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Inventory of the Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers (I) 1780-1929 Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers, 1780-1929 Mss. 65 B85

Inventory of the Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers (I) 1780-1929

A Collection in the
Manuscripts and Rare Books Department
Collection Number Mss. 65 B85


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Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary

Special Collections
Earl Gregg Swem Library
College of William and Mary
Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8794
USA
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Fax: (757) 221-5440
Email: spcoll@wm.edu
URL: http://swem.wm.edu/scrc/

© 2001 By the College of William and Mary

Funding: Web version of the finding aid funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary
Collection number
Mss. 65 B85
Title
Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers (I), 1780-1929.
Extent
3,433 items.
Creators
Brown family, Coulter family, Tucker family, William Segar Archer, Frances Bland Coalter Brown, Henry Brown, Henry Peronneau Brown, Elizabeth Tucker Coalter Bryan, John Randolph Bryan, Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, John Coalter, Judith H. Tomlin Coalter, Maria Rind Coalter, St. George Tucker Coalter, Cynthia Beverley Tucker Washington Coleman, Moses Drury Hoge, J. M. (James Murray) Mason, William Munford, William Nelson Pendleton, John Hampden Pleasants, Judith Randolph Randolph, William C. (William Cabell) Rives, Lelia Skipwith Carter Tucker, Henry St. George Tucker, St. George Tucker, John Tyler.
Language
English
Abstract
Papers, 1780-1929, of the Brown, Coalter, Tucker families.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Collection is open to all researchers.

Publication Rights/Restrictions on Use

Before publishing quotations or excerpts from any materials, permission must be obtained from the Curator of Manuscripts and Rare Books, and the holder of the copyright, if not Swem Library.

Preferred Citation

Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers (I), Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary.

Acquisition Information

Gift: 3,433 items, 03/04/1947.


Biographical/Historical Information

Note: The superscript numbers denote generations within each family.

Brown Family
Henry Brown 1(1716-1766) was born in Bedford County, Virginia. He married Alice Beard and had eleven children including; Capt. Henry Brown (1760-1841), and Daniel Brown (1770-1818).

Henry Brown 2(1760-1841), later commissioned as a Captain, was wounded in the Revolutionary War. After the war he opened a store in New London, Bedford (later Campbell) County with his brother, Daniel. He had a full and interesting life in mercantile pursuits, being involved in several ventures with other partners, and spending a good deal of his time in court collecting debts. He acted as Federal Tax Collector in Bedford County, 1800-1803, a deputy inspector of revenue and served several terms as a Sheriff. He was also a treasurer of the New London Academy Meeting House and the New London Agricultural Society. New London is in present day Campbell County, Virginia. His business and personal papers present a picture of the successful business man of that day. No letters written by Captain Henry Brown are in this collection, though many references to letters he had written are to be found. Capt. Henry Brown (1760-1841), married Frances Thompson (1775-1822). Their children included Henry Brown, Jr. (1797-1836), who married Eleanor Tucker; Samuel T. Brown, who married Lissie Huger; Locky [Lockie] T. Brown(b. 1827), who married Alexander Irvine; Frances Brown, who married Edwin Robinson; Alice Brown, who married William M. Worthington; and John Thompson Brown (1802-1836), who married Mary E. Willcox.

Many papers of Henry Brown, Jr. 3(1797-1836), are included in this collection, but his personality makes little impression on the reader. Toward the end of his short life he served in his father's store in Lynchburg, later opening a store of his own. Henry Brown Jr. married Eleanor Tucker. He died of an illness that had plagued him from his early years.

John Thompson Brown 3(1802-1836) was born near Bedford County, Virginia. He was a graduate of Princeton who later read law under Judge Creed Taylor. John became a member of the House of Delegates from Clarksburg, Harrison County, Virginia (later West Virginia), at the age of 26. Following his marriage in 1830 to Mary E. Willcox, daughter of a leading citizen of Petersburg, he was elected to the House of Delegates. His speeches to the House of Delegates on slavery, states rights, and politics in the Jackson and post-Jackson period exist in pamphlet form and are valuable for their insight into the position taken by Virginians in this period. He also served as member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention from 1829-1830. At the age of 29 he was mentioned as a possible candidate for U.S. Senator (appointed by the State legislature at the time), and undoubtedly would have been an important figure in national politics if he had not suffered an untimely death at the age of 34. He and Mary Willcox had three children; Henry Peronneau Brown (1832-1894), John Willcox Brown (b. 1833), and Col. John Thompson Brown II (1835-1864).

Col. John Thompson Brown II 4(1835-1864), was less than two years old when his father died. He lived to carry out his father's ideas in the next generation when the debate regarding state rights and slavery came to be settled by recourse to arms. His fiery speeches contributed to the war fever, a war in which he rose to the rank of Colonel in the artillery before being killed by a sniper's bullet on May 6, 1864.

Henry Peronneau Brown 4(1832-1894), was named after a Princeton schoolmate and close friend of his father's, Peronneau Finley, of Charleston, South Carolina. Henry Peronneau Brown lived briefly with his namesake after his father's death. The correspondence of Henry Peronneau Brown with his wife and their relatives, is chiefly of value for the insight it gives into family affairs during the Civil War and the Reconstruction. Henry Peronneau Brown (1832- 1894), married France Bland Coalter (1835-1894), in 1858. They were the parents of John Thompson Brown III (b. 1861), who married Cassie Dallas Tucker Brown (fl.1898), reuniting the Tucker family with the line. They in turn had five children; John Thompson Brown IV (b. 1896); Frances Bland Coalter Brown; Henry Peronneau Brown III; Charles Brown; Elizabeth Dallas Brown; and Willcox Brown.

Coalter Family
John Coalter 1(1769-1838), was born in 1769 to parents Michael Coalter and Elizabeth Moore. While his father was away serving in the war against the British, John Coalter and his brothers worked the family farm on Walker's Creek in Rockbridge County, Virginia. After brief schooling he became tutor to the children of St. George Tucker (1752-1827), and Frances (Bland) Randolph Tucker (d.1788). Following the death of Mrs. Tucker, Coalter moved with the family to Williamsburg, serving without pay in return for the legal training he received from Judge St. George Tucker (1752-1827). While studying law, he also attended lectures at the College of William and Mary under Bp. James Madison and George Wythe. In December 1790, he received his license to practice law. A year later he married Maria Rind, the orphaned daughter of a Williamsburg printer, who had been serving as governess for the Tucker children. After the death of Maria Rind Coalter (d.1792), in childbirth, he married (1795), Margaret Davenport (d. 1795), of Williamsburg, who also died in childbirth within the year. Ann Frances Bland Tucker (1785-1813), daughter of St. George Tucker, was taken as his third wife in 1802. John Coalter had been her tutor twelve years before. She later bore him his only three children, Frances Lelia Coalter (1803-1822), Elizabeth Tucker Coalter Bryan (1805-1853), and St. George Tucker Coalter (1809- 1839). John Coalter later became a Circuit Judge of the Virginia General Court and bought "Elm Grove," an estate in Staunton, Virginia. Coalter continued to live there until 1811, at which time he moved to Richmond to serve as Judge of the Circuit Court of Appeals. In 1822, Coalter took his fourth wife, the widow Hannah (Jones) Williamson. In his latter years he enjoyed wide holdings and interests, including a lively concern with gold mining in Virginia. John Tucker Coalter died at "Chatham" plantation in Stafford County, Virginia, 1838.

Elizabeth Tucker Coalter 2(1805-1853), married John Randolph Bryan (godson of John Randolph of Roanoke) in 1831 and lived at Eagle Point, Gloucester County, Virginia. They had nine children; John Coalter Bryan (1831-1853), Delia Bryan, (d. 1833), Frances Tucker Bryan (b. 1835), Randolph Bryan (b. 1837), Georgia Screven Bryan (b. 1839), St. George Tucker Bryan (b. 1843), Joseph Bryan (b. 1847), Thomas Forman Bryan (1848-1851), Corbin Braxton Bryan (b. 1852).

St. George Tucker Coalter 2(1809-1839), married the strong-willed Judith Harrison Tomlin (1808-1859). He lived out his life fighting sickness and the losing battle of making his farm profitable. Judith Harrison Tomlin collected letters, which included many exchanged by the fourteen cousins (nine Bryans and five Coalters). Though none of these people were prominent on the large canvas of life, their collected letters give an interesting and informative picture of life in Virginia in the first half of the nineteenth century. St. George and Judith Coalter had six children; Walker Tomlin Coalter (1830-1831); John Coalter (1831-1883); Henry Tucker (1833-1870); Ann Frances Bland Coalter (1835-1894), who married Henry Peronneau Brown (1832-1894), in 1858; Virginia Braxton Coalter (b. 1837), who married William. P. Braxton in 1855; and St. George Tucker Coalter (b. 1839), who married Amelia Downy in 1862 and Charlotte (Downy) Terrill in 1868. See Brown Family

Tucker Family
St. George Tucker 1(1752-1827), was born in 1752 near Port Royal, Bermuda to Ann Butterfield Tucker and Henry Tucker, a merchant. St. George Tucker had a extensive career in law starting with his acceptance to the College of William and Mary under the tutelage of George Wythe in 1771. He served as clerk of courts of Dinwiddlie County, 1774; commonwealth attorney for Chesterfield County, 1783-1786; law professor at the College of William and Mary, 1790; and federal court judge for Virginia, 1813-1825. In 1771, he married Frances (Bland) Randolph, a widow, who had three children from a previous marriage; Richard Randolph, Theodorick Randolph (d. 1792), and John Randolph of Roanoke. St. George and Frances Randolph Tucker together, had five children; Henry St. George Tucker (1780-1848), Tudor Tucker, Ann Frances Bland Tucker (1785-1813), Elizabeth Tucker (b. 1788), and Nathaniel Beverley Tucker (1784-1851). They lived on the Randolph plantation, "Mattoax" in Chesterfield County, Virginia, until the death of France Randolph Tucker in 1813. In 1791, St. George remarried the widow Lelia Skipwith Carter (fl. 1795). None of their three children lived to adulthood.

Henry St. George Tucker 2(1780-1848), served as a professor of law at the University of Virginia; in the Virginia House of Delegates, 1806-1807; in the U.S. Congress, 1815-1819; and in the Virginia Senate, 1819-1824. He married Anne Evelina Hunter in 1806 and had at least eleven children, including; Randolph Tucker, Dr. David Hunter Tucker, Frances Tucker, Mary Tucker, Virginia Tucker, Anne Tucker, and John Randolph Tucker (1823-1897).

Randolph Tucker 3married Lucy (?). The couple had children; St. George Tucker and Judge Randolph Tucker.

Dr. David Hunter Tucker 3married Eliz Dallas and had Rev. Dallas Tucker and Cassie Dallas Tucker.

John Randolph Tucker 3(1823-1897), married Laura Holmes Powell in 1848 and had seven children. He was served as attorney general of Virginia, 1857-1865; professor of law at Washington College (currently Washington and Lee University); and was elected to U.S. Congress, 1874-1887.

Ann Frances Bland Tucker 2(1785-1813), married John Coalter (1769-1838). See Coalter Family.

Nathaniel Beverley Tucker 2(1784-1851), graduated from the College of William and Mary with a law degree. In 1807, he married Mary Coalter (d. 1827), sister of John Coalter (1769-1838). He moved to Missouri and became the Circuit Court Judge of the Missouri Territory in 1817. Nathaniel remarried twice, to Eliza Naylor in 1828 and to Lucy Anne Smith. He returned to teach at the College of William and Mary in 1834.

Other People
William Munford (1775- 1825)
A friend of John Tucker Coalter's (1769-1838), from his Williamsburg days, William Munford, a poet and lawyer of some note, wrote letters to Coalter which contain interesting reports of the College of William and Mary and of Harvard University. He wrote of the poverty stricken French immigrants in Norfolk, and sent vivid descriptions of the activity of the British fleet in the Chesapeake Bay during the War of 1812. He lived and studied with George Wythe in Williamsburg, later moving with him to Richmond to serve as his clerk. His remarks on Wythe, for whom he had a great affection, throw light on that important member of the legal profession in the new nation.

Gary A. Adams' (fl. 1900), connection to the family is unknown. However, several bills to him from the dry goods stores and the household supply stores are included in the collection.

Cynthia Beverly (Tucker) Washington Coleman (1832-1908) of Williamsburg, was an aunt of Cassie Tucker.

Judge John Randolph Tucker (ca. 1915)
Newspaper Clippings, 1913-1915, from Nome, Alaska concern the term of judgeship of John Randolph Tucker, (ca. 1915).

Capt. David Tucker Brown (ca. 1918), was a member of the 1918 Peace Commission, Paris France.

Scope and Content Information

Papers, 1780-1929, of the Brown, Coalter, Tucker families including the papers of John Coalter (1769-1838), Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, and John Thompson Brown (1802-1836), member of the Virginia House of Delegates. Among the correspondents are Maria (Rind) Coalter, St. George Tucker, William Munford, Frances Bland (Tucker) Coalter, St. George Tucker Coalter, Frances Bland (Coalter) Brown, the Rev. Moses D. Hoge, and Henry Peronneau Brown.

Arrangement

Organization

This collection is organized into four series; Series 1 is Group A, containing the papers of Coalter and Tucker Families; Series 2 is Group B, containing the papers of Capt. Henry Brown and his family; Series 3 is Group C, containing the papers of John Thompson Brown; and Series 4 is Group D, containing the papers of the Brown and Tucker Families.

Arrangement

Each series in the collection has been arranged into various subseries by family names, personal names or subjects. The material in each subseries may contain the names of various other persons but the most prominent name is the one used to describe the subseries. Series 1 contains the following subseries: John Coalter; Children of John Coalter, Elizabeth Tucker Coalter, and St. George Tucker Coalter; and Grandchild of John Coalter, Frances Bland Coalter. Series 2 contains the following subseries: Capt. Henry Brown; Immediate Family of Capt. Henry Brown; and Children of Capt. Henry Brown, Henry Brown, Jr. and Samuel T. Brown. Series 3 contains six subseries pertaining to John Thompson Brown. Series 4 contains the following subseries: Col. John Thompson Brown II, Henry Peronneau Brown, John Thompson Brown III, Later Family Member, and Miscellaneous.

Related Material

There are two collections within the Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary that relate to this Collection. They include the Barnes Family Papers and the Tucker-Coleman Papers.

Barnes Family Papers, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary. Barnes Family Papers, 1797-1926, 1818-1875.247 items.Collection number: Mss. 39.1 B26Correspondence, chiefly 1820-1875, of Newman Williamson Barnes and his wife Margaret W.(Tomlin) Barnes of Richmond, Virginia and "Greenfield," Culpeper County, Virginia. Letters concern life in Falmouth, Virginia and also concern Fredericksburg, Virginia. Correspondents are members of the Braxton, Coalter, Tomlin and Oliver families.

Tucker-Coleman Papers, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary. Tucker-Coleman Papers, 1664-1945, 1770-1907.30,000 items.Collection number: Mss. 40 T79Papers, primarily 1770-1907, of the Tucker and Coleman families of Williamsburg, Winchester, Lexington, Staunton and Richmond, including papers of St. George Tucker(1752-1827), Nathaniel Beverley Tucker (1784-1851), Henry St. George Tucker (1780-1848), Ann Frances Bland (Tucker) Coalter (1779-1813), John Coalter (1769-1838), John Randolph of Roanoke, and Cynthia Beverley Tucker Washington Coleman (1832-1908) as well as other family members.

Separated Material

Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers (II), Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary. Brown, Coalter, Tucker Papers (II), 1791-1920.941 items.Collection number: Mss. 65 B855Papers, 1791-1920, of the Brown, Coalter and Tucker families. Includes correspondence, of Frances Bland (Coalter) Brown with Margaret W. Barnes, members of the Braxton family, Henry Peronneau Brown, Fanny T. Bryan, John Coalter, St. George Tucker Coalter and members of the Morton family.


Index Terms

    Family Names:

  • Brown family.
  • Coalter family.
  • Coulter family.
  • Tucker family.
  • Persons:

  • Archer, William Segar, 1789-1855.
  • Brown, Daniel.
  • Brown, Frances Bland Coalter, 1835-1894.
  • Brown, Frances Bland Coalter, 1835-1894.
  • Brown, Henry Peronneau.
  • Brown, Henry, 1797-1836.
  • Bryan, Elizabeth Tucker Coalter, b. 1805.
  • Bryan, John Randolph, 1806-1887.
  • Coalter, Frances Bland Tucker, 1785-1813.
  • Coalter, John, 1769-1838.
  • Coalter, Judith H. Tomlin, d. 1859.
  • Coalter, Maria Rind, d. 1792.
  • Coalter, St. George Tucker, 1809-1839.
  • Coleman, Cynthia Beverley Tucker Washington, 1832-1908.
  • Hoge, Moses Drury, 1818-1899.
  • Mason, J. M. (James Murray), 1798-1871.
  • Munford, William, 1775- 1825.
  • Murphy, Pleasants, 1786-1863.
  • Pendleton, William Nelson, 1809-1883.
  • Pleasants, John Hampden, 1797-1846.
  • Randolph, John, 1773-1833.
  • Randolph, Judith Randolph, fl. 1792-1813.
  • Rives, William C. (William Cabell), 1793-1868.
  • Thompson, John.
  • Tucker, Henry St. George, 1780-1848.
  • Tucker, John Randolph, 1823-1897.
  • Tucker, Lelia Skipwith Carter, 1767-post 1833.
  • Tucker, St. George, 1752-1827.
  • Tyler, John, 1790-1862.
  • Wythe, George, 1726-1806.
  • Subjects:

  • Education--Virginia--History-- 19th century.
  • American poetry.
  • Architecture, Domestic--Virginia.
  • Embargo, 1807-1809.
  • Guilford Court House, Battle of, 1781.
  • Slavery--Virginia-- History--18th century.
  • Springs--Virginia.
  • United States--History--War of 1812.
  • Virginia--Politics and government--1775-1865.
  • Virginia. General Assembly. House of Delegates.
  • Corporate Names:

  • College of William and Mary--History--18th century.
  • Princeton University--History.
  • University of Virginia--History--19th century.
  • Geographical Names:

  • Bedford County (Va.)--History--19th century.
  • Campbell County (Va.)--History--19th century.
  • Occupations:

  • Merchants--Virginia--Bedford County--19th century.
  • Merchants--Virginia--Campbell County--19th century.
  • Merchants--Virginia--Lynchburg--19th century.

Additional Bibliography, Indexes, Separated Material and Related Material

Bibliography

Honors Thesis Paper written by a student of the College of William and Mary. A Bibliography can be found on pages 75-77. Call Number: LD6051 .W5m Hist., 1987, B66

Boone, Jennifer Kathryn. "In Praise of the Family": A Study of Three Generations. 1987.

Additional Finding Aid Information

This finding aid is also available in the microfilm format at the Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary. An additional index can be found at: National Inventory of Documentary Sources in the United States available from Chadwyck-Healey, Inc., 1021 Prince Street, Alexandria, Va. 22314.


Additional Finding Aid Information

This finding aid is also available in the microfilm format at the Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary. An additional index can be found at: National Inventory of Documentary Sources in the United States available from Chadwyck-Healey, Inc., 1021 Prince Street, Alexandria, Va. 22314.


Bibliography

Honors Thesis Paper written by a student of the College of William and Mary. A Bibliography can be found on pages 75-77. Call Number: LD6051 .W5m Hist., 1987, B66

Boone, Jennifer Kathryn. "In Praise of the Family": A Study of Three Generations. 1987.

Components List

Group A: Coalter and Tucker Papers, 1780-1858.
Box: 1-6
6 boxes.
Series 1: Group A

Papers include John Coalter's autobiographical sketch (to age 18), 54 poems written by Coalter, St. George Tucker, and others including several by female writers. Correspondents of the Coalter family include St. George Tucker, Lelia Skipwith Carter Tucker, William Munford, Judith Randolph, Frances Bland Tucker Coalter and Maria Rind Coalter. Subjects include John Randolph of Roanoke (and his will), George Wythe, the Embargo of 1807-1809, College of William and Mary, War of 1812; and the springs of Virginia.

Group A also includes papers of Coalter's children: Elizabeth Tucker Coalter; and St. George Tucker Coalter and his wife Judith H. Tomlin and the correspondence of Coalter's granddaughter Frances Lelia Bland Coalter Brown. Her letters concern her education and friendship with Moses Drury Hoge.

  • Box 1-3
    John Coalter, 1780-1822.
    Subseries 1: John Coalter
    • Box-folder 1:1-60
      Subseries A: Box 1 - John Coalter's correspondence with his father, with St. George Tucker, William Munford, and with others until the death of his first wife, Maria Rind, 1780-1793.
      221 items.

      The record of the gift of the collection, genealogical charts of the Tucker, Coalter, Tomlin and Brown families, and sundry genealogical notes which form a preface to the collection, are placed at the beginning of this box. The collection begins with 54 poems, the first of which is signed by St. George Tucker. Two signed poems by William Munford are included. The largest group of poems are those exchanged by John Coalter and Maria Rind, his first wife. Others were collected in the family papers until the middle or the latter part of the nineteenth century.

      The bulk of the material in Box 1 concerns John Coalter: an autobiographical sketch written by him on his 18th birthday, and letters covering the period of his early life from 1787, when he went to live with the St. George Tucker family, until the death of his first wife in 1793. Interesting letters from John Munford, a classmate of Coalter, are included, several of which concern the College of William and Mary and Harvard College.

      • Box-folder 1:1-3
        Geneaological and Introductory Material, 1947-1987, n.d.
        • Box-folder 1:1
          Note concerning the gift "Received from Mrs. Fleming Saunders, of Evington, Virginia, in exchange for a scholarship grant to Miss Frances Bland Saunders," 3 March 1947.
        • Box-folder 1:2
          Genealogical Charts, 1964.
          3 items.AD.

          Genealogical charts: 1. Coalter, with Tucker and Randolph connections; 2. Tomlin, as connected with Coalter and Brown; 3. Brown, as connected with Coalter and Tucker.

        • Box-folder 1:2a
          Chart of Coalter and Brown families compiled by Jennifer Boone for honors thesis, May 1987.
        • Box-folder 1:3
          Sheets of sundry genealogical notes, n.d.
        • Box-folder 1:4
          Notes concerning John Coalter (1769-1838), 11 December 1883.
          3 items.ADr.
      • Box-folder 1:5
        Topical poems of this period, written by John Coalter, Maria Rind, St. George Tucker, William Munford, and others, 1780.
        54 items.ADr., ADrS.
      • Box-folder 1:6
        Autobiographical sketch of John Coalter until his 18th birthday, 1787.

        Describes life on Walker's Creek, Rockbridge County; his responsibility for the farm while his father is away at war.

      • Box-folder 1:7
        James Moore, Nottingham, to John Coalter, Augusta, January-October 1787.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:8
        Samuel Brown, Botetourt, to his schoolboy friend, John Coalter, Augusta, February-October 1787.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Samuel Brown is a young lawyer, earning 40£ per year as usher for John Holt.

      • Box-folder 1:9
        John Coalter, Chesterfield, to his father, Michael Coalter, 29 December 1787.

        Describes his new position as tutor to the children of St. George Tucker.

      • Box-folder 1:10
        John Coalter, Chesterfield, to Michael Coalter, January-March 1788.
        2 letters.ALS.

        The death of Mrs. Tucker; plans of St. George Tucker to move because the plantation, Matoax, reverts to the sons of Mrs. Tucker (Richard, John, and Theodorick Randolph). He intends to move to Williamsburg, but he can no longer pay John Coalter 30£ per annum; offers to give legal training in exchange for tutoring services.

      • Box-folder 1:11
        John Coalter, Chesterfield to his sisters, Betsy, Jinney, and Peggy, March-June 1788.
        5 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:12
        Michael Coalter, Augusta, to John Coalter, March-August 1788.
        3 letters.ALS.

        His father hopes that John Coalter will return home, to the higher country, for the "sickly season."

      • Box-folder 1:13
        David Coalter, Augusta, to his brother, John Coalter, Williamsburg. 2 May 1788.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:14
        Samuel Brown, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to John Coalter, Chesterfield, 5 October 1788.
        Physical Location: See medium oversize file.

        Samuel Brown gives details of his studies at Dickinson College, and congratulates John Coalter on his chance to study law with St. George Tucker.

      • Box-folder 1:15
        John Coalter, in Williamsburg to Michael Coalter. January-November 1789.
        6 letters.ALS.

        Attending lectures of the Rev. James Madison, President of the College of William and Mary, on Natural Philosophy, and of Mr. Wythe on Law. When John Coalter loses his ribbon he must let his hair hang free for want of money to buy another.

      • Box-folder 1:16
        Michael Coalter in Augusta to John Coalter, 27 February 1789.
        1 letter.ALS.

        Two young cousins, in custody of Indians for 3 and 6 years respectively, were freed by the army in Detroit.

      • Box-folder 1:17
        Michael Coalter in Augusta to John Coalter, September-October 1789.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:18
        J[ames] R[ind], in Kentucky, to his sister [Maria Rind] in [Williamsburg], 1 June 1789.

        James Rind, had been studying law with St. George Tucker in Williamsburg but left to take a position with "Col. N." Maria Rind remains in the household of St. George Tucker, where she cared for the children.

      • Box-folder 1:19
        Jacob Kinney, Augusta, to John Coalter, 4 June 1789.

        Concerning his wedding trip.

      • Box-folder 1:20
        Betsy, Jinney, and Peggy Coalter, Augusta, to their brother, John Coalter, June-October 1789.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:21
        J. Moore and Elenor Moore, Rockbridge, to their nephew, John Coalter, June-October 1789.
        3 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:22
        John Grierson Rind, Richmond, to John Coalter, July-November 1789.
        3 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.

        John Grierson Rind is a brother of Maria Rind. He mentions the need of John Coalter for a coat and a pair of spectacles.

      • Box-folder 1:23
        John Coalter, at Williamsburg, to his brother Cagy (Micajah) and sister Polly (Mary), August-November 1789.
        4 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 1:24
        James Coalter, Ninety-Six, South Carolina and York, Virginia, to his brother John Coalter, Petersburg and Williamsburg, Virginia, September 1789.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Approval of the Constitution by South Carolina is still in doubt; threat of an Indian War in Georgia. " Brother Dav[i]dis over in Gloucester. If he has success in purchasing Negroes, I hope we will be ready to sett [sic] out on our rout[e]to the South."

      • Box-folder 1:25
        "Cousin" to John Coalter, Williamsburg, 6 October 1789.
      • Box-folder 1:26
        John Coalter, in Williamsburg, to his sisters, Betsy, Jinney, and Peggy, 19 October 1789.
      • Box-folder 1:27
        Micajah Coalter, Jr., Augusta, to his brother, John Coalter, 29 October 1789.

        First letter of young Micajah Coalter, who is learning to write.

      • Box-folder 1:28
        Samuel Brown, Staunton, to John Coalter, 4 December 1789.

        "Have you been exempted from paying the oppressive Duty which most of our Backwoods Gentlemen have paid for that Knowledge which they have gathered at Williamsburg in Autumn--I mean the loss of Health and a good complexion."

      • Box-folder 1:29
        Micajah Coalter, Augusta, to John Coalter, January-May 1790.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Mentions John Coalter's desire to return home.

      • Box-folder 1:30
        John Coalter, in Williamsburg, to Michael Coalter, (May) 1790.

        Expresses desire to marry and to live on the farm while he is getting started in his law practice.

      • Box-folder 1:31
        James Rind, in Kentucky, to Maria Rind, 20 May 1790.

        "...nothing can be expected without riches...however deserving of a better fate the pooralways meet with rudeness and contempt." (Children of a Williamsburg printer, the Rinds were orphaned at an early age and were helped by the Tuckers.)

      • Box-folder 1:32
        John Coalter, Petersburg, Richmond, Staunton, and Rockbridge, to Maria Rind, in Williamsburg, May-November 1790.
        Physical Location: For letters of 16 June 1790, 4 July 1790, and 7 Sept. 1790 see medium oversize file.
        12 letters.ALS.

        His father does not have land to give him at that time, so he cannot marry at once. He has decided to move to Staunton, and continue his studies. In September he writes that he hopes to visit Williamsburg around Christmas, and apply for admission to the bar.

      • Box-folder 1:33
        Maria Rind, Williamsburg, to John Coalter. June-August 1790.
        5 letters.ALS.

        The letters are written with great difficulty, and show a lack of schooling.

      • Box-folder 1:34
        William Munford, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, 13 June 1790.

