Inventory of the Garrett Family Papers 1786-1928 Garrett Family, Papers, 1786-1928 Mss. 69 G19

Inventory of the Garrett Family Papers 1786-1928

A Collection in the
Manuscripts and Rare Books Department
Collection Number Mss. 69 G19


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Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary

Special Collections
Earl Gregg Swem Library
College of William and Mary
Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8794
USA
Phone: (757) 221-3090
Fax: (757) 221-5440
Email: spcoll@wm.edu
URL: http://swem.wm.edu/scrc/

© 2001 By the College of William and Mary

Funding: Web version of the finding aid funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Karyl Goldstein, 2000.

Repository
Special Collections, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary
Collection number
Mss. 69 G19
Title
Garrett Family Papers, 1786-1928.
Extent
Ca. 200 items.
Creators
Garrett Family, Dr. Robert M. Garrett, Alexander C. Garrett, B. F. Garrett, Lottie. Garrett, David E. Cronin.
Language
English
Abstract
Papers, 1786-1928, of the Garrett family of Williamsburg, Virginia.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Collection is open to all researchers.

Publication Rights/Restrictions on Use

Before publishing quotations or excerpts from any materials, permission must be obtained from the Curator of Manuscripts and Rare Books, and the holder of the copyright, if not Swem Library.

Preferred Citation

Garrett Family Papers, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary.

Acquisition Information

Gift: Ca. 200 items, March 1969.


Biographical/Historical Information

This collection contains material that starts with the marriage of Dr. Robert Major Garrett (1807-1885), to Susan Comfort Winder (1812-1878) and expands to include their families and their children.

Paternal Genealogy
Richard Garrett (d. 1825), married Ann Major (1785-1855), and had several children including but may not be limited to the following: Richard R. Garrett (b. 1801); Dr. Robert Major Garrett (1807-1885); Polly Garrett, William Garrett, John Garrett and Edmund Garrett. Richard R. Garrett (b. 1801), attended William and Mary from 1828-1831. He married Laura A. and had a son George R. Garrett.

Maternal Genealogy
Thomas Gore married Comfort Quinton. They had a daughter Comfort Quinton Gore (b. 1791), who married John Hermanson Winder (b. 1784). This marriage resulted in several children including but may not be limited to the following: Susan Comfort Winder (1812-1878); Bettie A. Winder; Lauretta A. (Savage) Winder, Charlotte Winder and John E. Winder.

Dr. Robert Major Garrett (1807-1885), attended the College of William and from 1822-1826. He was a physician and later became superintendent of Eastern Lunatic Asylum of Williamsburg. He held the position of mayor of the city of Williamsburg from 1860-1861. Married to Susan Comfort Winder (1812-1878), their children include but may not be limited to the following: Benjamin F. Garrett (1821-1878); Alexander C. Garrett (b. 1823); Capt. William Robertson Garrett (1839-1904); Van Franklin Garrett (1846-1932); Mary W. Garrett (b. 1851); and Lottie Garrett. Benjamin F. Garrett (1821-1878), and Alexander C. Garrett (b. 1823), both attended the College of William and Mary. Benjamin studied law.

Capt. William Robertson Garrett (1839-1904), attended the College of William and Mary and the University of Virginia receiving a degree in law. However his law practice in Williamsburg was interrupted by the Civil War. William Robertson served as a private in the 32d Virginia regiment and was elected captain. After the war, in 1868, he married Julia Flournoy Batte and moved to Tennessee, where he was employed as a professor of mathematics and later president at Giles College, Tennessee. Thus started his varied and important career in the education field. This including becoming Giles County superintendent, 1873-1875; establishing the Peabody Normal College for teachers, 1875 and later becoming chair of American History for the University of Nashville; editing the "American Historical Magazine," 1865-1902; holding the position of state superintendent of public instruction for Tennessee, 1891-1893; and becoming president of various state and national teaching organization including the National Educational Association. He fathered eight children.

Van Franklin Garrett (1846-1932), attended the Virginia Military Institute but left early to serve in the Civil War. He then attended the College of William and Mary, the University of Virginia and the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York City, New York, receiving a degree in medicine. He returned to Williamsburg to farm and practice medicine. He taught at Giles College, Tennessee only to return to Williamsburg to accept a position of professorship of Natural Science at the College of William and Mary. He married Harriett Nicholls (b. 1846), and had four children: Van Franklin Garrett Jr, Carra (George Dillard) Garrett, Suzanne (Selator Montague) Garrett, and Harriet (William Hodges) Garrett.

Scope and Content Information

Correspondence of the Garrett family of Williamsburg, Va., concerning family and social news, politics, and the Civil War. Earlier letters deal mainly with business and political news, as several Garrett family members, including Richard R. Garrett, Alexander C. Garrett, and Dr. Robert M. Garrett, were involved in the politics of 19th century Virginia. Correspondence of Dr. Robert M. Garrett and his brothers Alexander C. Garrett and B. F. Garrett concerning the sale of "Yardley," Northampton County, Va. There are letters written to Dr. Robert M. Garrett's daughter, Lottie Garrett, by David E. Cronin concerning his memoir of the Vest Mansion and the Civil War occupation of Williamsburg and portraits owned by Lottie Garrett.

Includes letters, dated from 1897 to 1911, written to Miss Lottie Garrett by American novelist Mary Johnston (1870-1936). Also includes a letter, 25 December 1863, written by Asa Hartz, a Confederate soldier held at Johnson's Island Federal Prison, describing the everyday life of a prisoner during the Civil War. Collection contains certificate, 1832, of services of a black Revolutionary War soldier.

Arrangement

Organization

This collection is organized into six series:
1. Letters
2. Accounts
3. Legal Documents
4. Writtings
5. Calling and Place Cards
6. Printed Matter

Arrangement

This collection is arranged chronologically by date with those items lacking a date located at the end of each series. Series 1 is divided into subseries by ten or twenty year increments depending on the amount of letters.

Related Material

Materials related to this collection is the account book, 1842-1849, of B. F. Garrett, attorney, Williamsburg, Va. It includes accounts with John Tyler, Jr.

B. F. Garrett Account Book, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary. B. F. Garrett Account Book, 1842-1849.158 p. bound volume 32 cm.Collection number: Mss. MsV Al6

Separated Material


Index Terms

    Family Names:

  • Garrett Family.
  • Persons:

  • Cronin, David E., b. 1839.
  • Garrett, Alexander C.
  • Garrett, B. F.
  • Garrett, Lottie.
  • Garrett, Robert M., Dr.
  • Subjects:

  • United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--African Americans.
  • Williamsburg (Va.)--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
  • Geographical Names:

  • Yardley (Northampton County, Va.)

Components List

Letters, 1825-1928, n.d.
Box: 1-2
Series 1: Letters
  • Box: Folder 1:1
    Subseries 1: Letters, 1825-1839.
    7 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:1
      John S. Meehan, Washington, to Robert Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 21 Feb[ruary] 1825.
      1 page.ALS.

      Excuses himself for not writing sooner as he was ill; believed that Mr. Armstrong gave him [RG] the receipt for the eight dollars for the entire liquidation of his account; informs him that his father's account is now entirely settled; regrets that he [RG] finds it "inconvenient, at present, to patronize the Star."

    • Box: Folder 1:1
      [?], W[illia]msburg, [Virginia], to "Sir" [?], n.p., 16 March 1830.
      2 pages.ALS. Torn.

      Defines happiness as consisting "of the exercises of the mind, and the development of its various faculties"; believes learning is for the "favoured many"; advocates the stimulation of the mind as a way to bring moral virtues into the light "from the darkness in which they were enveloped, and the latent sparks of the moral faculty, Concience [sic], & virtue [are] kindled into a flame and excited to action."

    • Box: Folder 1:1
      S. Godwin, Washington, [D.C.], to Alexander C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 10 Sept[ember] 1832.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Congratulates him on being elected Attorney for the counties of James City and Warwick[?]; asks if he has turned Scott or Seward Whig since those counties are Whig; finds it suspicious especially when he [ACG] speaks of carrying the Locofocos by 8,000; will examine Mr. Mason's father's papers if he [SG] is called an heir or a son of Adam Mason; asks him to tell Bowden that the Groves land claim will be reopened and a new investigation begun; will call the claim up for consideration with Mr. Barbour and expects to get it.

    • Box: Folder 1:1
      Madison, n.p., to Susan Winder, Eastern Shire, near Eastville, Northampton Co[unty], Virginia, 10 Oct[ober 1835?].
      2 pages.ALS.

      Shares details of his journey from Norfolk by ship; was welcomed quite kindly by the Garretts; mentions family and mutual friends; informs her that "they will never forgive you if you do not come when Rosina comes"; will board at Mr. Bicks', as will Rosina.

    • Box: Folder 1:1
      W[illia]mP. Nottingham, Mount Brilliant, to Dr. Robert M. Garrett, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 4 May 1838.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Was approached by Mr. N.I. Winder as to the least amount that would purchase the one half of Yardley that belongs to Nottingham, Garrett, and Lauretta; found the way Mr. Winder wanted to advertise the sale objectionable; has raised the purchase price to $11,000-12,000, subject to his and Lauretta's approval; informs him that there are many people wanting to buy Yardley, and that Peter S. Bowdoin has offered more than a fair price for it; hopes to sell the whole of Yardley for $10,500 at private sale.

    • Box: Folder 1:1
      W[illia]mP. Nottingham, Northampton C[oun]ty, Virginia, to Dr. Rob[er]tM. Garrett, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 5 Dec[ember] 1838.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Believes that Yardley will sell for $9,000 in August at public sale; is eager to sell the house, as is Lauretta, as it seems to be depreciating; informs him that this year's rent will be paid in grain; mentions that Lauretta and Charlotte are in agreement as to the sale of the plantation next to Yardley; informs him of the death of W[illia]mP. Custis, who has given his entire estate, worth $80,000 to $100,000 to his widow.

    • Box: Folder 1:1
      Nath[anie]lI. Winder, Eastville, [Virginia], to Doctor Robert M. Garrett, Williamsburg, [Virginia], 27 April 1839.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Was convinced that the August Court day would be a better time to sell Yardley; added into the advertisement for the sale statements concerning average crop yield; believes that Yardley will sell for more at private sale, rather than public sale; informs him that Mr. Nottingham concurs and is willing to sell Yardley for $9,500 or even $9,000; suggests not selling for less than $9,500 at this time; will send again the $87.91 he owes him if he [RMG] will send a receipt.

  • Box: Folder 1:2-3
    Subseries 2: Letters, 1840-1849.
    17 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:2
      Rose Winder, Pembroke, to Mrs. Anne Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 6 May 184?.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Explains that she did not intend to be negligent in not writing; remembers the time she spent in Williamsburg with fondness; informs her that her mother had recovered rapidly after she [RW] returned from Williamsburg, but had been attacked by a disease of the eyes a fortnight ago; feels that the county is "unusually tame" as no visitors have arrived yet; shares news of friends and family and sends her love.

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      Rose [Winder], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to Miss Anne Parker, Eastville, Virginia, 19 Dec[ember] 1840.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has been ill with a sore throat and was unable to write; describes herself as "too fat, & too happy, to go to the E[astern] Shore sooner than 4th July"; gives news of many mutual acquaintances.

