Inventory of the Dorsey-Coupland Papers 1840-1876, 1843-1865 Dorsey-Coupland Papers Collection Number: Mss.39.1 D73

Inventory of the Dorsey-Coupland Papers 1840-1876, 1843-1865

A Collection in the
Manuscripts and Rare Books Department
Collection Number Mss. 39.1 D73


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Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary

Special Collections
Earl Gregg Swem Library
College of William and Mary
Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8794
USA
Phone: (757) 221-3090
Fax: (757) 221-5440
Email: spcoll@wm.edu
URL: http://swem.wm.edu/scrc/

© 2000 By the College of William and Mary

Funding: Web version of the finding aid funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Karyl Goldstein, 2000.

Repository
Special Collections, College of William and Mary
Collection number
Mss. 39.1 D73
Title
Dorsey-Coupland Papers, 1840-1876, 1843-1865.
Extent
413 items.
Creators
Coupland Family, Dorsey Family, Dupuby Family, Edmund Ruffin Family, John R.Coupland, Susan Henley Coupland, Carter Coupland, Juliana Ruffin Coupland Dorsey, Jane S. Ruffin Dupuy, Edmund Ruffin, Jr.
Language
English
Abstract
Correspondence, chiefly 1843-1865, between members of the Dorsey and Coupland families of Virginia.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Collection is open to all researchers.

Publication Rights/Restrictions on Use

Before publishing quotations or excerpts from any materials, permission must be obtained from the Curator of Manuscripts and Rare Books, and the holder of the copyright, if not Swem Library.

Preferred Citation

Dorsey-Coupland Papers, Manuscripts and Rare Books Department, Swem Library, College of William and Mary.

Acquisition Information

Presented: 413 items, 11/18/1927.


Scope and Content Information

This inventory contains correspondence, chiefly 1843-1865, of John R. Coupland of Williamsburg, Richmond and Petersburg, Virginia with his wife Susan Henley Coupland. Some letters were written to Susan Henley Coupland while she was in Williamsburg and he was in Richmond working in Second Auditor's Office of Confederate States of America War Department. Letters written by Carter Coupland while serving on Confederate steamers are also included.

This inventory also contains correspondence of Juliana Ruffin Coupland Dorsey with members of the Edmund Ruffin family and with her sister Jane S. Ruffin Dupuy and members of the Dupuy family. Includes letters written by Edmund Ruffin, Jr.; one letter, 20 June 1864, written by Edmund Ruffin (1794-1865) and letters containing references to him. Juliana Ruffin Copeland Dorsey and Jane S. Ruffin Dupuy were sisters of Edmund Ruffin (1794-1865).

Arrangement

Arrangement

After being organized into Series this collection is arranged chronologically by date.

Organization

This collection has been organized into three Series: 1. Letters, 2. Accounts, and 3. Miscellaneous Material.

Index Terms

    Family Names:

  • Coupland family.
  • Depew family.
  • Dorsey family.
  • Ruffin family.
  • Persons:

  • Coupland, Carter, fl. 1833-1866.
  • Coupland, John R., fl. 1843-1866.
  • Coupland, Susan Henley, fl. 1843-1866.
  • Dorsey, Juliana Ruffin Coupland, b. 1806?
  • Dupuy, Jane S. Ruffin, b. 1800.
  • Ruffin, Edmund, 1794-1865.
  • Ruffin, Edmund, b. 1814.
  • Subjects:

  • Confederate States of America. War Dept.
  • Richmond (Va.)--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865-- Naval operations--Confederate States.

Components List

Letters, 1840-1866, n.d.
Box-folder: 1:1-4
174 items.
Series 1: Letters
  • Box-folder 1:1
    Carter Coupland, Inglewood, to cousin Tiffy [Tariffa Cocke], Evergreen. Postmarked Meridian Springs, Massachusetts, 8 Feb[ruar]y [1840].
    4 pages.ALS.