        Mentions "your quondam charges, Henry, Tudor, Beverley, and Fanny (Tucker) and John and Theodorick Randolph." Hopes he may live and study with Mr. Wythe. "Nothing would advance me faster in the world than the reputation of having been educated by Mr. Wythe, for such a man as he, casts a light upon all around him."

      • Box-folder 1:35
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, 20 July 1790.

        John Coalter has borrowed a horse from him for the trip to Staunton.

      • Box-folder 1:36
        David Coalter, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to his brother, John Coalter, October 1790.
        2 letters.ALS.

        "I...was much pleased to hear of your gallantry but am affeared it has been attended with some accident which occasioned your move to the mountains again..." (Evidently John Coalter did something to protect Maria Rind. He then decided to leave Williamsburg in order to establish himself and be in a position to support her as his wife.)

      • Box-folder 1:37
        John G. Rind, Richmond, to his sister [Maria Rind], 23 November 1790.
      • Box-folder 1:38
        John Coalter, Richmond, Louisa, Amherst, Augusta, and Staunton, to Maria Rind, March-September 1791.
        Physical Location: For letters of 6 April 1791 and 15 April 1791 see medium oversize file.
        18 letters.ALS.

        After obtaining his license in Williamsburg, John Coalter has his first case in Amherst. Of St. George Tucker, he writes: "I would rather have the approbation of that man than worlds for my admirers." Advice is given in regard to the torment by John Randolph; plans are made for their marriage in autumn.

      • Box-folder 1:39
        Maria Rind, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, March-August 1791.
        9 letters.ALS.

        In April she writes that Mr. Tucker plans to remarry; she wishes to move up the date of their marriage. She dreads "the prospect of Johnny Randolph returning and you well know, my love, how liable your dear is to be insulted by him..."

      • Box-folder 1:40
        William Munford, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, April-May 1791.
        Physical Location: For letter of 23 April 1791 see Medium Oversize File.
        3 letters.ALS.

        "...thru the surprising friendship of Mr. Wythe, I live in his house and board at his table...In this happy situation tomorrow I begin the Study of Law."

      • Box-folder 1:41
        John Coalter, Staunton, to James Rind, Williamsburg and Richmond, May-July 1791.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Congratulates James Rind on receiving his license to practice law.

      • Box-folder 1:42
        William Munford, Riveredge, to Maria Rind, May 1791.
        2 letters.ALS.

        "We visit very often at the different houses in the neighborhood, at Westover, Nesting, and Shirley, where I saw Robin Carter...we may expect to see you after Mrs. Carter has become Mrs. Tucker."

      • Box-folder 1:43
        Richard Randolph, Bizarre, to [John Coalter?], June-July 1791.
        2 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.

        On the return of a wagon and horses; purchases of additional farm animals.

      • Box-folder 1:44
        William Munford, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, June-August 1791.
        Physical Location: For letter of 22 July 1791 see Medium Oversize File.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Living and studying with Mr. Wythe. John Thompson (grandfather of John Thompson Brown) was among the 4th of July orators. Verse and poetic criticism of St. George Tucker. George Wythe is teaching his servant to write.

      • Box-folder 1:45
        John Coalter, Staunton, to St. George Tucker, June-July 1791.
        2 letters.ALS.

        This law practice is discouraging; entrusts Maria Rind to his care, and sends greetings on St. George Tucker's 39th birthday.

      • Box-folder 1:46
        Samuel Campbell, Bedford County, to John Coalter, August 1791.

        Discourages John Coalter from coming "across the Alps" -- there are too many lawyers already.

      • Box-folder 1:47
        William Munford, Richmond and Riveredge, to John Coalter, September-October 1791.
        2 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.

        Has moved to Richmond with Mr. Wythe. Mentions building of the canal. Samuel Brown to study in Scotland; congratulates John Coalter on his marriage to Maria Rind.

      • Box-folder 1:48
        Elizabeth Tucker, Bermuda, to Fanny Tucker, Williamsburg, 30 October 1791.

        Elizabeth Tucker is sister of St. George Tucker, and an aunt of Fanny Tucker. Mentions other Tucker children, Henry, Tudor, Beverly, and Elizabeth, as well as Theodorick and Richard Randolph and the latter's wife, Judith. Comments on the proposed marriage of St. George Tucker to Mrs. Carter, and the small children she will be bringing to the marriage.

      • Box-folder 1:49
        Samuel Brown, Philadelphia, to John Coalter, October-November 1791.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Description of George Washington delivering an address in Philadelphia. Congratulates John Coalter on his marriage and sends compliments to his brothers. (This Samuel Brown may be the uncle of John Thompson Brown.)

      • Box-folder 1:50
        Mrs. Maria Rind Coalter, [Staunton], to Fan [Frances Bland Tucker], [December] 1791.

        The letter was written soon after Mrs. Coalter had gone to Staunton with her husband.

      • Box-folder 1:51
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Bizarre, to Fanny [Frances Bland Tucker], in Williamsburg, 10 January 1792.

        On the marriage of St. George Tucker to Mrs. Lelia (Skipwith) Carter.

      • Box-folder 1:52
        James Rind, Williamsburg to John Coalter, January-May 1792.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Death of Maria Skipwith; the great distress of Mrs. (Lelia Skipwith) Tucker.

      • Box-folder 1:53
        John G. Rind, Richmond, to Mrs. John Coalter, 1 February 1792.

        His wages are to be 15£ or 20£ per year as a clerk.

      • Box-folder 1:54
        Samuel Brown, Philadelphia and Edinburgh, Pennsylvania, to John Coalter, February-October 1792.
        2 letters.ALS.

        The letter from Edinburgh contains an interesting description of life in the Scottish capital, the coldness of his fellow students until they are introduced, and his warm reception by a family to which he had a letter of introduction.

      • Box-folder 1:55
        William Munford, Richmond, to John Coalter, March-May 1792.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Reports that there are about forty students at the College of William and Mary; Theodorick Randolph has died; "Thompson has left W. & M.," and his mother proposes to send him to Harvard.

      • Box-folder 1:56
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, 21 October 1792.

        Enquires about Maria, and their expected first child. (Both mother and child died.)

      • Box-folder 1:57
        John Campbell, Rockingham County, to John Coalter, 26 January 1793.
      • Box-folder 1:58
        David Coalter, Orangeburg and Columbia, South Carolina, to John Coalter, February-December 1793.
        3 letters.ALS.

        The "distressing news" that his wife has died in childbirth.

      • Box-folder 1:59
        John G. Rind, Richmond, to John Coalter, 11 May 1793.

        War reports; the parade of the Richmond Grenadiers, Light Horse and Light Infantry.

      • Box-folder 1:60
        William Munford, Riveredge to John Coalter, 28 August 1793.

        Consoles John Coalter on the loss of his wife; reports the Independence Day orations at the College of William and Mary, and mentions the raising of subscriptions to aid distressed French immigrants at Norfolk.

    • Box-folder 2:1-70
      Subseries B: Box 2 - Correspondence of John Coalter during his second marriage to Margaret Davenport, and in the early years of his third marriage, to Frances Bland Tucker. Correspondence from St. George Tucker, Mrs. Lelia Tucker, Mrs. Judith Randolph, and others, 1793-1808.
      164 items.

      The contents of Box 2 trace the legal career of John Coalter from 10 April 1795, when St. George Tucker recommended him for the position of Clerk of the Court in Staunton, through the period of his second and third marriages to Margaret Davenport, 1795 (she died in 1797), and to Frances Bland Tucker, 1802.

      Included also are letters to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter from her father St. George Tucker, her stepmother Mrs. Lelia Skipwith Tucker, her sister-in-law Mrs. Judith Randolph of Bizarre, and others. Correspondence with William Munford, in Williamsburg, is also included.

      • Box-folder 2:1
        St. George Tucker, Charlottesville, to John. Tyler and others, 10 April 1793.

        Recommends John Coalter as Clerk of the Staunton Court.

      • Box-folder 2:2
        John Coalter, Charlottesville, to Peggy (Margaret) Davenport, in Williamsburg, 17 April 1793.

        "Yes, Peggy, my Maria is gone! The worst of evils has befallen your friend."

      • Box-folder 2:3
        R. Whiting, New York, to John Coalter, 1 November 1793.

        Requests payment of a debt.

      • Box-folder 2:4
        James C[oalter], Orangeburg, South Carolina, to John Coalter, 8 December 1793.
      • Box-folder 2:5
        William Munford, to John Coalter, 13 December 1793.
        ALS.

        William Munford has returned to the College of William and Mary, and is "in constant attendance on Mr. (St. George) Tucker...Mrs. Tucker has lately been so unfortunate as to lose a newborn child."

      • Box-folder 2:6
        Exchange of letters between Jenny Stuart and John Coalter, January-June 1794.
        4 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.

        Accuses John Coalter of "making a stroke at her character"; makes insulting statements regarding John Coalter's late wife. John Coalter responds by threatening to take Jenny Stuart into court, after which she offers to return John Coalter's letter.

      • Box-folder 2:7
        James Coalter, Charlestown, South Carolina, to John Coalter, 1 February 1794,

        James Coalter is a merchant, dealing largely in indigo.

      • Box-folder 2:8
        William Munford, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, 20 April 1794.

        Recounts a voyage to Hampton Roads to view the French Fleet, consisting of 150 ships, including three men of war, five or six frigates, and armed merchantmen laden with flour. Party spirit in Norfolk; Aristocrats more prominent; acrimony inflamed by the presence of the French fleet and a British frigate. William Munford is ready to apply for his law license.

      • Box-folder 2:9
        M[argaret] D[avenport]to F. Currie, 25 May 1794.

        "There can be but one in the world" for her, but he is "out of her reach." At a recent dinner the first toast by Governor Lee was to her.

      • Box-folder 2:10
        F. H. C[urry], North of Louisa, to Mrs. Margaret Davenport Coalter, Williamsburg, 15 February 1795.
        ALS.

        Congratulations on the occasion of her marriage to John Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:11
        John Coalter, Staunton, to Mrs. Coalter, February-May 1795.
        14 Letters.ALS.

        The difficulty of finding passage for Mrs. Coalter and her mother from Williamsburg to Staunton. John Coalter is finally able to borrow a phaeton which he has overhauled and supplied with an umbrella. Advice regarding divorce of F. C[?]y.

      • Box-folder 2:12
        D. Holmes, Harrisburg, to John Coalter, 2 May 1795.

        Concerning a mare to be serviced.

      • Box-folder 2:13
        Mrs. Coalter, Williamsburg to John Coalter, 10 May 1795.
      • Box-folder 2:14
        [Mrs. Coalter to John Coalter], 3 August 1795.
      • Box-folder 2:15
        John Coalter, Botetourt, to Mrs. Coalter, [August] 1795.
      • Box-folder 2:16
        J[ames] Brown, Danville, Kentucky, to John Coalter, 10 December 1795.

        The "war" and Indian victory are mentioned and a bloody spring season is predicted.

      • Box-folder 2:17
        John Coalter, Orangeburg, South Carolina and Louisville, Georgia, to Mrs. Coalter, January 1796.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Divorce proceedings for a Mrs. Matthews before the Georgia Legislature.

      • Box-folder 2:18
        F. H. A[llison], Cabin Point, to Mrs. Coalter, 15 July 1797.

        Mention is made of a child expected by Mrs. Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:19
        David Coalter, Orangeburg, South Carolina, to John Coalter, 19 August 1797.

        Condolences "on this distressing occasion" (the death of John Coalter's wife in childbirth; the child also died.)

      • Box-folder 2:20
        James Coalter, Ninety-Six, South Carolina, to John Coalter, 9 June 1797.
        ALS.

        Business letter concerning collections to be made in Virginia.

      • Box-folder 2:21
        Mrs. Lucy Randolph, at Curles, to Ann Frances Tucker, 2 December 1798.

        She should "by this time be fatigued with the name of Tucker" and that she "had better look about" (for a husband).

      • Box-folder 2:22
        ( ) Davenport, Williamsburg, to [John Coalter], February 1799.

        The letter is from the papers of John Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:23
        Lelia Anna Byrd, Riveredge, to Frances Tucker, 12 April 1801.
      • Box-folder 2:24
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Farmville, [Bizarre], to Frances Tucker, May-June 1801.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Judith Randolph, wife of Richard Randolph, half brother of Frances Tucker, sends greetings to Polly and Charles (Carter), step-sister and brother of Frances Tucker. The "Mama" mentioned is Mrs. Lelia Carter Tucker.

      • Box-folder 2:25
        St. George Tucker, Winchester, to John Coalter, 14 August 1801.
      • Box-folder 2:26
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Farmville, to Frances [Bland] Tucker, 6 February 1802.

        Complains that she is "surrounded by the real evils of life." (Her husband had been linked with her sister in the famous scandal proceedings.)

      • Box-folder 2:27
        David Coalter, Fredericksburg, to John Coalter, 28 April 1802.

        Concerning a horse in which he is interested.

      • Box-folder 2:28
        B. W. Leigh, Chesterfield, to Frances Tucker, 28 May 1802.

        Hint of a June wedding for Frances Tucker.

      • Box-folder 2:29
        Anne H. Nicholas, Swans Point, to Mrs. Fanny B. [Tucker] Coalter, 30 June 1802.
        ALS.

        Fanny B. Tucker has just married John Coalter and returned with him to Staunton. Anne H. Nicholas writes that Lelia Byrd has died at the age of 18.

      • Box-folder 2:30
        Mrs. Lelia Tucker, Williamsburg, to her stepdaughter, Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 13 July 1802.
      • Box-folder 2:31
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Farmville, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 29 August 1802.
      • Box-folder 2:32
        John Coalter, Elm Grove and Lexington, to his wife. August-September 1802.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Elm Grove was the new home of the Coalters. Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter was in the Warm Springs for her health in September.

      • Box-folder 2:33
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, [Warm Springs], to John Coalter, 6 October 1802.
      • Box-folder 2:34
        St. George Tucker, Richmond, to John Coalter, 14 November 1802.
      • Box-folder 2:35
        Mrs. Ann Coalter, Orangeburg, South Carolina, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 4 December 1802.
      • Box-folder 2:36
        John Coalter, Richmond, Elm Grove, and Lexington, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, January-August 1803.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Frances Bland Tucker Coalter returns to Williamsburg for the birth of her first child, Francis Lelia; the burning of the buildings of Lexington Academy.

      • Box-folder 2:37
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Lelia Tucker, Williamsburg, Haymarket, and Fredericksburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, June-October 1803.
        4 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:38
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Warm Springs, to John Coalter, 20 August 1803.
      • Box-folder 2:39
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Farmville, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 31 August 1803.
      • Box-folder 2:40
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, January 1804.
        3 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:41
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Elm Grove, to John Coalter, March, April 1804.
        3 letters.ALS.

        John Coalter was on the court circuit.

      • Box-folder 2:42
        John Coalter, Botetourt and Natural Bridge, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, [March, April] 1804.
        4 letters.ALS.

        The letters are undated, but are replies to those from Frances Bland Tucker Coalter to John Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:43
        Mrs. Judith Randolph to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, September 1804.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:44
        Mrs. F. D[avenport], Richmond, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 5 November 1804.

        F. Davenport was the mother of the second wife of John Coalter, who continued to live with the Coalters.

      • Box-folder 2:45
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg. Endorsement on letter from B. W. Leigh, Petersburg, 10 February 1805.

        Concerning deed to property, probably Elm Grove, the home bought by John Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:46
        St. George Tucker and Maria Carter, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 9 April 1805.

        Maria Carter was a step-daughter of St. George Tucker.

      • Box-folder 2:47
        James Davenport, Chillicothe, Ohio, to John Coalter, 13 April 1805.

        Writes of obtaining a clerk's position with the Ohio Assembly at $4.00 per day.

      • Box-folder 2:48
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Bizarre, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April-December 1805.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Death of her husband and her straitened circumstances; Bizarre in bad condition; hopes to send her son, St. George, to Europe to cure his deafness.

      • Box-folder 2:49
        St. George Tucker, Richmond and Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April-June 1805.
        5 letters.ALS.

        In June, St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker set out for Staunton in order to be there for the lying-in of Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:50
        Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April-December 1805.
        4 letters.ALS.

        First mention of the second Coalter child, Elizabeth.

      • Box-folder 2:51
        M[argaret] Coalter, Bizarre, to John Coalter, 20 April 1805.

        The illness of Tudor Randolph.

      • Box-folder 2:52
        David Coalter, Orangeburg, South Carolina, to John Coalter, 28 July 1805.

        Congratulates John Coalter on the birth of his second daughter and the purchase of Elm Grove. He writes at length about the difficulty in buying good house servants.

      • Box-folder 2:53
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, January-November 1806.
        5 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:54
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, January-May 1806.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Financial matters, mainly about bank shares and dividends.

      • Box-folder 2:55
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Hayes and Bizarre, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, March-October 1806.
        4 letters.ALS.

        St. George Randolph's visit to England; her disappointment over continued his deafness Dr. Cooper says "occasioned by the irruption of his ears at nine months old." Has no authority over the servants. Illness of Polly the seamstress.

      • Box-folder 2:56
        John Coalter, Charlottesville, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April (and after) 1806.
        4 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:57
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Wmsbg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, January-December 1807.
        12 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:58
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Bizarre, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February-October 1807.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Thirty sick Negroes. Poverty.

      • Box-folder 2:59
        John Naylor to John Coalter, 5 March 1807.
        ALS.

        John Naylor married to Jane, sister of John Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:60
        L. Bouye, Sweet Springs, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, May 1807.
      • Box-folder 2:61
        St. George Tucker, Richmond, to John Coalter, 12 October 1807.

        Payment of $1,230 on bank shares.

      • Box-folder 2:62
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, Warminster and Richmond, to John Coalter, January-December 1808.
        4 letters.ALS.

        The marriage of Beverley Tucker to Mary Coalter.

      • Box-folder 2:63
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Bizarre, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February, December 1808.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Small pox.

      • Box-folder 2:64
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg and Richmond, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February-December 1808.
        16 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:65
        P[olly] Coalter, Orangeburg, South Carolina, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February-March 1808.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Difficulties in South Carolina caused by the embargo.

      • Box-folder 2:66
        S. P. Dandridge, Martinsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 13 February 1808.

        His wife Evelina has given birth to a son.

      • Box-folder 2:67
        Elizabeth Carmichael, Orangeburg, South Carolina, to Anne Catherine Coalter, 7 March 1808.

        Anne Catherine Coalter was visiting the Coalters at Elm Grove.

      • Box-folder 2:68
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, [Warm Springs], to Mrs. Davenport, (August) 1808.

        Mention of her young daughters, Fancilea (Francis Lelia) and Lizba (Elizabeth Tucker Coalter).

      • Box-folder 2:69
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Warm Springs, to John Coalter, September 1808.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 2:70
        Maria E. and Anne Catherine Coalter, Elm Grove, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, October-December 1808.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Frances Bland Tucker Coalter spent every summer at the medicinal springs for her health.

    • Box-folder 3:1-50
      Subseries B: Box 3 - Correspondence of John Coalter and his third wife while he was serving as Circuit Court Judge; correspondence of their daughters, Frances Lelia and Elizabeth Tucker Coalter, with parents and grandparents. Subseries finishes with the fourth marriage of John Coalter, 1809-1822
      186 items.

      Interesting comments on the effect of the embargo in South Carolina, and of episodes in the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake Bay area are found in these letters. There is also a report of the destruction wrought in Bruton Parish Church by the "youth of Williamsburg," and remarks of Saint George Tucker (14 June 1809) upon the occasion of the birth of his first grandson, St. George Coalter, in which he strongly condemns the academies and colleges of that day.

      Letters include those exchanged by John Coalter with his third wife Frances Bland (Tucker) Coalter from 1809-1811, when John Coalter was serving as Circuit Judge. In 1811 he accepted an appointment as judge of the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals; the family then moved to Richmond. There are many letters received by Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter between 1809 and her death in 1813, from her father St. George Tucker, and stepmother Mrs. Lelia Tucker, in Williamsburg, from her sister-in-law Mrs. Judith Randolph at Bizarre, and from other members of the family. There also are many letters to the daughters of John Coalter, Frances Lelia and Elizabeth Tucker, from their grandparents, from 1813 to the death of Frances Lelia Coalter in 1821.

      • Box-folder 3:1
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, January-November 1809.
        7 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:2
        G. W. Hays, Richmond, to John Coalter, 20 March 1809.

        On the appointment of John Coalter to his position as "a judge under the new Judiciary System." (John Coalter was appointed February 7, 1807).

      • Box-folder 3:3
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Farmville, [Bizarre], to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 26 March 1809.

        Mentions a visit from the newly married Beverley [Tucker]and Polly [Coalter]and writes concerning her sons Saint (George) and Tudor.

      • Box-folder 3:4
        John Coalter, Botetourt, Greenbrier, Kanhawa Court House, and Richmond, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April-November 1809.
        9 letters.ALS.

        Written by John Coalter during spring and autumn sessions of the Circuit Court. Contain instructions for planting, the upkeep of Elm Grove, and other matters.

      • Box-folder 3:5
        John Coalter's instructions for planting and penning up of a farm, [April] 1809.
        4 pages.ADS.
      • Box-folder 3:6
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, E. Gr., to John Coalter, April-May 1809.
        5 letters.ALS.

        One of the letters concerns the troubles with the English and the hope for a peaceful settlement.

      • Box-folder 3:7
        St. George Tucker, Richmond and Williamsburg, to John Coalter, June-July 1809.
        3 letters.ALS.

        In the letter of June 14, St. George Tucker mentions the birth of John Coalter's first son his first grandson (St. George Tucker Coalter) "who, if my prayers for him may be heard, will never descend from the dignity of a private station." Concerning the education of his grandson, he writes, "unless the manners of our youth, or the management of their tutor, shall undergo a most surprising and happy change in this Country, I had rather he should never hear of an Academy or a College, than enter the walls of one.

      • Box-folder 3:8
        Ann Catherine Coalter, China Grove, South Carolina, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 15 July 1809.

        Congratulations on the birth of a son.

      • Box-folder 3:9
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Staunton, to John Coalter, September-October 1809.
        7 letters.ALS.

        This series of letters is concerned, among other problems, with the difficulty of meeting payments on Elm Grove, of a fight between two of their slaves, the treatment of one of the wives by slave husband and the imprisonment on the plantation of the two slaves. Effort to get a tooth pulled. Two doctors and, finally, "a shoemaker named Cease" were able to extract the tooth about a week after the first attempt was made. Alcoholism of a friend. Afflicting account of sister's situation at Bizarre. "she must come to us, as soon as she can leave Bizarre; which she says cannot be before Xmas, that she may complete the clothing of the Negroes."

      • Box-folder 3:10
        John Coalter to James All, 1 February 1810.

        Appeals to James All to represent the district. About the war situation: "We are more Colonies than ever--i.e. we give our wholetrade to aid Britain in her wars--were we Colonies we would only give the revenue arising from trade."

      • Box-folder 3:11
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to John Coalter and Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February-October 1810.
        1 letter.ALS.

        Her parents were trying to buy a cook for Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter without great success.

      • Box-folder 3:12
        Louisa Mercer, Sentry Box, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February-October 1810.
        5 letters.ALS.

        These letters although undated, are believed to have been written in 1810.

      • Box-folder 3:13
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, March-June 1810.
        13 letters.ALS.

        Reports that Bruton Parish Church has been "totally and wantonly destroyed...the Bellows and many of the pipes cut to pieces," evidently by the youth of the town.

      • Box-folder 3:14
        John Coalter, Richmond and Staunton, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April-September 1810.
        11 letters.ALS.

        John Coalter attending the spring and autumn sittings of the Circuit Court, sends instructions for the management of the farm.

      • Box-folder 3:15
        Mary Anne Johnson, Staunton, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, May-December 1810.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:16
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Elm Grove, to John Coalter, September-October 1810.
        6 letters.ALS.

        News of the farm, the slaves, and family. Relays questions from slave Ned about the farm and permission for him to visit his daughter in Rockingham and his wife's petition to accompany him.

      • Box-folder 3:17
        W. Chew, Fredericksburg, to St. George Tucker, 2 October 1810.

        Concerning a cook for sale.

      • Box-folder 3:18
        Mary Coalter, Columbia, South Carolina, to her aunt, Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 4 October 1810.

        D[avid] C[oalter], Mary's father.

      • Box-folder 3:19
        William McPheeter, J. W. Allison, Joseph C. Cabell, Polly A. Steele, and William Kinney to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, January-June 1811.
        5 letters.ALS.

        These letters from relatives of Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter are placed in one folder.

      • Box-folder 3:20
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, February-November 1811.
        8 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:21
        M.S. Baldwin, M. Bush, Arch. Stuart, and "M. T.," in Richmond and Petersburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April [1811].
        4 letters.ALS.

        These letters are undated but are presumed to date from 1811, and placed in one folder.

      • Box-folder 3:22
        John Coalter, Lewisburg and Kanahwa, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, April-October 1811.
        5 letters.ALS.

        In May, John Coalter writes of his appointment as Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia (May 11, 1811). "God help me, I know not what to do. All have advised my acceptance." In October he writes of arrangements made for the move to Richmond, and of plans to sell the cattle at Elm Grove.

      • Box-folder 3:23
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Elm Grove, to John Coalter, April-May 1811.
        2 letters.ALS.

        In April Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter writes, "I very much fear I shall never be reconciled to our fate"--of separation for such long periods when John Coalter is absent on the court circuit. (A month later John Coalter was appointed Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals.) Also mentions a "terrible whipping" their two year old son St. George Tucker Coalter had "for obstinacy."

      • Box-folder 3:24
        H[enry] St. George Tucker, Winchester, to John Coalter, 26 May 1811.

        Tucker strongly advises his brother-in-law against accepting his new appointment: "Rest assured that no other Judge of the General Court will accept the office which is tendered you."

      • Box-folder 3:25
        John St. George Randolph, Bizarre, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 27 May 1811.
        ALS.

        John St. George Randolph is a son of Mrs. Judith Randolph.

      • Box-folder 3:26
        B. W. Leigh and Catherine Matthews, Petersburg and Staunton, to John Coalter, May-June 1811.
        2 separate letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:27
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg to John Coalter, June 1811.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Speaking of himself as an "ex-judge," Tucker advises John Coalter regarding his new appointment; concern for the health of Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter.

      • Box-folder 3:28
        K. and A. Coalter, Columbia, South Carolina, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, July 1811.
      • Box-folder 3:29
        F[rances] L[elia] Coalterand Mrs. F. Davenport, Staunton, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter and John Coalter at Warm Springs, August-November 1811.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Frances Lelia Coalter writes with concern about her mother's health.

      • Box-folder 3:30
        Mrs. F. Davenport, Staunton, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter at Warm Springs, September 1811.
        2 letters.ALS.

        News of the children sent to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter who is quite ill.

      • Box-folder 3:31
        Mrs. Judith Randolph to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter at Warm Springs, September 1811.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:32
        Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Williamsburg, to John Coalter, November-December 1811.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:33
        Mrs. Judith Randolph, Farmville, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 3 March 1812.

        Concern for Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter's poor health.

      • Box-folder 3:34
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, March-August 1812.
        9 letters.ALS.

        The troubled times are reflected in this series of letters. In July, Tucker comments on the American privateer with one nine-pounder which took a British schooner armed with four twelve pounders. In August he gives an account of the Baltimore riot in which a jail was broken into and prisoners assassinated. He writes that such action "is beyond measure horrible and obnoxious; and every good Citizen ought to set his face against such damnable proceedings," but concludes, "The Yankees, no doubt, will be glad of the precedent...I look forward to a dissolution of the Union, as an Event not far off."

      • Box-folder 3:35
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker to John Coalter and Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, August-September 1812.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Concerning the sale of Elm Grove.

      • Box-folder 3:36
        Jos. C. Cabell. Edgewood, to John Coalter, 16 September 1812.

        Reflects the uncertainty of the war situation in his letter.

      • Box-folder 3:37
        Frances L. Coalter, Staunton, to John Coalter, July-September 1813.
        9 letters.ALS.

        Frances L. Coalter writes to her father who is with her mother, Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, in her last illness at the medicinal springs.

      • Box-folder 3:38
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, 9 July 1813.
        ALS.

        Writing to his daughter before she goes to the Springs for her final siege of illness, St. George Tucker sends the news that the enemy had left the waters about Williamsburg after much destruction and property along the river.

      • Box-folder 3:39
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg and Warminster, to John Coalter, July-August 1813.
        4 letters.ALS.

        In these letters it is apparent that Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter is near death.

      • Box-folder 3:40
        Mrs. Judith Randolph to John Coalter, July-August 1813.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Letters of hope and prayer for the recovery of Mrs. Frances Bland Tucker Coalter.