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      Rose [Winder], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to Miss Anne Parker, Eastville, Virginia, 11 Feb[ruary 18]41.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Thanks her for her well-wishes; fears being a "nominal christian" and has fallen in love with the "christian character"; believes there was not a better man than the pastor of her church and fears the "lukewarmness of his flock... will shorten his days, the recent dissipation seems to give him so much pain"; did not go to the vice-president's, John Tyler's, party the night before because she was tired and sleepy and the weather was damp; gives news of all the people currently in town; misses her home but knows Mrs. G[arrett]would like her to stay till after the fourth of July.

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      Jno. [John] W.H. Parker, Drummond Town, to Benjamin F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 24 Ap[ri]l [18]42.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has just returned from a trip to Northampton County, accompanied by his cousin Miss Wise; saw many young ladies in Northampton that he [BFG] is not acquainted with, mentioning Miss Neale, Miss Wilson, Miss Ellen Upshur, Miss S. Parker, Miss Mary Tazewell, and Miss Skipwith; mentions that having an "excellent heart... is the estimable quality in a young lady"; is "anxious to see the Alumni Association put into full and complete operation" and believes that "a glorious institution may be established" regarding the association; informs him that his friend Jno. G. Upshur is "as true a friend of Wm. & Mary as can be found anywhere. He vindicated her character and claims to the patronage of the south in a handsomely written and spirited argument in the Richmond Enquirer last year after his visit"; is looking forward to seeing everyone on the fourth of July.

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      Rose Winder, Pembroke, to Alex[ander]C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 4 June 1842.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has been participating in a whirl of social events which she has enjoyed, but later questioned whether that were all there is to life; has been taught "to enjoy with liveliest zest the pure outpourings of disinterested friendship, & the exalted sentiments of the upright, cultivated mind"; has made some new acquaintances and would set him up with one, except that she is eighteen months older than he; informs him that Ma and Pa are expecting him this summer; was glad to hear "the cause of temperance was prospering so in Wmsbg" and mentions that "some of my favourites have signed the pledge."

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      Geo[rge]H. Cabaniss, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Benjamin F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 7 July 1842.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Is upset to think that distance has caused their friendship to falter; mentions that "once more the Star of my Destiny beamed on the horizon of my brightest dreams" by the appearance of Fanny, with whom he is in love; believes he will be surprised to learn that "Bat" [?] is engaged to a wealthy and accomplished girl; will help him in any way he can if he wishes to relocate to Mr. Jones's neighborhood, and believes that his chances of success with a girl of Mr. Jones's home are quite favorable; informs him that their fourth of July was quite dull and less liquor drunk than anyone would have guessed; is a devotee to the cause of temperance, and remarks that it seems to be predominate.

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      S.J. Bowden, Richmond, [Virginia], to R.R. Garrett, Yorktown, Virginia, 8 March 1843.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Informs him that they are now debating the convention question and assures him that the bill will be defeated; hopes to be home by the 20th as they are trying to adjourn by that time; has much interesting news to share with him about "the Whig and Democratic Conventions and other incidents of the season"; informs him that "The Assembly has helped the bill relative to the Bruton Parish fund, according to the wish of York, and she is now entitled to demandand recieve [sic] her own,and to dispose of it as shemay please."

    • Box: Folder 1:2
      W[illiam]F. Weeks, Berryville, to B[enjamin]F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 12 Nov[ember] 1843.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Has had little time to write as what time he had "has been devoted to some fair lassies... a courting man should never be held accountable for delay of this kind"; enjoyed the time he and Conway had at Old Point; was prevented by rain in "executing my designs upon Miss ---"; has been convinced to go to the South this winter, which will prevent his return to college; encloses $10 in thanks to him; asks for all the news from college.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      J.C. Sheldon, Williamsburg, [Virginia], to R.R. Garrett, near Yorktown, Virginia, 13 April 1844.
      1 page.ALS.

      Informs him that his friends in New York are seeking some oysters, asks about the "prospect of their gratification."

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      R[ichard]Eppes, City Point, Virginia, to Alexander Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 24 June 1844.
      1 page.ALS.

      Will explain the neglect of his not writing when he comes to Williamsburg on the third; expects that he will come to stay with him at least a month; details the diversions in store for him, such as "an introduction to the belles of Petersburg & the neighboring counties, a trip to Nottoway, a visit to some of my pretty cousins in Greensville, and frequent discussions on politics"; informs him of his [RE] mother's death; asks to be remembered to their mutual friends.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      Alex[ander Garrett], Smithfield, [Virginia], to "brother" B[enjamin]F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 12 October 1844.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Explains that he forgot his diploma and his certificate in Williamsburg and gives him directions on how to procure each and where to send them so that he will have them before the Isle of Wight County court begins; explains that they were required of Ruffin before they would allow him to qualify; describes some people he has met in Smithfield already; is not sure of his prospects there as yet.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      Richard R. Garrett, Senate Chamber, Richmond, [Virginia] to "wife" Laura A. Garrett, Yorktown, York County, Virginia, 27 Jan[uar]y 1845.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Describes his trip to Richmond; informs her that "we had the most exciting session by far we have had this winter. The democrats made the whigs back out fairly from the election of a U.S. Senator"; describes a party he attended for Miss Hill and Mrs. Ashton at Mr. Parishe's; was ill from the food at the party but is now recovered; informs her that he saw no one at the party "as handsome & to my eyes as sweet as my own Laura"; called on Martha but found her indisposed and does not believe she will ever be in good health; has heard that Louisiana Barryham[?] has the ague and fever; mentions a revival in progress at the Fourth Baptist Church and that he went to hear Brother Walker at the Second Church; implores her to write to him.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      William S. Christian, Northampton, Virginia, to "friend" Benjamin F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 30 April 1845.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Writes to inform him that he is to be married on the 25th of June to a "splendid woman in every attribute"; has been very busy going to three to four parties a week; invites other members of the Garrett family through this letter; implores him to come to wait on him at the wedding.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      Ja[me]sW. Spratley, Smithfield, Virginia, to Alexander C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 14 June 1846.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has neglected to write as he has been very busy with his tax accounts; informs him that there is nothing happening in Smithfield and "so you must content yourself this time by simply hearing of my dreadful melancholy and despairing thoughts"; mentions the rumors that he is courting Mag again as having started at the wedding in Surry and denies any truth to them; describes the lady's anger at him as being so great the "I do not even visit Mag nor even walk the street with her in her evening strolls"; missed seeing him at J. Wilson's wedding; mentions the depression that he felt while at the wedding in remembering the time he'd spent there the year before and how he fully expected "a favourable result" to his courting; received an invitation to act as a groomsman at John Corsen's wedding next week; has promised Mary and Alice Coke that he will meet them at Old Point this summer and asks if he will go with them also.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      B[enjamin]F. Garrett, Halifax Co[urt] House, to "brother" Dr. Ro[bert]M. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 7 July 1846.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Asks him to write when he can; describes the "grand celebration here on the 4th" where he gave the address on the subject on Texas, Oregon, and the Mexican War; received many compliments on his address; has decided to speak on every occasion due to the successes he's had in addressing the Court and the crowd on the 4th; mentions that business is slow and has only four suits this term; is anxious for success; has not called on any ladies but will write to Susan if he does begin to court; will meet Mr. Leigh at Charlotte Court; has misplaced his account but is sure Mr. Leigh will pay the amount owed; believes Mr. Leigh owes him $30 but asks if he could send the account with his next letter.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      Charlotte [?], n.p., to "sister" Lauretta A. Winder, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 16 Dec[ember] 1847.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has not written before this because she has been very busy since she [LAW] left; shares news of many acquaintances and their goings-on, including weddings and courtships.

    • Box: Folder 1:3
      W[illia]mP. Nottingham, H[ickory] Grounds, N[orthampton] County, to Lauretta A. Winder, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 31 Aug[ust] 1848.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Received the articles and letter she sent by Mr. Wheeler and sends her many thanks for them; has sent her a box by Mr. Wheeler containing peaches, dried pears, and honey; has paid off her account with [?] N's store; informs her of several deaths, including that of W[illia]mBayly from an illness resulting from hemorrhage of the lungs, Mr. Marshall from worn-out constitution, and Dr. Yerby's youngest child from consumption; believes Mrs. Leah Bowden will not live much longer as her health is declining rapidly; mentions that Rose's cousins, Mrs. and Dr. Hayes and two daughters, will come to visit her after their visit to the President as Mrs. Hayes is the sister of President Polk; is pleased to tell her that Charlotte's health is improving and will soon be well again.

  • Box: Folder 1:4-6
    Subseries 3: Letters, 1850-1859.
    26 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:4
      Th[omas] H. Bayly, Washington, to Jno. [John] H. Pumphrey, n.p., 27 Jan[uary 18]50.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Describes the efforts he has made on his [JHP] behalf in writing to various people; informs him that no apology is necessary as he was glad to serve his constituent and friend.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      A[lexander] C. Garrett, Philadelphia, [Penn.], to "brother" Dr. Ro[bert] M. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 31 May 1850.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Escorted Mrs. Orgain to City Point on his way to Philadelphia; asks that he tell Miss Lauretta that he delivered her package to Mr. Ryle in Baltimore safely; felt "very queer in being surrounded by my black fellow citizens, and in seeing the deference and respect shown them. They are the priviledged [sic] class -- the aristocracy of the Quaker City... my wrath has cooled, and I endeavor not to notice these sable gentlemen"; describes a case he is currently working on with Mr. Boone; have made the acquaintance of an Englishman who wishes him to accompany him to Canada and then on to England, but he cannot for the money; has also met a Virginian who wishes him to accompany him to York.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      Th[omas] H. Bayly, Washington, to A[lexander] C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 22 Aug[ust 18]50.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Gave his letter to Judge Underwood, who has only had the time recently to reply; encloses Underwood's letter to him; informs him that the outcome of the slavery bill is very uncertain as yet; mentions that if the Texas Bill is taken up in advance of the Territorial Bills, the slavery bill will be defeated.

      This letter was included within the letter listed below; J.R. Underwood, n.p., to [Thomas H.] Bailey [sic], n.p., n.d.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      J.R. Underwood, n.p., to [Thomas H.] Bailey [sic], n.p., n.d.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Describes the laws regarding the sale of land for taxes; advises his friend to hire an agent to determine when the lands were sold and whether the sales were regular; recommends his son Eugene Underwood as the man to investigate the matter if the lands lay south of the Green River and are military land.

      This letter was included within the above letter; Th[omas] H. Bayly, Washington, to A[lexander] C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 22 Aug[ust 18]50.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      R.R. Garrett, Marl Banks, to son Geo[rge] R. Garrett, Richmond College, Richmond, Virginia, 8 Nov[embe]r 1850.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Is glad to hear he likes his school; advises him to "be studious, steady and moral, for your course will be watched with an eagle's eye"; reminds him that he should obey the rules and regulations for his school, for otherwise all his efforts to be good will fail; informs him that Mr. S.G. Cook received his letter and was pleased to hear from him; praises the letter he wrote to Penny as being the "best written and dictated letter I have yet seen from you"; admonishes him to not "be led off from the path of rectitude by vicious young men, or the temptations by which you are surrounded"; will only bring in a half crop of corn this year as the crops are not doing well; sends the love of family and friends.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      Thomas Palentini[?], Richmond, [Virginia], to Mr. Alex[ander C.] Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 11 Nov[ember] 1850.
      1 page.ALS.

      Asks that if he has received any money from Mr. Cooke or from Mr. W[illia]m Jones to please forward it to him; notices that Mr. [?] is not at college this year and requests him to see if he can procure the $15 dollars he owes him; has written to Mr. Henry Porter, who owes him $12, instructing him to give the money to him [ACG].