    Thanks his cousin for her letter and sends his love to her and the others at Evergreen; speaks of his trip to Jackson with his mother; met two boys his size that he played with; Brother George has a new spotted calf that allows him to saddle and bridle and lead around; knitted one stocking for his cat Rebecca Rosetta but tired of it and would not knit the other; Mr. Dorsey brought them oysters from Vicksburg; Mother has given him four hens but they have not laid yet; the weather is warming; Brother George will write Cousin Beck; sends love to Cousin Beck and Cousin Horatio and Little Betty; Mother and Brother George send their love; Brother John has gone visiting.

    Bears ALS from J[uliana] D[orsey], n.p., to Elizabeth R. Cocke, City Point, near Petersburg, Virginia. Mentions that they are all well; Mr. D[orsey] is improving; noticed a peach blossom and the potatoes are up but fears the frost will get to them; asks if Betty could send the blankets wrapped up in the bedding if it isn't too troublesome; sends love "to all friends"; B[?] returned from W[illia]m[s]b[urg] yesterday "much indisposed" to find Miss P[?] seriously ill; doubts if she will ever be much better; will write soon; Martha has chills, Jackson is gone, Tilla is the only remaining house servant. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    G.R. Coupland, Inglewood, to brother John R. Coupland, Elkridge Landing, Maryland Postmarked Meridian Springs, Massachusetts, 1 Jan[uary] 1841.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Hopes that he [JRC] is well since he was well in his last letter; describes Pensacola and the midshipmen on board the Warren who have been asking about him [JRC]; sends word of Midshipman Murry's coming in a schooner to get provisions and his killing of two Indians at Indian Key; convinced Uncle Harrison to write to Washington to get a Midshipmen's appointment for him [GRC]; describes Uncle Harrison's mishap with a rifle that nearly shot his hand off; has received two kids from Cousin Coupland; Mr. Fondren [?] sends his love and mentions he has made about 200 bales of hay; Rainy has made 50 bales at Mr. Fondren's [?] place; Brother Carter will write to Brother Johny [sic] soon; mentions his new colt and how her mane and tail were full of sheepburrs; soon he will be able to go hunting on her.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. Coupland at [William and Mary] College, [Williamsburg, Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, n.p., 24 Feb[ruary] 1843.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Has fallen into despair because she has refused him; defines happiness as being with her; urges her to reconsider her decision.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Jno. [John] R. Coupland, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 12 July [18]43.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Hopes it is not too soon after his departure from Williamsburg to write to her; describes his happiness and his love for her; becomes heartsick when he thinks of his journey southward in three months and having to put a great distance between them; is afraid she may fall victim to death or that she will change; has yet to tell Mother of their engagement; sends greetings to all who know of their engagement, which is to remain secret.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. C[oupland], Evergreen, to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia. Postmarked Petersburg, Virginia, 20 Sept[ember] 1843.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Acknowledges he has been remiss in writing her; attempts to convince her that she is not disobeying her mother when she writes to him; reminds her of her promise to speak of their engagement to her brother; fears he may not be able to visit until the latter part of Nov[ember]; sends his love to her and to those to whom she can safely give it.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. [Coupland], Mobile, [Alabama], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 17 Nov[ember] 1843.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Has arrived safely in Mobile; troubles with stage contractors caused a delay in his arrival; has not decided on an occupation or a place to live; is currently residing with his cousin Mr. Minge [?], who left his wife in northern Alabama because of the fever still raging; the house is not ready to accommodate guests; reiterates his love for her; is frightened of yellow fever but will leave it to Providence.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. C[oupland], Mobile, [Alabama], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 20 April 1844.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Speaks of his love and devotion to her; chastises her for not writing; fears that he may not be able to see her until after the 4th of July due to his mother's having business in Mississippi until that time; gives his reason for not writing her; speaks of the balls and parties of Mobile that he would rather not be invited to; returns to the subject of his love for her.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John R. Coupland, Mobile, [Alabama], to Thomas H. Campbell, S.D. Whittle, H. Wiley, H. Woodis, and G.G. Thompson, committee, Williamsburg, Virginia, 25 June 1844.