      • Box-folder 3:41
        Joseph C. Cabell, Mary W. Cabell, Edgewood, and Wm H. Cabell, Monte Videa, to John Coalter, July 1813.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Reports of the war: "the conduct of the British at Craney Island was the most cowardly imaginable," and "We have just been informed by rumor that the British Squadron in the Chesapeake has been reinforced..."

      • Box-folder 3:42
        A cover addressed to John Coalter with the date and "J. Randolph, Jr." endorsed on it with the seal containing the Randolph Coat of Arms, September 1813.
      • Box-folder 3:43
        John Coalter, Elm Grove, to John Randolph of Roanoke, 25 September 1813.

        Writes of his "great and irretrievable loss" his wife died "on Sunday evening, the 12th instant."

      • Box-folder 3:44
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Tucker, Bush Hill, near Richmond, to John Coalter, 30 September 1813.
        2 letters.ALS.

        The first letters written after the death of St. George Tucker's daughter.

      • Box-folder 3:45
        Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to Miss Elizabeth T. Coalter, 30 January 1816.

        To her granddaughter, the second child of John Coalter and his late wife. (A biographical note of John Coalter's family is enclosed in the folder with this letter.)

      • Box-folder 3:46
        Mrs. Tucker, to Frances L. Coalter and Elizabeth T. Coalter, Bush Hill, near Richmond, 12 March 1817.
        3 letters.ALS.

        She writes that "the events of the present week will supply to you the want of a Mother and Sister, which you have so severly felt, particularly in the last six or eight months." Frances L. Coalter, the sister of Elizabeth T. Coalter, died in 1821 at the age of 18. John Coalter was soon to marry his fourth wife, a widow Williamson.

      • Box-folder 3:47
        Mrs. Tucker and St. George Tucker Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, Richmond, January-February 1820.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Second is titled "Tucker-Green Annals."

      • Box-folder 3:48
        Mrs. Tucker and St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, Bush Hill, Richmond, February-April 1822.
        4 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 3:49
        Mrs. Tucker and St. George Tucker, Warminster, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, August-October 1822.
        5 letters.ALS.

        The Tuckers are in their summer home at Warminster, with Maria Carter Cabell, daughter of Mrs. L. Tucker, and her husband Joseph Cabell.

      • Box-folder 3:50
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter and Anne J. Tucker, 1 January 1823.

        A New Year's greeting to his granddaughters.

  • Box 4-5
    Children of John Coalter - Elizabeth Tucker Coalter and St. George Tucker Coalter; their spouses; children and other extended family, 1778-1852.
    Subseries 2: Children of John Coalter
    • Box-folder 4:1-48
      Subseries A: Box 4 - Correspondence of the two surviving children of John and Frances Bland Tucker Coalter, Elizabeth Tucker Coalter, and St. George Tucker Coalter with their respective spouses, John Randolph Bryan and Judith H. Tomlin, and others; genealogical material on the Tomlin and Ball families: Judith H. Tomlin with Virgilia Savage and others, before her marriage;. letters from St. George Tucker Coalter describing life at the medical springs, 1778-1838.
      181 items.

      The letters in this box are primarily those of the two surviving children of John and Francis Bland Tucker Coalter: Elizabeth Tucker Coalter Bryan and St. George Tucker Coalter, and their respective spouses, John Randolph Bryan and Judith H. Tomlin Coalter.

      This group includes genealogical material on the Tomlin family, and correspondence of Judith H. Tomlin before her marriage to St. George Tucker Coalter. Her letters form an important part of the collection from this time until her death in 1859.

      The last letters from their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. St. George Tucker, are preserved, as well as letters to their uncles Henry and Beverley Tucker and John Randolph of Roanoke. Of special note is a letter of October, 1831 in which St. George Tucker Coalter writes fully of Randolph during a visit to Roanoke. After his death in 1833, Randolph's will caused great difficulty and misunderstanding in the family, and appears to cast a slur on his step-father St. George Tucker.

      The letters of St. George Tucker Coalter to his wife and sister, especially those written from the springs which he visits each year, form the largest single group. In these letters an interesting picture of nineteenth century social life is to be found.

      • Box-folder 4:1
        "Descendants of John Walker Tomlin and Margaret Williamson (Ball), his wife," 1899.
        9 pages.Typescript.
      • Box-folder 4:2
        "A List of Sundry Bonds for Hire of Negroes, etc. Belonging to the Estate of Williamson Ball," 25 December 1799.
      • Box-folder 4:3
        Judith H. Tomlin, to Virgilia Savage, February-November 1823.
        6 letters.ALS.

        Schoolgirl letters written by J. H. T. before her marriage.

      • Box-folder 4:4
        Judith H. Tomlin to Virgilia Savage, February-November 1824.
        8 letters.ALS.

        Judith H. Tomlin writes of her visit to Yorktown to see Lafayette on his return visit to America.

      • Box-folder 4:5
        Judith H. Tomlin to Virgilia Savage (later Mrs. Virgilia S. Macon), February-December 1825.
        5 letters.ALS.

        Judith H. Tucker writes to congratulate Virgilia Savage in December on her marriage.

      • Box-folder 4:6
        Judith H. Tomlin to Mrs. Macon, January-August 1826.
        3 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 4:7
        St. George Tucker and Mrs. Lelia Tucker, Warminster and Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, August-December 1826.
        5 letters.ALS.

        Endorsed: "Letters of my dear and venerated Grandfather, S. G. Tucker, High Souled, Generous Gentleman."

      • Box-folder 4:8
        Thomas T. Tucker, Washington, to John and E[lizabeth] T. Coalter, 11 August 1826.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Thomas T. Tucker, a brother of St. George Tucker, enclosed these two letters in a packet which he forwarded from Beverley Tucker.

      • Box-folder 4:9
        St. George Tucker, Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, February-August 1827.
        4 letters.ALS.

        St. George Tucker complains about his sight and signs himself "Your old blind Grandpa" in the first of these letters. The last is endorsed: "All the letters concerning my most dear Grandfather's illness and death are omitted and put to themselves."

      • Box-folder 4:10
        Mrs. Tucker, Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, 3 December 1827.
        2 letters.ALS.

        These were written after the death of St. George Tucker.

      • Box-folder 4:11
        H[enry] S[aint] G[eorge] Tucker, Winchester, to Saint George T. Coalter, 10 May 1828.

        Writes in regard to his instruction in law, as suggested by Elizabeth T. Coalter. He mentions the poor health of his step-brother, John Randolph, of Roanoke; and suspects that his brother, Beverley, "will not return to Virginia as a resident." Beverley Tucker, then in Missouri, did return to Williamsburg, and later became Professor of Law at the College of William and Mary.

        Tucker enclosed his "Introductory Lecture," reprinted from his Commentory on the Laws of Virginia . . . Lectures delivered at the Winchester Law School, pp. 7-14.

      • Box-folder 4:12
        Mrs. Lelia Tucker, Williamsburg, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, 17 May 1828.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 4:13
        St. George Tucker Coalter, University of Virginia, to Miss J[udith] H. Tomlin, February-August 1829.
        2 letters.ALS.

        The first is a printed invitation to a ball at the Jefferson Hotel with a message added; the second is a Temperance pledge signed by St. George Tucker Coalter, Judith H. Tomlin and three others.

      • Box-folder 4:14
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Chatham, to his father, John Coalter, February-March 1829.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Evidently left in charge of his father's estate, Chatham, he writes concerning examinations at the College of William and Mary and of his experiences in vaccinating and performing minor operations on the slaves. (He was a 20 year old farmer with no medical training!)

      • Box-folder 4:15
        L. H. Barnes, Chericoke, to St. George Tucker Coalter, 21 February 1829.
      • Box-folder 4:16
        John Coalter, Richmond, to Elizabeth T. Coalter, 11 May 1829.

        St. George Tucker Coalter prepares to leave school to marry.

      • Box-folder 4:17
        Elizabeth T. Coalter to Mrs. St. George Tucker Coalter, 29 December 1829.

        The first letter to Judith Tomlin Coalter after her marriage to St. George Tucker Coalter, December 16, 1829. "Tell St. George that yesterday Uncle R. (John Randolph of Roanoke) made an attack on the Judiciaryand Papa (John Coalter), finding no one else would rise to their defense, answered him..."

      • Box-folder 4:18
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter to her husband, St. George Tucker Coalter, [December] 1829.
      • Box-folder 4:19
        To "My dear Cousin," 13 January 1830.
      • Box-folder 4:20
        St. George Tucker Coalter, New Kent County, to Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, September-November 1830.
        7 letters.ALS.

        His "chill and fever," the recurring sickness which was to bring on his early death in 1839. His wife goes to Chatham, the Coalter family home, for the birth of her first child, Walker Tomlin Coalter.

      • Box-folder 4:21
        Mrs. Coalter, Chatham, to her husband, St. George Tucker Coalter, November 1830.
        3 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 4:22
        St. George Tucker Coalter and Mrs. Coalter, Cumberland, to John Randolph Bryan, 9 January 1831.
      • Box-folder 4:23
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Richmond, Cumberland, and Roanoke to Mrs. Coalter, June-November 1831.
        5 letters.ALS.

        In October he writes: "Uncle R. (John Randolph of Roanoke) looks dreadfully, is much worn away by disease..." Two weeks later he writes describing Randolph's estate and personality: "He is very agreeable indeed and entertains me highly with his conversation on all subjects...He is a man of the finest and nicest feelings I have ever met with..."

      • Box-folder 4:24
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Cumberland, to St. George Tucker Coalter, October-November 1831.
        2 letters.ALS.

        On her husband's financial difficulties.

      • Box-folder 4:25
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Cumberland to Mrs. Elizabeth T. (Coalter) Bryan. January-October 1832.
        7 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 4:26
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Cumberland, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-November 1832.
        5 letters.ALS.

        Writes to his sister about crops, planting, and the like.

      • Box-folder 4:27
        John Coalter, Jr. [by St. George Tucker Coalter], Cumberland, to John Coalter Bryan, 23 April 1832.
        ALS.

        The two cousins, grandsons of John Coalter, are infants; this letter is written by St. George Tucker Coalter.

      • Box-folder 4:28
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Cumberland, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-December 1833.
        7 letters.ALS.

        In the January letter, he announces the birth of a son, Henry St. George Tucker Coalter. From White Sulphur Springs, he writes (July 27) that "the shortness of breath and the hacking cough have left me entirely."

      • Box-folder 4:29
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Cumberland, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, February-September 1833.
        7 letters.ALS.

        Her husband is at the Springs; she would like to join him but cannot afford it. "He says he never wished for money before, as the want of it keeps him from having company..."

      • Box-folder 4:30
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Charlottesville, White Sulphur Springs, Warm Springs, Sweet Springs, and Salt Sulphur Springs, to Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, July 1833.
        6 letters.ALS.

        An interesting group of letters describing life at several of the medicinal springs which were so popular in the 19th century. He describes his daily regimen, the meals, the baths, other tourists, the costs, and the physical characteristics of the resorts.

      • Box-folder 4:31
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Cumberland, to St. George Tucker Coalter, July-August 1833.
        9 letters.ALS.

        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter writes to her husband about family matters while he is at the springs for his health.

      • Box-folder 4:32
        St. George Tucker Coalter, to Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, August 1833.
        10 letters.ALS.

        A continuation of his previous letters, including a crude drawing of the buildings and grounds of Salt Sulphur Springs.

      • Box-folder 4:33
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter at Cumberland to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, March-November 1833.
        8 letters.ALS.

        In November she mentions that Beverley Tucker called on way to Williamsburg.

      • Box-folder 4:34
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Mrs. Coalter, and Johnny and Hinny (Henry) to John Coalter, 30 April 1833.

        The boys, who are just learning to write, add their notes to the letter to their grandfather.

      • Box-folder 4:35
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Cumberland to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 20 August 1833.
      • Box-folder 4:36
        Mrs. J. H. Coalter, Cumberland, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-October 1835.
        6 letters.ALS.

        Her husband is overworking, and she fears for his health.

      • Box-folder 4:37
        Robert W. Tomlin, Chericoke, to John Coalter, 19 May 1835.

        The brother of Mrs. Judith H. Coalter writes to her father-in-law asking help in gaining a position with a Richmond company.

      • Box-folder 4:38
        St. George Tucker Coalter at Chericoke to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, October-December.
        2 letters.ALS.

        He writes about his poor health; mentions his uncle, Beverley Tucker.

      • Box-folder 4:39
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter and St. George Tucker Coalter, Cumberland, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-November 1836.
        7 letters.ALS.

        John Coalter is very much concerned with gold mine projects; he now orders St. George Tucker Coalter about at his will, and has decided that the family shall move closer to him. They are dependent on John Coalter financially.

      • Box-folder 4:40
        St. George Tucker Coalter to Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, July-September 1836.
        6 letters.ALS.

        Life at the springs, his continuing illness and his poverty.

      • Box-folder 4:41
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Cumberland, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, July-December 1836.
        6 letters.ALS.

        His discouragement as he contemplates the move insisted upon by his father: "after seven years we have to begin the world afresh and fix and build and lay out and all that -- oh thunder - -how I dread and hate it."

      • Box-folder 4:42
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Sweet Springs, to John Randolph Bryan, 25 August 1836.
      • Box-folder 4:43
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Cumberland, to St. George Tucker Coalter, November 1836.
      • Box-folder 4:44
        St. George Tucker Coalter to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-December 1837.
        7 letters.ALS.

        Regarding the move from Cumberland, New Kent County, to St. George's Park, King William County, and the difficulty of the move.

      • Box-folder 4:45
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Chericoke, to St. George Tucker Coalter, February-November 1837.
        6 letters.ALS.

        John Coalter is very ill, and the new place is slow in getting established. Mention of the will of John Randolph of Roanoke.

      • Box-folder 4:46
        St. George Tucker Coalter, to John R. Bryan, February-October 1837.
        4 letters.ALS.

        The will of John Randolph of Roanoke, in which the good name of St. George Tucker is slighted. Henry and Beverley Tucker, sons of St. George Tucker are also involved.

      • Box-folder 4:47
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, March-August 1837.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Home has not been settled since leaving Cumberland. Her husband has finally bought a place "about 2 hundred and 50 acres, very poor, with a new house but a very indifferent one."

      • Box-folder 4:48
        Reuben T. Thom to "Dear Madam," 2 February 1838.

        Concerning the "continued illness" of Judge (John) Coalter; offers to be of any help that he can. (John Coalter died the day this letter was written.)

    • Box-folder 5:1-74
      Subseries B: Box 5 - Continuing correspondence between the St. George Tucker Coalter and the John Randolph Bryan families: letters exchanged by the cousins, five Coalter children, and nine Bryan children. The controversy over the will of John Randolph of Roanoke is mentioned in several of the letters. St. George Tucker Coalter was a nephew of John Randolph, John Randolph Bryan was his godson, and both were heirs, 1838-l852
      167 items.

      The correspondence between St. George T. Coalter, his wife, his sister Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, and her husband John Randolph Bryan, form the core of the material in this box. St. George Tucker Coalter attempts to establish a new home where his late father John Coalter forced him to move (St. George Tucker Coalter was never financially independent of his father). A doctor's prescription, 28 April 1839, for the man who has been slowly dying of lung trouble and constant fever is: salts to be taken internally, salve rubbed on externally, baths at the medicinal springs and regular exercise. Four months later St. George Tucker Coalter died.

      The five surviving children of Mrs. Coalter and the nine children of Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan add to the correspondence as the years go on, for the families are very attached to one another and there is much visiting back and forth as well as letter writing. The letters of the cousins have been combined in this collection, so that an interesting picture is given of the life of this period; see a report of a traveling entertainer who visits the great houses (23 February 1847), a description of a costume ball at Warner Hall (8 February 1851) and a list of courses studied at a Girl's school (2 February 1852).

      There is much discussion of diseases which were prevalent: consumption, scarlet fever, typhoid fever, cholera, and influenza. 16-year-old John Coalter copied out a cholera cure sent by his aunt for use by two local doctors (13 July 1849).

      • Box-folder 5:1
        St. George T. Coalter at St. George's Park to J[ohn] Randolph Bryanat Gloucester Ct. Hse., March-May 1838.
        2 letters.ALS.

        The first letter is endorsed by John Randolph Bryan. The second was started by St. George Tucker Coalter but was completed and signed by his wife.

      • Box-folder 5:2
        Mrs. J[udith] H. Coalter, Chatham, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, March-November 1838.
        13 letters.ALS.

        Concerned principally with the rapidly deteriorating health of St. George T. Coalter. In June he begins a letter that he is unable to finish but by November he is again supervising the farm activity. The establishment of the new farm and the erection of additional buildings is a great strain.

      • Box-folder 5:3
        St. George Tucker Coalter and Mrs. Coalter to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan and John Randolph Bryan, April-December 1838.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Mrs. Coalter wrote the first two letters for her husband who was too weak to write, but by December he was again active in supervising St. George's Park, their new home.

      • Box-folder 5:4
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, St. George's Park, to St. George Tucker Coalter, May 1838.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Coalter visits his uncle, Beverley Tucker, who has moved back to Williamsburg.

      • Box-folder 5:5
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Chericoke, to Mrs. Coalter, 23 May 1838.

        Visiting the family home of Mrs. Coalter their son, John, falls down the basement stairs and is unconscious for a time. His father writes, "the Doctor bled him and yesterday morning we gave him a dose of salts...he is now to all appearances as well as ever tho' from loss of blood, the shock, the Salts and low diet he is a little fainty when he first begins to move about in the morning." (The child survived the ministrations of the doctor!)

      • Box-folder 5:6
        R. B. Maury, Treasurer of the Federal Union Manufacturing Co., Fredericksburg, to St. George Tucker Coalter, 16 October 1838.

        A receipt for $100.00 and a demand for another $100.00 on shares of stock.

      • Box-folder 5:7
        St. George Tucker Coalter, St. George's Park, to John Randolph Bryan, 2 January 1839.

        Concerned with the business of a ferry, gold mines, and a mill, evidently part of the estate left by John Coalter to his two children.

      • Box-folder 5:8
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, St. George's Park and Chatham, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, February-May 1839.
        7 letters.ALS.

        Mr. Coalter has had a relapse, and "has lost all the flesh and muscle he had gained. Yet he makes a trip down country in April, only to return much worse.

      • Box-folder 5:9
        St. George Tucker Coalter, St. George's Park, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, February-May 1839.

        He marks his 30th birthday: "I can neither eat nor sleep nor move about with comfort and am so weak from fever...that I can hardly stand up or sit down."

      • Box-folder 5:10
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, St. George's Park, to St. George Tucker Coalter, April 1839.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Letters written to her husband when he is on his last trip from home.

      • Box-folder 5:11
        Edw. H. Charmichael to St. George Tucker Coalter, 28 April 1839.

        A doctor's prescription: salts, used internally, salves externally, baths at the Hot Springs, and continued exercise.

      • Box-folder 5:12
        A[nn] E[liza] Fitzhughand St. George Tucker Coalter, St. George's Park, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 23 May 1839.

        Announces the birth of a child to Mrs. Coalter. St. George Tucker Coalter writes of the "fire in my breast that must soon burn me out."

      • Box-folder 5:13
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, St. George's Park, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, June-July 1839.
        6 letters.ALS, E.

        News of a young son; congratulates Mrs. Bryan on the birth of a daughter. St. George Tucker Coalter adds a note in July 4th letter: "I can't make much hand at writing this evening but I send you these few words to comfort you...my thoughts and prayers are with you may the Lord work all things together for our good." To this Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan has added the endorsement, "The last line I ever got from him."

      • Box-folder 5:14
        "List of Negroes allotted by the Commissioners to the Children of St. Geo. T. Coalter." (St. George Tucker Coalter died at St. George's Park on, August 18, 1839.)
      • Box-folder 5:15
        Ann B. Fitzhugh, Chessanamsie, to Mrs. St. George Tucker Coalter, 11 April 1840.

        After the death of her husband, Mrs. Coalter has gone to live with her sister-in-law at Eagle Point.

      • Box-folder 5:16
        Unsigned and undated letter to Judy [Mrs. Coalter], n.d.
        AL.
      • Box-folder 5:17
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, Hanover County, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, June-November 1842.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Mrs. Coalter moved from St. George's Park to Presley. Her brother, Harrison Tomlin, was living with the family and takes the place of a father to the children.

      • Box-folder 5:18
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, March-October 1843.
        5 letters.ALS.

        Of her poverty and of the need for means to educate her children.

      • Box-folder 5:19
        John Coalter II, Presley, to John C. Bryan, 11 August 1843.

        The son of Mrs. Coalter writes to his young cousin, the son of John Randolph Bryan, at Roanoke, a plantation that had been in litigation since the death of John Randolph. The property was being administered by J. R. Bryan, one of the heirs. Young John C. Bryan, was one of the chief beneficiaries of the will, then being contested.

      • Box-folder 5:20
        C. B. C[ocke], Belmeade, to Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, 5 April 1844.

        Announcing the birth of a child.

      • Box-folder 5:21
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Ditchley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 18 September 1844.
      • Box-folder 5:22
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-December 1845.
        5 letters.ALS.

        Preparations are made to send Fanny (Frances Bland Coalter) to live with her grandmother and to attend school in Fredericksburg. The sale of the estate of her late husband took place in October.

      • Box-folder 5:23
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, May-November 1846.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Enquires about money from the estate of John Randolph of Roanoke; her plans to send John and Henry Coalter away to school. (St. George Tucker Coalter, father of John and Henry, was a nephew of John Randolph, and it was expected that the Coalter children would inherit something from his estate.)

      • Box-folder 5:24
        John Coalter II, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, [September] 1846.
        ALS.

        Written from school to his aunt; "all of the boys have to get in school by sunrise and stay there until five in the evening."

      • Box-folder 5:25
        F[rances] T[ucker] Bryan, Eagle Point, to Fanny Bland Coalter, 23 February 1847.

        The Bryan place, Eagle Point in Gloucester County, is so isolated and the family growing so large that a school teacher was kept there for the other children. She mentions her brothers and sisters, and tells of a traveling entertainer: "De [Delia] and myself went to Warner Hall...and there found an Italian ventriloquist with a hat on that had little bells all around the brim...if he comes to Chatham you will probably be deceived by him..."

      • Box-folder 5:26
        John Coalter II, Riggary (Academy), Charlottesville, to Miss F. B. Coalter, March-October 1847.
        4 letters.ALS.

        He tells his sister: "I reckon this is the coldest and most melancholy place in the world."

      • Box-folder 5:27
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter at Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, April-December 1847.
        4 letters.ALS.

        Hopes to get a place from the sale of the estate. "Seven years this last Christmas is a long time not to have a house to call your own." Her hopes for the settlement of the Randolph estate are not fulfilled.

      • Box-folder 5:28
        Sue to Fanny [B. Coalter], 16 February [1847].
      • Box-folder 5:29
        Georgia T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Miss F. B. Coalter, May-November 1847.
        3 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 5:30
        Nanie and Lucy, Lower Bremo, to Georgia B. Coalter, n.d.
      • Box-folder 5:31
        Nanie and Lucy, Lower Bremo, to Georgia B. Coalter, n.d.
      • Box-folder 5:32
        De[lia Bryan], Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.
      • Box-folder 5:33
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.
      • Box-folder 5:34
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-November 1848.
        6 letters.ALS.

        Congratulates Mrs. Bryan on the birth of a son, her 8th child. Mentions shopping trips to Richmond and the remodeling of the house, so, perhaps, some money may have been received from the Randolph estate.

      • Box-folder 5:35
        Georgia S. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 26 February 1848.

        A 9-year old writes of attending a dance at Warner Hall and staying until 11 p.m. "We take dancing lesson of 2 hours length every Saturday."

      • Box-folder 5:36
        B. C. Jones, Eagle Point, to "Dear Sister," 12 May 1848.
        2 items.ALS. Enclosure.
      • Box-folder 5:37
        John Coalter II, Riggery, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 29 August 1848.
      • Box-folder 5:38
        Frank Chiam, Fredericksburg, to Fanny B. Coalter, Fork Union, 11 September 1848.
      • Box-folder 5:39
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, March-December 1849.
        7 letters.ALS.

        Consumption and Cholera are discussed as well as the final division of the estate. Mrs. Coalter still hopes to be able to buy a home of her own. Sons John and Henry left in September for the University of Virginia where they room with their cousins, Jack Coalter and J. Braxton. On Christmas Day she mentions "A dreadful affair has lately occurred at the University, one young man killed another, both intoxicated and from the south; as wicked as that is, it takes the cold bloodedyankees to perpetrate the refinement of barbarism in stewing, and boiling...living people..."

      • Box-folder 5:40
        Frances Bland Coalter, Chatham, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, May-July 1849.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 5:41
        H[enry] T. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 13 July 1849.

        Henry T. Coalter, 16 years old, writes that he has had charge of the harvest at the farm because the overseer was sick. He has also advised the local doctors on Cholera cures: "Mama received your letter by the last post and was much obliged to you for the copy you sent her of the cure for the Cholera. Since it reached here I have copied it twice for different doctors who seemed much pleased with the proscription (sic)."

      • Box-folder 5:42
        F. T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 14 July 1849.

        A beautiful description of the Cove and the island as seen from the Eagle Point house.

      • Box-folder 5:43
        John Coalter II, Presley, "Dear Aunt" [Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan], 6 August 1849.
      • Box-folder 5:44
        Betty (Braxton), Bremo, to Frances Bland Coalter, 14 September 1849.
      • Box-folder 5:45
        Mrs. B[etty] C. Lacy, Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 7 November 1849.

        Mrs. Lacy, related through the fourth wife of her grandfather, John Coalter, was like an older sister to Frances Bland Coalter, and the affectionate relationship between the two continued for many years.

      • Box-folder 5:46
        Mrs. B. C. Lacy, Chatham, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 23 November 1849.

        The Lacy's are preparing to move into Ellwood, the former summer home of John Coalter.

      • Box-folder 5:47
        John Coalter II, University of Virginia, to Frances Bland Coalter, 24 November 1849.
      • Box-folder 5:48
        Frances Bland Coalter, Chatham, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 1 January 1850.
      • Box-folder 5:49
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, January-July 1850.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Letters written before and after a long visit. There were ties between the families despite the distance between them. Mrs. Coalter fears her youngest son, Saint [George], has Typhoid fever.

      • Box-folder 5:50
        Lucy Lindley, Ingleside, to Frances Bland Coalter, February-November 1850.
        4 letters.ALS.

        A school friend tells of a visit to Richmond to see the relics of Gen. and Mrs. Washington.

      • Box-folder 5:51
        Mrs. B. C. Lacy, Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 2 April 1850.
        3 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 5:52
        Georgia B[ryan], Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 13 April 1850.
      • Box-folder 5:53
        Georgia Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, February-August 1851.
        3 letters.ALS. Cover lacking.

        About life in the great houses of Virginia, excursions on river boats, dances, and the like. Mentions a fancy ball where everyone appeared in a mask and gown, "You cannot tell a man from a woman. They go about in this costume for some time and have a dance...one gentleman went draped as a lady and no one found him out,...one went as a monk in robes and with his beads..."

      • Box-folder 5:54
        Mrs. B. C. Lacy, Greenwood and Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, March, August 1851.
        2 letters.ALS.

        "When will your new house, or rather, new home be ready for you? (Frances Bland Coalter's mother has finally been able to buy a house, Stanley.)

      • Box-folder 5:55
        Lucy Lindley, Ingleside, to Frances Bland Coalter, April, July 1851.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 5:56
        B.C. Lacy, Ellwood, to "My dear Cousin" [Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan], 8 May 1851.
      • Box-folder 5:57
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, June-December 1851.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Mentions the war threat: "my anxiety about a lastingpeace and the welfare of my children preys very much on my spirits."

      • Box-folder 5:58
        Elizabeth Gordon, Eliwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 1 September 1851.

        Announces the birth of a daughter to Mrs. Lacy.

      • Box-folder 5:59
        Mannie [Tomlin], Lower Bremo, to Fanny [Coalter], 22 September 1851.
      • Box-folder 5:60
        F. T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 25 November 1851.

        Fanny Coalter is attending a school conducted by Rev. Moses D. Hoge.

      • Box-folder 5:61
        Virginia B. Coalter, Chericoke, to Betty, 7 December 1851.

        Endorses note from Mrs. Judith H. Coalter.

      • Box-folder 5:62
        Mrs. B. C. Lacy, Chatham and Eliwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, January-July 1852.
        4 letters.ALS.

        About her daughter, Agnes, and the progress on the improvements at Ellwood.

      • Box-folder 5:63
        F. T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 7 January 1852.