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      A[lexander] C. Garrett, Richmond, [Virginia], to "brother" Dr. Ro[bert] M. Garrett, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 17 Dec[embe]r 1850.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Wishes he had received his letter sooner as it would have persuaded more people to vote for his side; informs him that his side won the vote by eighteen votes and that "the question is now considered settled -- we hear men of all parties speak of the Bill as the law of the land"; mentions that Southall feigned illness to try to postpone the debate; believes that the Bill will certainly pass on Thursday or Friday; will go with the rest of the Democrats, save for "that red headed Montague from Middlesex who will vote against us," to the Governor to demand that the Democrats be given control of the Board of Directors; wonders why Saunders & Co. read such an unwise remonstrance before the public body; sends Barlow some extra copies of the Examiner as the editor published the remarks without their knowledge; informs him that the Enquirer will also take notice of this subject; asks that he see if he can find the $30 in his desk drawer and send it to him.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      Geo[rge] T. Williamson, Cincinnati, [Ohio], to A[lexander] C. Garrett, n.p., 21 Jan[uar]y 1851.
      1 page.ALS.

      Informs him that during the sale of a portion of land by Mr. P. Pumphrey to the late W.T. Galt of Williamsburgh [sic], he found that some parts of this land were sold for taxes that had been left for the heirs of N. Fox Sr.; mentions that each heir, including Nat Fox and Henry Fox, were entitled to 355.5 acres; will find out where Nat Fox and Henry Fox lived and died in Ohio; feels the Tax Title under which these lands are held is very strong, but will try to save a sum for the heirs.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      Alexander C. Garrett, White Sulphur Springs, to "sister," n.p., 27 August 1851.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Describes all the ladies at White Sulphur Springs and mentions Miss Izetta Coles as "a belle who rings to the tune of $60,000"; mentions a party of South Carolinians and Floridians and describes all in the party; believes the belle of White Sulphur is a Miss Bowyer of Botetourt, to whom he has been paying attention; assures her there is nothing serious in that arena for "why be 'college larnt' and let a simple mountain maid fool me"; mentions the Presidential party and in particular Mr. Corcoran, "the great banker from Washington and who is the money changer of the Presidential party," as also paying attention to Miss Bowyer; is smug that youth has won over money in the matter of Miss Bowyer but is aware that he needs to moderate his attentions; mentions that Miss Bowyer is either in love with him or is simply carrying on a harmless flirtation; has been slightly ill and believes it due to drinking too much of the water.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      A[lexander] C. Garrett, Sweet Springs, to "brother" [Dr. Robert M. Garrett?], n.p., 3 September 1851.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Informs him that Governor Floyd is anxiously seeking the nomination from the Staunton Convention; was approached by P.H. Aylitt, an editor of the Richmond Examiner, with an offer to allow him [ACG] to choose the Board of Directors for the Lunatic Asylum in Williamsburg if he could secure the vote for Floyd in Williamsburg, York County, and James City County; was offered head of the Board of Directors under this plan; has decided to go with this offer and asks whom should be appointed to the Board; has "rather a difficult game to play" as Johnson also wants his support for Governor; would like to support Judge Christian for judge of their circuit; would like to run for the legislature as "there is nothing like office to give a man influence 'with the powers that be'"; afraid that Segar will defeat him; had $200 stolen from him and asks that he send $16 or $20 to him at Staunton.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      A.F. Leonard[?], Norfo[lk, Virginia], to Robert Garrett, Williamsburg, [Virginia], 3 Nov[ember] 1851.
      1 page.ALS.

      Writes on behalf of Mr. N. Pumphrey; informs him that the real estate formerly belonging to W[illia]m R. Pumphrey that he [RG] has advertised for sale is part of the trust deed from Pumphrey to Jno. M. Gregory and so now belongs to Gregory.

    • Box: Folder 1:4
      W[illiam] Lyttleton Savage, Philadelphia, [Penn.], to "sister," n.p., 12 Dec[embe]r 1851.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Was sorry to hear his brother's severe and painful attack; sends a prescription of living solely on oatmeal porridge for six weeks; did not send marble hearths and casings for the upstairs rooms because he feels that would be too expensive; discusses the possibility of sending his slave, John, to help his brother, "Say to my brother I am very willing, for him to have John as long as he wishes him, provided John is willing to go to the Western Shore,...I am perfectly willing, but I cannot compel him to separate from his friends and wife...and if John is willing I am not only willing, but desirous that my brother should have him as long as he lives;" shares his views on the treatment of slaves as "conscientious;" owns no ploughboy of the kind that his brother would like, being that his other slaves are unsuitable, George is too young and Harry is too old; speaks of other furnishings for the house that he has procured for her; sends a total of the amount of money he has paid so far.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      Two letters written on the same page, 3 March 1852.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Maria L. Savage, Eyre Ville, to "mother" Lauretta [?], n.p., 3 March 1852. Has been visiting relatives and friends; shares news of all with whom she is staying; has read "Wide Wide World" and enjoyed it; believes she and Father would enjoy it as well; is afraid Father did not receive the basket she made; feels er basket was well done for a first attempt. 3 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Lucy [?], n.p., to Aunt Lauretta [?], n.p., n.d. Informs her of the death of Colonel Lucad of Accomac from pneumonia; asks her to write when she [Lucy] gets to Washington. 2 pp. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      Ellen [?], Hern Cliffs, to "aunt" Lauretta [?], n.p., 29 March 1852.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Shares a great deal of news of friends and family; asks her to tell Uncle Thom[as?] many things about the family; misses them both a great deal.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      W[illiam] F. & Thomas Ritchie, Richmond, [Virginia], to R.R. Garrett, Yorktown, Virginia, 22 Sept[ember] 1852.
      1 page.ALS.

      Seeks to approximate the Presidential election and asks him to send the probable vote of his county; would also like to know how to vote would compare to last fall's vote for Governor.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      W. Goddin, Richm[on]d, [Virginia], to A[lexander C.] Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 8 Nov[ember] 1852.
      1 page.ALS.

      Has employed Mr. Thomas M. Ladd to survey where Mrs. Richardson lives; informs him that Mr. Ladd will be there several days, when it would be a good time for him [ACG] to visit there also.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      Two letters written on the same page, 2 December 1852.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Susie [?], Hern Cliffs, to "aunt" Lauretta [?], n.p., 2 December 1852. Intends to walk to Kendall Grove today, and must start early as it is five miles away; was disappointed that Uncle William arrived without Uncle Thomas; informs her that Uncle Thomas "is a sorry farmer not to have his corn gathered before this," but will excuse him since he has had the rheumatism; Father will not let Rob go to see them [Lauretta] this year until his lungs get stronger; believes General Nottingham has gone deranged on the subject of religion, but it will soon pass; informs her that this week is her last in her family's house, as it is being sold; believes Father will settle in Washington; supposes she has heard of the death of Cousin Ellen Burbridge. 3 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Susan E. Wilson to Lauretta [?], n.p., n.d. Feels in such confusion that she is not sure what she has written or what she wants to say; informs her that the house is to be sold on the fifteenth of the month, when they will sell everything, and possession must be given on the first of January; mentions William Savage's departure the next day for Philadelphia; had hoped to see her, but Mr. Wilson seems to think he will be able to visit her soon. 1 p. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      B[enjamin] F. Garrett, Ho[use of] Delegates, to Alex[ander C. Garrett], n.p., 9 Dec[embe]r 1852.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Describes the praise that his [ACG] speech has received from various members, including Segar and W[illia]m Ritchie ; informs him that the editor of the Whig will publish it next week; regrets that he cannot come home until after Christmas because the Internal Improvement Bills come up next Saturday; hopes that he [ACG] will be able to come up before then; asks him to tell Ma that he intended to visit her but circumstances prevented him; will bring Maria and Mary to visit Ma.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      W[illia]m H. Ammon, Henrico County, [Virginia], to Alexander C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 11 Feb[ruary] 1853.
      1 page.ALS.

      Had heard from Mr. M. Bishop that the suit between himself and Pumphrey had been settled in his [WHA] favor; asks him to write and give him all the details; asks if he [?] has taken the Tho[mas] W. contract and if Whitaker has paid the money on the contract; would like to see him the next time he comes to Richmond; misses Dr. G[arrett] in the practice of his family; has had several Negroes sick and has suffered from a bad cold himself.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      W[illiam] W. Coke, Princess Anne Court House, [Virginia], to Col. Alexander C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 16 Feb[ruary] 1853.
      1 page.ALS.

      Had written to him about the appointment as Physician for the Marine Hospital of Dr. W.P. Morgan; would like to add the amendment of his appointment in the event of the removal of the present incumbent; feels that his [ACG] compliance will place him under many obligations to him; asks about the rich Irishman that died in Halifax Co. without heirs; would like to know all the information as he thinks he will be able to find his heirs in Ireland through correspondence with lawyers in Cork, Ireland.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      Newton Short, n.p., to Alexander C. Garret [sic], Williamsburg, Virginia, 21 March [18]53.
      1 page.ALS.

      Postmarked Richmond, Virginia Has heard from Mr. Saunders that he [ACG] has been authorized to put his claim against Nelson's estate before the court; has a receipt for the bond held by Mr. Saunders from Mr. Nelson.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      W[illia]m H. Ammon, Henrico [County, Virginia], to Alex[ander C. Garrett], n.p., 8 August 1853.
      1 page.ALS.

      Assumes that Mr. Whitaker has not yet paid the bond he [WHA] left with Garrett; asks him to inform Mr. Whitaker that he is not in compliance with his promise; would like a check on Richmond Bank if he is successful in getting the money; asks for news from Philadelphia.

    • Box: Folder 1:5
      B[enjamin] F. Garrett, Mt. Laurel Post Office, Halifax County, [Virginia], to Ellie [Alexander C. Garrett], n.p., 14 Octo[ber] 1853.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has not written due to wrapping up his former business as he intends to quit the practice; feels it impossible to make it to Williamsburg at any given time; has pulled their house down and intends to build another; and Maria is at the Court House visiting her uncle Bailey during this time; is willing that he and brother Robert divides the slaves between them and asks if he needs to be present during this time; encloses a letter from Francis H. Lee and asks if he will find out from Mr. Lee whether he wants to advertise the selling of the property according to the deed; informs him the railroad will be finished to Clover Depot, near his home, by the first of February.

    • Box: Folder 1:6
      W[illia]m Lyttleton Savage, Philadelphia, [Penn.], to "brother" [?], n.p., 23 Jan[uar]y 1855.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Agrees with the suggestion in Maria's letter that he ["brother"] take a trip to Northampton in order to convalesce and recover from his illness; has not been well himself, and has been suffering from a disease that resembles bilious cholic, and supposes it was combined also with gout; was truly sorry to hear of the loss suffered by Dr. and Mrs. Garrett [the death of one of their daughters]; informs him of the death of Mr. Lyon, who passed away peacefully and retained his faculties up to within a few hours of his death; hopes that he and his wife may decide to move to Williamsburg.

    • Box: Folder 1:6
      W[illia]m P. Nottingham, Eastville, [Virginia], to [his sister] Lauretta [Savage], n.p., 3 May 1855.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Expresses deepest sympathy for the loss of [her husband] W. Savage; was shocked by Savage's change in health when he saw him last; asks her to inform Dr. Garrett that he is to travel to Norfolk next Tuesday and will meet Garrett there; sends the love of the family.