    Letter declining an invitation to a dinner to be given by the students of William and Mary College. See William and Mary Papers, Folder 16.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn R. Coupland], Petersburg, [Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 14 August [18]46.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Opens his letter with no affectionate salutation because she asked "as you wrote, so do you expect me to write"; apologizes for his "dilatory conduct"; asks if she has "mentioned the matter to Ma'"; reiterates his love and devotion towards her; his having a chill and fever prevented him from traveling to Williamsburg; hopes she will not go to King and Queen [Ball] by then.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], White Sulphur Springs, [Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 6 September 1846.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Is disappointed that "the crowd" from Petersburg has left and leaves him with little social opportunity; remembers fondly his stay in Williamsburg; declares his love for her; hopes to return to Williamsburg as soon as possible.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John R. C[oupland], White Sul[phur] Springs, [Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 16 September [18]46.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Enjoys nothing in White Sulphur Springs without her; asks God to bless her for agreeing to link her destiny with his; believes this trip has been of "incalculable benefit" to him; will leave for Ohio either Saturday or Monday and be in Williamsburg as soon as possible.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], Milford Center, [Union County], Ohio, to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 14 Oct[ober] 1846.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Has heard no news from Williamsburg since he left White Sulphur Springs, [Virginia]; fears sickness or death has visited Williamsburg; worries that his friend Joseph Lewis is bed-ridden as he has not responded to his [JRC] letters; had expected to hear from her through his friends; warns her that if there are no letters for him in the next mail he will set out for Virginia immediately; worries that something, particularly sickness will prevent or delay his return; encourages reflection on the past as well as the present; reminds her they will be together soon; sends his love.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Frances [?], Williamsburg, Va, to her cousin John R. Coupland, Mobile, Alabama, 3 February [18]47.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Warns him that she [Susan E. Henley] is quite upset and has forbidden her [Frances] to write to him; shares news from Williamsburg; mentions that she [SEH] felt "slighted" and "treated with indifference" on his last trip to Williamsburg.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John R. C[oupland], Mobile, [Alabama], to his cousin F[rances], Feb[ruary] 1847.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Finds himself in shock over her last letter; explains that she [Susan E. Henley] had promised to write him each time they were apart but never did; is angered that she [SEH] is upset that he "slighted" her by stopping writing when she never wrote; explains that he told her plainly at his last leaving that since she [SEH] will not write, she cannot expect to hear from him; will leave for Illinois and Ohio in four to six weeks; asks that she hurry a reply to him

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], Mobile, [Alabama], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 11 March 1847.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Has not heard from her or from Miss Frances [his cousin]; explains his reasoning for writing his last letter to Miss Frances; asks her to write to him.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Susan [E. Henley], Williamsburg, Virginia, to John R. Coupland, Mobile, Alabama, 24 March 1847.
    ACS.

    Gives him the choice of breaking their engagement or leaving the situation between them as it stands, depending on his desires.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Susan [E. Henley], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to John R. Coupland, Petersburg, Virginia, 17 June 1847.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Thanks him for his last letter; explains that their party went well; describes the party; gives news from Williamsburg; is glad he is over his chills and hopes he will not expose himself to the night air.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 25 June [18]47.
    5 pages.ALS.

    Cannot describe his pleasure at receiving a letter from her; echoes her wish that he could have been at her party with her; asks after Cousin Harriet and sends his love to her; worries about Miss Clarissa's health; discusses the love between two of their friends; promises he will be settled soon and then he can make her "the wife of my heart."

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Edwin Shield, Williamsburg, [Virginia], to Susan E. Henley, [Williamsburg, Virginia], 18 July 1847.
    1 p.ALS.

    Thanks her for the kindness she extended to him.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John B. [?], Bethany, to his cousin Susan E. Henley, Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia, 27 July 1847.
    1 page.ALS.