        "Rumors of a great revival at Mr. H.'s school have reached us from different quarters and report says Jinney and yourself acted a conspicuous part."

      • Box-folder 5:64
        Mannie Tomlin, Lower Bremo, to Frances Bland Coalter, care of Rev. M. D. H., January-August 1852.
        2 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 5:65
        Sue Fickler, Fredericksburg, to Frances Balnd Coalter, February-December 1852.
        2 letters.ALS.

        A school friend writes of her textbooks: "Paley's Moral Philosophy, Olinstead's Natural Philosophy, Hume's History of England, Conic Sections, Thompson's Arithmetic and French Studies."

      • Box-folder 5:66
        Mrs. Judith H. Coalter to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, February-October 1852.
        5 letters.ALS.

        Includes a most interesting account of trip by boat from Gloucester County, viaJamestown, to Richmond.

      • Box-folder 5:67
        Lucy Cocke, Lower Bremo, to Frances Bland Coalter, 1 March 1852.
        ALS.
      • Box-folder 5:68
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Rumford Academy, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, March-October 1852.
        4 letters.ALS.

        The first letters written by Mrs. Coalter's youngest child.

      • Box-folder 5:69
        John Coalter II, University of Virginia, to Frances Bland Coalter, 20 March 1852.
      • Box-folder 5:70
        Mannie Morton, Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, April-November l852.
        6 letters.ALS.

        A schoolmate who has left Rev. Mr. Hoge's school writes back.

      • Box-folder 5:71
        St. George Tucker Coalter, Rumford Academy to Randolph Bryan, 4 May 1852.
      • Box-folder 5:72
        Rev. Moses D. Hoge, Richmond, to H[arrison] B. Tomlin, 8 October 1852.

        An offer to abate charges so that Fanny B. Coalter could remain in school.

      • Box-folder 5:73
        John Coalter II, Presley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 2 November 1852.

        Writes that he has stood his examination for license to practice law; reports on his brothers and sisters.

      • Box-folder 5:74
        Mattie [Morton], Prince Edward, to Frances Bland Coalter, 20 December 1852.

        Fanny has returned to Rev. Hoge's school; her friend writes regarding scarlet fever.

  • Box 6:1-109
    Grandchild of John Coalter - Frances Bland Coalter, daughter of St. George Tucker Coalter. Her correspondence gives a picture of mid-nineteenth century life and includes a near scandal in her attachment to her married schoolmaster, the Rev. Moses D. Hoge. The contents of this box end with the marriage of Frances Bland Coalter and Henry Peronneau Brown, Letters of Brown and his wife resume in Box 21, 1853-1858.
    172 items.
    Subseries 3: Grandchild of John Coalter

    This box consists largely of papers collected by Frances Bland Coalter between February 1853, when she is preparing to leave school, and December 1858, when she married Henry Peronneau Brown. Through this marriage the Tucker-Coalter line was connected with the Brown line; thus, the papers of the two families were brought together into one.

    The collection gives an interesting picture of the life and interests of a young lady of moderate circumstances in the mid-l9th century. Of special interest are the letters concerning the Rev. Moses D. Hoge, whose school in Richmond Fanny Coalter had attended. Shortly after she left school, the Rev. Mr. Hoge carried on a very romantic correspondence with Fanny, although he was a married man with several children. The correspondence became more ardent in the early months of 1854 and, when Mrs. Hoge wrote that her husband had gone to Baltimore to stay with his brother who was ill, Fanny followed him there. According to the gossip of Mattie and Lizzie Morton, she went there to "entrap him." In October it was suggested that the brother, William Hoge, was the one in whom she was interested. The Rev. Mr. Hoge later sought to calm the fervours of his correspondent, as shown by his letters of 28 January 1855, 19 June 1856, and 19 March 1857.

    Fanny B. Coalter did not lack for other suitors, however, for she preserved a letter of 17 July 1854, a proposal of marriage from Alfred B. Tucker. A year later there are reports of her interest in the Brown brothers, John Thompson and Peronneau, of Petersburg, both of whom were courting her. She finally settled on the latter; some acceptances to the marriage invitation are included in this box.

    Letters of Frances Bland Coalter and her husband Henry Peronneau Brown continue in Box 21. The intervening boxes contain manuscripts of the Brown family, especially Capt. Henry Brown, grandfather of Henry Peronneau Brown (Boxes 7-13); the Hon. John Thompson Brown, father of Henry Peronneau Brown (Boxes 14-19); and Col. John Thompson Brown II, brother of Henry Peronneau Brown (Box 20).

    • Box-folder 6:1
      Hess ( ), Ditchley, to Frances Bland Coalter, 8 February 1853.

      Fanny is preparing to leave the school, having finished the course.

    • Box-folder 6:2
      Josie McIlwaine and V[irginia] Braxton Coalterto Frances Bland Coalter, March-May 1853.
      2 letters.ALS.

      A schoolmate and Fanny's sister write after she leaves school.

    • Box-folder 6:3
      Mrs. B.C. Lacy, Eliwood and Chatham, to Frances Bland Coalter, April-November 1853.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:4
      Betty Braxton, Chericoke, to Virginia B. Coalter, 31 May 1853.

      Reports that Jack Bryan, oldest son of Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan is dying at the Coalter home, Presley.

    • Box-folder 6:5
      Mrs. Judith H. Coalter, Stanley, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, June-December 1853.
      4 letters.ALS.

      After many years of waiting (since the death of her husband in 1839) Mrs. Coalter is finally able to buy her own place, Stanley. She tells of her move and of the illness that put her in bed afterward.

    • Box-folder 6:6
      Sallie [Gaines], Powhite, to Frances Bland Coalter, 18 June 1853.
    • Box-folder 6:7
      J. T. Morton and Lizzie, Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, 15 July 1853.
    • Box-folder 6:8
      Fanny W. Gaines, Powhite, to Fannie [Coalter], 16 July 1853.
    • Box-folder 6:9
      [Rev.] Moses D. Hoge, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 20 July 1853.

      The school is closed for the summer, his wife and children are away, so he enlivens his solitude "by having a little chat with you...and where I always think of you and the delightful morning when we enjoyed the scene together...how I cherish every memorial of you. "I greatly enjoyed your last brief visit to us and that evening (do you remember it?) when the music room being full of company we found quiet, and cool breezes in the back porch. I have been sitting there tonight." (A strange letter, indeed, and one which was to cause some upset in the heart of Frances Bland Coalter, as subsequent correspondence show.)

    • Box-folder 6:10
      Frances Bland Coalter, Stanley, to "My own dear Aunt" [Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan], 18 November 1853.
    • Box-folder 6:11
      James K. Lee, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 29 November 1853.
    • Box-folder 6:12
      Hess ( ) to "My dear sister" [Mrs. Judith H. Coalter], [November] 1853.

      Written to Mrs. Judith H. Coalter soon after she purchased her home, Stanley.

    • Box-folder 6:13
      Rev. M.D. Hoge, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 20 December 1853.

      "This letter cannot hold any news, so I will fill it with love...entertaining myself by wishing that you could walk into the room and occupy a vacant chair hard by ."I hope to see you sometimes...nothing to what I would enjoy were I to keep house in a quiet way and have you for my guest a week at a time..."I would like you to marry some fine fellow and live in Richmond, only I...like you best as you are, except that you are too far from me."

    • Box-folder 6:14
      Rev. M. D. Hoge, Hampstead, to Frances Bland Coalter, [January] 1854.

      "When I woke up yesterday morning and found it raining, my spirits fell as low as the mercury for I feared you would not come to Hampstead..."

    • Box-folder 6:15
      Lizzie Morton, Buffaloe and Petersburg, to Frances Bland Coalter, February 1854.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:16
      Rev. M. D. Hoge, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 23 March 1854.

      "You ask me why it is that I am so partial to you--well, the very first time we get a chance to have a talk by ourselves I will tell you...When shall the opportunity come? There is always so much company at your house..."

    • Box-folder 6:17
      John Coalter II, Stanley Hall, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, April, July 1854.
      2 letters.ALS.

      He conducts a school: "I succeeded in six days of raising 21 scholars." He writes that Henry has graduated in Law with distinction.

    • Box-folder 6:18
      Mrs. Susan M. Hoge to Fanny [Bland Coalter], [April] 1854.

      "I think from his letter, Brother [William Hoge]has been much sicker than we had any idea of Mr. [Moses D.] Hogeis going on Thursday to see him and will probably remain in Baltimore until he is well enough to travel..."

    • Box-folder 6:19
      Mattie [Morton], Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, 27 April 1854.

      Addressed to Fanny at Baltimore. Her friend writes, "Cousin Joe says you went to Baltimore purposely to see Mr. Hoge."

    • Box-folder 6:20
      Sallie [W. Gaines], Powhite, to Frances Bland Coalter, 12 June 1854.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Reports gossip concerning Fanny's Baltimore trip.

    • Box-folder 6:21
      F[annie] W. Gaines, Powhite, to Fannie [Bland Coalter], 24 June 1854.
    • Box-folder 6:22
      Rev. M. D. Hoge, New York, to Frances Bland Coalter, 24 June 1854.

      "Often when (I am) abroad, you will be in my mind and heart. Neither do I want you to get married before I return. I am to perform that service, you know..."

    • Box-folder 6:23
      Lizzie Morton, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 29 June 1854.

      Concerning the gossip regarding Fanny and Rev. Hoge: "Surely you could not think me so deceitful as to profess to love you and then say that you would try to entrap a gentleman. I did not say so. I remember saying that if you went to Baltimore and were thrown with Mr. Hoge I believed he would address you, because I know he admired you very sincerely..."

    • Box-folder 6:24
      Alfred B. Tucker, Winchester, to Fanny [B. Coalter], 17 July 1854.

      A proposal of marriage.

    • Box-folder 6:25
      Mrs. Betty C. Lacy, Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 19 July 1854.
    • Box-folder 6:26
      J. Horace Lacy, Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 22 August 1854.

      A rumor that Frances Bland Coalter is to marry.

    • Box-folder 6:27
      F[rances] T[ucker] Bryan, Rockbridge, to Frances Bland Coalter, 8 September 1854.
    • Box-folder 6:28
      Mattie H. Morton, Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, 3 October 1854.

      "Julia Green was here...when I told her that you had gotten a letter from Mr. Hoge she said she was so jealous of you that she was ready to fight..."

    • Box-folder 6:29
      Sallie W. Gaines, Powhite, to F. B. Coalter, 6 October 1854.

      "I am going to Baltimore...and I shall see Mr. Wm. Hoge! Don't you wish you were going? What shall I tell him for you?"

    • Box-folder 6:30
      St. G[eorge] T. Coalter, Boswell, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 23 October 1854.

      St. George is now in school at Staunton.

    • Box-folder 6:31
      A. Steven, Jr., Charlottesville, to Col. [Harrison] Tomlin, 12 January 1855.

      Construction work to be done at the University of Virginia.

    • Box-folder 6:32
      Rev. M. D. Hoge to Frances Bland Coalter, 28 January 1855.

      "I hope that it will not be long before I have the pleasure of seeing you, my dear and constantly remembered friend."

    • Box-folder 6:33
      Mattie Morton, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, February-September 1855.
      4 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:34
      Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 12 February 1855.
    • Box-folder 6:35
      Mrs. B.C. Lacy, Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, February-December 1855.
      2 letters.ALS.

      "I have heard several times of your engagement to Thomas--who has made himself very scarce."

    • Box-folder 6:36
      Betty Braxton, Oak Springs, to Frances Bland Coalter, April-( ) 1855.
      9 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:37
      Sue [Taliaferro], Belle Ville, to [Frances Bland Coalter], 28 May 1855.

      Accepts invitation to the marriage of Virginia, younger sister of Fanny Coalter.

    • Box-folder 6:38
      Sallie [Gaines], Powhite, to Frances Bland Coalter, 25 June 1855.
    • Box-folder 6:39
      W. Hall to Frances Bland Coalter, 28 June 1855.
    • Box-folder 6:40
      Mrs. B.C. Lacy, Eliwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 29 July 1855.
    • Box-folder 6:41
      Frances Bland Coalter, Salt Sulphur Springs, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 1 September 1855.
    • Box-folder 6:42
      Betty Braxton, Chericoke, to Franes Bland Coalter, November, December 1855.
      2 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.
    • Box-folder 6:43
      Henry T. Coalter, Gloucester Court House, to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan, 21 November 1855.

      Now a practicing lawyer, he writes to his aunt on business.

    • Box-folder 6:44
      Lucy T. Braxton, Philadelphia, to Frances Bland Coalter, 10 December 1855.
    • Box-folder 6:45
      Fanny C. Braxton, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, December 1855.
      2 letters.ALS.

      To her cousin regarding "Mr. President" and "The Vice." (This appears to refer to the Brown brothers, John Thompson and Henry Peronneau. Frances Bland Coalter was to marry the latter.)

    • Box-folder 6:46
      J[ohn] T[hompson] Brownto Frances Bland Coalter, (?) 1855.

      "I wish you to be very particular in your conversations with P[eronneau]not to let him have the least idea of the tenor of my remarks to you yesterday and at the same time manage to convince him that I am not in love with you, as I am afraid such is his present opinion."

    • Box-folder 6:47
      Sue Carter, Pampatike, to Frances Bland Coalter (?) 1855.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:48
      H. B. Tomlin, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 9 January 1856.
    • Box-folder 6:49
      Mrs. Elizabeth Bryan, Eagle Point, to Mrs. St. George Coalter, 15 February 1856.

      Trouble in: finding a teacher for her children; "the Roanoke business"--(evidently a reference to the still unsettled will of John Randolph of Roanoke.)

    • Box-folder 6:50
      Mrs. B. C. Lacy, Chatham, to Frances Bland Coalter, February, December 1856.
      2 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.

      Concerned about the health of Fanny's mother, has a horror of those "distracting springs" for invalids.

    • Box-folder 6:51
      Thomas H. Carter and James P. Roy, Chericoke, to Frances Bland Coalter, 14 March 1856.

      The solution to a problem in surveying (this may be the "Thomas" to whom Frances Bland Coalter was rumored to be engaged).

    • Box-folder 6:52
      Alex Martin, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 22 April 1856.

      On the death of Mrs. E. T. Bryan, aunt of Fanny Bland Coalter.

    • Box-folder 6:53
      "Cousin Sue," Oak Spring, to Frances Bland Coalter, 2 May 1856.
    • Box-folder 6:54
      Ann E. T. Magill, Winchester, to Frances Bland Coalter, 7 May 1856.

      On the death of Mrs. Elizabeth T. Bryan.

    • Box-folder 6:55
      J. H. L[acy], Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, 13 May 1856.
    • Box-folder 6:56
      Georgia Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, June-July 1856.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Thanks Fanny for her help at the time of the death of Mrs. Bryan, her mother.

    • Box-folder 6:57
      F. T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Mrs. St. George Tucker Coalter, 10 June 1856.

      Is in charge of the plantation since her mother's death; busy making summer clothes for the slaves.

    • Box-folder 6:58
      Rev. M. D. Hoge, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 19 June 1856.

      Suggests a visit together to "cousin Horace Lacy."

    • Box-folder 6:59
      Sue S. Taliaferro, Belle Ville, to Frances Bland Coalter, 20 June 1856.
    • Box-folder 6:60
      Betty Braxton, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 26 June 1856.

      P[eronneau] Brownand his brother, Thompson, are mentioned. (See letters of December 1855, Box-folder 6:44-45.)

    • Box-folder 6:61
      Joseph R. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Mrs. St. George Tucker Coalter (J. H. C.), 2 July 1856.

      Writes to ask Mrs. Coalter to stay with his daughters during his absence in the south.

    • Box-folder 6:62
      J. F. Morton, Farmville, to Frances Bland Coalter, 23 July 1856.
    • Box-folder 6:63
      Fanny C. Braxton, Bremo, to Frances Bland Coalter, 2 August 1856.
    • Box-folder 6:64
      Georgia L. Bryan, Savannah, Ga., to Mrs. St. George Tucker Coalter, 31 January 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:65
      Mrs. Delia B[ryan] Page, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, 28 February 1857.

      Has charge of the large plantation, keeping four seamstresses, three spinners and a weaver busy.

    • Box-folder 6:66
      Mrs. Betty B[ryan] Daliam, Baltimore, to Frances Bland Coalter, 9 March 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:67
      Mrs. B. C. Lacy, Eliwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, March, December 1857.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:68
      Rev. M.D. Hoge to Frances Bland Coalter, 19 March 1857.

      "No, my dear Fanny, my affection for you has not changed."

    • Box-folder 6:69
      Josie McIl[waine], Petersburg, to Frances Bland Coalter, March, October 1857.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Regarding Mr. Willcox Brown and his brother Peronneau, future husband of Frances Bland Coalter.

    • Box-folder 6:70
      J. F. Mcllwaine to [Frances Bland Coalter], 11 June 1857.

      Invitation to the commencement party at Hampden Sidney College.

    • Box-folder 6:71
      G[eorgia] L. Bryan, Eagle Point, to Frances Bland Coalter, July-October 1857.
      3 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:72
      Lucy T. Braxton, Staunton, to Frances Bland Coalter, July, August 1857.
      2 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.
    • Box-folder 6:73
      J. H. Lacy, Fredericksburg, to Frances Bland Coalter, 7 August 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:74
      H[arrison] B. Tomlin, Staunton, to Frances Bland Coalter, 23 September 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:75
      Mary T. Magill, Winchester, to Frances Bland Coalter, 26 September 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:76
      J. H. Lacy, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 15 October 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:77
      Mattie H. Morton, Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, October, November 1857.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:78
      "Jennie," Belmead, to Frances Bland Coalter, 6 December 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:79
      E. Martin to Frances Bland Coalter, 18 December 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:80
      N. Morson, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, [December] 1857.
    • Box-folder 6:81
      H. B. Tomlin and John Coalter II, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 16 January 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:82
      John Coalter II, Bascobel, Louisiana, to Frances Bland Coalter, 10 February 1858.

      Accompanying his uncle on a business trip, he has visited the main cities of the south and attended the opera in New Orleans. "I must confess that I have been rather disappointed in the people that live in these rich lands--they are as rough as possible...live in log houses and on the very poorest fare."

    • Box-folder 6:83
      H. B. Tomlin, [Richmond], to Frances Bland Coalter, February 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:84
      J. Mcllwaine to Frances Bland Coalter, 11 March 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:85
      G[eorgia] L. Bryan, Warner Hall, to Frances Bland Coalter, 10 April 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:86
      F. C. Means, Fairfield, to Frances Bland Coalter, 6 May 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:87
      Mary T. Magill, Winchester, to Frances Bland Coalter, May-November 1858.
      4 letters.ALS.

      "I suppose your wedding will be postponed unless Mr. Brown's recovery is unusually rapid."

    • Box-folder 6:88
      Lucie [Gaines], Powhite, to Frances Bland Coalter, 18 June 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:89
      Cousin "F. B. M." to Frances Bland Coalter, 23 July 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:90
      Helen Fitzhugh, Alum Springs, to Fanny Bland Coalter, 5 August 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:91
      Mrs. J. H. Coalter, Staunton, to Frances Bland Coalter, 20 August 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:92
      Lucy T. Braxton, White Sulphur Springs, to Frances Bland Coalter, [August] 1858.
      4 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 6:93
      Mrs. Betty B. Dallam, Baltimore, to Frances Bland Coalter, 1 September 1858.

      "The news of your engagement [to Henry P. Brown] did not surprise me...how heartily I approve of your choice..."

    • Box-folder 6:94
      F. T. Bryan, Cargobrook, to Frances Bland Coalter, 21 September 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:95
      Mrs. B.C. Lacy, Ellwood, to Frances Bland Coalter, September-December 1858.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "If my letter arrives too late for Miss Fanny Coalter, I hope Mrs. Brown will have enough affection for the old name to lay claim to it."

    • Box-folder 6:96
      Eliza P. Willcox, Fleur de Hundred, to Frances Bland Coalter, 29 October 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:97
      Ann Eliza [Fitzhugh Gordon], Fredericksburg, to Frances Bland Coalter, 29 October 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:98
      Mattie [Morton], Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, 8 November 1858,
    • Box-folder 6:99
      Alfred B. Tucker, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 3 December 1858.

      Regrets that he cannot attend the wedding.

    • Box-folder 6:100
      Mrs. Virginia S. Brooke, Ashland, to Frances Bland Coalter, 4 December 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:101
      S. G. Carrington, Richmond, to Frances Bland Coalter, 6 December 1858.
    • Box-folder 6:102
      Elthu M. Higgins, Farmville, to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.

      This letter is undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:103
      F. T. Bryan, W[arner] Hall, to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.

      This letter is undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:104
      M. [H. Morton], Buffaloe, to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.

      This letter is undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:105
      S. [Gaines], Powhite, to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.
      7 letters.ALS.

      These letters are undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:106
      Betty Vice to Frances Bland Coalter, n.d.

      This letter is undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:107
      Jack, "Perfect Misery" and "M" [to Frances Bland Coalter], n.d.
      3 letters.ALS.

      These letters are undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:108
      "The King Wm. and Hanover Charaders. Positively their last appearance. At Stanley on Friday evening the 9th this brilliant Company....Ticket 1 ct., children and servants half price." A home performance by the Coalter and Bryan cousins, n.d.

      This item is undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

    • Box-folder 6:109
      Covers addressed to Miss Fanny B. Coalter, n.d.
      17 items.ALS.

      These covers are undated but probably received before December 7, 1858.

Group B: Capt. Henry Brown and Brown Family Papers, 1774-1848.
Box: 7-13
7 boxes.
Series 2: Group B

Papers of Henry Brown, a merchant and county official include a manuscript map of Guilford C. H., business records and correspondence of Brown and Clayton, New London, Bedford (now Campbell County), Virginia and Hancock and Brown, Lynchburg, Virginia. Collection also includes papers concerning a lawsuit against Pleasant Murphy and estate papers of Daniel Brown and Henry Brown's father-in-law John Thompson. There are papers of his immediate family including Henry Brown, Jr.

  • Box 7-11
    Capt. Henry Brown, 1774-1841.
    Subseries 1: Capt. Henry Brown
    • Box-folder 7:1-80
      Subseries A: Box 7 - Correspondence and business papers of Capt. Henry Brown, Revolutionary War veteran who opened a store in Bedford County, in 1793; Papers of Capt. Brown as Collector of Federal taxes on stills and real property, 1774-1803.
      160 items.

      The Brown family papers begin with the letters and papers of Capt. Henry Brown (1760-1841), successful merchant of Bedford County and Lynchburg, who established the family fortune. He was the father of John Thompson Brown, Delegate to the Virginia Assembly, whose letters and papers are collected in the next section (Boxes 14-19).

      A few letters and receipts pertaining to Henry Brown, 1712-1798, the father of Capt. Henry Brown, are included. The great bulk of the material, however, relates to Capt. Brown, beginning with a map of a Revolutionary War battle, 1777, in which he was wounded. With his brother, Daniel, he opened a general store in Bedford soon after the conclusion of the war. A partnership agreement of April 1797, which brought James Leftwich into the business, is preserved and the bulk of the material in this box pertains to the business of the store. A good picture of early merchandising is given by the accounts, letters relating to buying and selling trips, and the court actions taken to collect accounts.

      Also, starting with folder 60, are 39 items relating to the duties of Henry Brown as tax collector in the Bedford area in the years 1800 to 1803.

      • Box-folder 7:1
        J. Arran, Germania, to "My Dear Friend," July 1774.

        "Your friends here tremble for you and apprehend the worst from the dangers that encompass you...the deadly rifle, the scalping knife, tomahawk...return to us in all speed."

      • Box-folder 7:2
        Military map, Guilford Court House, Hillsboro and Salisbury, North Carolina, [1781?].

        Endorsed: "Map of revolutionary battle, found 1926 by F. B. Saunders in old papers from Ivy Cliff. Capt. Henry Brown, born at Ivy Cliff about 1760, was wounded at Guildford C. H."

      • Box-folder 7:3
        Receipts made to Henry Brown, 1786-1792.
        4 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:4
        Buck and Brander, Manchester, to Henry Brown, 25 March 1793.

        Concerning goods for a retail store.

      • Box-folder 7:5
        Henry Brown's note to Buck and Brander for ll.9.3£, witnessed by Jack Beverley, 30 April 1793.

        Endorsed: "Note Henry Brown, payable 1 September, 1793."

      • Box-folder 7:6
        Order to pay to Henry and Daniel Brown, with letter from Israel Thompson, 20 June 1793.
        2 items.ALS.

        Regarding saddle goods in stock at the store.

      • Box-folder 7:7
        From P. Bennet in Philadelphia, 17 November 1793.
      • Box-folder 7:8
        Commission of Daniel Brown as Ensign in a Company of Light Infantry, signed by Sam'l Coleman and James Wood, Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, 24 March 1794.
      • Box-folder 7:9-11
        Accounts, receipts and notes of Henry and Daniel Brown, May-November 1794.
        5 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:12
        Receipt from James Steptoe, Clerk of Court, to Henry Brown for recording a deed, September 1795.
      • Box-folder 7:13
        Agreement of Henry and Daniel Brown with James Leftwich to enter into a partnership, 1 September 1797.
      • Box-folder 7:14
        Daniel Brown, Richmond, Georgetown, and Baltimore, to Henry Brown, September 1797.
        4 letters.ALS.
      • Box-folder 7:15-16
        "Cash, etc. carried by Daniel Brown to Philadelphia, n.d.
      • Box-folder 7:17
        Daniel Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, 8 May 1798.
      • Box-folder 7:18
        List of medicines received by Henry Brown from Howard Bennett, 5 March 1799.
      • Box-folder 7:19
        Receipts to Henry Brown, January-December 1800.
        4 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:20
        Manuscript account book, 22 March 1800.
        14 pages.Unsigned.
      • Box-folder 7:21
        Accounts kept by Henry Brown, Tax Collector of the Bedford district, July-October 1800.
        4 items.
      • Box-folder 7:22
        Daniel Brown to Henry Brown, 1 June 1801.

        Writes to his brother concerning tobacco prices.

      • Box-folder 7:23
        Sam Reid, Bedford, to Henry Brown, 3 June 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:24
        A "promise to pay" from Henry Brown to Christian Houts, 8 June 1803.
      • Box-folder 7:25
        Receipt to Henry Brown from Jon. Steptoe, 27 June 1803.
      • Box-folder 7:26
        Daniel Brown, Franklin, to Henry Brown, 31 December 1803.

        Concerning business affairs a suit for debt, purchase of tobacco and a "Negro wench" for the store, etc. "P.S. I heard at court they had made you a Captain."

      • Box-folder 7:27
        Brown, Leftwich and Co. to Clerk of Campbell Court, recording a deed, March 1804.
      • Box-folder 7:28
        Accounts of Henry Brown, March-December 1805.
        2 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:29-30
        Receipts to Henry Brown, 1806-1808.
        3 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:31
        From Lewis Stuart in Lewisburg, 14 October 1809.
      • Box-folder 7:32
        Statement of bonds to Henry Brown in hands of Jeremiah Jenkins for collection, 4 November 1809.
      • Box-folder 7:33
        Receipt for bonds received from D. and Abram Jenkins, 1 March 1810.
      • Box-folder 7:34
        Charles Thomas to Henry Brown, 14 April 1810.
      • Box-folder 7:35
        Court cost vouchers, 18 September 1810.
      • Box-folder 7:36
        Miscellaneous, n.d.
        3 items.AD.
      • Box-folder 7:37-40
        Accounts notes, etc., of Henry Brown, March-November 1811.
        6 items.AD, ALS.
      • Box-folder 7:41
        Daniel Brown, Lynchburg, to [Henry Brown], 6 August 1812.

        Includes a list of the new officers of the Farmer's Bank in Richmond.

      • Box-folder 7:42
        J. Leftwich to Henry Brown, 9 August 1812.

        Concerning the division of Negroes, total value £815, between Leftwich and the Brown brothers.

      • Box-folder 7:43
        Court cost vouchers to Henry Brown for recording deeds, n.d.
        3 items.PDS.
      • Box-folder 7:44
        J. Leftwich to Henry Brown, 25 December 1813.
      • Box-folder 7:45
        T. H. McGilly, Richmond, to Brown, Leftwich and Co., 14 January 1814.

        Regarding loss of West India produce on which $5,000.00 was borrowed. Endorsed: "I fear our loss will be considerable."