    • Box: Folder 1:6
      Jno. [John] E. Winder, Eastville, [Virginia], to "sister" [?], n.p., 14 Aug[us]t 1858.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Received her last letter without a signature or a date; informs her that Uncle Sam's violin is beyond repair; would not sell Pa's violin but if she would like Rob to have it, he will lend it to him; encloses $45 to settle the bill with Mr. Kellum.

    • Box: Folder 1:6
      B[enjamin] F. Garrett, Clover Station, to Dr. Ro[bert] M. Garrett, n.p., 14 Jan[uary] 1859.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has filled his ice house with ice three inches thick; killed his hogs, which averaged 225 lbs. each; has taken all his Negroes to his new plantation that he intends to make the finest in the county; is determined to make a good farmer; asks after all the news, especially of the Asylum, who the candidates are for the Senate and the House of Delegates, and whether there is no opposition to Garrett for Congress; informs him that Mr. Clark gave Bettie 15 Negroes and $3,000.

    • Box: Folder 1:6
      Two letters written on the same page, 22-23 May 1859.
      4 pages.ALS.

      S[?] Guion, [?] of Virginia, to "aunt" [?], n.p., 22 May 1859. Informs her that Robertson is in love with a certain black-eyed lady, whose name he cannot yet reveal. 2 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: S[?] Guion, [?] of Virginia, to "aunt" [?], n.p., 23 May 1859. Regrets that he could not finish the letter the night before, but he was overcome by sleep; reveals that he will come to Williamsburg soon to become engaged; informs her that the weather has been quite warm; shares news of the family. 3 pp. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 1:6
      W[illia]m Lyon, Richmond, [Virginia], to Dr. [Robert M. Garrett], n.p., 31 Oct[ober] 1859.
      1 page.ALS.

      Encloses a check for $5, the amount of Mrs. Saunders' donation to the Bible Society of Virginia; informs him that the money is also intended as the first payment toward making George T. Wilson, son of Rev. G.T. Wilson, a life member; thanks him for the kind care he received while a houseguest at his home.

  • Box: Folder 1:7-8
    Subseries 4: Letters, 1860-1869.
    20 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:7
      M. T. Hughes, Prince Edward C[ourt] Ho[use], [Virginia], to Dr. Rob[er]t M. Garrett, n.p., 8 Jan[uary] 1860.
      1 page.ALS.

      Encloses a note to him; hopes that he will accede to his wishes.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      B[enjamin] F. Garrett, Clover Station, [Virginia], to "brother" [Dr. Robert M. Garrett], n.p., 28 Jan[uary] 1860.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Informs him that Mary has been extremely sick for a week, but it appears that she is recovering; will return home next week if she continues to improve; regrets that he has no concrete information to give him regarding Mr. Hughes; advises him that if Lou has made up her mind about Hughes, that there is little he can do to stop the wedding; was sorry to hear of the death of A.C. McCandlish but was told by Robby that his habits were bad.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      Bettie A. Garrett, Chester, to "sister" Susan [Winder Garrett], n.p., 27 Feb[ruary] 1860.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has heard of Lou's impending marriage but is concerned that she is a bit young, being not yet twenty; assures her that Mary is quite recovered and has an enormous appetitite; Mr. Garrett has gone up to Court today, so she will have three or four servants to sleep in the house and protect her and the baby; informs her that the baby is getting fatter every day, but still has no teeth; asks after her garden and shares news on her own gardening.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      Two letters written on the same page, 29 February [18]60.
      pages.

      P.W. Garrett, n.p., to "uncle" Robert [M. Garrett], n.p., 29 February [18]60. Has waited to write till Lou settled on a date for her wedding, which will be on the 25th of April; was told by Mr. Hughes that he intends to meet him in Richmond; informs him that Lou could not do with less than $300 for the wedding; was told by Mama that the interest on the money earned from the sale of the servants along with what brother owes for Negro hires would be more than $300; asks if [cousin] Laura has yet gone to the Eastern Shore as they expect her every day. 3 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Mary Lou Garrett, n.p., to "uncle" [Robert M. Garrett], n.p., n.d. Believes that $300 would not be even half enough for her wedding; assures him that she cannot do with less than $1500; sends love to Aunt Sue and the children; asks to have him send the $1500 as Mama agrees that it is not too much. 2 pp.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      B[enjamin] F. Garrett, Clover Station, [Virginia], to Col. Alex[ander] C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 17 July 1860.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Reports that his wheat crop has been damaged by a hailstorm and fears he will get only a half a crop; hopes for rain because otherwise he will not make a good crop of corn or tobacco; discusses politics and who will be elected; informs him that his ankle is no better and hopes that he can send the "receipt" he made for his leg; has decided to go to White Sulphur [Springs] this summer.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      W[illia]m P. Nottingham, Eastville, [Virginia], to [his sister] Lauretta [Savage], n.p. 4 pp. ALS. 25 Mar[ch 18]60[?].
      pages.

      Has just received the interest on her two bonds from the Messrs. Nottingham; has been expecting her to visit but realizes she does not know yet when she will be able to; hopes that her children have passed the critical point of scarlet fever and are now safely convalescing; informs her that he and Comfort are suffering from bad colds; shares the news that Hamilton Neale and Lizzy Smith are to be married this summer, and Rob[ert] Nottingham and Miss Byrd are to be married at length also; informs her that the new steamer Northampton is to make her first stop on this shore tomorrow, and on which one may safely and comfortably cross the bay.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      Jno. [John E. Winder], Norfolk, [Virginia], to "sister" [Susan Winder Garrett?], n.p., 25 April 1860.
      1 page.ALS.

      Has not had time to make the inquiries she wanted; deposited $100.66 in her account to bring her balance to $574.59; has not heard from [?] Guion; will send the ring she spoke of if he finds it; informs her that Mrs. Galt is in Norfolk staying at the Atlantic Hotel.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      [W. Robertson Garrett], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "aunty" [?], n.p., August 1860[?].
      2 pages.ALS. Incomplete.

      Spent about a week dividing his time between Norfolk and Hampton and saw the Great Eastern; was appointed a delegate to the Democratic convention at Charlottesville as soon as he returned; rode up to the convention with Miss Maggie Parker and plans to go see her in September on the Eastern Shore when all the rest of her beaux have departed.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      E. Pettis, Edgewood, to "madam" [Susan Winder Garrett], n.p., 13 Nov[ember] 1860.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Seeks to gain the vote of [W.] Robertson [Garrett] for Tallie's husband [?]; is afraid that the man will lose his office, and he has no other means of employment; informs her that Eliza's health has been poor lately; will not be able to make it down this winter as Eliza is taking care of some little servants who have lost their mother, and she is afraid that they will be mistreated if she leaves them; has had a severe attack which makes him more aware of his age and his mortality.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      J.A. Smith, Farmer's Bank of Virginia, Richmond, to Mr. Ro[bert] M. Garrett, W[illia]m[s]burg, [Virginia], 31 Jan[uar]y 1861.
      1 page.ALS.

      Returns Humphrey's and Taliaferro's check for $150 to him as it was not endorsed; informs him that there was no deposit made to his credit at that bank.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      [W.] Robertson [Garrett], Young's Mill, [Virginia], to "father" [Dr. Robert M. Garrett], n.p., 9 Oct[ober] 1861.
      1 page.ALS.

      Reported to General McClaws [McLaws] last Monday and was stationed at Young's farm at the mouth of the Warwick River; occupies the right of the line of defenses and is in command of the right battery; was told by General McClaws [McLaws] that General Magruder wished to take New-Ports News [Newport News], but there are 11,000 men stationed at that place and there is little chance for a fight; will take winter quarters nearby.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      B[enjamin F. Garrett, Clover Station, [Virginia], to "brother" [Dr. Robert M. Garrett], n.p., 3 Dec[embe]r 1862.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Informs him that George and his family have been staying with him since last summer; assures him that George has quit drinking and will hopefully do well; has been enjoying the company of Laura and family, who is at Hampden Sydney College in Prince Edward County; has a good crop this year but find groceries and salt difficult to obtain; purchased salt for $25 a bushel last week, corn sells for $10 a barrel and wheat at $4 a bushel; describes the prosperity of the tobacco farmers in these times; feels that "times will be worse after 1st of January if Lincoln attempts to carry out his Emancipation Proclamation"; assures him that "our success [in winning the war] is certain"; informs him that Burnside will fight at Fredericksburg but is sure Gen. Lee will defeat him whenever they meet.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      J.W. Blair, Richmond, [Virginia], to Dr. [Robert M.] Garrett, n.p., 3 Dec[embe]r [18]62.
      1 page.ALS.

      Is now at the Military Institute [Virginia Military Institute] in Lexington; is told that a young man cannot be gotten in there, and that expenses are quite high, being $400-$500 per year; asks that Winder brings a letter to his [JWB] son Daniel in Col. Gorgas' department if he comes up; will write to Col. Smith and his son will write to him [RMG] as soon as possible.

    • Box: Folder 1:7
      Asa Hartz, Johnson's Island [Federal Prison], Lake Erie, to Miss A., n.p., [25 December] 1863.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Decided to write to her, though he does not know her, when Col. W. read parts of her letter to him; has let his imagination wander to think of his home in the South, and wishes "'this cruel war was over'"; has amused himself by coaxing a rat out of his hole and then throwing Col. W.'s toothbrush at him; joined the Confederate Army with the notion "that it was a mighty funny thing; that there was a good joke in it somewhere, & that I was the Columbus to discover it"; finally "found the joke -- [through] curiosity morbid curiosity" when he stumbled upon a group of Union troops who pressed him to go with them, and so became a prisoner; asks her not to mention that he wishes to go back again; describes an "exchange" ceremony (a funeral); closes with poetry that makes clear his desire to receive a letter from someone back in Dixie.

    • Box: Folder 1:8
      W. R[obertson] Garrett, Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "cousin" [?], n.p., 6 Feb[ruary] 1866.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Hopes that she will stop in Williamsburg on her way to Richmond to visit Cousin Mary Howard; shares news of many friends and relatives; informs her that Mary Garrett, daughter of Uncle Ben[jamin Garrett], is visiting and breaking many hearts; urges her to visit while Mary is there also.

    • Box: Folder 1:8
      W. R[obertson] Garrett, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, to "aunt" L[auretta] A. Savage, Eastville, Virginia, 9 Ap[ri]l 1866.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Apologizes for his lack of correspondence; refutes the statement she made in her previous letter "about an 'old aunt who gives offence [sic] by showing an interest in the family'"; assures her that she is well- loved by all but that the younger generation is "very negligent in the little etiquettes of life"; informs her that Comfort is visiting them, but will leave soon as she is afraid of the smallpox and fears it will reach Hickory Grounds; shares the news that Winder [Garrett] is in love with Miss Bettie Custis and Van with Miss Jenn Bright.

    • Box: Folder 1:8
      C[omfort?] [?]. Nottingham, Hickory Grounds, to "auntie" [?], n.p., 25 Dec[ember] 1866.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Has not been able to get up to Eastville to get the blankets, paper, or envelopes for her since it has either rained, snowed, or been very cold lately; cannot "see the slightest probability of borrowing you any money" and Mother cannot make her a comfort; informs her that Nancy has not been able to work since last August, Patience has been sick, and the new cook has been in bed almost every day since she arrived, so all the work of the house lands on Mother; looked in Eastville for blankets but found only common ones that would not suit her.

