthing, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 27 July 1800
    1 p. ALS. (B/4/10).

    (Keppell's disgrace and my little girl's birthday). He and Lady Eden will arrive at Epsom on Monday. He has read Lucien Bonaparte's speech of 14 July and finds it a most eloquent invective against Revolutions. Its purpose, Anglice, is "keep my Brother, the First Consul, as long as you can"; but he does not agree with his Eulogium on the theft of treasures from the Pope.

  • Box-folder 2:22
    [Sir] F[rederick M[orton] E[den], W[orthing], [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Rottingdean, [Eng.] 4 Aug. 1800
    1 p. ALS. (B/4/11).

    He laments over the English climate. He considered Burns a poet of great descriptive powers, pastoral humour and pathos, and regrets that he should have had such a melancholy fall. He quotes some lines from Cowper's "Retirement" about philologists. The Committee of the House of Commons has passed five or six Resolutions for the improvement of the Metropolis identical to those in Porto Bello [Eden's book on the Improvement of the Port & City of London, 1798].

Rev. Charles Daubeny to Boucher; 1745-1827; D.N.B.; vicar of North Bradley, Dean of Salisbury; author of works upholding orthodoxy and dignity of Anglican Church.]
  • Box-folder 2:23
    Char[le]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, at Joshua Watson's, No. 16, Mincing Lane, London, [Eng.] 7 May 1798
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/1).

    He has received Boucher's valuable and interesting publication [his American sermons] from Mr. Watson [Joshua Watson; D.N.B.; wine merchant and philanthropist; married to Daubeny's niece]; he sees in this country the principles which led to the American Revolution. In an article on his Guide to the Church, the Analytical Review calls him, Boucher and Horsley [Samuel Horsley, later Bp. of St. Asaph; D.N.B.] the Lauds of the present day. He sent Mr. Wilberforce a copy of his book but does not know whether he will read it.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    le]s Daubeny, N[orth] Bradley, near Trowbridge, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 20 June 1798
    3 pp. ALS. (B/5/2).

    He asks Boucher how to direct a letter to the Rt. Rev. W.A. Drummond at Hawthorndon [William Abernethy Drummond, Bp. of Edinburgh]; the Bishop believes his Guide to the Church may do some good in Scotland and wishes to have it abridged there. Daubeny would like Boucher's opinion of Sir Richard Hill's "farrago" as he intends to answer it [Sir Richard Hill; D.N.B.; supporter of Calvinistic Methodism, attacked Daubeny's Guide, and carried on a long controversy with him by pamphlets]. The work of churchmen is usually to go over old ground.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Mr. [Jonathan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 28 Dec[embe]r 1798
    3 pp. ALS. (B/5/3).

    He apologizes for not acknowledging earlier sermons Boucher sent him, but he has been much occupied with his new church at Bath [Christ Church, Walcot] and with his reply to Sir Richard Hill, which Boucher advised him to write; he would like him to read the first part of this work; Mr. William Stevens has written to tell him that Mr. Jones [of Nayland] is thinking of replying to Sir Richard. He asks whether Boucher has heard from his friend, the Scotch Bishop [of Edinburgh], how the abridgement of the Guide to the Church is progressing.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 8 Jan[uar]y 1799
    3 pp. ALS. (B/5/4).

    He is sending part of his reply to Sir Richard Hill for Boucher to read and criticize.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    [rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 18 Feb. 1799
    3 pp. ALS. (B/5/5).

    He has received his packet of papers and Boucher's notes upon them and is sending him another packet which he should keep until the remaining part of the publication comes before him; he would like Boucher's opinion on the scope of the work, particularly on the subjects of Calvinism, Church Unity and Schism.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher 22 Feb[ruar]y 1799
    3 pp. ALS. (B/5/6).

    He is sending Boucher the final part of his work which has already been corrected by Mr. Bowdler, [John Bowdler, D.N.B.]; although he wishes everything harsh-sounding to be cut out of the work, he thinks that Bowdler has carried this a little too far, and would welcome Boucher's opinion on those corrections; Boucher can expect no other reward than the satisfaction of supporting the Cause of the Church.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, No. 8 Cresent, Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher 18 Mar[ch] 1799
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/7a).