    Acknowledges the receipt of her letter; expects to leave for Williamsburg on 10 Aug. and arrive there 14 Aug.; will wait to share his news until he reaches Williamsburg.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], Baltimore, [Maryland], to Susan [E.] Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 19 Aug[ust] 1847.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Feels very alone in the midst of the crowds of Baltimore because she is not there also; describes his love for her; promises he will be kind to her once they are united; fears that his friend is dying and so will return immediately; has purchased a ring for her.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Evergreen, to Susan [E.] Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia. Postmarked Petersburg, Virginia, 2 Sept[ember] 1847.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Had intended to go straight to Petersburg upon his departure from Williamsburg, but felt the tranquillity of Evergreen would be more suited to his state of sadness over leaving her; explains that he loves her because her "noble spirit has replied to mine"; promises to wear the ring she gave him; professes his deep love for her; sends his love to family and friends and asks for news.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Susan [E. Henley], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to [John R. Coupland], n.p., 15 September [18]47.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Rode out to the country the previous week to see Cousin Mary and Alice [?]; describes Mary's happiness as she will be married "October twelve months"; mentions Mr. Shields' visit the previous night; feels Mr. Shields "has completely thrown himself away"; urges him to visit Cousin John [?] on his way to Mobile if at all convenient as Cousin John is anxious to have him visit; send the love of all to him.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Petersburg, Virginia, to Susan [E.] Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 21 Sept[ember] 1847.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Had expected to hear from her sooner; expresses his disappointment in the contents of her letter as being "better calculated to arouse a painful rather than a pleasant emotion"; surprised to hear of Miss Mary [?] and Conway [?]'s engagement; is sorry but he does not know of [?] Bolivar's whereabouts; asks if Harriet could send word when she hears from Bolivar; sends his regards to all; apologizes that the letter was a bit late but he was ill.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], Petersburg, [Virginia], to Susan [E.] Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia Postmarked 10 Oct[ober 1847], October 1847.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Has been sick since his departure from Williamsburg; looks forward eagerly to the time when they will be united; mentions that Mary Dupuy is honored by her [SEH] invitation and will respond immediately; has had a conversation with "Butch"[?] to explain why he [JRC] did not invite him to wait on him; sends love to all.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to Susan [E.] Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, 27 Oct[ober] 1847.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Chastises her for not writing; wonders if she feels that she would rather be dead than marry him; is hurt that she remains silent this last week before their wedding; will invite some friends to their wedding.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to Susan [E.] Henley, Williamsburg, Virginia, Oct[ober] 1847.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Received her letter today; determines that the mail service is at fault for delaying her receipt of his last letter; decided not to travel to Richmond until he received her letter; tells her that his miniature should not be taken at this time as he is still recovering from his illness and he looks hollow and thin; promises to have a likeness made when he is well; sends his sympathy to James Christian, whose brother has died; discusses "the prospect of my old Alma Mater for the next two or three years" as "the course of the visitors has been indeed unfortunate"; mentions that if his letter is not all she expected, that his letters reflect the light of her own letters.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    John [R. Coupland], n.p., to S[usan] E. Henley, n.p., 1847.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Is saddened by the prospect of leaving her; had an interview with Mrs. Henley which went satisfactorily, though Mrs. Henley cried at the prospect at her daughter's leaving her; believes that Mrs. Henley is satisfied with him as a husband for her daughter; asks her to be strong if their marriage necessitates their parting from her family.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[uliana] D[orsey], Mobile, [Alabama], to her son John R. Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia, 21 June 1848.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Hopes her letter finds him on his birthday, and hopes he is well and happy; mentions her heart's sadness after his departure, but now feels calm and satisfied; sends news of various acquaintances; wishes she could have joined him in visiting Virginia this summer; sends news of her activities; will send some hands to Mr. Morton for the summer to go to Pensacola with him as he will pay her 10 dollars round for men and boys; needs to find homes for the last two women and then she will be ready to move on the first of July; asks him to write to her.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[uliana] D[orsey], n.p., to Mrs. John R. Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia. Postmarked Mobile, Alabama, 13 July 1848.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Consoles her on the death of her grandmother by telling her that God's "mandate [had] gone forth and taken one, and another, and yet another, from your beloved circle, but only the aged, whose infirmities were almost intolerable, and whose preparation for death was made , and the smiling infant, innocent and pure, as God's hand and a Saviour's blood could make it, were called away" while the young stayed healthy; tells of the death and burial for Mr. Lewis and presents a eulogy for him; describes the beauty of her location on the Gulf Shore and wishes she could share it with her Virginia friends; speaks of her neighbors on the Gulf Shore and some of their social gatherings; sends greetings from their mutual acquaintances.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[uliana] Dorsey, n.p., to her son John R. Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia. Postmarked Mobile, Alabama, 17 Aug[ust] 1848.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Sends news of the death of Willis [?], who succumbed after suffering a series of chills resulting from catching some sleep on the Gallery immediately on the river while sitting up with a sick child; her son Carter was there when Willis died and is quite distressed; points out this warning of "the uncertainty of life"; gives religious reassurance as to the mercy of God after death; asks that Sue [Mrs. John R. Coupland] write to her [JD] son about "contracting bad habits" as the message "will sound sweeter from you"; advises them on the buying of a farm in Virginia as Mobile is more expensive; promises to help them in their search for a home.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    Juliana Dorsey, n.p., to Mrs. John R. Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia. Postmarked Mobile, Alabama, 2 Sept[embe]r 1848.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Assures her that the choice of her [JRC] home should rest wholly with her; tells her that they do not have the money to purchase a southern plantation, so they should look at settling on a small farm in Virginia; suggests also a small tract in Alabama to use for growing cotton; describes the area where she's living; the fever has hit in town again; shares news of friends and acquaintances that send their love; encloses some of her son George's hair, who passed away suddenly; mentions the tombstone she erected for him which cost $100; encloses the words engraved on the tombstone.