      • Box-folder 7:46
        Return of hospital stores, Regimental hospital of the 35th U.S. Infantry. Sig. Wm. W. Southall, 31 March 1814.
      • Box-folder 7:47
        Daniel Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 22 May 1814.
      • Box-folder 7:48
        Receipt to Henry Brown from Nathaniel H. Price brick-layer, 3 November 1814.
      • Box-folder 7:49
        Receipts from Nathaniel H. Price and William Woodford, January-May 1815.
      • Box-folder 7:50
        Receipt from William Woodford to Capt. Henry Brown, 27 May 1815.

        Receipt is for $130.43 to be paid to John Roberts on land that Capt. Henry Brown sold to William Woodford.

      • Box-folder 7:51
        D. Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 27 December 1815.
      • Box-folder 7:52
        Receipts and accounts due to Henry Brown. March-November 1816.
        4 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:53
        Daniel Brown to Henry Brown, February-October 1816.
        3 letters.ALS.

        Tobacco sold by Leftwich to a man who was a bad risk: "...we are thrown out of between 20 and 30 thousand dollars...one fourth of what it has taken us 20 years to earn is lost for want of prudence."

      • Box-folder 7:54
        Receipt and memo of notes due Henry Brown. October 1817.
        2 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:55
        Undated letters, Daniel Brown to Henry Brown, 1818.
        5 items.ALS.
      • Box-folder 7:56-57
        Vouchers and receipts to Henry Brown. February-November 1819.
        7 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:58
        Notes, accounts, etc., February-October 1820.
        11 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:59
        Court cost voucher to Brown, Leftwich and Co., 1821-1831.
        14 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:60
        Accounts of Taxes collected by Robt. Snoddy, in Bedford, 30 September 1800.
        14 pages.
      • Box-folder 7:61
        Return of taxes collected by John Patrick, November 1800.
        2 items.PDS.
      • Box-folder 7:62
        Lists of taxes collected, n.d.
        3 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:63
        Blank tax list form, 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:64
        Abstract of duties collected from owners of stills and distilleries, 6 January 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:65
        Receipts to Henry Brown for monies received by James, January-September 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:66
        Monthly return blank, March 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:67
        Appointment of Henry Brown as Deputy Inspector of Revenue, 6 May 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:68
        Accounts of Henry Brown in tax collections, May-December 1801.
        3 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:69
        Abstract of duties collected on distilleries, 30 June 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:70
        Circular letter from E. Carrington, Supervisor of Collections, 30 June 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:71
        Henry Brown to Robert Snoddy, August 1801.
        2 letters.ALS.

        Directions for sending tax collections.

      • Box-folder 7:72
        From James Daniel, Insp. of Revenue at Prince Edward, 7 September 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:73
        Henry Brown to Edw. Carrington, 6 October 1801.
      • Box-folder 7:74
        Accounts of still taxes received by Henry Brown, January 1802.
        20 pages.
      • Box-folder 7:75
        Return of monies collected by Henry Brown, 31 January 1802.
      • Box-folder 7:76
        A list of insolvencies reported by Henry Brown, May 1802.
        2 items.ADS.
      • Box-folder 7:77
        E. Carrington to Henry Brown, 30 June 1802.
      • Box-folder 7:78
        "Ballances [sic] due for still [tax] on the S. Side of the Road," 1 July 1802.
        28 pages.
      • Box-folder 7:79
        E. Carrington, Richmond, to Henry Brown, with copy of Federal instructions to tax collectors, November-December 1802.
        3 items.PDS.
      • Box-folder 7:80
        Circular letters and drafts, February-April 1803.
        3 items.PDS, ADr.
    • Box-folder 8:1-3
      Subseries B: Box 8 - Business records and correspondence of the firm of Brown and Clayton in New London, Bedford County, and of Hancock and Brown, in Lynchburg. Include papers concerning a suit to collect a debt of Pleasant Murphy, 1810-1839.
      159 items.

      Business records and correspondence of Henry Brown and Samuel P. Clayton. After the death of his brother Daniel in 1818, Brown entered into a partnership with Clayton, his son-in-law. Brown survived Clayton, who died in 1832; this box also includes papers from 1833 to 1839 made out to Henry Brown, surviving partner of Brown and Clayton Company.

      The accounts of Henry Brown with Hancock and Brown, Lynchburg, 1824-1833, are retained as one group.

      Also retained as a separate group are the papers relating to the court suits of Brown and Pleasant Murphy. All notes of the period carried a 100 percent penalty clause. This resulted in many law suits being brought to establish what would now be considered exorbitant claims. In one case (see entry for March 10, 1823) for a debt of $42.05, the debtor surrendered 1 sound filly, 2 cows, a calf, 2 feather beds, all household and kitchen furniture, all plantation utensils, and 6 hogs!

      • Box-folder 8:1
        Accounts, letters, notes, vouchers, etc. concerning the Brown and Clayton store, Bedford, Virginia, 1810-1839.
      • Box-folder 8:2
        Accounts of Capt. Henry Brown concerning the Hancock and Brown store, Lynchburg, Virginia, 1824-1833.
      • Box-folder 8:3
        Papers relating to the suit of Brown and Clayton vs.Pleasant Murphy, Bedford County, Virginia, 1827-1832.
    • Box-folder 9:1-5
      Subseries C: Box 9 - Papers of Capt. Henry Brown, as Sheriff of Bedford County, Treasurer of the New London Academy Meeting House and of the New London Agricultural Society, and as executor of the estates of his brother, Daniel Brown, and father-in-law, John Thompson, 1815-1838.
      247 items.

      Captain Henry Brown had many interests in his long life apart from the purely commercial activities upon which his considerable fortune was built. Included in this box are the papers relating to his other interests.

      • Box-folder 9:1
        Receipts and other papers collected by Henry Brown, Sheriff of Bedford County, 1820-1829.
      • Box-folder 9:2
        Accounts of subscriptions to the repair and improvement of New London Academy meeting house, Bedford County, 1815-1831.
      • Box-folder 9:3
        Records of Henry Brown, Treasurer of the New London agricultural Society, Bedford County, 1834-1836.
      • Box-folder 9:4
        Papers and records kept by Henry Brown, Executor of the estate of Daniel Brown, 1817-1838.
      • Box-folder 9:5
        Papers and records kept by Henry Brown, Executor of the estate of John Thompson, 1833-1837.
    • Box-folder 10
      Subseries D: Box 10 - Papers relating to Capt. Henry Brown's court suits connected with debts incurred at his stores, 1829-1840.
      176 items.

      Business papers of Henry Brown, not directly connected with any of his various business enterprises, but concerned principally with court suits involving debts to him. Included is an interesting case of Mark Anthony, who took the oath of an Insolvent Debtor, making out a deed of trust of all his property to his creditors (11 April 1829 and 6 July 1833).

      Also includes papers concerned with the suit of Henry Brown vs. Nicodemus Leftwich, 1832-1840. Brown pays for the attendance of witnesses at the court and pays the county Jailor "for imprisoning and releasing" Leftwich.

    • Box-folder 11
      Subseries E: Box 11 - Household and personal bills of Capt. Henry Brown, 1819-1841.
      193 items.

      Household, family and personal bills preserved by Henry Brown, an interesting collection of a family illustrating the activities of eight children in the second quarter of the nineteenth century, 1819-1841.

  • Box 12:1-69
    Correspondence of the immediate family of Capt. Henry Brown, including letters from his brothers, his daughters, and their respective spouses, 1797-1841.
    81 items.
    Subseries 2: Immediate Family of Capt. Henry Brown

    The personal correspondence of Henry Brown with his brothers, Samuel and Daniel, and his children. The correspondence between Henry Brown and his son, John Thompson Brown, is found in Boxes 14-19.

    Also letters from the sons and daughters of Samuel, brother of Henry Brown.

    In a separate group are collected letters written by Edward J. Steptoe, grandson of Henry Brown, from West Point Military Academy and from the Indian Wars in Florida, where he served after he was commissioned.

    • Box-folder 12:1
      Samuel Brown, Rockbridge, to his brother, Henry, 3 October 1797.

      Purchase of a watch in Winchester; requests 30 Dollars to repay a debt.

    • Box-folder 12:2
      Samuel Brown, Lexington, to Henry Brown, 6 June 1799.

      His wife's estate; purchase of a Negro girl.

    • Box-folder 12:3
      Samuel Brown to his niece, Nancy Brown, 10 March 1808.
    • Box-folder 12:4
      Daniel Brown, Franklin, to his brother, Henry Brown, 6 August 1811.

      On his return from the Spring; attack of "bilious Cholic;" his treatment.

    • Box-folder 12:5
      Samuel Brown to Henry Brown, 13 November 1813.

      Concerning "the purchase of some land at $20. per acre..."

    • Box-folder 12:6
      Samuel Brown, Brownsburg, to Henry Brown, 30 December 1814.

      Beats female slave, using a walking stick, his wife using a cowhide whip. The slave's mate attempted to protect her with an axe but he was subdued, beaten and sent to jail the next day. Hopes for peace, unpopularity of the conscription law and the whiskey tax.

    • Box-folder 12:7
      Mary Brown, Ann Smith Academy, to her father, Henry Brown, 2 August 1815.

      On her studies: Blair's lectures, piano playing, drawing, painting and embroidery.

    • Box-folder 12:8
      Will Steptoe, Bedford, to his sister-in-law, Mary Brown, 20 August 1815.

      The husband of Nancy Brown writes: "...Bounaparte is on his way to this country. If so I greatly fear we shall go backwards with accelerated velocity in all peaceful, literary and ornamental pursuits..."

    • Box-folder 12:9
      Daniel Brown to Henry Brown, [1817].

      Advice on a move to the State of Ohio. "Although I like Slavery as little as you or anyone else, still...I think it probable that we should be as unhappy as we are with them" (Daniel died in 1818. For the next 20 years Henry administered his estate for the benefit of his wife and children.)

    • Box-folder 12:10
      Samuel Clayton, Red Sulphur Springs, to his father-in-law Henry Brown, August-September 1818.
      3 letters.ALS.

      Mary Brown's illness at the Springs (she was to die within a year).

    • Box-folder 12:11
      Samuel Brown to Henry Brown, 6 October 1818.

      The building of his house and the health of his family.

    • Box-folder 12:12
      Lavinia A. Brown, Rockbridge, to Henry Brown, 6 November 1822.

      The daughter of Samuel Brown, writes to console her Uncle on the death of his brothers and his two daughters, Mrs. Anne [Nancy] B. Steptoeand Mrs. Mary [Polly] B. Clayton.

    • Box-folder 12:13
      Doctor's bill from Dr. Will Steptoe to the estate of James Jones, September 1824.
    • Box-folder 12:14
      James Morrison, Brownsburg, to Henry Brown, 11 October 1824.
    • Box-folder 12:15
      Samuel Brown, Greenbrier, to Henry Brown, Jr., 6 March 1825.

      An uncle of Henry Brown writes, "My grandson wishes to get in to Business in a store..." (Henry Brown, Jr. now has a store in Lynchburg.)

    • Box-folder 12:16
      Henry Brown, Jr., Deerwood, to Henry Brown, 14 August 1825.

      His continued bad health. The death of James Leftwich, Capt. Brown's business partner.

    • Box-folder 12:17
      J. C. Steptoe, to Henry Brown, 12 February 1826.

      Requests assistance in obtaining appointment as Clerk of Court at Bedford.

    • Box-folder 12:18
      James Williams, Liberty, Bedford County, to Samuel Clayton, 17 June 1826.
    • Box-folder 12:19
      Henry Brown, Jr., Deerwood, to Henry Brown, 20 January 1827.

      The value of the Deerwood tract.

    • Box-folder 12:20
      Dr. Will Steptoe to Henry Brown, 5 April 1828.
    • Box-folder 12:21
      James Morrison, Brownsburg, to Henry Brown, 22 July 1828.
    • Box-folder 12:22
      Frances Brown to her father, Capt. Henry Brown,

      Begs her father to let her have money to go to the inauguration of President Jackson.

    • Box-folder 12:23
      Frances Brown, Audley, to her father, 8 February 1829.

      On her visit to Washington: "this is the thickest settled neighborhood that I ever was in--the neighbors are situated all around, some in view and others not more than a quarter of a mile from the house..."

    • Box-folder 12:24
      Henry Brown, Jr., Audley, to Henry Brown, March, July 1829.

      On his visit with his brothers, John Thompson Brown, in "Washington City." Description of crowded Washington, full of pickpockets and of the confusion even in the President's house.

    • Box-folder 12:25
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, August 1830.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 12:26
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to Dr. Gustavus Rose, October 1830.
    • Box-folder 12:27
      Samuel Brown, Ft. Wayne, Indiana, to his father, Capt. Henry Brown, 17 October 1830.

      "...the last day I rode more than thirty miles through a dreary wilderness without seeing a single house...I am yet travelling alone and have come six hundred miles without a single man travelling my course..."

    • Box-folder 12:28
      Samuel (son of Samuel Brown), Princeton, New Jersey, to his uncle, Henry Brown, 1 January 1831.

      His progress in college.

    • Box-folder 12:29
      Rev. James M. Brown (son of Samuel Brown), near Martinsburg, to his uncle, Henry Brown, 3 January 1832.

      His progress in repaying a debt to the estate of his uncle, Daniel.

    • Box-folder 12:30
      Rev. J. M. Brown, near Martinsburg, to Henry Brown, 23 July 1833.
      ALS.

      Report of workers on the Chesapeake and Ohio canal dying from Cholera.

    • Box-folder 12:31
      Henry Brown, Jr. to Henry Brown,

      On the death of his maternal grandfather, John Thompson.

    • Box-folder 12:32
      Henry G. Brown (son of Samuel Brown) to his uncle, Capt. Henry Brown, 22 March 1834.
    • Box-folder 12:33
      Henry Brown, Jr., Red Sulphur Springs, to Henry Brown, March-August 1834.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 12:34
      Rev. S. Brown, Bath County, to Henry Brown, 8 April 1834.
    • Box-folder 12:35
      Henry Brown, Jr. to Henry Brown, 13 February [1835].

      Leaving for New York to lay in goods.

    • Box-folder 12:36
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg and New York, to Henry Brown, March-April 1836.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Hopes for his store despite illness and some hostile feeling toward his former partner, Ammon Hancock.

    • Box-folder 12:37
      Jesse Miller to [Henry Brown], 12 June 1836.

      On the death of Henry Brown. (Henry Brown, Jr. died while he and his wife were on a shopping trip for the store.)

    • Box-folder 12:38
      William Brown (son of Samuel Brown), Staunton, to Henry Brown, 30 July 1836.

      On the changing population: "The people still retain the simple manners of the old Scotch-Irish and, I may add, much of the intelligence and piety. But the restless spirit of emigration is taking away our best people and in their place we generally get Germans, who commonly are deplorably ignorant and will do very little toward supporting the Gospel."

    • Box-folder 12:39
      K. B. Townley, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, September-December 1836.
      2 letters.ALS.

      A Quaker associate of Henry Brown, Jr. writes to settle accounts and close the store.

    • Box-folder 12:40
      Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 10 October 1836.

      The widow of Henry Brown, Jr., writes of the disposal of her house.

    • Box-folder 12:41
      Dr. Will Steptoe to Edwin Robinson, 12 December 1836.

      To Frances Brown's husband, on the loss of her two brothers, "and such brothers too, in so short a time." (Henry Brown, Jr. died in June, 1836, and his brother, John Thompson Brown, in December of that same year.)

    • Box-folder 12:42
      Henry J. Brown (son of Samuel Brown) to Henry Brown, 15 December 1836.
    • Box-folder 12:43
      K. B. Townley, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, February 1837.
      2 letters.ALS.

      On the sale of merchandise and an expected loss.

    • Box-folder 12:44
      P. Echols, Inn-holder at New London, to Henry Brown, 9 May 1837.

      Agrees to furnish Gould B. Raymond, manager of the Menagerie Co., lodging for 30 men, 65 horses, 1 elephant, 1 camel and 2 ponies.

    • Box-folder 12:45
      Mrs. M[ary] E. Brown, Petersburg, to Mrs. Edwin [Frances B.] Robinson,

      The inscription on the tomb of her late husband, John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 12:46
      Mrs. E[leanor]to Miss Alice Brown, [May] 1837.

      The widow of Henry Brown, Jr., writes of the death of her husband a year ago.

    • Box-folder 12:47
      Mrs. F[rances B. Robinson]to her father, Henry Brown, n.d.
      ALS.
    • Box-folder 12:48
      Mrs. Mary E. Brown to her father-in-law, Henry Brown, 27 January 1838.

      The widow of John Thompson Brown writes regarding her three sons.

    • Box-folder 12:49
      Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 24 April 1838.
    • Box-folder 12:50
      S. H. Guiland, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 10 May 1838.
      ALS.

      The executor of an estate demands payment of a note on which Henry Brown, Jr. was a cosigner.

    • Box-folder 12:51
      Mrs. Alice [Brown Worthington], Richmond and Georgetown, to Henry Brown, March-June 1839.
      2 letters.ALS.

      The youngest daughter of Henry Brown writes about her marriage and the first meeting with her new relatives.

    • Box-folder 12:52
      William Brown (son of Samuel), Staunton, to Henry Brown, 25 April 1839.
    • Box-folder 12:53
      W. W. Worthington, Richmond, to Henry Brown, 15 June 1839.

      On his marriage to Alice Brown.

    • Box-folder 12:54
      Mrs. A[lice B.] Worthington, Cincinnati, to her sister Mrs. Alexander [Lockie T. Brown] Irvine, 14 November 1839.

      Her wedding trip to New Orleans.

    • Box-folder 12:55
      Mrs. A. B. Worthington, New Orleans, to Henry Brown, 12 December 1839.

      Her sickness on the way down the river due to fresh paint in the boat.

    • Box-folder 12:56
      Daniel Brown (son of Samuel), Laporte, Indiana, to Alexander Irvine, 25 December 1839.
    • Box-folder 12:57
      Rev. James Mitchell Setter to Henry Brown, n.d.

      Concerning eventual conversion of Baptists to the Presbyterian Church.

    • Box-folder 12:58
      Mrs. Frances [B. Robinson]to her father, Henry Brown, 8 January [1840].
    • Box-folder 12:59
      Mrs. Alice (Brown) W[orthington]at Georgetown to Henry Brown, 20 April [1840].
      3 pages.ALS.

      "...I left New Orleans the 28th of March and reach G[eorge].T[own]. The 15th of April...Sam (Brown) was in New Orleans the day before I left-he was not married but expected to be the 9th of April."

    • Box-folder 12:60
      W. W. Worthington, Georgetown, to Henry Brown, 17 July 1840.

      "Last evening our darling Alice made me the happy father of a fine boy..."

    • Box-folder 12:61
      Mrs. Alice Worthington, Georgetown, to Henry Brown, 8 May 1841.
    • Box-folder 12:62-63
      Three undated items: Account of Samuel White with Witt and Dow, "Definition of Oratory," and "Breathing," n.d.
    • Box-folder 12:64
      E. J. Steptoe, West Point, to Dr. Wm. Steptoe at New London, 10 December 1833.

      Report to his father of his first grades at the Academy.

    • Box-folder 12:65
      E. J. Steptoe, West Point, to Henry Brown, 25 January 1834.

      To his grandfather regarding his first term marks.

    • Box-folder 12:66
      E. J. Steptoe, West Point, to his stepmother and father, November 1834.
      3 items.ALS.

      "The first two years of our course are exclusively devoted to Mathematics and French..." Encloses a work sheet and "Synopsis of the Course of Studies at the Military Academy."

    • Box-folder 12:67
      E. J. Steptoe, Oklawaka River and St. Augustine, Flordia, to Dr. Wm. Steptoe, January-February 1838.
      2 letters.ALS.

      "The Congress must get rid of its 'sickly sympathy' (with the Indians) or, rely upon it, this is a war of years to come." Gives a vivid description of St. Augustine.

    • Box-folder 12:68
      E. J. Steptoe, Rose's Landing, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; and off Cape Hatteras, July-November 1838.
      3 letters.ALS.

      Contrasts the Cherokees in Tennessee with the Seminoles of Florida. Describes Savannah in a letter enclosed, dated February 16, 1839.

    • Box-folder 12:69
      Typescript copies of letters of E. J. Steptoe. 1826-1838.
      8 letters. Total of 12 pages.Typescript.
  • Box 13:1-71
    Children of Capt. Henry Brown - Letters of Henry Brown, Jr. and Samuel T. Brown, 1822-1856.
    128 items.
    Subseries 3: Children of Capt. Henry Brown

    Letters of Henry Brown, Jr., oldest son of Capt. Henry Brown; Samuel Thompson Brown, youngest son; and other members of the immediate family.

    Henry Brown, Jr., who suffered a grave illness in 1822 as a result of which he almost lost his eyesight, went into the partnership of his father with Amman Hancock. In 1835-1836, he opened his own store in Lynchburg, but died in May 1836, while on a buying trip to New York. Interesting items in this part of the collection include a 44 page book of mineral and chemical notes (31 July 1826), a 56 page diary kept by Henry Brown, Jr. on his trip abroad (24 July 1831), drafts of letters by Henry Brown, Jr. to newspapers regarding horses, and instructions for horse care, and the like (13 April 1835-March 1836). The will of Henry Brown, Jr. (May-December 1830), and his deathbed statement dictated to his wife (May 1836), are also included.

    The papers of Samuel Thompson Brown include the card which announced the opening of his law office in Bedford (8 May 1838), records of his marriage in Alabama (27 April 1840), and the death of his wife within the year (3 April 1841). A letter of 22 January 1842, mentions the business failures taking place in Richmond and Lynchburg, and one of 27 August of the same year comments on the national political situation which is "sadly out of joint." In a letter of 20 September [1845], there is a report of "the thefts which were perpetrated by Thomas H. Benton whilst a student at Chapel Hill."

    • Box-folder 13:1
      Henry Brown, Jr., White Sulphur Springs, to his father, Capt. Henry Brown, 9 July 1822.

      "My eyes appear to have improved gradually." (His ailment seemed to be at its worst at this time, though he continued to suffer from the ailment until his death in 1836 at the age of 39 years.)

    • Box-folder 13:2
      Henry Brown, Jr. to Henry Brown, [1823].
    • Box-folder 13:3
      Henry Brown, Jr., to Farmer's Bank of Virginia, 4 June 1824.

      A note for $1000.00. At this time he was getting started in the store, Hancock and Brown Co.

    • Box-folder 13:4
      Henry Brown, Jr., White Sulphur Springs, to Henry Brown, 9 August 1824.
    • Box-folder 13:5
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, [1825].
    • Box-folder 13:6
      Henry Brown, Jr. to Henry Brown, 27 February [1826].

      The "most favorable accounts" of John Thompson Brown from the members of the House of Delegates.

    • Box-folder 13:7
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to Henry Brown,
      2 letters.ALS.

      Concerning the business of Col. [Mark] Anthony, in which Henry Brown, Jr. appears to be involved.

    • Box-folder 13:8
      Court cost vouchers, of Sam Clayton vs. Mark Anthony, March 1826.
      2 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 13:9
      Henry Brown, Jr. Mineral and chemical notes, etc., 31 July 1826.
      44 pages.
    • Box-folder 13:10
      Successive wills of Henry Brown, Jr., 22 May, 29 July, 25 December 1830.
      3 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 13:11
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to Henry Brown.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Mentions the marriage of John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:12
      J. Burton Harrison, Lynchburg, to Monsieur Niles, in Paris, 21 July 1831.

      A letter of introduction for Henry Brown, Jr., for use on his trip to England and the Continent in that year.

    • Box-folder 13:13
      Travel notebook of Henry Brown, Jr., 24 July 1831.
      56 pages.
    • Box-folder 13:14
      Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown to her husband, Henry Brown, Jr. on his trip, October-November 1831.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "Oh, my dear husband, why was it that I did not accompany you?" (None of these letters reached Henry Brown, Jr. on the trip, but followed him home).

    • Box-folder 13:15
      Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown to Henry Brown, [October] 1831.

      News from a letter she received from Henry Brown, Jr. in England.

    • Box-folder 13:16
      George Tucker, University [of Virginia], to Henry Brown, Jr., January 1832.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Payment of his debts in Lynchburg; hiring out of a slave.

    • Box-folder 13:17
      Henry Brown, Jr. to Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown, 8 December 1832.

      "it's really a sad case for me, to be sick from home and away from all that (are) Dear to me..."

    • Box-folder 13:18
      Accounts of Samuel T. Brown, in account with Hancock and Brown, 3 April 1833.
      4 items.AD.

      This was the store in Lynchburg in which Henry Brown was a partner and with which Henry Brown, Jr. was associated until he opened his own store in 1835.

    • Box-folder 13:19
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, May 1834.
      3 letters.ALS.

      Brother-in-law, Jack [Willcox]; his brother, John's speech on the Petersburg Rail Road; and the house that Henry Brown has vacated in Lynchburg.

    • Box-folder 13:20
      Henry Brown, Jr., Deerwood, to Henry Brown, [1834].

      On a debt of Thomas Williams.

    • Box-folder 13:21
      Letters, advertisements etc. concerning horses, 1835.
      18 items.
    • Box-folder 13:22
      Letter to "Mssrs. Editors," concerning Virginia geological formations, [1835].
    • Box-folder 13:23
      Lists and memoranda, [1835].
      2 items.ADr.

      Appear to refer to pictures, and may date from the time of one of the buying trips that Henry Brown, Jr. made with his wife.

    • Box-folder 13:24
      "Henry Brown, Jr.," February 1836.

      After breaking from the partnership of Hancock and Brown, he opened his own store.

    • Box-folder 13:25
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, [March] 1836.
      ALS. Cover lost.

      Concerning the care for his horses, Young American Eclipse and Spring Hill, while he is away.

    • Box-folder 13:26
      Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown, Philadelphia and New York, to Capt. Henry Brown, April-May 1836.
      3 letters.ALS.

      Written while she and her husband were on a buying trip for the Lynchburg store. In New York Henry Brown, Jr. was taken desperately ill and died.

    • Box-folder 13:27
      Deathbed statement of Henry Brown, Jr., unsigned and undated, [May] 1836.

      Evidently taken down by Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown during the final days in New York.

    • Box-folder 13:28
      K. B. Townley, Lynchburg, to Samuel L. Brown, July, October 1836.
      3 letters.ALS.

      An associate of Henry Brown, Jr. in the Lynchburg store, was liquidating the stock and selling horses in order to settle the estate.

    • Box-folder 13:29
      Profile to accompany the Geological Reconnoisance of the State of Virginia by Prof. Wm. B. Rogers, 1836.
    • Box-folder 13:30
      Capt. Henry Brown in account with the estate of Henry Brown, Jr., 7 January 1837.
    • Box-folder 13:31
      Samuel T. B[rown]to Henry Brown, 3 May 1837.

      A note regarding the settlement of the Henry Brown, Jr. estate.

    • Box-folder 13:32
      Henry Guilford Brown, Brownsburg, to his mother, Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown, August 1837.

      Written from school, with endorsement by James Morrison, schoolmaster.

    • Box-folder 13:33
      "A Description of the Departure of some of the Pilgrims for the Celestial City (vide Pilgrims Progress)," [1837].

      Signed Eleanor C. L. Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:34
      Calling card of Samuel T. Brown, Attorney, 8 May 1838.
    • Box-folder 13:35
      Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown to her son, H. Guilford Brown, 24 May 1838.
    • Box-folder 13:36
      Sam. H. Garland, Lynchburg, to Samuel T. Brown, 25 May 1838.
    • Box-folder 13:37
      E[dward] L. Steptoe, Fort Payne, Alabama, to Samuel T. Brown, 28 July 1838.
    • Box-folder 13:38
      Charge slips to Samuel T. Brown for failing to attend army musters between 1829 and 1839, 1839.
      10 items.PDS.
    • Box-folder 13:39
      W. W. Worthington, New Orleans, to his brother-in-law, Samuel T. Brown, 27 April 1840.

      Congratulating S. T. B. on his marriage.

    • Box-folder 13:40
      Mrs. Mary E. Brown, Walnut Hill, to her sister-in-law, Mrs. Alexander Irvine, 22 June 1840.

      Writes of the aged John Vaughan Willcox, her father, with whom she is living and for whom she is caring; Samuel T. Brown and his "youthful bride."

    • Box-folder 13:41
      Draft of a statement of Henry Brown and Samuel T. Brown to Micajah Davis, Jr., concerning the estate of Henry Brown, Jr., 3 November 1840.
    • Box-folder 13:42
      Samuel T. Brown, Louisville, to his father, Henry Brown, 15 November 1840.

      His extended wedding trip; description of Gen Harrison's house.