    The first part of his work is in the press, and he asks Boucher to return any part of the remainder with which he has finished. He asks if Boucher has seen Bp. Drummond's abridgment of the Guide ; and abridgement of the work, with addenda from the letters to Sir Richard Hill, would be a useful book for general circulation; he is unwilling to undertake this task himself as an author is the worst qualified to abridge his own work. The liberal ideas and smooth sentences of such modern speculatists as Dr. Paley [William Paley, D.N.B.] may be preferred to his old-fashioned writing as more accommodating. He sent a copy of the Guide to the Archbishop of Canterbury but he did not acknowledge it.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    Suggested title page for Daubeny's Letters to Sir Richard Hill [which were published under the title An Appendix to the Guide to the Church] n.d.
    Wrapper of (B/5/7a). 1 p. AMS. (B/5/7b).
  • Box-folder 2:24
    Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan] Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 10 April 1799
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/8).

    He is revising the last part of his work, incorporating many of Boucher's suggestions; he hopes it may be better received than the Guide which had a very poor review in the British Critic ; his friend, the author of Reform or Ruin , [John Bowdler], does not wish to undertake a review; Daubeny considers Boucher the fittest person to do this. He commends the sound constitutional principles of the Anti-Jacobin ; his abilities are at the service of the editor [John Gifford, D.N.B.]; he considers "that schismatic courier", The Gospel Magazine, a danger to the Constitution.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, N. Bradley, Trowbridge, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.]. 16 July 1799
    2 pp. ALS. (B/5/9).

    He has directed Hatchard [John Hatchard, D.N.B., publisher] to keep six copies of the book for Boucher to distribute to his friends at Shrewsbury, Bp. Skinner [of Aberdeen] and his father, and the Rev. Dr. Glegg [sic: George Gleig, D.N.B., later Bp. of Brechin]. He hopes his book has aided the cause of the church. Thanks Boucher for his revisions.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, N[orth] Bradley, [Trowbridge], [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 24 Sept[embe]r 1799
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/10).

    He has received strong and decided letters from Bp. Skinner and Dr. Gleig, and believes that will write good reviews of his book; however, he is sorry that Boucher would not undertake this task. He is sorry to hear that the Anti-Jacobin is declining and wishes he had more leisure to write for it. He has written a pamphlet to Mrs. Hannah More, whose faith, like that of Mr. Wilberforce, is Calvinism in disguise; her doctrine that Faith is necessarily productive of works is a most dangerous error, a true Child of Enthusiasm. An explanation of his reasoning on that point.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.]. 23 Oct[obe]r 1799
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/11).

    Sir Richard Hill is to reply to Daubeny's answer; all Calvinists are the spawn of the Scotch Covenanters and, were it in their power, would be just as intolerant; Daubeny has also been attacked by a brother clergyman. Of some parts of Mrs. More's writings he has as high an opinion as Boucher, but as she has it in her power to do so much good, he wishes her to be "wholly with us"; however, the difference is in expression rather than idea. He will use his influence at Winchester College [where he was a Fellow] on behalf of Boucher's son, but application for admission should be made immediately; he will find out about fees when his own boys come home for Christmas.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to [Jonathan Boucher] 7 Jan[uary] 1800
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/12).

    The fees of Winchester College have nearly doubled since his time, being £60 p.a. He has met Dr. Matthew Spens who told him that Bp. Drummond has lost a colleague [the principal Minister of the English Episcopal Chapel in Edinburgh] and, wishing him to be replaced by a minister of the Church of England has written to Boucher [see also A/4a-b]; however, Bp. Watson Richard Watson, Bp. of Llandaff, D.N.B.] has written someone else a testimonial, which Daubeny considers a very poor recommendation. He and Bp. Douglas [see A/4] agree that the Anti-Jacobin is in need of assistance. He disapproves of Bp. Porteaus' [of London] support of Hannah More; the Bishop has acted very badly in another matter which Daubeny cannot explain in a letter.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] [28 January 1800]
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/13).