    • Box: Folder 1:8
      C[omfort] L.G. N[ottingham], Hickory Grounds, to "auntie" L[auretta] A. Savage, Williamsburg, Virginia, 10 Dec[ember] 1867.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Encloses the receipt of the deposit in First National Bank and asks that she let her know as soon as she receives it; informs her that Capt. Turner died a few days before; shares the news that Cousin R. took Mollie away with him and that Uncle John left a few minutes before for the island; asks when she will visit; would like Aunt Susan and Lottie to send her some scraps of worsted for her bed quilt; shares news of friends and relatives.

    • Box: Folder 1:8
      C[omfort] L.G. Nottingham, Hickory Grounds, to "auntie" [?], n.p., 4 June 1868.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Received a letter from Miss Sarah Mallett telling her of the extreme illness of Cousin Susan, being of the heart; was informed that Dr. Yardley thought Susan could not live through the night; informs her that Miss Lizzie Savage is visiting Eyre Hall; shares news of the activities of various relatives; describes the damage caused by windstorms; fears that they will have no fruit this year as the cold spring has destroyed the crop; have been two fires since last she wrote, and a neighbor's stable with all his horses and a cow were burned.

    • Box: Folder 1:8
      Capt. W. Robertson Garrett, Pulaski Giles County, Tennessee, to "aunt" [?], n.p., 3 Aug[ust] 1868.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Was elected a Professor at Giles College on the fourth of July; does not wish to take her money because she needs to have it for herself; informs her how to send a box or a trunk, but also tells her that it would be very costly, and believes the clothes will be suitable for the boys; informs her that John is back from Scotland and would like to teach school.

  • Box: Folder 1:9-10
    Subseries 5: Letters, 1870-1889.
    19 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Mary [?], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "aunt" [?], n.p., 16 November 1870.
      3 pages.Incomplete.

      Asks if she thinks she is an affectionate niece, "to write to my old Aunt twice a week"; informs her that Mrs. Taliaferro is back in Williamsburg after a trip to Canada; has organized a choir of the Mercer family, since the Southalls refused to participate; shares the news that Mary Stubbs has a baby girl about three weeks old, but does not know what she will name her; is pleased with the visits that Mr. Tucker and his wife make to her family.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Mary [?], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "aunt" L[auretta] A. Savage, Eastville, Virginia, 8 Dec[ember] 1870.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Received the box of presents she sent; thanks her for the two beautiful dresses she sent; has made up her black Africa dress and feels very exquisite in it; informs her of the loss of Mary Stubbs' infant daughter; shares the news that Mr. Southall and Lizzie have a baby daughter; the election at the Asylum has retained all the old officers; expects Miss Fanny Crump for a visit the first of January; informs her that "one of your Eastern Shore girls," Miss Brown, has visited Williamsburg, and that she likes her a great deal.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      [W. Robertson Garrett], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "auntie" [?], n.p., 19 May 1871.
      1 page.ALS. Incomplete.

      Informs her that a decision has been made in her suit against W[illia]m Evans; explains that the suit took so long to settle because the court was trying to determine exactly how much money was due her; informs her that the amount due her should be paid within four months from the date of the decree.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      W. R[obertson] Garrett, Pulaski, Tenn., to "auntie" [?], n.p., 6 Aug[ust] 1871.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Writes for information on Aunt Charlotte's condition, as he has been informed that she is very ill; explains that Van's engagement has been terminated as his fianc饬 Miss Mattie Children, has run off and married Mr. Lindsay of Pulaski; describes Van as bearing this information "very nobly and I think is not seriously wounded"; informs her that their new house will be complete the first of September and begs her to come see it.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Mary [?], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "aunt" L[auretta] A. Savage, Eastville, Virginia, 8 Aug[ust] 1871.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that Ma has put off her visit to the Eastern Shore until Van comes to visit his home, since she will be able to stay longer if she waits; is relieved that Aunt Charlotte is much better now; explains that Miss Mary Sherwell is to go to New York for a few weeks because her health is bad; expects Professor Garrett and his bride later in the month.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      C[omfort] L.G. N[ottingham], Balt[imore, Maryland], to "auntie" [?], n.p., 9 Jan[uary] 1873.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Has written Mr. Nottingham in regards to the bond he owes and will write to her as soon as he responds; expects to lose at least half the amount due from Mr. Shellan's estate; shares news of family and friends.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      C[omfort] L.G. N[ottingham], Balt[imore, Maryland], to "auntie" [?], n.p., 8 July 1873.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has been very ill for a long time; wanted to return to Northampton the next day, but as she is still too weak to dress, she will have to wait at least another week; mentions the death of Uncle Tom Nottingham after a long illness; informs her of the activities of other members of the family.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      C[omfort] L.G. N[ottingham], Balt[imore, Maryland], to "auntie" [?], n.p., 22 July 1873.
      4 pages.

      Has been better lately; has been diagnosed by Dr. Page as being worn down from "nervous depression"; has been advised to travel a bit in order to recover fully; received an invitation to visit with a family in the Blue Ridge section of Maryland and will go there in a few days; expects to travel to Northampton later in the season; informs her that Miss Lucie Jamison (the sister of Cousin Carrie Nottingham) is quite ill and is expected to pass away soon; has been informed by Mr. and Mrs. Custis of Accomac that the railroad will run through Northampton, a desirable prospect if it increases property value. 4 pp. ALS.

      Includes AN from C[omfort] L.G. N[ottingham], Balt[imore, Maryland], to "auntie" [?], n.p., n.d., thanking her for her "kind thoughtfulness" and asking her to come to visit during the cold weather. 1 p.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Sue [?], Williamsburg, Virginia, to "auntie" [?], n.p., 1 Jan[uary] 1874.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Thanks her for the wonderful Christmas presents she sent; mentions that the whole family misses her a great deal; informs her that Mr. Wharton went to Norfolk for the holidays and has a new suit of clothes; cannot understand the extravagance of Mr. Wharton unless he is seriously debating matrimony; mentions that they have received a letter from Julia in which there was enclosed a photograph of Rob; was upset to hear of Uncle John's poor health and hopes Cousin Comfort is better.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Mary [?], Gloucester, [Virginia], to sister Sue [?], n.p., 17 June 1874.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Will be very accomplished when she returns home as Dr. Tabb has been teaching her how to eat fish, play whist, and boil eggs; asks for news of Winder; mentions that she is fast becoming a brunette and enjoying it; describes the pleasantness of being near the water; asks for news of friends and family and sends greetings to many.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Winder [Garrett], Cleburn, Johnson County, Texas, to "father" [Dr. Robert M. Garrett], n.p., 5 July 1874.
      6 pages.ALS.

      Has been asked by the editor of the Cleburn Chronicle to reply to an attack on Gov. Coke by the Galveston News, and to condense some articles from the New York Herald; has yet to take out his license to practice law; describes the town of Cleburn as being "a tolerable little country town, with a population of about 1200, and growing quite fast"; informs him that the prairie lands in this area will produce 20,000 bales of cotton, which will sell for $50-$75 per bale; gives the prices of flour ($6 a barrel), good cows ($6 a head), horses ($25-$50), and corn ($0.25 per bushel after September 1st); is currently staying at a hotel but is eagerly awaiting a position in a private home to teach for an hour or two a day; mentions that the whole state is crowded with lawyers; informs him that the land laws are complicated and provide most of the revenue to be gained in this profession; was obliged to ride with the driver when traveling to Cleburn as the stage was filled with ladies, and as a result was treated to the view of a "magnificent country"; describes the people as "healthy, but their eyes look dull, and they are generally listless and inanimate"; mentions that the people are hard-working and thrifty, and that Cleburn "makes no pretensions to anything like fashion or refinement, but they appear to be very good plain people."

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Kate [?], Park Avenue, to "cousin" [?], n.p., 25 Jan[uary] 1875.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Took the hair that was sent immediately to Madame De Vourges to be made up as soon as it was received; informs her that Mary Garret's [sic] hair is so tangled that it would not be worth making it up, and the same is true for Mrs. Vest's; misses Comfort a great deal, but knows she will be happier being with her father; fears Comfort is sick; shares news of the family.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      James H. Smith, Boston, Mass., to Dr. Rob[er]t [M.] Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 20 Feb[ruary] 1876.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Writes because he would like to know the date of his birth; asks also for the age of his sister Lucy, who is going to school at the Normal collage [sic]; would like to go to Williamsburg next fall before going to school.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      R.B. Winder, Balt[imore, Maryland], to cousin Lauretta [Savage?], n.p., 13 Sept[ember] 1876.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that the package was sent back to Baltimore, but that he has sent it down again to Dr. Van Garrett, and it should be in Yorktown on Thursday morning; is sorry to hear of Cousin Sue's illness; sends his love to all.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Two letters written on the same page, 2 Oct[ober] 1877.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Julia Garrett, Nashville, [Tenn.], to "aunt" [?], n.p., 2 Oct[ober] 1877. Informs her that the children are greatly looking forward to the trip to going to see her; describes everyone as looking well; mentions the weather as being "real hot summer weather" and that no one is yet wearing winter hats or garments. 3 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Willie Garrett, Nashville, [Tenn.], to "aunt" [?], n.p., n.d. Has spent one of his dimes on three apples but still has a quarter and a nickel left; mentions that he makes a nickel ever week for carrying the milk; informs her that the President passed through Nashville and they all had a flag to wave; is sent down each day to the meat store for Mama, but could not go today because his knee is sore. 2 pp. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Jno. [John ?], Eastville, Virginia, to sister Lauretta A. Savage, Williamsburg, Virginia, 14 Dec[ember 18]77.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Had built up his stock with dry goods and shoes, etc., and left town in October; still owes some money that has to be paid back; informs her that Mr. Bell has moved out to Hickory Ground, and that Clara Nottingham was married a week ago; would like to come to visit but would lose too much if he came now.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      M.C. Watkins, Kenmore, to cousin Lottie Garrett, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 28 May 1878.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Expresses grief for the death of Aunt Susan, her [LG] mother; asks why Susan was laid in the churchyard; sends her love to Uncle Robert; informs her that the sale of all her father's personal property at Chester will take place next Thursday.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      E.G. Booth, Philadelphia, [Penn.], to Mrs. [Lauretta A.] Savage, n.p., 8 Nov[ember 18]78.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that the photograph she received is of a lady who claims to be 15, dating her existence from the date of her marriage; mentions that the lady would like to have a good husband to share her life with; has been advised to get married but to wait for a first rate chance.

    • Box: Folder 1:9
      Mary [?], Nashville, [Tennessee], to aunt Lauretta A. Savage, Williamsburg, Virginia, 26 Sept[ember], [1877-1881].
      6 pages.ALS.

      Describes in great detail the visit of "our President" [Rutherford B. Hayes] to Nashville; mentions the appearance of Mrs. Hayes in terms of her dress and the manner in which she wears her hair; has been invited to Pulasky [sic]; sends love and asks for news.

  • Box: Folder 1:11
    Subseries 6: Letters, 1890-1899.
    9 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Josephine Nicholls, Mountain Lake, to cousin Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 20 Aug[ust] 1894.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Regrets not being able to visit Williamsburg this season; describes Mountain Lake as being "a lovely place and the people are as friendly and sociable as can be"; plans to stay in Mountain Lake a little while longer, then will go to a sulfur spring for a short time before returning to their home; has met a girl from Norfolk who had visited Williamsburg and knows both the Colemans and the Tylers; thanks Van through her for the college souvenir he sent her.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Cynthia B.J. Coleman, n.p., to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 20 Sept[ember] 1894.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Postmarked Williamsburg, Virginia Informs her that her father Dr. Coleman valued no man above her [LG] brother Van; is comforted by the friendship of them both; was disappointed that she did not come up to the house; realized later that she would need a special invitation [after her father's funeral].