    Including AN from Juliana Dorsey, n.p., to Mrs. John R. Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia, bearing the inscription of the tombstone of George Coupland. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:1
    J[uliana] Dorsey, Mobile, [Alabama], to John [R. Coupland], n.p., 1 Nov[ember] 1848.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Informs him that their old friend Alfred Johns is willing to sell him some land on the Tensaw River; suggests that this land will suit him admirably; will purchase some nearby land for Carter [Coupland] as well; assures him that he can be settled within six weeks and then return for Sue [Mrs. John R. Coupland].

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Robert Hughes, Galveston, Texas, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 12 April 1851.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Promises to send her the money he owes as soon as she informs him what the total amount is; has left behind all his office papers in Jackson and despairs of seeing them again; mentions also that he can repay her in the form of land in the future, but cannot do that at present as the land is held up in litigation.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Robert Hughes, Galveston, Texas, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 15 June 1851.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Apologizes for not sending the above letter, but was tied up in court until this time; reassures her that he will send payment when she informs him of the total amount owed; shares news of his family; asks if she will be in Mobile at least until the first of July, as he will visit her on his way to New Orleans if so.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Robert Hughes, Galveston, [Texas], to J[uliana] Dorsey, n.p., 10 October 1851.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Strongly wishes to pay all those he owes money to, but cannot at this present time; has "scarcely received money enough to keep soul and body together" even though he has been employed in his profession since he arrived in Galveston three years before; informs her that he hopes to have some twenty or thirty thousand acres of land once the land litigation is over during the next winter; assures her that this land will go towards paying his debts at a reasonable price; informs her that she and Mrs. Martin will be the first of his creditors to be paid; hopes that she can come to Texas to visit and apologizes for not visiting her in Mobile; his son Archibald will be married in November, and will then join his father in the practice of law.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Story Point, [Albermarle County, Virginia], to his mother Juliana Dorsey, Mobile, Alabama, 9 Feb[ruary] 1852.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Is glad to hear that brother [Carter Coupland?] is doing so well; advises that she tell brother to set aside a bit of each month's wages "for money thought it may not be much always makes on feel independent"; shares news of his children; informs her that he is doing well this year; has raised a fine crop of corn and enough pork for his own consumption and some to sell; his wife Sue has made a small fortune with her pork; will slaughter one of her hogs today which is over 500 pounds, which will give him about $37.50.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    W.J. Dupuy, Cottage Farm, to Sue [Mrs. John R. Coupland] , n.p., 15 March 1853.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Will cash the draft she sent for $1000 as soon as he gets to town; thanks her for the "kind and maternal care you have extended to my very dear Mollie during her late trying ordeal"; is anxious to see Mollie and the little fellow and will certainly have them with him by next summer; has only been able to fence in the field north of the road; two members of the church have died, even though the town has been "comparatively exempt from diseases this winter."