    He is sorry that the fees at Winchester have risen so high, and fears that this trend will lead to less learning in the Church. His Letters to Mrs. Hannah More have received very handsome reviews, but his critic, Sir Richard Hill, has appeared again and attacked both the Guide and the Appendix ; Daubeny is not eager to write another reply.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Charles Daubeny to [Jonathan Boucher] 27 Feb[ruar]y 1800
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/14).

    He has read through Boucher's papers and returns them with his comments. The tenet that Faith is necessarily productive is very near the Calvinistic doctrine of the irresistibility of divine Grace; as long as Mrs. More continues to frequent independent chapels he will doubt her attachment to the Church of England; he gives her credit for much good done on the best principle, but not for the best judgment or the best information. When he has time, he will tell Boucher more about the Bp. of London, whom he thinks neither sound nor honest.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 16 April 1800
    4 pp. ALS. bears seal. (B/5/15).

    He has sent Boucher his comments on Sir Richard Hill's last publication; he believes he should be answered as in these times, his work may do mischief. He is also sending a sermon by a Mr. Dennis in defence of Mrs. More, who keeps a sort of school for the younger, self-confident, "hop, step and jump" clergy; he has reviewed it at length as it misrepresents what he wrote in his Letters to Mrs. Hannah More. He has received a letter from a Mr. Ludlam [possibly Thomas Ludlam, D.N.B., theologian and opponent of Calvinism] complimenting him on this work.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 7 Nov[embe]r 1800
    7 pp. ALS. (B/5/16).

    He believes his packet containing Mr. Dennis's sermon may not have reached Boucher; Dennis is one of those self-sufficient, forward young Divines now growing up in the Church. He has seen Boucher's handsome review of a work by the Bp. of Lincoln but doubts whether the Bishop is as orthodox and apostolical as he is represented to be.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] [14 January 1801]
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/17).

    Bp. Skinner [of Aberdeen] has asked him to reply to Dr. Campbell's posthumous publication [Lectures on Ecclesiastical History] by Dr. George Campbell]; he feels that this might seem like presumption in a Church of England clergyman, and that Bp. Skinner himself is the fittest person to defend the Scottish Episcopacy. The Anti-Jacobin has reviewed a work by Mr. Evans, who was Daubeny's curate until dismissed with disgrace.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, [Bath, Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 21 January 1801
    2 pp. ALS. (B/5/18).

    He encloses a letter he has written at the pressing solicitation of Bp. Drummond to Lord Kinnoul who was a friend of his at Oxford; the Earl has already consulted the Archbishop of Canterbury on the subject [of the Scottish Church]. Daubeny has heard once more from Mr. Jones Dennis who has sent him notice of the Churchman's Magazine which is shortly to be published.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to [Lord Kinnoul, Robert Auriol Hay-Drummond, 1751-1804, Earl of Kinnoull] November 1800
    8 pp. ACyS. (B/5/19).

    The Bishop is the center of Unity in his diocese and any departure from the obligation of ecclesiastical Unity is schism; English Bishops have no authority is Scotland so the claim of the clergy of the Anglican communions in Scotland to be attached to the Church of England is without foundation; they owe canonical obedience to the Scottish Bishops and any resistance is resistance to the Ordinance of God.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, [Bath, Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, [Eng.] 3 March 1801
    4 pp. ALS. bears seal of Daubeny. (B/5/20).

    He is sending Boucher some of his sermons intended to publication as a relaxation from etymological research. The British Critic , which he had thought at least Episcopalian, is doing more harm than good to the cause of the Scottish Episcopacy. The Anti-Jacobin Review exaggerates the value of Dr. Randolph's sermons.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 6 May 1801
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/21).

    He has heard nothing from Boucher about the papers he sent him but his nephew [Joshua] Watson says he is very busy and very lazy. A new medical publication by a Dr. Haggarth is said to have been read before the library & Philosophical Society at Bath; such literary juntas, full of half- informed, unprincipled men, are all the fashion; this society, self-constituted at Bath, is headed by infidels and Quakers; the Treasurer is Matthews, the Quaker; Dr. Gibbes [Sir George Smith Gibbes, D.N.B.] is the secretary; Sir George Colebrooke, the President; and Sir William Watson [D.N.B.], the Vice President.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 29 May 1801
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/22).