    • Box-folder 13:43
      Court cost voucher recording transfer of 400 acres from Henry Brown to Samuel T. Brown, with tax receipt, 1840.
      2 items.PDS.
    • Box-folder 13:44
      Angile Ede Vendit, Spring Hill, to Mrs. Caroline C. [Samuel T.] Brown, 28 January 1841.
    • Box-folder 13:45
      A. Henry to Miss Mary Nicholson, care of Judge Crawford at St. Stephens, Alabama, 3 April 1841.

      Consolations upon the death of Mrs. Samuel T. Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:46
      Letters received by Susan Crawford, St. Stephens, Alabama, May-June 1841.
      3 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 13:47
      J. E. Sawyer, Greensboro, to Samuel T. Brown, May-June 1841.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Condolences upon the death of Mrs. Samuel T. Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:48
      Mrs. Alice [Brown] Worthingtonto her brother, Samuel T. Brown, 19 May 1841.

      A letter of consolation.

    • Box-folder 13:49
      S. Mordecai, Mobile, to [Samuel Brown], 8 June 1841.
    • Box-folder 13:50
      Mrs. Frances [Brown] Robinsonto her brother, Samuel T. Brown at St. Stephens, Alabama, 22 January 1842.
    • Box-folder 13:51
      Ed. Robinson, Baltimore, to Samuel T. Brown, February-April 1842.
      5 letters.ALS.

      On the death of W. W. Worthington, brother-in-law of Samuel T. Brown. "Your sister Alice is desirous of your attention to the affairs of Mr. W. in New Orleans prior to your return to Virginia."

    • Box-folder 13:52
      [Judge] Wm. Crawford, St. Stephens, Alabama, to Wm. Grimes, Clerk of the County Court of Washington, 10 March 1842.

      Recording certain deeds for his son-in-law, Samuel T. Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:53
      J. E. Sawyer, Greensboro, Louisiana, to Samuel T. Brown, New London, Virginia, 27 August 1842.
    • Box-folder 13:54
      Samuel T. Brown(?). Unsigned and undated draft, n.d.

      Written to his overseer with whom he has quarreled.

    • Box-folder 13:55
      Alice Worthington, Richmond, to Samuel T. Brown, 3 January 1843.
    • Box-folder 13:56
      E. Patterson to Samuel T. Brown, 29 September 1843.
    • Box-folder 13:57
      T. W. F. Crawford, St. Stephens, Alabama, to Samuel T. Brown, 14 October 1843.
    • Box-folder 13:58
      Virginia Pegrune, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, 13 February 1845.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 13:59a
      E. Irvine, Rocky Mount, Virginia, to Samuel T. Brown, 20 September 1845.

      On the fees paid by Henry Brown in the Leftwich case: "between twenty and twenty-five dollars for my services as an attorney." On the thefts "perpetrated by Thomas H. Benton whilst a student at Chapel Hill."

    • Box-folder 13:59b
      Agreement between Beverage Hughes and David Wright for the payment of a debt, 23 September 1845.
    • Box-folder 13:60
      Samuel T. Brown. Drafts of a letter to Mark Andrews, [August] 1847.
      2 items.ADrS.

      Concerning the cutting of trees on the property of Samuel T. Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:61
      M. Andrews to Samuel T. Brown. 31 August 1847.

      A reply to the above letter, Box-Folder 13:60.

    • Box-folder 13:62
      Mrs. Alice Worthington to her brother, Samuel T. Brown, 17 February 1848.
    • Box-folder 13:63
      Receipt to Samuel T. Brown from Broods and Bell, 13 May 1848.
    • Box-folder 13:64
      Wm. T. Yancey, Lynchburg, to Samuel T. Brown, 30 October 1848.

      On a charge of Ammon Hancock against the estate of Henry Brown, Jr.

    • Box-folder 13:65
      [Samuel T. Brown] to Alice [Worthington], 20 December 1848.
    • Box-folder 13:66
      J. H. Hopkins, Richmond, to Edwin Robinson, 12 March 1849.

      Estimate for the cost of the construction of a bridge.

    • Box-folder 13:67
      Receipt to Samuel T. Brown for postal expenses, April-June, 1849, signed H. Stevens, 29 June 1849.
    • Box-folder 13:68
      August Leftwich, Lynchburg, to Samuel T. Brown, July-October 1849.
      4 letters.ALS.

      On the property in Mobile, Alabama, purchased by Samuel T. Brown.

    • Box-folder 13:69
      W. H. Haxable, Richmond, to Samuel T. Brown, July-November 1849.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 13:70
      W. H. Haxable, Richmond, to Samuel T. Brown, March-April 1850.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 13:71
      Edward Robinson, Richmond, to his brother-in-law, Samuel T. Brown, February-March 1856.
      3 letters.ALS.

      The sale of a female slave "with her Brood."

Group C: John Thompson Brown Papers, 1816-1839.
Box: 14-19
6 boxes.
Series 3: Group C

Papers concern John Thompson Brown's attendance at Princeton, study of law, and trips to the South and to the West Indies. Includes speeches and correspondence as well as his published writings (newspaper articles, bills and pamphlets). The collection emphasizes his political career in the Virginia House of Delegates including his views on slavery. Also includes architectural plans for a two room house and elevations (1827), drafts of toasts and letters concerning his fight with John Hampden Pleasants.

Prominent correspondents include William Segar Archer, James Murray Mason, John Hampden Pleasants, William Cabell Rives, Henry St. George Tucker and John Tyler.

  • Box-folder 14:1-30
    Subseries 1: Box 14 - Papers of John Thompson Brown, son of Capt. Henry Brown; attendance at New London Academy; of his schooling at Princeton (1817-1820); his travels to the West Indies; his legal training under Judge Creed Taylor; arid his trip to Clarksburg, where he set up practice. Also bound scrapbook of his letters printed in newspapers, and speeches made in the General Assembly of Virginia, 1816-1832.
    62 items.

    John Thompson Brown (1802-1836) was born at Otter Hills, near Bedford, Virginia and was the son of Henry Brown (1760-1841). He attended the New London Academy, 1816; studied at Princeton, 1817-1820; traveled to the South and the West Indies, 1821; and studied law with Judge Creed Taylor in Cumberland County, Virginia, 1822-1823. He began his law practice in Clarksburg, Virginia (later West Virginia), in 1824, and represented Harrison County in the House of Delegates, 1827-1830. He was a member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830. He married Mary E. Willcox June, 1830, and moved to Petersburg, where he again was elected to the General Assembly, 1831-1836. He was a delegate to the national convention of the Republican (now Democratic) Party, but died on 20 November 1836, at his father's home, Otter Hills, after a brief illness.

    The first two letters in Box 14 date from the period of his attendance at New London Academy; then follow the papers relating to Princeton, where he matriculated in 1817 at the age of 19. He was placed in the Sophomore Class on the basis of an examination before the faculty, and received the highest mark given at the College, in each of the three years he spent at the College. His report sheets show the requirements for entrance, lists of courses, and contain a resolution passed by the trustees which condemned the sharp practices of the merchants in town.

    Some of the correspondence of John Thompson Brown with his brother-in-law Dr. William B. Steptoe in this period is interesting for the comments it contains on the Missouri question and other matters then being debated in the U.S. Senate. The remarks made by John Thompson Brown in letters from his collegiate period may be compared with his statements on the subject of slavery later made on the floor of the House of Delegates.

    After graduating from Princeton, John Thompson Brown traveled to the South, and made a brief trip to the West Indies, keeping notes on his impressions. Upon his return he took up the study of law with Judge Taylor. From this period come interesting musings on such subjects as "the family fireside," "youthful recollection," "friendship," and "behavior of a lawyer if he is to succeed." His license to practice law, dated 7 March 1824, is included in the collection. He journeyed to Clarksburg, Virginia, to set up his law practice, and kept a notebook on the trip West which reveal his first impressions of the Clarksburg area.

    At the end of this box is a scrapbook containing some of his published writings, speeches, and newspaper articles.

    • Box-folder 14:1
      James H. Otey, Mount Prospect, to John [Thompson] Brown, 6 December 1816.

      Letter from a schoolboy friend regarding New London Academy.

    • Box-folder 14:2
      Ann T. Brown to her brother, Henry Brown, in Franklin County, [1816].

      John Thompson Brown's examinations at the New London Academy.

    • Box-folder 14:3
      John [Thompson Brown], Princeton, New Jersey, to Henry Brown, 4 November 1817.

      "I have just been examined by the faculty and am admitted to the Sophomore Class, which is the second in the college." His expenses are estimated at $200.00 for the first term and $90.00 for the second. "I will pledge myself not to spend one cent more than is really necessary."

    • Box-folder 14:4
      Dr. William B. Steptoe, New London, to his brother-in-law, John Thompson Brown, November-December 1817.
      2 letters.ALS.

      News from home; a rumor that some boys were expelled from Chapel Hill for their politics.

    • Box-folder 14:5
      Dr. William B. Steptoe, New London, to John Thompson Brown, January-November 1818.
      6 letters.ALS.

      Medical advice; a suggested teacher for New London Academy ("Has he energy enough manage southern students?"); the death of Polly [Mrs. Mary Brown Clayton], sister of John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 14:6
      Dr. William B. Steptoe, New London, to John Thompson Brown, 21 March 1818.

      The political upheaval at William and Mary College; deputies appointed "...to fix upon the site of the Virginia University."

    • Box-folder 14:7
      John Thompson Brown, Princeton, to his father, Henry Brown, May-October 1818.
      4 letters.ALS.

      "My expenses have far exceeded what was necessary or what you expect. I now see my error and repent..." Three months later he offers to leave school because of his additional debts. Later in Baltimore, he is robbed of $200.00. His father adds up the year's expenses to a total of $670.00.

    • Box-folder 14:8
      Report of John Thompson Brown of the sophomore class, Princeton, New Jersey, to Henry Brown, 29 September 1818.

      Behavior, No. 1. distinguished; Industry, No. 1. distinguished; Scholarship, No. 1. distinguished (1) "If under the article scholarship, a student is marked No. 1 distinguished (1), he is considered as ranking among the first in his class." (From printed explanation of the report.)

    • Box-folder 14:9
      James H. Otey, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to John Thompson Brown, January-September 1819.
      2 letters.ALS.

      "Once the busy scene of commercial enterprise...now lifeless and inactive." Concerning Lynchburg.

    • Box-folder 14:10
      Dr. William B. Steptoe, New London, to John Thompson Brown, January-December 1819.
      5 letters.ALS.

      The University of Virginia is established at Charlottesville with an annual appropriation of $15,000; news of a threat of slave uprisings in Fredericksburg.

    • Box-folder 14:11
      Report of John Thompson Brown of the junior class at Princeton, New Jersey to Henry Brown, 14 April, 29 September 1819.
      2 reports.PDS.

      Similar reports to that of 1818. Warning is added to the September report concerning excessive expenditures by students: "the trustees of the college give this notice to the parents and guardians of the youth, that they ought to pay no debt contracted in this town, which they have not specifically authorized."

    • Box-folder 14:12
      List of the names of members of the class, n.d.

      Endorsed: "Collegians mei consocui." He knew 162 fellow students.

    • Box-folder 14:13
      John Thompson Brown, Princeton, to Dr. William B. Steptoe, 28 January 1820.

      On the "present session of Congress."

    • Box-folder 14:14
      J. H. Otey, Chapel Hill, to John Thompson Brown, January-May 1820.
      4 letters.ALS.

      Rumor of a great rebellion that has taken place at Princeton; the Missouri question.

    • Box-folder 14:15
      Report of John Thompson Brown of the senior class of Princeton; to [Henry Brown], 11 April 1820.
    • Box-folder 14:16
      Dr. William B. Steptoe, New London, to John Thompson Brown, 29 July 1820.

      A 4th of July oration supporting the idea of colonizing the free Negroes in Africa.

    • Box-folder 14:17
      Travel book kept by John Thompson Brown on his trip to the South, January [1821].
      15 pages.AD.
    • Box-folder 14:18
      John Thompson Brown, New Orleans, to his brother, Henry Brown, Jr., 14 January 1821.

      "My father may justly complain of the great sums which he has expended on me, but his kindness shall not be abused much longer, as I hope to be in a situation to support myself." Endorsed: "Brother J.--after his return from Princeton went South--through the Cherokee Nation [Alabama and Georgia] to Pensacola, and on to New Orleans--thence to Cuba and returned to U. States in the U.S. Frigate 'Hornet,' as a guest of the officers. Samuel T. Brown."

    • Box-folder 14:19
      John Thompson Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 27 May 1823.

      A gambling scrape he was involved in; asks his father's forgiveness.

    • Box-folder 14:20
      John Thompson Brown, Needham, to Henry Brown, 10 November 1823.

      "Chancellor Taylor has been of incalculable service to me in the study of law." (Needham was a law school operated by Judge Creed Taylor in Cumberland County in the years 1821-1836.)

    • Box-folder 14:21
      [John Thompson Brown,] Lynchburg, to Peronneau [Finley]; continued, July 8, 1831, Petersburg, 25 April 1822.

      These are the continuous drafts of a multiple of letters. The first section consists of musings and youthful recollections; the second is a humorous report on a 4th of July oration made in Petersburg after his marriage.

    • Box-folder 14:22
      Alex. M. Jackson, at New London, to John Thompson Brown, "Student in the Law School, near Farmville," 24 July 1823.

      Regarding the marriage of Dr. Steptoe.

    • Box-folder 14:23
      John Thompson Brown's notes made at Judge Taylor's Law School, n.d.
    • Box-folder 14:24
      License of John Thompson Brown to practice law in the superior and inferior courts of this Commonwealth (Virginia), 7 March 1824.
    • Box-folder 14:25
      [John Thompson Brown], Otter Hills, to P. Finley, 20 May 1824.

      Musings on Friendship and the wise behavior of a lawyer if he is to succeed.

    • Box-folder 14:26
      [Judge] C[reed] Taylor, Lynchburg, to [Henry] St. George Tucker, at Winchester, 23 May 1824.

      A letter introducing John Thompson Brown when he went to Clarksburg to set up practice.

    • Box-folder 14:27
      John Thompson Brown's notebook, [June-November] 1824.
      44 pages.

      Musings written on a trip through Virginia: thoughts on a disappointing love affair; notes on "Crab Orchard" and the "Creek Nation" --the latter were to be incorporated into an Independence Day address delivered in Petersburg in 1831.

    • Box-folder 14:28
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, June-December 1824.
      3 letters.ALS.

      Impressions of Clarksburg; the countryside is beautiful and the land very rich, but "The people have no money and are wretchedly poor and lazy..."

    • Box-folder 14:29
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., 20 August 1824.

      His plans to establish himself.

    • Box-folder 14:30
      Published Writings And Speeches Of John Thompson Brown, 1825-1832.

      The following newspaper clippings and pamphlets are included in a bound scrap book, with endorsements and were undoubtedly collected by John Thompson Brown himself.

      • Box-folder 14:30
        For the Clarksburg Intelligencer, Crawford and Adams, signed "Paul," [1825].
      • Box-folder 14:30
        For the Clarksburg Intelligencer, signed "Jacob," n.d.

        Concerning "several cases of contempt of court, occurring in various parts of the Union, in which the punishment inflicted, has been made a subject of grievous complaint."

      • Box-folder 14:30
        For the Intelligencer, signed "Alexander," n.d.

        Concerning "...Mr. Jefferson...the disclosure of his poverty..."

      • Box-folder 14:30
        Clarksburg, Virginia For the Intelligencer, signed "Phocion," 17 December 1825.

        Concerning "The President's message."

      • Box-folder 14:30
        Report of a committee, Appointed to enquire into the nature and extent of the evils arising from the present unsettled state of Land Titles on the Western Waters of Virginia, 1827-1828.
      • Box-folder 14:30
        Virginia Legislature, Speech of Mr. Brown, of Harrison, in Committee of the Whole, Jan. 13th, Saturday, 31 January 1829.
      • Box-folder 14:30
        Virginia Legislature, 12 January 1830.

        A Bill authorizing a loan of $6,000.00 on the credit of the state, for the construction of Turnpike Road from Winchester to Parkersburg by way of Clarksburg, being under consideration.

      • Box-folder 14:30
        To "A Voter," 10 August 1831.

        "Sir:--I have read in the "Intelligencer" of the 9th inst. your communications to the Editors of the paper, in which you remark, substantially, that the only Candidate to represent the town of Petersburg in the General Assembly is a stranger to most voters...Not doubting that I am the person alluded to...," signed John Thompson Brown"

      • Box-folder 14:30
        Petersburg. Slave Mechanics, 8 November 1831.

        "The following copy of a Petition to the Legislature of Virginia, we insert at the request of a number of our Citizens."

      • Box-folder 14:30
        House of Delegates of Virginia, 11-18 January 1832.
        32 pages.

        "On motion of Mr. Brown of Petersburg, the report of the committee on slaves, free Negroes and mulattoes, and the amendment of Mr. Preston were taken up; when Mr. Brown rose and addressed the house as follows:..."

      • Box-folder 14:30
        Virginia Legislature. House of Delegates. Petersburg Railroad, 13 February 1832.

        "The bill to amend an act authorizing the Board of Public Works to subscribe on behalf of the Commonwealth, to the stock of the Petersburg Rail Road, was read a third time. Mr. Brown said..."

      • Box-folder 14:30
        The Caucus, 15 March 1832.

        "Andrew Jackson was unanimously recommended to the Citizens of Virginia, as the next President. "Mr. Miller of Powhatan then submitted the following Resolution..."(Concerning the Vice-President). Mr. Brown of Petersburg, then submitted the following by way of substitute for the above..."

  • Box-folder 15:1-39
    Subseries 2: Box 15 - Correspondence of John Thompson Brown while establishing himself in Clarksburg, and while representing Harrison County in the General Assembly, 1825-1829.
    66 items.

    The material in this box covers the period 1825 to 1829, when John Thompson Brown was resident of Clarksburg, Harrison County, Virginia (later West Virginia). In this period John Thompson Brown wrote some of the "Letters to the Editor," printed in the Clarksburg Enquirer, contained in the scrap book noted above in Box 14. A draft of a part of the letter concerning the poverty of Mr. Jefferson is to be found in this box (1825).

    In July 1826, John Thompson Brown wrote to his brother Henry Brown, Jr. of his aim to run for the U.S. Congress. In 1827 he was elected to the House of Delegates; he was re-elected in 1828 and 1829. This box also contains various printed and manuscript material touching upon his career in the General Assembly.

    By the end of 1829, John Thompson Brown had established himself in Clarksburg, built a house, and planned to buy into a partnership in a store to advance his financial position. In a letter of March 23, 1829 he mentions his desire to run in the next election for the U.S. Congress.

    • Box-folder 15:1
      Henry Brown, Jr., New London, to his brother, John Thompson Brown, 20 February 1825.

      "...the friends of Old Hickory...hear Adamses success spoken of and the probability of Clay's being made Secretary of State..."

    • Box-folder 15:2
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to his father, Henry Brown, 2 September 1825.

      Encloses a legal opinion concerning sheriffs, which his father apparently requested.

    • Box-folder 15:3
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Wm. P[eronneau] Finley, Charlestown, South Carolina, 20 December 1825.

      A flowery letter to an old friend from Princeton. "I have acquired some little reputation at the bar and a practice that supports me very decently."

    • Box-folder 15:4
      John Thompson Brown. "Mon Debut," [1825].

      Draft of an address to an investigating group (perhaps a grand jury), with endorsement: "1. Act against cutting down trees. 2. Act providing for a good and sufficient jail."

    • Box-folder 15:5
      Draft of a letter to the editor, [1825].

      This is part of a printed letter concerning "Mr. Jefferson the disclosure of his poverty..." over the signature Alexander. (See bound scrapbook, the last item in Box 14.)

    • Box-folder 15:6
      Henry Brown, Jr., Woodlawn, to Henry Brown, 10 July 1826.

      Desire of John Thompson Brown to run for the U.S. Congress or for a seat in the General Assembly. Suggests that Henry Brown send $1,000.00 to help achieve this.

    • Box-folder 15:7
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., 8 November 1826.

      "I find that there is a serious and, I believe, a somewhat general wish to bring me out for the Legislature."

    • Box-folder 15:8
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, 15 December 1826.

      "I am a candidate for the Legislature at the next election..."

    • Box-folder 15:9
      John Thompson Brown. "To the People of Harrison County," 9 February 1827.

      An announcement of the candidacy of John Thompson Brown for the General Assembly. He reviews what he considers to be the most important problems of the day, and discusses (1) the invasion of State sovereignty by the Federal program of "internal development," (2) the harm done to Southern farmers by import duties, (3) the calling of a Constitutional Convention for the state of Virginia, (4) the dangers of the uncontrolled banking system.

    • Box-folder 15:10
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg and Richmond, to Capt. Henry Brown, April-December 1827.
      4 letters.ALS.

      His election to the General Assembly; hope of election to the U.S. Congress, and the purchase of a four acre lot in town. In the first letter which John Thompson Brown wrote from the House of Delegates he said "I have not taken much part in the debates of the House and do not expect to do so..."

    • Box-folder 15:11
      Note regarding a report in the Richmond Enquirer "in regard to the question whether Clinton or Calhoun should run as Vice-President on the Jackson ticket," 25 September 1827.
    • Box-folder 15:12
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., 9 December 1827.

      His ride to Richmond in a coach with other, more experienced law-makers, "having been, as you predicted, greatly edified and instructed by a coach-full of legislators 'big with the cares of state."

    • Box-folder 15:13
      Report Of A Committee, Appointed To Enquire Into The Nature And Extent Of The Evils Arising From The Present Unsettled State Of Land Titles On The Western Waters Of Virginia, And To Devise A Remedy Therefor, With Leave To Report A Bill Or Otherwise, [1827-1828].
      6 pages. 2 copies.
    • Box-folder 15:14
      A Bill, For Settling And Adjusting The Titles Of Lands On The Western Waters Of Virginia, [1827-1828].
      3 copies.
    • Box-folder 15:15
      Draft of a petition of Anne Quinlin to the General Assembly for a divorce, [1827].
    • Box-folder 15:16
      Draft of a petition of Edith Cornwall, [1827].
    • Box-folder 15:17
      Drawing of a two room house, [1827-1830].
    • Box-folder 15:18
      House plans and draft of explanations of a plan, [1827-1830].
      4 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 15:19
      House plan, elevations, and draft of notes on construction, [1825-1830].
      4 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 15:20
      R. H. Toler, Secretary, Lynchburg Colonization Society, to John Thompson Brown, 1 January 1828.

      "Resolving that members of the House of Delegates be requested to unite...in advancing the cause of this Society before the General Assembly of Virginia."

    • Box-folder 15:21
      Henry Brown, Jr., in Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, 5 February 1828.

      On John Thompson Brown's speech: "considered the most able one that had been delivered in the House in 5 years."

    • Box-folder 15:22
      R. R. Gurley, Colonization Society of Washington, to John Thompson Brown, 19 February 1828.

      "Our Society, in the success of which, you are pleased to express so deep an interest, is I believe, making sure progress."

    • Box-folder 15:23
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to William Peronneau Finley, 1 March 1828.

      His legislature activities and speeches. "I am a Jackson man like yourself but not perfectly orthodox, as you would say, on the subject of States Rights. I published my opinions, pamphlet of 30 pages, 12 months ago and will send you a copy..."

    • Box-folder 15:24
      John Tho. Brown To The People Of Harrison[County], n.d.
      Physical Location: Removed from this collection and catalogued in the Rare Books Deptartment F 247 H3B73. The second copy is located in the Rare Books Department - Virginia, under the same call number as above.
      17 pages.

      A report to his constituents on such matters as (1) the state Constitutional Convention, (2) the lottery for the Randolph Academy in Clarksburg, (3) county elections, (4) the bill abolishing the chancery Courts and establishing a Superior Court, (5) a Turnpike to their area (defeated by the "Eastern People"), (6) the proposed Baltimore Railroad and (7) the settling of the question of land titles in Western Virginia. Included in the pamphlet are the full texts of the report of the committee on this subject, which he chaired, and the bill proposed by the committee.

    • Box-folder 15:25
      Henry St. George Tucker, Winchester, to John Thompson Brown, 12 March 1828.

      Comment on the land titles, Chancery court bills.

    • Box-folder 15:26
      John Thompson Brown at Clarksburg and Sweet Springs, to Henry Brown, March-September 1828.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "Even now I am as comfortably situated as I could desire and shall support myself hereafter without any further drafts on your goodness..."

    • Box-folder 15:27
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., May-July 1828.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Now well situated in his "mansion," he discusses his prospects for Congress and of his plan to "offer 2 years hence."

    • Box-folder 15:28
      Draft of a 4th of July speech, [4 July] 1828.
    • Box-folder 15:29
      Announcement of a meeting of the Alumni Association of Nassau Hall (Princeton), 14 August 1828.
    • Box-folder 15:30
      Regimental Order appointing John Thompson Brown Adjutant of the 11th Regiment, Virginia Militia, 9 October 1828.
    • Box-folder 15:31
      Muster Roll of the 11th Regiment, [1828].
    • Box-folder 15:32
      "Notes...relating to Military Tactics...," [1828].
      5 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 15:33
      Military notes initialed "J. T. B.'s" [John Thompson Brown], [1828].
      2 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 15:34
      Military Notes, [1828].

      Endorsed: "McConley's System of Sword Tactics."

    • Box-folder 15:35
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., October 1828.

      Reflections on people met at the Medicinal Springs, as contrasted with those of his constituency.

    • Box-folder 15:36
      Wm. B. Giles. Report on the Board of Public Works, 23 January 1829.
    • Box-folder 15:37
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, February-December 1829.
      8 letters.ALS.

      In February, he forwards a copy of sheriff's commission to his father. During the year he borrows $400.00 for payments on his house in Clarksburg, and by the end of the year his father has agreed to advance enough capital for him to become a partner in a mercantile business. Upon the conclusion of the 1828-1829 session of the General Assembly, he writes that he will be a candidate once more, then run for Congress. In the letter of March 23rd, he writes that opposition has arisen "on account of some laws we had passed last session authorizing the county court to levy a tax for repairing roads and, bridges." On March 23rd he relates his experiences in Washington at the inauguration of Jackson: on December 14th he predicts that the basis of votes for whites will be surrendered in the formation of the new State constitution.

    • Box-folder 15:38
      J[ames] M[urray] Mason, Winchester, to John Thompson Brown, 24 September 1829.

      Suggests they ride together to Alexandria, then go to Richmond by boat.

    • Box-folder 15:39
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., 6 December 1829.

      The Virginia Constitutional Convention: "I had an opportunity of hearing the most distinguished members of the body--Mr. Madison and Mr. Marshall among the rest..."

  • Box-folder 16:1-28u
    Subseries 3: Box 16 - Correspondence of John Thompson Brown after his marriage to Mary E. Willcox, of Petersburg (May 1830), and his move to that city, which he represented in the General Assembly in 1831. Also includes over one hundred toasts given at various occasions, 1829-1835, n.d.
    85 items.

    The change which was to occur in the life and fortunes of John Thompson Brown in the year 1830 is forecast in the first letter of this box, a letter received by Mary E. Willcox of Petersburg in [December] 1829, in which there is a discussion of "Mr. B." Three months later (18 March 1830) in a letter to his father, John Thompson Brown announces his intention of leaving Clarksburg, and of his need for a horse and sulky so that he may arrive in Petersburg in a manner which should "avoid the appearance of poverty and destitution." The next letter in the collection (9 [May] 1830), in draft, contains an account of his wedding, a wedding which was attended by no members of his immediate family.

    Subsequent letters tell of the generosity of the new father-in-law John V. Willcox in the gift of a town house "provided with servants," a draft of $1500, and the promise of as much more as he asks (22 July 1830). Yet the position is not satisfactory and because John Thompson Brown feels that he is losing his independence, he returns to Clarksburg with the intention of resettling there and sending for his wife (2 May 1831). During a four week visit to Harrison County, he finds his political position has declined (7 June 1831), so he returns to Petersburg, and is invited to make the Independence Day address for the town (8 June 1831). As a result of this address (and the good influence of his father-in-law) he is nominated to represent the town in the House of Delegates, and is elected without opposition (26 September 1831).

    He successfully sponsors a bill in the Assembly for the Petersburg Railroad (28 December 1831), is appointed Judge of Elections for the Petersburg Office of the Bank of Virginia (29 December 1831), and is sought as a sponsor of a new newspaper which is being established in Richmond (20 October 1831). Of particular interest is a letter to his nephew outlining his philosophy of life and advising the young man on his future (3 October 1831). A report of the slave insurrection in Southhampton is described in a letter of 26 September 1831.

    At the end of this box are collected more than a hundred drafts of toasts made by John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 16:1
      G. Aell, Richmond, to Miss Mary E. Willcox, care of John V. Willcox, at Petersburg, 15 [December] 1829.