  • Box-folder 1:2
    A. Sidney Robertson, Iberville, [Louisiana ], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 18 January 1854.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Received her letter and will remit a draft to her in the amount of $183; had previously received a letter from Carter [Coupland] giving the amount he [ASR] owed her in error; responded to Carter's letter and informed him that he [ASR] owes her $225.04; will send balance with the interest she desires in a short time; has had a good sugar crop this year and sent some to Louisville in the hope that he can get a better price there than in New Orleans; discusses the worth of one of her slaves and mentions the loss of one of his; has made up a barrel of syrup just for her; wishes John [Coupland] had purchased the plantation he [ASR] had suggested as the value has increased dramatically.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    John H. Marshall, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, n.p., 3 Feb[ruar]y 1854.
    1 page.ALS.

    Sends information on the account she holds with Marshall & Son; holds twenty shares of Mobile Insurance Company for her; asks for the note he gave her as he has no record of it in his books; sends his love.

    Bears ALS from John H. Marshall, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, n.p. Shows the information relating to her account with Marshall & Son. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    George Conway, Mobile, [Alabama], to J[uliana] Dorsey, Petersburg, Virginia, 1 August 1854.
    1 page.ALS.

    Would have collected and forwarded the amount owed her but it was difficult to collect at this time of year; is "under the necessity of omitting $50 in the am[oun]t due by D. Walkin for Nelson"; encloses a check for $420.50 and hopes it is enough to meet her purposes.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    John [R. Coupland], Stony Point, [Albermarle County, Virginia], to Mrs. John R. Coupland, Red Sunset Springs, Alleghany County, Virginia, 14 Sept[ember] 1854.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Speaks of the love he has for his dear wife; knows that she loves him as well, even though she says she has not the language to express it; wishes that he would never have to be apart from her; has sold the carriage for $350 and will use the money to buy a piano in Richmond.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Thomas Branch & Sons, Petersburg, [Virginia], to J[uliana] Dorsey, n.p., 8 Nov[ember] 1854.
    1 page.ALS.

    Urges her to accept Mr. Harrison as security as he is now good for $20,000; gives details for the sale of her land.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Jno. [John] H. Marshall, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, n.p., 29 Nov[ember] 1854.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Encloses a check for $1199.34; hopes the check reaches her in time; Mr. Collins is to be married this evening to Miss Gale.

    Bears ALS from John H. Marshall, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, n.p. Shows the information relating to her account with Marshall & Son. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    George Conway, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, Petersburg, Virginia, 16 December 1854.
    1 page.ALS.

    Encloses a check for $200; mentions that "the negroes are well excepting Becky, who has been complaining for several days."

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Jno. [John] H. [Marshall], Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana [Dorsey], n.p. 11 Jan[uar]y 1855.
    1 page.ALS.

    Encloses a check for $119.10; discusses other monetary matters; Mollie has been sick but can now come down to her meals.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    George Conway, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, Yorktown, Virginia, 10 February 1855.
    1 page.ALS.

    Encloses a check for $230 for negro hire; attempted to obtain the $200 from Dr. Ketchum but was told it was impossible at this time; gathered up all he could and is forwarding this amount to her as asked.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Thomas Branch & Sons, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, Yorktown, Virginia, 21 Feb[ruar]y 1855.
    1 page.ALS.