    He is sending Boucher some further Discourses with a Preface addressed to the younger clergy mentioning Dr. Campbell's work, as Bp. Skinner suggested. Dr. Randolph merely skimmed over a great subject; the admiration of William Stevens ("not my friend") for him is a species of self- idolatry. If Bp. Skinner wishes to see Daubeny's letter to Lord Kinnoul, will Boucher send on his copy [B/5/19]; criticism of Dr. Campbell's book. He knows nothing of Mr. Faber, but as he is a Calvinist, their works will hardly cover the same ground.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, N[orth] Bradley, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] [16 September 1801]
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/23).

    He is sending via Joshua Watson, a very handsome letter he received from John Bowden, D.D., Principal of the Episcopal Academy in Connecticut; he is much impressed by the sound principles and seal of both the American and the Scottish Episcopacy. He asks Boucher to help him make his Discourses fit for the press; the lengthy criticism of Dr. Campbell's works needs a more formal introduction.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    John Bowden, Cheshire, Connecticut, to Charles Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.] 18 June 1801
    Cp. of ALS. (B/5/24).

    On behalf of the Convocation of the Episcopal Church in Connecticut he thanks Daubeny for Writing his Guide to the Church . He sent for a copy on reading a review in the Anti-Jacobin , and was so impressed by it that he and his colleagues are determined that it shall be a standard book for candidates for Holy Orders. Expresses admiration and affection for England and its institutions.

  • Box-folder 2:27
    C[harles] D[aubeny], Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 19 Nov[embe]r 1801
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/25).

    His Discourses have been much improved by Boucher's revisions. He has just been sent a pamphlet by a layman attacking him as a traducer of Baxter; "the Laity write with so much confidence on divine Subjects, that if we are to take their own word for it, the Clergy may shut up shop"; he believes that he gave Baxter as much credit as he deserved in his Guide to the Church, in fact, he treated him generously. Lists misdeeds [in Daubeny's eyes] of [Richard] Baxter.

  • Box-folder 2:27
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 19 Mar[ch] 1802
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/26).

    He is sending copies of his Discourses [published under the title of Eight Discourses on the Connexion between the Old and New Testament ] to Boucher and Bps. Drummond and Skinner; he hopes that Boucher and Skinner will review it. He hoped that Bp. Skinner would have been able to visit Bath to see his church [Christ Church, Walcot] there. He has received Boucher's Prospectus [of his Glossary of Archaic and Provincial Words ] and has put his own name down and that of Winchester College Library.

  • Box-folder 2:27
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, Bath, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 27 March 1802
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/27).

    He has asked Dr. Gleig to review his Discourses as Boucher has declined to do so. He believes William Stevens to be fundamentally an honest man, but his passions so run away with his judgment, that he is subject to be imposed upon by those who are not honest men. Daubeny defends Public Seminaries on a general principle, considering them to be the best security against Ignorance and Enthusiasm.

  • Box-folder 2:27
    Cha[rle]s Daubeny, North Bradley, Trowbridge, [Eng.], to Jonathan Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 11 July 1803
    4 pp. ALS. (B/5/28).

    He hopes that Boucher will read through the Guide to the Church making marginal remarks, preparatory to a new edition. He refers to the prospect of a stall at Durham for Boucher. Exhorts Boucher to spend his time in defense of the church.

  • Box-folder 2:28
    W[illia]m Cobbett, Philadelphia, [Pa.], to Jona[tha]n Boucher, Epsom, Surrey, [Eng.] 24 Aug[ust] 1798
    2 pp. ALS.

    Thanks for JB's book; attitudes to the American Revolution; no possibility of an edition of JB's work selling in America; WC's attachment to England.

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Author: Daubeny, Charles, 1745-1827.
  • Author: Eden, Frederick Morton, Sir, 1766-1809.
  • Author: James, John 1729-1785.
  • Author: Knox, William, 1732-1810.
  • Author: Maury, James, 1718-1769.
  • Author: Stevens, William, 1732-1807.