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Josephine H. Nicholls, White Sulphur Springs, [Virginia], to cousin Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 30 September 1894.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Is quite disappointed that they will not be able to meet this summer; hopes that she can travel to Petersburg next Saturday to be able to see her; has received several invitations to stay with various families, but the locations are too far off the way home that she will not be able to accept them; describes the nicest compliment she has received as coming from Virginia Lassiter, "who said I reminded her of you -- my voice and manner"; reports that Father has been ill with hay fever.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Frank W. Nicholls, Ridgefield, Thibodaux, La., to cousin Lottie Garrett, White Sulphur Springs, Eggleston, Virginia, 20 July 1895.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has heard that she will be joining the party at Eggleston, along with Cousins Mary, Sue, and Van; regrets he cannot be there as well; reports that Cousin Sallie Winder had called her home Lorton; feels indebted to Cousin Mary's genealogical work and asks if there is any news related to her search; thanks her for the pictures of Lorton Hall and Lorton Church, which are now on display in the library at Ridgefield; reports that Carrie's health is almost entirely recovered; had read in a paper that a northern university had bestowed the degree of L.L.D. upon President Tyler of William and Mary; hopes that she will be able to visit his home soon.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Carra [?], n.p., to cousin Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 31 January 1896.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that Hattie is quite sick, and feels that she would feel better if she heard from Van; reports that Van has been silent for a long while, and so they believe he is very sick; mentions that "la grippe" is going around, and that Virginia is fighting it off while Hattie seems to be about to come down with a severe case of it; had thought the wedding was not till June, but was told by Hattie that she and Van have decided on the first of April; asks if she will be able to make a visit after the wedding.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Josephine H. Nicholls, n.p., to cousin Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 4 Feb[ruary] 1896.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Postmarked New Orleans, La. Has been quite busy as Mother and Hattie have been otherwise occupied, so all the social duties have fallen to her; has been fighting off the grippe; informs her that Miss Coleman of Williamsburg will be visiting Mrs. Burns in New Orleans; reports that Hattie is better but still looks tired from la grippe; mentions that there will be a masque ball held tonight but since there will be eight held before the Carnival closes, she does not feel obligated to go; hopes she feels better now.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Carra [?], n.p., to cousin Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 21 Feb[ruary] 1896.
      12 pages.ALS.

      Postmarked New Orleans, La. Regrets that she cannot be in New Orleans with them for Mardi Gras; describes in very great detail the events of Mardi Gras; explains that the procession has just passed her house and will return from uptown soon; reports that she is writing a condolence letter for a friend whose husband has passed away, and is struck by the contrast of a man lying on his deathbed and the jollity and gaiety of the festival; informs her that Hattie will be married sometime after the 26th of April.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Julia Smith, Phoebus, Virginia, to Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 15 Nov[ember 18]96.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Is glad that the plates were received unbroken; hopes that the flowers she sent will live; expresses how highly she thinks of her by the simple act of sending her the platters; asks that she display the picture of Mr. Davis in her house; would like a picture of the prison and asks if her brother Robbie could send her one.

    • Box: Folder 1:11
      Mary Johnston, n.p., to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia 16 July 1897.

      Postmarked Devon, [England]. Asks her to imagine her in this Devonshire town; describes her surroundings and her activities there; asks her to remember her.

  • Box: Folder 1:12-13
    Subseries 7: Letters, 1900-1909.
    19 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Mary Johnston, Virginia Beach, Virginia, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 19 March 1901.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Reassures her that she may have her photograph; will send her photograph as soon as she returns home; is pleased to be asked to become an annual member of the Colonial Capital branch of the A.P.V.A.; informs her that she and her cousin plan to be in Williamsburg for a few days; hopes to see her and her sister.

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Mary Johnston, Birmingham, Ala., to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 12 April 1901.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Encloses the photograph that she had wanted; reports that she had been called home to Richmond suddenly because of the death of her sister.

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Coralie H. Johnston, n.p., to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 13 April 1901.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Postmarked Richmond, Virginia Returns her book by mail; thanks her for the hours they spent together while she and Mary were in Williamsburg.

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Mary Johnston, Warm Springs, Bath County, Virginia, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 25 June 1902.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Would like to be with her in Williamsburgh [sic], "finals or no finals"; will not be able to visit because she is recovering from severe illnesses she has suffered all winter; remembers fondly the time she spent with her; hopes she has "a beautiful commencement week!"

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Mary Johnston, Richmond, [Virginia], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 2 April 1903.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has been told that her [LG] presence has really pleased the Williamsburg party; writes to thank her again; is suffering from a bad headache; sends her latest photograph and mentions that if she does not want it, she should put it in the fire.

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Mary Johnston, Richmond, [Virginia], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburgh [sic], Virginia, 22 April 1903.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Thanks her for her kindness that she has shown; explains that Mrs. Page has not been able to come to Richmond, and so her son Mr. Arthur Page accompanies the party of Miss McCormack; thanks her for her readiness to call on Mrs. Page when she reached Williamsburg; mentions the possibility of visiting Williamsburg with Mrs. Page.

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Mary Johnston, Richmond, [Virginia], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 9 May 1903.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Chastises her for not informing her that she would be in Richmond for a longer time; was upset to find that she was in Richmond for several days; thinks that she treated both her and Coralie [Johnston] quite badly.

    • Box: Folder 1:12
      Margaret Guion Ellis, n.p., to Hattie [Mrs. Van Garrett], n.p., 21 May 1905.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Congratulates her on the birth of her daughter; asks her to write and tell of the baby as soon as she feels well enough; sends congratulations to Van as well.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Capt. R.E. Lee, West Point, Virginia, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 7 Mar[ch] 1906.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Has not written to her because he was waiting for the circulars about Old Bruton Church; surmises that they were sent to his nephew, R.E. Lee, Jr., believes that it is important to preserve the old; remembers the good times they spent together; would like to see her again and assures her that when he comes to Williamsburgh [sic], he will accept her invitation to visit.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Lottie C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, to Dr. [J.A.C.] Chandler, n.p., 26 Feb[ruary] 1907.
      12 pages.ALS.

      Asks where he found the authority for claiming that her ancestor Sir George Yeardly "was the son of a merchant sailor, and of humble and obscure birth"; indicates her indignation resulting from this claim; prevails upon his fairness as a historian to publish only the facts; includes excerpts copied from the "Yeardly Genealogy" which she possesses and offers to have him peruse if he would visit her home.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Harriet Winder Young, n.p., to Hattie [Mrs. Van Garrett], n.p., 10 March 1907.
      4 pages.ALS. Partly illegible.

      Shares social news of relatives and mutual friends.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Mary Johnston, New York, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburgh [sic], Virginia, 2 April 1907.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Thanks her for her invitation to visit; asks if she may come another time; mentions that she is quite fond of her and Miss Mary; has been in New York for ten days and will remain there another week before she returns home; reports that New York is "very big and bright."

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      James U. Goode, Norfolk, Virginia, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 22 April 1907.
      1 page.TLS.

      Has not forgotten his promise to escort her to the opening of the Jamestown Tercentennial; will meet her at the Virginia Building early Friday morning.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Mary Johnston, New York, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburgh [sic], Virginia, 7 October 1907.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Apologizes that she could not be in Williamsburg on the 5th; landed in Boston a week ago after having taken the Mediterranean route from Naples; will do some shopping in New York; has enjoyed her summer but is looking forward to returning home.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Mary Johnston, Richmond, [Virginia], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 18 December 1907.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has put the colored card from Boston that she sent into an album of souvenirs; is very busy with her debutante "daughter" and her coming out this season; relives her youth in the coming-out of her debutante; will publish another story next summer; reports that her eyes are troubling her.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      William M. Pettis, Washington, D.C., to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 16 Jan[uar]y 1908.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Apologizes for not responding to her Christmas card earlier; describes in great deal what a wonderful, noble, and great gentleman her father was; is thankful for the friendship that her father showed him; looks forward to being with him again after this life; reminisces about Williamsburg and the happy times he spent there in youth; believes that education involves more than book-learning, and declares that "what you get out of people, places, situations, environment means more to the mind than in the formative period"; contemplates moving to St. Louis to be with his son, whose wife died 12-15 years ago and who is lonely now; regrets deeply that he was not able to be there for Cousin Letty's death, and that he was not able "to put her sacred dust away as I had promised her."

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Two letters written on the same page, 29 June 1909[?].
      2 pages.ALS.

      Armistead C. Gordon, Staunton, Virginia, to Mrs. Letitia Tyler Semple, Washington, D.C., 29 June 1909[?]. Informs her that the Board of Visitors of the College of William and Mary "adopted a resolution authorizing the erection of the monument of which you wrote"; reports that a copy of the resolution will be mailed to her by the Secretary. 2 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Mrs. Letitia Tyler Semple, n.p., to Lottie [Garrett], n.p. 6 July [1909?]. Has received her letter that informed her of the action of the Board of Visitors; has yet to receive the letter from the Secretary; asks who the Secretary is and why he has not done what he has been ordered to do; reports that the work is begun and she will soon send the workers the inscription; asks her to preserve this letter from Mr. Gordon. 1 p. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Hattie [Mrs. Van Garrett], on board the S.S. Wensleydale, to her parents [?], n.p., 19 Aug[ust] 1909.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has been keeping a diary of her trip that she will share when she returns home; gives details of her journey; hopes her children are behaving.

      This letter was included within the letter listed below; Hattie [Mrs. Van Garrett], on board the S.S. Wensleydale, to Josie [?], n.p., n.d.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Hattie [Mrs. Van Garrett], on board the S.S. Wensleydale, to Josie [?], n.p., n.d.,
      4 pages.ALS.

      Reports that it is so cold that she is wearing her heavy tan jacket from her trousseau; hopes that her children have not been much trouble; has yet to be seasick, along with Cousin Lottie and Van.

      This letter was included within the above letter; Hattie [Mrs. Van Garrett], on board the S.S. Wensleydale, to her parents [?], n.p., 19 Aug[ust] 1909.

    • Box: Folder 1:13
      Van F. Garrett, London, to Miss Mary Winder Garrett, Black Mountain, North Carolina, 1 Sept[ember] 1909.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Will travel from the port at Savannah, Georgia, by train to Black Mountain on their return journey; thanks her for her sweet letters; reports that he has visited Old Barking Church where they saw the Winder Cenotaph and encloses the inscription, describing the ancestry of John Winder of Grays Inn, buried there in 1699; has seen the original charter for the College of William and Mary.

  • Box: Folder 1:14-15
    Subseries 8: Letters, 1910-1928.
    21 items.
    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Mother [?], n.p., to Mrs. Van Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 26 Feb[ruary] 1910.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Postmarked New Orleans, La. Shares reminisces of her sister, who had not long before passed away; mourns her death; shares information pertaining to the will.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      David E. Cronin, Phila[delphia, Penn.], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 15 Dec[embe]r 1910.
      9 pages.ALS.