      A friend writes regarding "Mr. B.," "a man of boundless pride and diffidence. His attachment was cut down in the bud and You, my sweetest Mary, have hoped whilst he desponded..."

    • Box-folder 16:2
      List of names, cover addressed to Miss Mary E.Willcox, 27 October 1829.
    • Box-folder 16:3
      John Thompson Brown, Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, 18 March 1830.

      "My friends, Webster, Goffard, and others believed I could certainly be elected to Congress next Spring...I wish to appear at P[etersburg]in a manner which would probably be expected and to avoid the appearance of poverty and destitution . Henry is to get me a sulky, horse, etc., and if you can spare this additional sum you may hand it over to him..."

    • Box-folder 16:4
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., 9 [May] 1830.

      "Our nuptials took place at the time expected and I cannot say that there was any other allay to my happiness, than that neither you nor any of my near relatives were present."

    • Box-folder 16:5
      John Thompson Brown, Washington City and Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., May-June 1830.
      4 letters.ALS.

      On his honeymoon: "Peronneau Finley travels with us, as one of our immediate party. Mr. Willcox, Sr., and three of his friends are going to N. York to the races. They came with us thus far..." There is much discussion about where they will live, but, "I think it probable we shall reside in Petersburg..."

    • Box-folder 16:6
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, 5 June 1830.

      On his Washington visit: "we remained a week, were introduced to the President, etc., heard some interesting debates and saw all the great men of the nation...My situation is in all respects agreeable."

    • Box-folder 16:7
      M. H. Garnett to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, 8 June 1830.

      Congratulations on her marriage coupled with much advice.

    • Box-folder 16:8
      John Thompson Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, July-December 1830.
      5 letters.ALS.

      After a visit with his father, he writes: "I have nothing to add on the subject of my future arrangements. I shall pursue the course which you seemed to approve when we were together." He writes later that Mr. Willcox has turned over to them his town house "furnished with servants"; in another letter: "He handed me a check for $1,500 and said that I should always have as much as I wanted..."

    • Box-folder 16:9
      John Thompson Brown, Walnut Hill in Petersburg, to Samuel T. Brown, 15 September 1830.

      Sends advice to his younger brother and, and account of his own situation.

    • Box-folder 16:10
      John Thompson Brown, Walnut Hill and Clarksburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., September-October 1830.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Letters from Harrison County report that "the District needs me badly...but it is too late..."

    • Box-folder 16:11
      Thomas W. Grimes, Charlottesville, to John Thompson Brown, 12 November 1830.

      "I regret that you have temporarily declined public life--for I would not believe you have abondoned it altogether."

    • Box-folder 16:12
      Notes on the case, Mclndoe vs. Dugger and Co., [1830].
    • Box-folder 16:13
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to his nephew, Edward Jenner Steptoe, February 1831.
      2 items.ADr and ALS.

      Advice given to a young man summarizing John Thompson Brown's own philosophy of life.

    • Box-folder 16:14
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, May-June 1831.
      2 letters.ALS.

      On his return to Harrison County, "I found that my position here was to be too dependent..."

    • Box-folder 16:15
      Thomas L. Wilson to John Thompson Brown, 8 June 1831.

      "At a meeting of the citizens of Petersburg...'Resolved, that John Thompson Brown, Esq., he appointed Orator of the Day'."

    • Box-folder 16:16
      John Thompson Brown. Drafts of Independence Day Address, 4 July 1831.
      2 items.ADr.

      The first important public speech of John Thompson Brown, in Petersburg, one which appears to have established his reputation, and which influenced his decision to remain there.

    • Box-folder 16:17
      John Thompson Brown, Walnut Hill, to Henry Brown, Jr., 5 July 1831.

      Regarding his Independence Day address; the wisdom of his brother's decision to visit England.

    • Box-folder 14:21
      [John Thompson Brown], Petersburg, to Peronneau [Finley], 8 July 1831.
      Physical Location: See 25 April 1822, Box-folder 14:21,

      These are the continuous drafts of multiple letters. This draft concerns the second part which contains a humorous report on a 4th of July oration made in Petersburg after his marriage.

    • Box-folder 16:18
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, July-November 1831.
      4 letters.ALS.

      On July 25, he states that his brother has left on the packet for Baltimore on the way to Liverpool. Concerning his "reasons of my determining not to remove to Harrison." On September 14 he writes that his wife has given birth to a son, who will be named Henry Peronneau, "after you and my friend Peronneau Finley."

    • Box-folder 16:19
      Henry Brown, Jr., Liverpool, to John Thompson Brown; Mrs. Eleanor C. L. Brown to John Thompson Brown (enclosing the former), September-October 1831.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Henry Brown, Jr. writes of his journey, as a result of which "I become more and more an American in feeling and principle..."

    • Box-folder 16:20
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., September-December 1831.
      4 letters.ALS.

      "I was elected without opposition, after announcing my sentiments freely and boldly." News of an insurrection of Negroes in Southampton, "they killed 55 persons, mainly women and children."

    • Box-folder 16:21
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Dr. William B. Steptoe, 3 October 1831.

      Gives his opinions on the education of his nephew, Edward. He approves strongly of the emphasis on science to be found at West Point; on going to college among the Yankees: "I partake in some measure of the prejudice against them--but think nevertheless that...southern firewould be none the worse for being somewhat cooled by the northern frost."

    • Box-folder 16:22
      Wm. M. Rives, Lynchburg, to John Thompson Brown and Lewis Mabry, 20 October 1831.

      A new newspaper is proposed for the city of Richmond.

    • Box-folder 16:23
      N. Legrand, Richmond, to John Thompson Brown. Endorsed by Windham Robertson, November 1831.

      A request for help in covering a $3,000 debt to "sharpers."

    • Box-folder 16:24
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, December 1831.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Describes the quarters he has for his wife and son. On the main question of the day he writes: "I think no measure can or ought to be taken now for the abolition of slavery..."

    • Box-folder 16:25
      D. Mackenzie, Petersburg, to John Thompson Brown, 28 December 1831.

      Concerning "the bill now before the Legislature on the subject of our (Rail) Road."

    • Box-folder 16:26
      G. W. Steinback, Petersburg, to John Thompson Brown, 29 December 1831.

      Appointment of John Thompson Brown as judge of the election for directors of the Bank of Virginia in Petersburg.

    • Box-folder 16:27
      Draft regarding the case of Maclnde and Co. vs. Drinkland, Dugge and Lowry, n.d.
    • Box-folder 16:28a-u
      Toasts Given by John Thompson Brown, 1830-1835.
      • Box-folder 16:28a
        Thomas Jefferson, "Drank 1830, Barrauds," 1830.
      • Box-folder 16:28b
        Toast to The People and the Press, and The Soldiers and Statesmen of the Revolution, "Drank 1832," 1832.
      • Box-folder 16:28c
        Drafts of various toasts, 1833.
        45 items.ADr.

        Includes the following subjects: The Press, Lafayette, The Cuase of of Civil and Religious Liberty, The Militia Volunteers, Woman, Thomas Jefferson, Virginia, The Constitution, The Militia, State Rights, President of the United States, Our Guests, Benjamin Franklin, The Union, ("Drank 1833." ADr.), The Day We Celebrate, Washington, and The Army and Navy.

      • Box-folder 16:28d
        Drafts of various toasts, 1833.
        45 items.ADr.

        Includes the following subjects: The Federal Consitiution, Free Press, President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, Lafayette, Our Guests and Woman.

      • Box-folder 16:28e
        The Memory of Lafayette. "Drank 1833," 1833.
        1 item.ADr.
      • Box-folder 16:28f
        "Toasts of 1834, Relating to the celebration of 4 July," brief notes on this toasts and drafts of the order in which the toasts were to be made, 1834.
      • Box-folder 16:28g
        Drafts of various toasts, 1834.
        7 items.ADr.

        Includes the following subjects: The 4th of July, 1776, The Cause of Liberty Throughout the World, The Heroes and Statesmen of the Revolution, Thomas Jefferson, Lafayette, and The Federal Constitution.

      • Box-folder 16:28h
        Drafts of various toasts, 1835.
        7 items.ADr.

        Includes the following subject: The Union "(This toast was drank, as a standing toast at the Petersburg Republican Celebration of Mr. Jefferson's election on the 29th of January, 1801)." Most toast endorsed: "Offered 1835, not adopted."

      • Box-folder 16:28i
        Draft of various toasts, 1835
        1 item.ADr.

        Includes the following subjects: The Day We Celebrated, The Memory of Washington, The Army and the Navy, Military Spirit, Free Press, Popular Suffrage, and National Character.

      • Box-folder 16:28u
        Drafts of various toasts, n.d.
        14 items.ADr.

        Includes the following subjects: The Friends of Constitutional Restriction, Political Toleration, National Character, The State Legislature, Virginia Military, Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Petersburg, The District of Columbia, The Right of Instruction, The Press and John Tyler.

  • Box-folder 17:1-46
    Subseries 4: Box 17 - Correspondence and publications of John Thompson Brown; two speeches given before the House of Delegates, published in pamphlet form: The speech of John Thompson Brown, in the House of Delegates of Virginia, on the Abolition of Slavery; Speech of John Thompson Brown, (of Petersburg,) in the House of Delegates of Virginia, in Committee of the Whole, on the State of the Relations between the United States and South Carolina, 1832-1833.
    81 items.

    The important and exciting national political events of the years 1832 and 1833, as they affected the people of Virginia, are seen through the eyes of John Thompson Brown in the items included in this box. A member from Petersburg in the House of Delegates of the Virginia Assembly, John Thompson Brown was placed in a position of leadership and strongly influenced the decisions taken in those critical years.

    His speech on the abolition of slavery was considered so important that Judge Henry St. George Tucker and others raised the money to have it printed (18 January 1832). He was a member of the Virginia delegation to the national convention of the Republican Party; his resolution of the Vice-Presidential nominee (21-22 May 1832) was the one adopted by the Virginia caucus. As Chairman of the Finance Committee of the House of Delegates, the question of President Jackson's moves against the United States Bank was of particular concern to him (9 April 1833).

    Great excitement was aroused by South Carolina's threat of nullification. John Thompson Brown was a member of the Committee on Federal Relations, and his substitute motion on the question is included in this box, as well as his speech on The State of the Relations between the United States and South Carolina, delivered 5 January 1833, also published in pamphlet form.

    John Thompson Brown was invited to be a Director of the Petersburg Railroad which he declined (7 May 1832), and was considered for the position of U.S. Senator, although he felt that he was not qualified by years or experience (December 1832). An interesting report of his meeting with President Jackson is included in a letter from John Thompson Brown to his wife (23 May 1832).

    Also included in this box are letters from John Tyler, William Cabell Rives, and William Segar Archer (7 February, 3 March 1833).

    Two poems, possibly written by John Thompson Brown, clipped from a newspaper, signed Julian are included at the end of this box.

    • Box-folder 17:1
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown in Petersburg, January-March 1832.
      6 letters.ALS.

      Writes of the fortunes of the (Petersburg) Railroad Bill in the House of Delegates and State Senate.

    • Box-folder 17:2
      Amos Eaton, Rensselaer School, Troy (New York), to Hon. John Thompson Brown, 17 January 1832.

      Information regarding Rensselaer School. Samuel T. Brown, younger brother of John Thompson Brown, appears to have been interested in this school.

    • Box-folder 17:3
      John Thompson Brown. Speech...in the House of Delegates of Virginia...delivered January 18, 1832, 18 January 1832.

      In this important speech John Thompson Brown took up several proposals for the freeing of slaves, including that of Thomas Jefferson, as submitted to the Legislature by Jefferson Randolph, his grandson, and argued against each.

    • Box-folder 17:4
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., January-18 March 1832.
      5 letters.ALS.

      "My speech on abolition has had great eclat--a fund has been raised for publishing it in pamphlet form for general distribution... Judges [Henry St. George] Tucker and Brookehave taken active part in puffing the speech." He also reports, "I have carried my Railroad Bill...and shall enjoy the credit of effecting it by my personal influence."

    • Box-folder 17:5
      "The Letter of Appomatox to the People of Virginia...view of the Recent Proceedings in the House of Delegates on the Subject of the Abolition of Slavery," 4 February 1832.
      Physical Location: Removed from this collection and catalogued in the Rare Books Deptartment - Virginia, E 449 L45.
      47 pages.

      Includes in a "Postscript" an answer to a statement in The Enquirerover the signature of Jefferson [Randolph]. Reference is made to a remark made in The Wigthat his argument "had been far surpassed by the discussion of the subject by a stripling . Mr. Brown of Petersburg." General Assembly. Committee on Federal relations. Official Document Nos. 14, 15, 16.

    • Box-folder 17:6
      J. F. May, Battersea, to John Thompson Brown, 5 February 1832.

      Concerning a suggested amendment for the Circuit Court Law.

    • Box-folder 17:7
      John Tyler, Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, 12 February 1832.

      He cannot give his nephew, Edward Steptoe, an appointment to West Point because he has used his appointment for the session. "...the Senate is involved in the Tariff discussion...The farther I have gone into it the more thoroughly have I convinced myself of its tyrannical and oppressive character."

    • Box-folder 17:8
      D. MacKenzie, Petersburg, to John Thompson Brown, 6 March 1832.

      A resolution from the Petersburg Rail Road Company to tender thanks for "the zeal and ability with which our Delegate John T. Brown, Esq. and our Senator, Wm. Old, Esq. have exerted in procuring passage of the said (Rail Road) act."

    • Box-folder 17:9
      Draft of a resolution concerning the vote of Virginia for Vice-President, [15] March 1832.

      This is the resolution presented by John Thompson Brown and reported in a newspaper article of this date preserved in the scrapbook to be found in Box 14.

    • Box-folder 17:10
      John Thompson Brown, to Henry Brown, Jr., March-May 1832.
      3 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 17:11
      J[ames] M[urray] Mason(1798-1871), Winchester, to John Thompson Brown, 4 April 1832.
    • Box-folder 17:12
      Henry Brown, Jr. to Henry Brown, April 1832.
      2 letters.ALS.

      "I send you 2 copies of John's speech (on Slavery) and a paper with one of Jefferson Randolph's in reply to him."

    • Box-folder 17:13
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to D. MacKenzie, 7 May 1832.

      Declines appointment as a member of the Board of Directors of the Petersburg Railroad.

    • Box-folder 17:14
      Notes of John Thompson Brown on the Baltimore convention of the Democratic Party, 21, 22 May 1832.
      5 pages.ADr.

      Notes on the convention of the whole party and of the Virginia Caucus. At the latter the resolution of John Thompson Brown. was adopted, viz. that Virginia's vote should go first to P. P. Barbour for Vice- President, and when there was no longer a reasonable prospect of his selection, to Van Buren.

    • Box-folder 17:15
      John Thompson Brown, Washington, D.C., to Mary E. Brown, 25 May 1832.

      "...on last evening we went to the President who is in excellent health and fine spirits. Many persons here, including some members of Congress from Virginia, seem to be much dissatisfied with our proceedings at Baltimore..."

    • Box-folder 17:16
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Samuel T. Brown, at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, June-November 1832.
      3 letters.ALS.

      To his youngest brother, attending college, regarding the health of Henry, Jr.

    • Box-folder 17:17
      Jacqueline P. Taylor, Richmond, to John Thompson Brown, 6 June 1832.
    • Box-folder 17:18
      John Thompson Brown, Walnut Hill, to [Peronneau Finley], 14 September 1832.

      On the death of Finley's brother.

    • Box-folder 17:19
      John Thompson Brown, Hobson's (Inn), Stony Point Mills, to Henry Brown, Jr., 24 October 1832.

      The family has traveled south to escape an epidemic of Cholera.

    • Box-folder 17:20a-b
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mary E. Brown, December 1832.
      8 letters.ALS.

      In the letter of December 3 he discusses the election of U.S. Senators, stating that Mr. Leigh is out because of his opposition to President Jackson. Among those mentioned for the position are Judge [Henry St. George] Tucker, [John] Randolph Rives, and himself, though he feels that he has neither the years nor the experience for the position. President Jackson's message on the U.S. Bank is discussed. On nullification he writes: "It will, I fear, be an exciting subject and one of engrossing interest...South Carolina is unquestionably wrong and as long as she remains in the Union,must obey its laws..."

    • Box-folder 17:21
      William Cabell Rives, Fredericksburg, to John Thompson Brown, 4 December 1832.

      The possibility of his appointment as Senator to supply the vacancy left by Mr. Tazewell.

    • Box-folder 17:22
      J[ohn] Y[oung] Mason, Washington, to John Thompson Brown, 10 December 1832.

      Excitement in Washington caused by the President's proclamation on nullification debate.

    • Box-folder 17:23
      Notes on the cases of James Dunlop and Leslie vs. Henderson, and of John C. Hobson, n.d.
      2 items.ADr.
    • Box-folder 17:24
      J. C. Brice to John Thompson Brown, [January] 1833.

      Regarding the removal of deposits from the U.S. Bank by the Federal Government.

    • Box-folder 17:25
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, January 1833.
      2 letters.ALS.

      "I was rather mortified at making a very poor speech [on Federal Relations] in the House today...To avoid misrepresentation I shall have to write out my speech..."

    • Box-folder 17:26
      General Assembly. Document No. 14, No. 15, and No.16, [January] 1833.
      4 pages.

      Doc. No. 14. Report of the Committee on Federal Relations
      Doc. No. 15. Mr. Marshall's Substitute to the Report...
      Doc. No. 16. Mr. M'dowell's Amendment to Mr. Marshall's Substitute,...
      Opinion on proceedings in South Carolina, the proclamation by Andrew Jackson, and "the communication of the governor of this Commonwealth on the same subject."

    • Box-folder 17:27
      Speech on the state of the relations between the United States and South Carolina.Delivered January 5, 1833. Richmond: Thomas W. White, printer. 1833. 5 January 1833.
      42 pages. 3 copies.

      After stating his opposition to protective tariffs, John Thompson Brown argued that they result from "a perversion of the spirit and intent of the Constitution, rather than a violation of its literal principles."

      He compliments the Chief Magistrate of the United States on his general policy but disputes the Proclamation of the President on other grounds, basing his argument on The Law of Nationsby E. de Vattel.

      As to the action of South Carolina, he contends that there is no possibility of nullification under the Constitution, but that the redress of the wrong done in the tariff act must come by recourse to the Supreme Court, to the "Co-states" acting in Congress, and if necessary, by an amendment to the Constitution.

    • Box-folder 17:28
      Doc. No. 19. (General Assembly) Substitute Submitted By Mr. Brown, Petersburg, For the Amended Report of the Committee on Federal Relations, [January] 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:29
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Miss Frances Brown, 8 January 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:30
      Thos. Gregory, King William, Virginia, to John Thompson Brown, 17 January 1833.

      Compliments John Thompson Brown on his resolutions.

    • Box-folder 17:31
      William Cabell Rives, Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, 30 January 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:32
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Capt. Henry Brown, Sr., January-March 1833.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "I was anxious myself that Virginia should maintain an impartial and just attitude toward both S. Carolina and the President, but far the greater part of the Assembly seemed in favour of going into one extreme or other . . . whereas I thought there was error on both sides..."

      He remarks that Edward [Steptoe]has been successful in getting his appointment to West Point "obtained (by Mr. Archer, the Senator) as a favour to me" but "without...your letter...the application could scarcely have been successful."

    • Box-folder 17:33
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, [January] 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:34
      Constitution and By-laws of Petersburg Light Dragoons, February 1833.
      2 copies.PM.
    • Box-folder 17:35
      Resolutions on arrangements for a military dinner and festivities, n.d.
    • Box-folder 17:36
      William Segar Archer, Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, 7 February 1833.

      Appointment of Edward Steptoe to West Point; report of the enforcing bill in the President's proclamation, and the Tariff Bill.

    • Box-folder 17:37
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., 25 February 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:38
      William Segar Archer, Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, 3 March 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:39
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, April-October 1833.
      4 letters.ALS.

      In July he announces the birth of a son.

    • Box-folder 17:40
      Edward Steptoe, West Point, to John Thompson Brown, 20 June 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:41
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Samuel T. Brown at Chapel Hill and at Harvard, June, December 1833.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 17:42
      [John Thompson Brown], Petersburg, to [William] Perroneau [Finley], 9 November 1833.
    • Box-folder 17:43
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, December 1833.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 17:44
      William Cabell Rives, Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, December 1833.
      2 letters.ALS.

      On the Force Bill and the Bank of the U.S.

    • Box-folder 17:45
      Two poems clipped from newspapers, signed Julian, January 1826.
      2 items.

      "On seeimg Miss ____ at Clarksburg," and "Julian Abandoning His Muse." Possibly written by John Thompson Brown about this period.

    • Box-folder 17:46
      John Thompson Brown, For My Sons in the Care of Their Mother. Petersburg, 1833.
  • Box-folder 18:1-26
    Subseries 5: Box 18 - Correspondence of John Thompson Brown: The party spirit of 1834-1835; exchange of blows over political questions in this period. Manuscript of a speech on the death of Lafayette; two notebooks relating to Virginia laws which concerned Brown as Chairman of the Finance Committee of the House of Delegates, 1834-1835.
    44 items.

    The letters written by John Thompson Brown during portions of the 1833-1834 and the 1834-1835 sessions of the General Assembly are found in this box.

    The manuscripts begin with letters reporting the legislative battle fought and lost against the Portsmouth-Norfolk road which John Thompson Brown believed would have disastrous effects on the future of Petersburg (January 1834). Near the end of the box are letters concerning John Thompson Brown's battle fought with fists and canes in the halls of the State Capitol with a fellow representative John Hampden Pleasants (January 1835). The fracas resulted from a heated debate on the election of a U.S. Senator. John Thompson Brown was one of those mentioned for the position of U.S. Senator (December 1834), but his youth (28 years) was against him and he did not enjoy the rough and tumble of party politics then developing.

    Also of interest are the draft of a speech delivered on the occasion of the death of Lafayette (9 July 1834), and two notebooks used by John Thompson Brown as Chairman of the Finance Committee of the House of Delegates (January 1835).

    • Box-folder 18:1
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to his father, Henry Brown, in New London, 11 January 1834.

      News that his brother, Samuel, is ill at Harvard.

    • Box-folder 18:2
      E[dward] J. Steptoe, West Point [Military Academy], to John Thompson Brown, 15 January 1834.

      Reports on his progress at the college.

    • Box-folder 18:3
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to his brother, Henry Brown, Jr., 18-31 January 1834.
      3 letters.ALS.

      His attempts to defeat the Norfolk rail road in the Assembly; family news.

    • Box-folder 18:4
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to his wife, Mrs. Mary E. Brown, January 1834.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "All is lost except our honour. The Portsmouth Bill [Norfolk railroad] has passed...our town [Petersburg] is prostrated...but the ancient spirit of our little town, which Mr. Madison called the 'cockade of the old Dominion' is not dead."

    • Box-folder 18:5
      Henry Brown, Jr., Lynchburg, to John Thompson Brown, 24 February 1834.

      A patent for producing domestic salt.

    • Box-folder 18:6
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., 27 February 1834.
    • Box-folder 18:7
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, February-March 1834.
      6 letters.ALS.

      Election of a U.S. Senator, for which he has been mentioned; Mr. Leigh's election. At the end of February and beginning of March he is kept in bed with an illness.

    • Box-folder 18:8
      Henry Brown, Jr. to [John Thompson Brown], March 1834.
    • Box-folder 18:9
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., 15 March 1834.

      Gives his views of the political situation, mentioning the message President Jackson sent to Congress with the "Force Bill," the President's plans for the Bank of the U.S., and objections to Van Buren and "the N. York system of tactics which he will bring with him."

    • Box-folder 18:10
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, March, October 1834.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Plans for Samuel, John Thompson Brown's brother, to start his study of law with him.

    • Box-folder 18:11
      John J. Allen (1797-1871), Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, 1 May 1834.
    • Box-folder 18:12
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., May-July 1834.
      3 letters.ALS.

      Sold bank shares to help his brother go into business for himself; gives advice on racing horses.

    • Box-folder 18:13
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond and Otter Hills, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, May 1834.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 18:14
      John Thompson Brown. Draft of a speech delivered in Petersburg on the occasion of the death of Lafayette, 9 July 1834.
      43 pages.ADrS.

      Endorsed: "To my sons, should they ever read it."

    • Box-folder 18:15
      Edward J. Steptoe, West Point, to his uncle, John Thompson Brown, 11 August 1834.

      Report of his progress at the U.S. Military Academy.

    • Box-folder 18:16
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Peronneau Finley, 8 November 1834.

      Draft of a letter sending condolences for the death of a sister and congratulations on the birth of a son.

    • Box-folder 18:17
      William Cabell Rives, Washington, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, December 1834.
      2 letters.ALS.

      His resignation from the U.S. Senate.

    • Box-folder 18:18
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, December 1834.
      2 letters.ALS.

      "No subject arouses anybody except the senatorial election."

    • Box-folder 18:19
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., 17 December 1834.

      He offers to place all his monetary resources at the service of his brother in his new business venture.

    • Box-folder 18:20
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., January 1835.
      3 letters, 1 draft.ALS, ADrS.

      On the 17th he prepared a draft of a letter, which he sent on the 20th, giving an account of a fight in the halls of the General Assembly between himself and John Hampden Pleasants.

    • Box-folder 18:21
      John Hampden Pleasants to John Thompson Brown, 17 January 1835.

      A letter of apology for the battle fought in the halls of the Virginia Capitol.

    • Box-folder 18:22
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, 29 January 1835.

      An account of his speech which was "better received than anything I have ever made."

    • Box-folder 18:23
      Speech of John Thompson Brown of Petersburg upon the Election of a Senator in Congress: Delivered in the House of Delegates of Virginia, 29 January 1835.
      28 pages.PB.

      Points out the importance of this election for "future political events and party combinations in the state," and defends the incumbent, Mr. Leigh.

    • Box-folder 18:24
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, [January] 1835.
    • Box-folder 18:25
      John Thompson Brown. "Notes and References on Virginia Statutes at Large," [1838].
      70 pages.AMs.

      Prepared for use in the Finance Committee of the House of Deputies.

    • Box-folder 18:26
      John Thompson Brown. "A common-place Book of Notes and References 'quae reconderet duta que promeret'," [1838].
      116 pages.AMs.

      Notes on taxes, license fees, and the like, prepared by John Thompson Brown for use on the Finance Committee of the House of Delegates.

  • Box-folder 19:1-47
    Subseries 6: Box 19 - Correspondence of John Thompson Brown from February 1835, until his death in November 1836; manuscripts of four articles written to oppose the candidacy of Martin Van Buren for President, 1835-1839, n.d.
    104 items.

    The closing sessions of the State Legislature of 1834-1835 are reported in the letters at the beginning of this box. The party spirit runs high in Petersburg as the "Jackson party" opposes John Thompson Brown (March 1835). He is involved in a street fight with an opponent in which he receives a black eye, but the argument is made up after he wins the election (April 1835).

    Before the next session of the legislature, John Thompson Brown is occupied in collecting more material on the question of slavery (August 1835), and prepared three long drafts written in opposition to the candidacy of Martin Van Buren for President of the U.S. Undated drafts of notes on legal cases are included at the end of the 1835 section.

    Henry Brown, Jr., the brother of John Thompson Brown, died in May 1836, while on a buying trip to Philadelphia and New York for his Lynchburg store. The trip of John Thompson Brown to meet the body of his brother, and his activity in settling his brother's affairs in Lynchburg are reported in the letters included in this box.

    At the end of July he takes his family to his father's home, Otter Hills, near New London in Campbell County, for the funeral sermon of Henry Brown, Jr. While there he contracts an illness which keeps him there until his death on 26 November 1836.

    • Box-folder 19:1
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to his brother, Henry Brown, Jr., 6 February 1835.

      Announces the birth of a son, John Thompson Brown II, and tells his brother that he had ordered $2800 placed to his account to support the store that he had opened.

    • Box-folder 19:2
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to his wife, Mrs. Mary E. Brown, February-March 1835.
      6 letters.ALS.

      Political activity in Petersburg.

    • Box-folder 19:3
      John Thompson Brown, Richmond, to Henry Brown, Jr., March 1835.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "The Jackson party has brought out the most popular man in Petersburg against...it is quite likely he will beat me."

    • Box-folder 19:4
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., April 1835.
      2 letters.ALS.

      On April 18 he writes, "I was elected by a majority of 37 (13 of which were from Richmond)." There is also a report of a street fight between John Thompson Brown and "a Jackson man."

    • Box-folder 19:5
      John Hampden Pleasants, Richmond, to John Thompson Brown, 16 May 1835.