      Encloses a few more excerpts from the book he is writing about the Civil War; asks her note that "the whole purpose of the book is against war (physical combat) as a method of settling any question among civilized people"; mentions that he "was glad to read... of Mr. Carnegie's gift toward settlement of national questions by arbitration."

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      David E. Cronin, Phila[delphia, Penn.], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 20 Dec[embe]r 1910.
      12 pages.ALS.

      Describes rescuing a Confederate soldier who was laying horribly mutilated in a garret; insisted on visiting the soldier even though he was a Yankee soldier; informs her that he met her father at the bedside of this Confederate soldier; encloses more excerpts of his book on the Civil War; explains that his motivation in writing the book is to represent the War in a non-biased way from a man who was there for the sake of future generations.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Van F. Garrett, New York, to Lottie [Garrett], n.p., 16 April [19]11.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Wishes her a happy birthday; hopes she is continuing to improve herself; describes his trip to New York with members of his family.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Mary Johnston, The Hague, [Netherlands], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 4 July 1911.

      Gives details of her sightseeing in The Hague.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Hattie [Garrett], Ridgefield, to Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 8 November 1911.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Reports that the new horse arrived, so they all went for a drive to try him out; is relieved that she goes to visit Van and the children every day while she is away; informs her that Father is looking well and is recovering from his long illness; describes her home there; asks about news of Williamsburg.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      David E. Cronin, Phila[delphia, Penn.], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 18 March 1912.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Mentions that he has finished illustrating Mr. Widener's book; sends her the address of Albert Rosenthal so she may write to him about the painting she would like appraised; wonders if the painting is the one of Washington; informs her that Mr. W.E. Havemeyer would pay handsomely for this painting; assures her that if she has not sold it by the time Mr. Widener returns to America, that he will show it to Mr. Widener who may wish to purchase it.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      David E. Cronin, Phila[delphia, Penn.], to Miss [Lottie] Garrett, n.p., 23 March 1912.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Advises her to retain Mr. Rosenthal to appraise a tinted print portrait of Washington to determine its value and whether it is unique; informs her that if she knows the history of the painting on glass of Lady Hester Stanhope it would be more valuable than the Washington portrait regardless of whether it was painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds or not; informs her that the Earl of Rosebery would almost certainly be interested in her portrait of Lady Stanhope; advises her that if she is not satisfied with the appraisal of Mr. Rosenthal, she should write to Dr. Rosenbach.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      David E. Cronin, Phila[delphia, Penn.], to Miss [Lottie] Garrett, n.p., 3 April 1912.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Has talked to Mr. Henkels and described her portrait of Washington to him; reports that Mr. Henkels believes the portrait to be worth between $800 and $1000 as it is quite rare; describes how to examine the portrait of Lady Stanhope to determine whether it is a stipple engraving varnished and painted onto glass, as Mr. Henkels believes it is; gives information about Mr. Henkels.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      David E. Cronin, Phila[delphia, Penn.], to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 15 April 1912.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Is glad that she had received the advice of Mr. Henkels in addition to the offer of Dr. Rosenbach for the Washington portrait; advises her to use Mr. Henkels' price as leverage for securing a deal with Dr. Rosenbach; reports that Mr. Henkels is also willing to act as her agent in the sale of the portrait.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Van [F. Garrett], Williamsburg, Virginia, to his sisters the Misses Garrett, Dublin, Virginia, 5 Sept[ember] 1913.
      16 pages.ALS.

      Describes his return trip to Williamsburg; reports that everything is nice and green and the crops are quite good; shares news of Williamsburg; informs her that Williamsburg just missed the violent storm that swept up the Atlantic coast on the first.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Cary T. Grayson, Washington, to Miss Lottie Garrett, W[illia]msburg, Virginia, 16 [April 19]14.
      1 page.Telegram.

      Regrets that he will not be able to visit this week after all.

    • Box: Folder 1:14
      Cary T. Grayson, Washington, to Miss Lottie Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 13 November 1914.
      7 pages.ALS.

      Could not accept her invitation to visit as his trip to Richmond was quite short; informs her that all of her family are in his thoughts, ever since he left college [William and Mary] in '98; is leaving soon to go to New York with the President [Woodrow Wilson]; reports that the President may make a quiet and informal visit to Williamsburg; has spoken to the President about how good she and her family were to him while he was in college; asks her to keep the possible visit of the President quiet.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      [?], n.p., to Miss Lottie Garrett, n.p. 2 Feb[ruary] 1915.

      Note sent with a box of candy to her.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      Grandma [?], n.p., to Susanne [?], n.p., 13 May 1915.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Shares news of friends and family.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      Van [F. Garrett], Williamsburg, Virginia, to his sisters the Misses Garrett, Washington Sanitorium, Takoma Park, Washington, D.C., 24 May 1917.
      6 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that his children are doing well on their examinations; reports that many of the boys at the college have had to leave school, either to enlist or to work on the farms; is glad to hear she has the doctor's permission to leave the sanitorium soon and hopes her recovery is permanent.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      Mary [Garrett?], Williamsburg, Virginia, to Hattie [Garrett], n.p., 29 August 1918.
      12 pages.ALS. Partly illegible.

      Describes her trip to England in great detail.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      Hattie [Garrett], Ridgefield, to Van F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 20 April 1923.
      6 pages.ALS.

      Reports that a tornado swept through her neighborhood, but her home escaped damage; describes the damage in the surrounding area; will go up to New Orleans in the car; will leave to return to Williamsburg next Saturday night.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      Van [Garrett], Winston-Salem, N.C., to his father Dr. Van F. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, 15 June 1928.
      1 page.TLS.

      Writes to express his pride in his father; thanks him for all he has done for him throughout his life; was very honored when he came to visit; misses his family greatly.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      Van [F. Garrett], La Grange, Georgia, to Miss Mary Winder Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, August 1928.
      3 pages.ALS.

      Describes his trip south through Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia; expects to reach Louisiana on Wednesday.

    • Box: Folder 1:15
      [?], Baltimore, Maryland, to Hattie [?], n.p., 17 Sept[ember] 1928.
      2 pages.AL.

      Remembers her and mentions that his "recollection of her [her mother] is one of the most beautiful things in my college life"; explains that she is the only thing that draws him to Williamsburg; asks her to let him know when she is to be in town so that he can see her.

  • Box: Folder 2:1
    Subseries 8: Letters, 1910-1928.
    36 items.
    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort L.G. Nottingham], Eastville, Northampton, Virginia, to "auntie" [?], n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Shares a great deal of family and neighborhood news.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort] L.G. Nottingham, Eastville, Virginia, to "auntie" [?], n.p., n.d.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Reports that Mr. Ware, their new minister from Clarke County, gave his first sermon on Sunday; mentions that although he is 25, he looks no more than 17; informs her that Miss Ida Peed and a Mr. Bayly were married last week, but owing to a confusion with the minister over the time appointed for the wedding, the ceremony did not occur until 3 a.m. that night; shares a great deal of other family news and occurrences in the neighborhood.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort L.G. Nottingham], Eastville, Northampton, Virginia, to "auntie" [?], n.p., n.d.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Reassures her that she is being overly anxious about her [CLGN] state of health; would like to go to the Island for two months; shares news of other family members.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort] L.G. Nottingham, n.p., to "auntie" [?], n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Has not been able to find anything like Mary's dress; encloses samples of fabric that are $0.25 per yard; describes the fashion in dresses this season; reports that Mrs. Ann Seymour died the night before after an illness of just a few days; hopes that she will come to visit in November before the cold really starts to set in.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary Johnston, Richmond, Virginia, to Miss [Lottie] Garrett, n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that Mrs. Walter H. Page of New York will be at the Colonial Inn in Williamsburg the following Thursday; asks her if she could call upon Mrs. Page while she is there; reports that she has been ill all winter and has just returned from the Bahamas; mentions that Mr. Page is a prominent editor-publisher.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C.G. Nicholls, n.p., to Van [F. Garrett], n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Informs him that he should be thankful that Carra is to marry a Virginian and will live near them; asks him to tell Hattie to send a list of presents; shares news of family and friends.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Two letters written on the same page, 5 Oct[ober] n.y.
      12 pages.ALS.

      Carra [?], n.p., to cousin Lottie [Garrett], n.p., 5 Oct[ober] n.y. Grieves for the loss of her [LG] friend Mr. Thompson; begs her to come visit so that she may comfort her; mentions that her husband is off to hold court in Shreveport soon; informs her of the news of other family members. 12 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Virginia [?], n.p., to cousin Lottie [Garrett], n.p. n.d. Begs her to come visit this winter; sends her love. 1 p. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort L.G. Nottingham], Baltimore, [Maryland], to "auntie," n.p., 12 Oct[ober] n.y.
      6 pages.ALS.

      Mentions that she forgot to send her a scrap of the material for the dress so she could match scarf, gloves, etc.; asks that Lottie sell the kid gloves for $1.25 for she will send her new ones that will fit; describes the suits she has just sent off to Northampton; shares that Nan is coming to visit on the 24th and will stay for several weeks; describes a torch light procession in Baltimore that was so large that it took an hour to pass by; relates that two men were shot during the procession, one dying instantly and one passing away an hour later.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort] L.G. Nottingham, Hickory Grounds, to "auntie," n.p., 11 Nov[ember] n.y.
      7 pages.ALS.

      Informs her that Maria Savage has returned from Philadelphia and that her cousin Henrietta has come down also, but that Maria and Mr. William Savage have since returned home; shares the news that Maria's visit with her uncle was mysteriously cut short, as she had planned to stay at least until Christmas, if not the entire winter; gives news of many acquaintances, including a local wedding; is excited that her room is finished now, but the house will not be completed this year as the workmen have all been released for the winter; asks that she come visit as there is plenty of space in her room; looks forward to the completion of the house so that Aunt Susan, Uncle Garrett, and the children can come for a visit; sends love to all.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [Mary Garrett?], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to Vannie [Garrett], n.p., March n.y.
      10 pages.AL. Incomplete.

      Shares news of many common acquaintances; tries to put to rest the rumors that Mr. Boyden is now her beau by saying that he is simply filling the place of her brother while he is away shares a great deal of information about neighbors and friends; was sorry to hear of his sickness, but as he is well again now she won't speak of the sad subject.

      Also included: 4 pp. AL. Incomplete.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary [?], Williamsburg, Virginia, to Miss Sue C. Garrett, Baltimore, Maryland, 3 Oct[ober] n.y.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Postmarked 20 Oct[ober]. Informs her that Nannie was slighted that the last letter they received from her did not include Nannie's name; relates that Mrs. Hansford gave birth to a "little heir to her estate"; begs her to persuade Bayly and Cousin Kate to come visit; informs her that the filling has fallen out of her tooth and that she is very worried about the state of it; refuses to go see the dentist in Williamsburg because he is from the Asylum and she is afraid of him; asks if Van can treat her tooth; shares much information about family and friends.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary [?], Williamsburg, Virginia, to "Father" [?], n.p., October n.y.
      4 ALS.pages.

      Is glad that he enjoyed his trip to Tennessee but is eager to see him again; informs him that there will be a meeting in Yorktown next week for preliminary measures for the Centennial of 1880; expects many people will go to the meeting; relates that Dr. Wise has been elected visiting physician for the Asylum with an annual salary of $1200, but will retain his position at the College; shares news of family and friends.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Lottie [Garrett], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "auntie" [?], n.p., 7 Dec[ember] n.y.
      2 pages.AL. Incomplete.