      Concerning the chances of Van Buren to carry Virginia in the election.

    • Box-folder 19:6
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., 6 June 1835.

      Plans to retire from politics and seek a position as Judge of the courts.

    • Box-folder 19:7
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Samuel T. Brown, June-July 1835.

      He has sent a box of books to help him in his law studies, and describes a visit by his old friend Peronneau Finley and his family.

    • Box-folder 19:8
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, 8 August 1835.

      Writes to his father about plans to visit him.

    • Box-folder 19:9
      Drafts on the subject of the northern resolutions on slavery, particularly those recently passed in Portland and Boston, 25 August 1835.
      3 items.ALS.
    • Box-folder 19:10
      Notes on slavery, n.d.
      4 items.ADr.
    • Box-folder 19:11
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., October-November 1835.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Family discussion, especially concerned with the sisters who were yet to find husbands.

    • Box-folder 19:12
      Carter N. Berkeley, and others, University of Virginia, to John Thompson Brown, 26 October 1835.

      Notice of the election of John Thompson Brown as an honorary member of the Jefferson Society.

    • Box-folder 19:13-18
      Undated Drafts, n.d.
      • Box-folder 19:13
        An act to extend the 1834 acts concerning slaves, free Negroes and mulattoes, etc., [1835].
      • Box-folder 19:14
        Notes for a speech on the stand of Mr. Van Buren on emancipation, [1835].
        28 numbered columns.ADrS.

        Signed "Mr. Brown."

      • Box-folder 19:15
        Notes entitled "Acts, not Professions, the index of Truth," [1835].
        11 pages.ADr.
      • Box-folder 19:16
        Notes entitled "No. 2. Acts, not Professions, the test of Truth," also an additional 2 page insertion, [1835].
        12, 2 pages.ADr.
      • Box-folder 19:17
        Notes entitled "No. 3. Acts, not Professions, the test of truth," [1835].
        48 pages.ADr.

        This series of drafts is in opposition to Martin Van Buren, candidate for the President of the United States.

      • Box-folder 19:18
        Undated legal drafts of John Thompson Brown, n.d.
        9 items.ADr.
    • Box-folder 19:19
      " H[ouse] of D[elegates]...Mr. Brown of Petersburg said...," 16 January 1836.
      6 pages.
    • Box-folder 19:20
      A page from The Southern Literary Messenger, Vol. II, No. 3, February 1836.
    • Box-folder 19:21
      Address of the Anti-Van Buren Members of the General Assembly . . . to the People of Virginia, 16 March 1836.
      15 pages.
    • Box-folder 19:22
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, 30 March 1836.

      Good reports of the new business venture of his brother, Henry Brown, Jr.

    • Box-folder 19:23
      John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, Jr., 8 April 1836.

      To his brother, on a buying trip to New York; political prospects now look bright, but "the state is lost" to the Anti-Van Buren forces.

    • Box-folder 19:24
      Commission as Captain in the Cavalry of the Virginia Militia of John Thompson Brown, 20 April 1836.

      Signed by Wyndham Robertson.

    • Box-folder 19:25
      Constitution and By-laws of the Petersburg light Dragoons, signed Capt. John Thompson Brown, 1836.
    • Box-folder 19:26
      John Thompson Brown, Hobson's Inn, Homes, Otter Hills, and Lynchburg, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, May-June 1836.
      5 letters.ALS.

      On the trip to accompany his sister-in-law and the body of Henry Brown, Jr. back to the family home, Otter Hills. Henry Brown, Jr. died while on a shopping trip to New York for supplies for his Lynchburg store.

    • Box-folder 19:27
      Ann Maury, New York, to Mrs. John Thompson Brown, 20 May 1836.

      The body of Henry Brown, Jr. was taken that morning for Virginia.

    • Box-folder 19:28
      John Thompson Brown, near New London, to his niece, Maria C. Brown, at the Academy of the Visitation, Georgetown, D.C., 31 May 1836.

      On the death of her father, Henry Brown Brown, Jr.

    • Box-folder 19:29
      John Thompson Brown, Lynchburg, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, June 1836.
      6 letters.ALS.

      Taking inventory at the store of his late brother; preparing to settle his estate.

    • Box-folder 19:30
      John Thompson Brown, Lynchburg, to Henry Brown, June-July 1836.
      5 letters.ALS.

      Reports on the stocktaking in the store of Henry Brown, Jr. On July 19 he wrote that he was coming to his father's place on the Sunday next to hear his brother's funeral preached. This is the last letter from John Thompson Brown to his father, for on that visit to Otter Hills he was taken with the illness from which he died.

    • Box-folder 19:31
      John Thompson Brown, Lynchburg, to his sister, Miss Frances Brown, Otter Hills, June 1836.

      On the disposal of the store inventory; sends a piano to her.

    • Box-folder 19:32
      John Thompson Brown, Lynchburg, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, 2 July 1836.

      Mourning his brother's death, he makes arrangements for his own family to join him. (This is the last letter written by John Thompson Brown preserved in this collection.)

    • Box-folder 19:33
      Maria Carter Brown, Georgetown, D.C., to John Thompson Brown, 5 July l836.

      The niece of John Thompson Brown writes to her uncle regarding the recent death of her father, Henry Brown, Jr.

    • Box-folder 19:34
      K. B. Townley, Lynchburg, to John Thompson Brown, 15 August 1836.

      A Quaker associate of Henry Brown, Jr. writes regarding the settling of the store business.

    • Box-folder 19:35
      K. B. Townley, Lynchburg, to John Thompson Brown, 21 October 1836.
    • Box-folder 19:36
      "The sermon...preached at the funeral of the late John T. Brown," [November] 1836.
      36 pages.AD.

      Enclosures: "A lock of the hair of John Thompson Brown, 29 years"; envelope marked, "For sister Mary from my dear brother John's Grave, Nov. 13th, 1845, [Mrs.] A[lice Brown] Worthington," with clover leaves inside.

    • Box-folder 19:37
      "A copy of the proceedings of a Meeting of the Petersburg Light Dragoons," signed Robt. B. Bolling, Chairman, 24 November 1836.

      A resolution in memory of John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 19:38
      "Memorial Resolution by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commality of the Town of Petersburg to John Thompson Brown," 26 November 1836.

      Signed D. M. Bernard, Clerk. Endorsement by James MacFarland, Jr., to Mrs. John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 19:39
      Ann Maury, New York, to Mrs. John Thompson Brown, 29 November 1836.

      Condolences on the death of her husband.

    • Box-folder 19:40
      "Tribute of Respect, Nassau Hall, Princeton...In behalf of the Cliosophic Society, Wm. A. Dod," 5 December 1836.

      A resolution that the members wear the usual badge of mourning for thirty days in honor of John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 19:41
      George W. Munford, House of Delegates, to Henry Brown, Esq., 5 December 1836.

      A copy of the unanimous resolution of the House of Delegates in memory of John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 19:42
      Four calling cards of John Thompson Brown, n.d.
      4 items.
    • Box-folder 19:43
      Mrs. Mary E. Brown, widow of John Thompson Brown, Petersburg, to Henry Brown, 27 January 1837.

      A letter of grief written by Mrs. Brown to her father-in-law.

    • Box-folder 19:44
      M. W. Garnett to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, 9 March 1837.

      A letter of consolation.

    • Box-folder 19:45
      Court document to Henry Brown and Mrs. Mary E. Brown, Executors of John Thompson Brown, March 1839.
    • Box-folder 19:46a-n
      John Thompson Brown Papers. Undated drafts, n.d.
      • Box-folder 19:46a
        Manuscript notebook, n.d.
        40 pages.ADr.

        Includes: A dramatic sketch, Kentucky Land Laws, Goosawattee Indians, and map of the region around Bedford, Virginia

      • Box-folder 19:46b
        "Concerning the summary and unwanted dismissal of W. from his position of Clerk of Court by Judge C.," [pre. 1830].
        16 pages.ADr.
      • Box-folder 19:46c
        "Concerning the problem of instruction to the Senators,"
        5 pages.ADr. Incomplete.
      • Box-folder 19:46d
        Notes on Mr. Madison's position on State Rights, n.d.
      • Box-folder 19:46e
        The bounties offered for Indian scalps in Bedford between 1755 and 1758, n.d.
      • Box-folder 19:46f-n
        Miscellaneous other papers, n.d.
        11 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 19:47
      "The draft within is of the Doric order...," n.d.

      A large folded ink drawing of a building "taken from the Colonade of the Temple of Minerva Parthenon at Athens," with notes of construction details. Ca. 1830.

Group D: Brown and Tucker Papers, 1839-1929.
Box-folder: 20-24
5 boxes.
Series 4: Group D

Papers of John Thompson Brown, Colonel of 1st Regiment Virginia Artillery who was killed in action in 1864. Included are letters concerning a disagreement with William Nelson Pendleton. Papers also include correspondence of his son, Henry Peronneau Brown and his son's wife Frances Bland (Coalter) Brown as well as newspaper clippings concerning Judge John Randolph Tucker and the correspondence of Cynthia Beverley Tucker Coleman. There are also nineteenth century engravings.

  • Box 20:1-40
    Correspondence, commissions, receipts, etc., of Col. John Thompson Brown II, killed in action on 6 May 1864; his drafts of speeches in defense of slavery, 1844-1864.
    83 items.
    Subseries 1: Col. John Thompson Brown II

    This box contains the papers from the period after the death of John Thompson Brown, and concern John Thompson Brown II, born in 1835, some 18 months before the death of his father.

    One letter (20 November 1844) lists the courses studied by boys at the ages of 9, 11, and 13; a travel book gives an interesting picture of Europe (4 May 1857); and a draft of a letter describes the bleedings to which a tourist entering Italy had to submit.

    John Thompson Brown II was elected Second Lieutenant by the members of his company (1 December 1859). Also included are notes of speeches made to rouse war enthusiasm. The receipt for a saber and belt (23 April 1861) mark the beginning of action, and other records follow John Thompson Brown II's rise to Major, then to Colonel. His request for a transfer to a more active field of war and an extended argument with his commanding officer, Brig. Gen. William Nelson Pendleton, are of interest. The box concludes with items which appear to have been on the person of Col. John Thompson Brown II, when he was killed in action on 6 May 1864.

    • Box-folder 20:1
      John Thompson Brown II, Petersburg, to his "Aunt Lockie" [Brown Irvine], 20 November 1844.

      Lists the courses in school taken by a nine year old boy and his two brothers, Wilicox, 11 years old, and P[eronneau], 13 years old.

    • Box-folder 20:2
      Travel notebook, unsigned, 4 May 1857.
      58 pages.ADr.
    • Box-folder 20:3
      A report of "repeated bleeding in Italy," n.d.
    • Box-folder 20:4
      Promissory note, N. M. Lewis to Wm. J. Chick, 1 January 1859.
    • Box-folder 20:5
      Thomas P. August, Col. 1st Reg., Virginia Volunteers, 1 December 1859.

      Certifies that John Thompson Brown II was elected Second Lieutenant by viva voce vote of the members of his company.

    • Box-folder 20:6
      Draft of Speech in favor of the Southern position, [1860].

      References to Douglas and the threat to slavery.

    • Box-folder 20:7
      Draft of speech opposing abolition, [1860].
      5 pages.ADr.

      Concerns the raid on Harper's Ferry by John Brown, 19 October 1859, and the treatment of him as a martyr in the North.

    • Box-folder 20:8
      Speech at the dedication of an Armory, [1861].

      "I greatly fear that the time has passed when great questions of State equality are to be settled in the Halls of Congress...this settlement requires powder and ball..."

    • Box-folder 20:9
      M. C. Selant and Co. bill for coal to John Thompson Brown II, 5 January 1861.
    • Box-folder 20:10
      H. R. Pleasants and John Thompson Brown II, receipt for sabre and belt from Geo. W. Randolph, Capt., 1st Reg., Virginia Volunteers, 23 April 1861.
      2 copies.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:11
      Bills rendered to Capt. John Thompson Brown II and his Company, May 1861.
      3 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 20:12
      J. H. Sands, Young's Mill, to Major John Thompson Brown II, at Young's Farm, 6 October 1861.

      Report on ammunition on hand.

    • Box-folder 20:13
      Receipts for pay and supplies for Col. John Thompson Brown II, January-May 1862.
      3 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:14
      C. H. D. Chine, Poe's Farm, to [of the Court], and Corp. M. Terrell to the Court, 19 June 1862.
      2 items.ADS.

      Court Martial action taken for refusal to do guard duty, by a trooper under the command of Col. John Thompson Brown II.

    • Box-folder 20:15
      Receipts for horses and supplies, June-September 1862.
      4 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:16
      Col. John Thompson Brown II to Brig. Genl. William Nelson Pendleton, 29 September 1862.

      Request for transfer, with his command, to the Division of Gen. D. H. Hills, so that he might be more actively engaged.

    • Box-folder 20:17
      Receipt and lists of stores, October 1862.
      3 items.AD.
    • Box-folder 20:18
      Draft of a suggestion for winter furloughs in order to extend the length of service in the fighting season, [1862].
      6 pages.ADr.
    • Box-folder 20:19
      Map of the State of Virginia, published by West and Johnson, Richmond, 1862.
    • Box-folder 20:20
      Receipts for Ordnance stores, January 1863.
      4 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:21
      R. P. Rides to Col. John Thompson Brown II, 1 February 1863.

      Concerning the families of the officers.

    • Box-folder 20:22
      Receipts for horses, mules, and supplies, February-April 1863.
      13 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:23
      Col. John Thompson Brown II, to Brig. Gen. William Nelson Pendleton, 3 June 1863.

      Concerning a dispute arising between the two over John Thompson Brown's command.

    • Box-folder 20:24
      Special Order No. 154, signed by W. H. Taylor and Brig. Gen. William Nelson Pendleton, 8 June 1863.
      4 items.
    • Box-folder 20:25
      Exchange of letters between John Thompson Brown II and Brig. Gen. William Nelson Pendleton, August 1863.
      4 items.ALS.
    • Box-folder 20:26
      Receipts for supplies by Col. John Thompson Brown II, November-December 1863.
      4 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:27
      Receipt for whitewashing 2 rooms to Mrs. Brown by John M. Godwin, 1863.
    • Box-folder 20:28
      Col. John Thompson Brown II, to Lt. Col. William Nelson Taylor, 11 March 1864.

      Request the return of his report on the battle of Chancellorsville so that he might submit it to Gen. Stuart.

    • Box-folder 20:29
      Receipts and accounts regarding provisions for the Howitzer Companies, April 1864.
      4 items.ADS.
    • Box-folder 20:30-37
      Papers which appear to have been on the person of John Thompson Brown II, when he was killed in action, 6 May 1864.
      • Box-folder 20:30
        Gift list and cover addressed to Jackson's Reserve Artillery, near Bowling Green, Caroline County, n.d.
      • Box-folder 20:31
        Commission Book, containing several commissions, leather bound, n.d.
      • Box-folder 20:32
        Commission from the Commonwealth of Virginia, n.d.
      • Box-folder 20:33
        Receipt for supplies, n.d.
      • Box-folder 20:34
        Blank pay account documents, n.d.
        2 copies.PM.
      • Box-folder 20:35
        Printed calling cards of John Thompson Brown in cover, n.d.
      • Box-folder 20:36
        Two leather pocket packets, n.d.
      • Box-folder 20:37
        Terrain map, n.d.
    • Box-folder 20:38
      Newspaper obituaries of Col. John Thompson Brown II, May 1864.
      5 items.NCl.
    • Box-folder 20:39
      "In Memory of John Thompson Brown," autograph poem and newspaper text; "Lines written on seeing 'Rifle' the war-horse of Col. J. T. B...." from the Richmond Dispatch, 6 May 1864.
      3 items.
    • Box-folder 20:40
      A marker. "Thompson Brown" with blue ribbons attached, [1864].
  • Box 21:1-71
    Letters to Henry Peronneau Brown, oldest son of the Hon. John Thompson Brown, written by his widowed mother, Mrs. Mary E. Brown, of Petersburg; family correspondence after his marriage to Frances Bland Coalter (see also Box 6) in the Civil War and Reconstruction years; twelve letters from John Coalter II, to Mrs. Brown, his sister, illustrating the difficulties in re-establishing a farm in Virginia after the war, 1849-1885.
    108 items.
    Subseries 2: Henry Peronneau Brown

    Papers relating to the oldest son of John Thompson Brown, Henry Peronneau Brown, begin with letters written by his mother Mrs. Mary E. Brown. She expresses concern that her son is more interested in affairs other than his studies (1 March 1849). His school career is traced briefly through his years at the University of Virginia (28 June 1851).

    The letters exchanged between Henry Peronneau Brown and his fiancee, Frances Baland Coalter, 1858, lead into the family correspondence which completes this box. (Other letters of Frances Bland Coalter and her family are found in Box 6, Coalter and Tucker Papers.)

    From May, 1861, all letters are concerned with the war. Letters written by John Coalter II, to his sister Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown in 1878 give a graphic picture of the struggle made by a southern farmer to re-establish himself after the war.

    • Box-folder 21:1
      Mrs. Mary E. Brown, Petersburg, to her brother-in-law Samuel T. Brown, Charleston, South Carolina and New London, Virginia, March-October 1849.
      2 letters.ALS.

      The widow of John Thompson Brown writes with concern about her oldest son, Peronneau, who is attending school in South Carolina. He was devoting too much time to outdoor affairs of college life and not enough to his studies.

    • Box-folder 21:2
      Samuel T. Brown, Otter Hills, to Henry Peronneau Brown, 18 April 1850.
      ALS.

      Congratulating him on his success at Charleston College; a proposed biography of John Thompson Brown.

    • Box-folder 21:3
      Mrs. Alice [Brown] Hogal, Richmond, to Mrs. Mary E. Brown, 17 June 1850.
    • Box-folder 21:4
      Samuel T. Brown, Otter Hills, to Mrs. Mary [E. Brown], 28 June 1851.

      Concerning Henry Peronneau Brown, attending the University [of Virginia].

    • Box-folder 21:5
      Receipt for 65 pounds of ice to Henry Peronneau Brown from Long and Stevens, Petersburg, 11 July 1857.
    • Box-folder 21:6
      F[anny] B. Coalterto Henry Peronneau Brown, May-July 1858.
      5 letters.ALS.

      Affectionate letters to her fiance.

    • Box-folder 21:7
      Mrs. B[etty] C. Lacy, Chatham, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, at the New York Hotel, 23 December 1858.
    • Box-folder 21:8
      Henry T. Coalter, Hanover, to his sister Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 24 December 1858.
    • Box-folder 21:9
      Mrs. Betty C. Lacy and Margaret Barnes, Chatham, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 11 January 1859.
    • Box-folder 21:10
      Hess to Mrs. Brown, at Oak Springs, 8 February 1859.
    • Box-folder 21:11
      Carrie, Otter [Hills], to "Dear Cousin," n.d.
    • Box-folder 21:12
      Mrs. Betty C. Lacy, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, March-November 1859.
      4 letters.ALS.

      In August she writes to console Mrs. Brown on the death of her mother, Mrs. Judith H. Coalter.

    • Box-folder 21:13
      Lucy T. Braxton to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown at Loving Creek P.O., March-December 1859.
      3 letters.ALS.

      "We are all as glad, dear Fanny, that your home is so lovely and you are so happy...for its mountain scenery."

    • Box-folder 21:14
      John Coalter II, to his sister Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, March-September 1859.
      2 letters.ALS.

      Concerning the failing health of their mother.

    • Box-folder 21:15
      Cousin Sue, Vaucluse, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 8 August 1859.

      Consolations on the death of Mrs. Coalter.

    • Box-folder 21:16
      Mrs. T. Magill, Winchester, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], August-November 1859.
      2 letters.ALS. Covers lacking.
    • Box-folder 21:17
      C. B. T. Washington, Williamsburg, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 9 September 1859.
      ALS. Cover lacking.
    • Box-folder 21:18
      Mrs. B[etty] B. Dallam, Baltimore, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 31 September 1859.
    • Box-folder 21:19
      Mrs. Mary W. Braxton, Chericoke, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 17 November 1859.

      Concerning the loss of an infant.

    • Box-folder 21:20
      St. George Tucker Coalter, University of Virginia, to his sister Mrs. Fanny Bland [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown] Brown, 9 December 1859.
    • Box-folder 21:21
      L. T. Moore to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, n.d.
      5 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 21:22
      M. E. Irvine, Buffalo, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, n.d.
    • Box-folder 21:23
      Mrs. Betty B. Dallam, Baltimore, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 11 January 1860.
    • Box-folder 21:24
      Cousin Sue, Richmond, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 6 March 1860.
    • Box-folder 21:25
      Mrs. Eliza P. Willers, Fleur de Hundred, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, March-May 1860.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 21:26
      Mrs. V. C. Braxton to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 7 March 1860.
    • Box-folder 21:27
      Mrs. Betty C. Lacy, Chatham, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 9 March 1860.
    • Box-folder 21:28
      Eight calling cards in a cover addressed to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 10 March 1860.
      8 items.ALS.
    • Box-folder 21:29
      John Coalter II, Moon's Mount, to his sister Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 19 March 1860.

      The bachelor brother of Mrs. Brown writes that his loneliness on an out-of-the-way plantation is heading him to the madhouse.

    • Box-folder 21:30
      F[anny] T. Bryan, Eagle Point, to her cousin, Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 28 May 1860.
    • Box-folder 21:31
      [Rev.] Moses D. Hoge, Prince Edward, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 31 July 1860.
    • Box-folder 21:32
      Mrs. M[ary] G. Braxton, Ingleside, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, May-July 1861.
      2 letters.ALS.

      She writes of the ladies making vests and shirts for the soldiers. News that the Yankees have landed at Hampton; the first of the war casualties in the family.

    • Box-folder 21:33
      Mrs. G[inny] B. Grinnanto her cousin, Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 17 May 1861.

      Making clothes for the army: "1500 yards have just been received which we are to turn our attention to at once."

    • Box-folder 21:34
      John Coalter II, Moon's Mount, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 29 May 1861.

      His house was set afire and cannon are firing all about. Comments on "the tennessee company...the roughest men you ever saw..."

    • Box-folder 21:35
      Mrs. Margaret T. Martin, West Brook, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 28 July 1861.
    • Box-folder 21:36
      Mrs. Mary S. Brown, Williamsburg, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 3 August 1861.

      The wife of John Thompson Brown II, is in "this antiquated spot" because her husband was drilling some new troops and sent for her to join him.

    • Box-folder 21:37
      A "Comic Valentine," from Stanley, the family home, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 7 August 1861.
    • Box-folder 21:38
      St. George Tucker Coalter to his sister [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 30 August 1861.

      Their brother, Henry, is at a camp near Williamsburg; the other brother, John, is in Richmond.

    • Box-folder 21:39
      M. A. Tomlin, Clifton, to Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 28 September 1861.
    • Box-folder 21:40
      Mrs. F. C. Young, Westbrook, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 15 November 1861.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 21:41
      Agreement of a sale of land between Thos. Burroughs and K. G. Holland, 25 October 1862.

      "adjoining the lands of Henry Peronneau Brown and others."

    • Box-folder 21:42
      J. R. Bryan, Cargobrook, to John [Coalter II], 11 May 1864.

      "I am sorry Henry's name is not in the list of exchanged prisoners..."

    • Box-folder 21:43
      Deed for transfer of land from Thos. Burroughs to K. G. Holland, 3 September 1864.
    • Box-folder 21:44
      Henry T. Coalter, prisoner at Fort Pulaski, Georgia, to his sister, Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, November-December 1864.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 21:45
      Receipt for wheat delivered by Bassett's Farm, King William Couny, signed A. Wynne and L. Hatchet, 1868.
    • Box-folder 21:46
      George Bagby, Tappahannock, to Rev. A. J. Leavenworth, 3 February 1869.

      Request for someone to serve the Presbyterian Church at Tappahannock.

    • Box-folder 21:47
      John Coalter, witness to sale at G. W. Bassett's estate, 12 February 1869.
    • Box-folder 21:48
      A bill brought in Chancery Court by John R. Bryan against H. B. Tomlin, executor of St. George Tucker Coalter, 14 September 1869.

      The settlement of the John Randolph estate which was in litigation for many years.

    • Box-folder 21:49
      William Phillips, agreement to pay James A. Lipscomb, 30 October 1869.
    • Box-folder 21:50
      Rev. John G. Shepperson, Bedford, to Mrs. F. B. Brown and to Mrs. John Thompson Brown, 8 February 1870.
    • Box-folder 21:51
      H. B. Tomlin, Brandywine (formerly Old Church) to John Coalter II, 15 March 1870.

      Refuses a request for $500 by his nephew; recommends that he stop drinking.

    • Box-folder 21:52
      Receipt by Everett Twann, Curie's Neck, to John Coalter II, for wages, 9 May 1871.
    • Box-folder 21:53
      Bills of Mrs. Peronneau Brown, 1872-1873.
      2 items.PDS.
    • Box-folder 21:54
      Accounts of John Coalter II, with stores, 1873-1874.
      3 items.PDS.
    • Box-folder 21:55
      J[ohn] T[hompson] Brown III, Evington, Virginia, to his mother, Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 9 July 1875.

      Note written on an early "penny post card."

    • Box-folder 21:56
      John Coalter II, Walnut Hill, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, February-December 1878.
      12 letters.ALS.

      Letters written to his sister as he made a start in farming after the end of the war: "I have not the means to buy me a suit of clothes." Later he added: "I never was as poor in my life before as I am now...I have not spent during the whole year on myself more than $10..."

    • Box-folder 21:57
      [?], Stanley, to "My darling little angel," 6 February 1878.
      2 letters.ALS.
    • Box-folder 21:58
      Susie Bon to Aunt, n.d.
    • Box-folder 21:59
      Wedding invitation from Mrs. William C. Beale to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 20 August 1878.
    • Box-folder 21:60
      John Coalter II to Fanny, [January 1879].

      First mention of Cassie Tucker, who was later to marry John Thompson Brown III.

    • Box-folder 21:61
      Lillie Hope Lister, Rockbridge Baths, to Mrs. Brown, 11 November 1880.

      A request for a purchase of a case of "56 Home Remedies."

    • Box-folder 21:62
      Lillie Hope Norton, Charlottesville, Virginia, to Mrs. Brown, 13 April 1881.
    • Box-folder 21:63
      Prints from seed catalogues, Spring 1881.
      2 items.
    • Box-folder 21:64
      Store accounts of Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, July-October 1881.
      4 items.PDS.
    • Box-folder 21:65
      Mrs. Cynthia Beverly Tucker Coleman, Williamsburg, to Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, 1 January 1883.

      Writes of Cassie [Tucker], wife of [John] Thompson [Brown III]. "You have introduced into your home a very sunbeam."

    • Box-folder 21:66
      J. Willcox Brown, Baltimore, to his sister-in-law, Fanny [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 5 February 1883.

      Concerning the death of John [Coalter II].

    • Box-folder 21:67
      Sallie A. Donnan, Petersburg, to "My dear friend," 26 September 1883.
    • Box-folder 21:68
      Seed Catalogues, n.d.
    • Box-folder 21:69
      Statement of H. B. Tomlin concerning the trust for Mrs. Fanny B. Brown [Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown], 10 February 1885.
    • Box-folder 21:70
      Henry Peronneau Brown, Bedford, to Fanny, 13 March 1885.
    • Box-folder 21:71
      Drawing of a house, n.d.
      2 items.AD.
  • Box 22:1-19
    Correspondence of John Thompson Brown III, son of Henry Peronneau Brown, who married Cassie Tucker, thus reuniting the family with the Tucker line. Includes letters of Mrs. Cynthia B. Tucker Coleman, of Williamsburg, 1869-1890.
    80 items.
    Subseries 3: John Thompson Brown III

    The letters in this box concerning John Thompson Brown III, begin with one from his mother, Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown, the former Frances Bland Coalter. There are 6 report cards from The University School, Petersburg, Virginia (1877-1879). Of interest is a pamphlet of Resolutions Passed in 1894, 1895, and 1896...Denouncing the Bedford High School Act.

    Many of the letters in the collection are from Mrs. Cynthia B. Tucker Coleman to her niece Cassie (Mrs. John Thompson Brown III). Letters from the children, John Thompson Brown IV, Frances Brown, and Henry Peronneau Brown II, are included as well as photographs of some members of the family and pictures of the family home, Ivy Cliff, Bedford County (formerly Otter Hill) the home of Capt. Henry Brown, great grandfather of John Thompson Brown III.

    At the end of the box is a notebook containing sermons copied out by Mrs. Henry Peronneau Brown for her son John Thompson Brown III.