      Apologizes for not writing sooner; explains that she has had no time to do anything since Sue was so anxious to have her suit to wear on Christmas Day; is working hard on Mary's dress to have it ready by Sunday; informs her that Father has gone up to Richmond to see about the state stock; relates that Ma has been quite sick but is now much better.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [?], 320 Josephine St., to Cousin Lottie [Garrett], n.p., 31 Oct[ober] n.y.
      4 pages.AL. Incomplete.

      Sends a photograph of herself to refresh her memory; is excited that she will finally come to visit them; informs her that Carrie is improving and that "the baby looks like a different child"; relates that Mother has been quite ill with a cold but is getting better.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [Mary Garrett], n.p., to [?], n.p., n.d.

      Mentions that Van will only stay a fortnight; asks that she be informed if there is any change in Aunt Charlotte's condition.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      "Mother" [?], n.p., to "Puss" [?], n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.ALS. Illegible handwriting.

      Asks her to thank Van for the invitations to the College [of William and Mary?] finals.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      "Mother" [?], n.p., to "Puss" [?], n.p., n.d.
      2 pages.ALS. Illegible handwriting.

      Thanks her for finally sending a letter; shares news of acquaintances.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      C[omfort] L.G. Nottingham, Baltimore, [Maryland], to "auntie" [?], n.p., 24 August n.y.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Has found jet-headed pins inexpensive and so has purchased some as they are very useful in mourning; mentions that Cousin Kate and Cousin Richard have gone to Frederick; is proud of the way she is running the house in their absence; has found that grey, solid black, and drab are the most popular colors for clothing for a lady; informs her that calico suits are very fashionable; suggests that the girls send some money to her a few weeks before they need their winter clothing so that she has time to look around and find the most reasonable prices; mentions that Miss White and Mr. Lynch were married and off to Sand Shoal before anyone at Eastville knew the wedding had occurred; was sad to learn that Mr. Craighill and Maggie lost their young child to sickness on a visit to Northampton; believes she has found a situation for her father; has been able to find the English needles at only one place; mentions that Sallie Upshur will be teaching at Staunton next year.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary W. Garrett, Gloucester, [Virginia], to "father" [?], n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Asks that he send for her on Wednesday if possible, but will be ready to go on the day they originally agreed to if he desires it; thanks him for sending her on this visit; believes that Loyd [sic] may come for a visit to Williamsburg; asks him to tell Van that when she returns she wants to read Shakespear [sic] to appear "wise and knowing."

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary [?], Baltimore, [Maryland], to "Father" [?], n.p., 24 June n.y.
      8 pages.ALS.

      Has been hoping that she would receive a letter from him; believes the change in air has done her well; was able to see Cousin Kate, but Cousin Richard has gone up to Philadelphia and Bayly had yet to hear of her arrival; thanks her father for this trip and promises to "look out for a rich beau, and when I get very rich I will pay you back"; asks why none of their family's names have become famous and insists that merit has been overlooked in favor of locality; asks that he write to Cousin Monroe as they have few rich relations and "cannot afford to slight any of these"; informs him that Mary's baby is doing well but only wishes that Mary would leave the nurse behind.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      J.W. Mercer, n.p., to Mrs. Dr. [Robert] Garrett, n.p., 24 Oct[ober] n.y.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Thanks her for her gift; informs her that the services he performs for her are done with "the utmost pleasure"; hopes that God keeps her well.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      J.M. King [?], n.p., to Ro[bert] Garrett, n.p., n.d.
      1 page.ALS. Illegible handwriting.

      Concerns claims.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary [W. Garrett], n.p. to "Aunt" [?], n.p., n.d.
      2 pages.ALS.

      Thanks her for the presents she sent; informs her that Lottie is invited to Miss Lena Harding's wedding; has heard that Brother [?] can "play a number of duets, had stopped chewing, wore kid gloves to school, and never got mad"; shares more news of friends and family.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Two letters written on the same page, 9 April n.y.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Mary [W. Garrett], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to "Aunt" [?], n.p., 9 April n.y. Informs her that Father determined there is no position for a young lawyer in Williamsburg, so Winder has gone to Texas to find employment; is saddened to have Winder gone; wishes that Cousin Comfort accompany her [Aunt] on her visit; will send the hats by way of Florence Custis because she would rather they be trimmed there; mentions that Miss Henry was engaged to her cousin, but just before the wedding "she had conscientious scruples, and discarded him and all of the family." 4 pp. ALS.

      Also contains the letter of: Lottie [Garrett], n.p., to "Auntie" [?], n.p. Asks if she could only stay in Baltimore two or three more days so that Florence can deliver the bonnets; trusts Comfort's taste more than anyone and would like her to trim the bonnets. 1 p. ALS.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary [W. Garrett], Williamsburg, Virginia, to Miss Susie Garrett, n.p., Dec[ember] n.y.
      4 pages.ALS.

      Chastises her for not writing since she left; was asked by Charlie McLean to send his love; informs her that Charlie was saddened to not see her [SG] before she left as he does not think he'll be able to make it back to Williamsburg for another three years; asks that she have her photograph taken as she [MWG] would really like one; shares news from Van's letter.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary Johnston, [Williamsburg, Virginia], to Miss [Lottie] Garrett, n.p., n.d.
      1 page.ALS.

      Believes the drive should be postponed until Wednesday as the weather is bad; "Williamsburg evidently has its April in March."

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      W.H. Martin, Convalescent Camp, [?], to Mr. [?] Garrett, n.p., 1 Oct[ober] n.y.
      1 page.ALS.

      Thanks him for his and his daughter's kindness; would like to thank him also on behalf of the convalescents for his kindness.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [?], n.p., to Carra [?], n.p., n.d.
      4 pages.AL. Incomplete.

      Thanks her for the gift she has sent by Hattie; informs her that she gave her a priceless gift.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Mary Johnston, n.p., to Miss [Lottie] Garrett, n.p., n.d.
      1 page.ALS.

      Informs her that she and Coralie will be there around six o'clock; regrets that Miss Garrett's sister will not be there.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Talbot Sweeney, American Hotel, to "Ellick," A[lexander] C. Garrett, Williamsburg, Virginia, n.d.
      1 page.ALS.

      Has spoken to the Governor and learned that the position was first offered to Mr. Wise, and when he refused it was offered to Stovall; believes that if Stovall refuses the position, that he [ACG] has a good chance of securing it; feels that had he [ACG] stayed in Richmond after Mr. Wise's refusal, he would have had an excellent chance.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [?], n.p., to "Rob" [Dr. Robert M. Garrett?], n.p., n.d.
      2 pages.AL. Written over another letter.

      Relates the circumstances of his mother's severe illness which caused her excruciating pain.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Lotty [Garrett], n.p., to "my dear sisters" [?], n.p., n.d.
      1 pages.ALS.

      Shares news of her doings and of her family.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      Ada May [?], n.p., to [?], n.p., n.d.
      1 page.ALS.

      Shares a poem with her correspondent.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [Comfort L.G. Nottingham], n.p., to [?], n.p., n.d.

      Informs her correspondent that the trim she uses for cotton chemises and nightgowns is fairly inexpensive, about ten cents a yard; was able to get wide chintz for twelve and a half cents a yard; fears that it is now all sold.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [Comfort L.G. Nottingham], n.p., to [?], n.p., n.d.
      1 page.frag.

      Feels that her correspondent need not fear small pox; relates how she was living next door to a home in which six people died of the small pox and that the window of her home was not more than three yards from the open window of the house of the sick and she was never taken ill.

    • Box: Folder 2:1
      [?], n.p., to [?], n.p., n.d.
      2 pages.frag.

      Informs her correspondent that she has "captured 'the catch of Morehead'," a gentleman named James Richard Young; explains that Young is one of the prominent men in North Carolina; will be residing in Raleigh; shares information about his five children, ranging in age from about 22 to ten years old.

Accounts chiefly of Mr. Richard R. Garrett, 1832-1868.
Box: Folder: 2:2
Series 2: Accounts
Legal Documents, 1786-1848.
Box: Folder: 2:3-7
Series 3: Legal Documents
  • Box: Folder 2:3
    Will of Edward Moss of York County, 21 February 1786.
  • Box: Folder 2:4
    Deed in which 1,000 acres of land in Harrison County, Virginia, were sold to John Reedle by John Philips of Virginia, 3 September 1788.
  • Box: Folder 2:5
    Notice from Robert G. Scott, Captain of the Rifle Company attached to the 68th Regiment, Virginia Militia, to Lieutenant Richard Garrett, 16 March 1818.

    Informing him that the officers of the Regiment will meet to begin their training on the fifth Wednesday of April at the Rawleigh Tavern in Williamsburg.

  • Box: Folder 2:5
    Document written by Alexander W. Green swearing that he is acquainted with Timothy Jones, a "free man of colour, and now a resident of York County," who served in the Revolutionary War and lost one of his legs in action at Yorktown, 22 October 1832.
  • Box: Folder 2:5
    Summons for Callshell Presson [?] to appear in court on behalf of Henry and Levon Smith, accused of assaulting George Elliott, 3 November 1834.

    Signed by Samuel Sheild, Clerk of the Court of York County.

  • Box: Folder 2:6
    Documents mainly pertaining to inheritance suits in which Richard Garrett or Alexander C. Garrett served as Commissioner, 1841-1853.
  • Box: Folder 2:7
    Documents pertaining to the estate of Polly Pigg, deceased, 1844-1848.
Writtings, n.d.
Box: Folder: 2:8
Series 4: Writtings

Includes stories, reminiscences, and speeches of various members of the Garrett family.

Calling and Place Cards, n.d.
Box: Folder: 2:9
Series 5: Calling and Place Cards

Includes many calling cards and place cards of various members of the Garrett family.

Printed Matter, 1851-1900, n.d.
Box: Folder: 2:10
6 items.
Series 6: Printed Matter
  • Box: Folder 2:10
    Printed volume of an address at Yorktown delivered by Colonel Alexander C. Garrett, on the anniversary of the Battle of Yorktown, 19 October 1851.
  • Box: Folder 2:10
    Pamphlet entitled Facts about Williamsburg and Vicinity,belonging to Miss [Lottie?] Garrett, published in 1900.
  • Box: Folder 2:10
    Printed copy of the epitaph of Captain John Smith, n.d.
  • Box: Folder 2:10
    Fragment of a newspaper article celebrating Robert E. Lee as a great general, n.d.
  • Box: Folder 2:10
    Pamphlet entitled Angel Voices, containing Biblical verses and hymn verses, n.d.

    Given to Susan Yardley and Montie from Aunt Mary and Aunt Sue.

  • Box: Folder 2:10
    Printed version of a hymn, given to "his Virginia cousins" by Richard Watson Gilder, composer of the hymn, n.d.

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Alex[ander]
  • B[enjamin]
  • Nath[anie]l
  • R[ichard]
  • W[illia]m
  • Alexander C. Garrett,
  • B. F. Garrett,
  • Cronin, David E., b. 1839.
  • David E. Cronin.
  • Dr. Robert M. Garrett,
  • Garrett, Alexander C.
  • Garrett, B. F.
  • Garrett, Lottie.
  • Garrett, Robert M., Dr.
  • Geo[rge]
  • Ja[me]s
  • Lottie. Garrett,
  • Ro[bert]
  • Rob[er]t
  • W[illia]m
  • W[illiam]

Significant Places Associated With the Collection

  • W[illia]msburg
  • Yardley (Northampton County, Va.)