    Regrets the inconveniences she has experienced with the sale of her land; Mr. Flower has not yet arrived but assures her that he is honest; has paid Mr. Davis for the negro hire.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Tho[ma]s W. Upshur, Norfolk, [Virginia], to Mattie Pierce, Williamsburgh [sic], Virginia, 1 August 1855.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Asks for a correspondence with her; was very surprised to find she left so quickly this morning without allowing him a chance to say goodbye.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Tho[ma]s W. Upshur, Oakland, to Mattie [Pierce], n.p., 7 August 1855.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Is quite glad that she did not refuse a correspondence with him; people are leaving Norfolk "by the boatloads yet still there is no real cause of alarm"; there has been no new case of fever for two days and the sick have been moved out to Oak Grove hospital where not one has died; the streets are deserted and few were in church on Sunday; has something to tell her that he would rather tell her in person; wishes that they are to meet again.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    W[illia]m G. Dunbar, Norfolk, [Virginia], to Mattie [Pierce], n.p. 1 Dec[ember] 1855.
    1 page.ALS.

    Regrets that he cannot accept the invitation to be present at Mrs. Henley's next week.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Tho[ma]s W. Upshur, n.p., to Mattie [Pierce], n.p., 16 December 1855.
    1 page.ALS.

    Was unable to attend Mrs. Henley's party earlier this month; hopes to continue the correspondence if it is agreeable to her.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    [Juliana Dorsey], Glebe, to her son Carter [Coupland], n.p., 20 Dec[embe]r 1855.
    1 page.ALS.

    Shares family news; encloses Alf's note for what he owes and asks that a check for it be sent to her; wants $1880 and hopes she can raise it.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    [Juliana Dorsey], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to [Carter Coupland], n.p., 25 Jan[uar]y 1856.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Feels that it is almost useless to try to mail a letter as the rivers are frozen and the roads are impassable; has not suffered from the cold but hasn't stirred from her warm room; would like to buy 50 acres and build a small cottage in which to live; asks that he remit the payment directly that he receives from Mr. Conway, Alf, and John Marshall.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    W.L. Watkins, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, Evergreen, Prince George [County], Virginia, 21 April 1856.
    1 page.ALS.

    Informs her that a brother of Mr. Flowers[?] has arrived to prevent his property from being sold; asks that she send all the bonds she holds against Mr. Flowers so that he [WLW] can perfect the arrangement.

    Including ALS from W.L. Watkins, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, Evergreen, Prince George [County], Virginia, describing her statement of account with him. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J[uliana] Dorsey, Evergreen, to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 10 May 1856.
    1 page.ALS.

    Gives details of a land transaction that he is to handle for her.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J[uliana] D[orsey], Petersburg, [Virginia], to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 26 May 1856.
    1 page.ALS.

    Encloses duplicate checks, but hopes the first reached him safely; will sign the contract to buy their land tomorrow and will stay with Mrs. Henley for two or three weeks; John's house is almost done, except for the doors and windows.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J[uliana] D[orsey], Williamsburg, [Virginia], to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 3 June 1856.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Has concluded the land deal fairly amicably; discusses business matters; John [R. Coupland]'s house will be habitable in four or five weeks; expects to be able to pay off her house in two or three years and then will have a nice income from it.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    E. Ruffin, Jr., Beechwood, to his aunt J[uliana] Dorsey, Petersburg, Virginia, 14 Aug[ust] 1856.
    1 page.ALS.

    Discusses business matters.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J[uliana] D[orsey], n.p., to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 17 Aug[ust] 1856.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Asks him to attend to her business matters immediately; needs a note for $1000 to settle the business between her and Edmund Ruffin; asks about his activities.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    George A. Ketchum, Mobile, [Alabama], to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 19 Aug[ust] 1856.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Informs him that when the servant Neill [?] was told he was to be sent to Virginia, he became upset at the idea of leaving his young wife and children; asks if he could buy Neill so the family could stay together; needs to buy Neill on time as he has not the cash to outlay right now; mentions that Neill has had syphilis several times and is not entirely sound; wonders if he would make a trade for him.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    E. Ruffin, Jr., Beechwood, to "Aunt" [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 4 Sept[ember] 1856.
    1 page.ALS.

    Discusses business matters and shares family news.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Wilmer A. Jones, n.p. to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 16 July 1857.
    1 page.ALS.

    Asks for the amount owed to him for the sale of a cart to him [CC]; has a debt to pay off and does not quite have all the money needed for it.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    W. L. Watkins, at Petersburg, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 31 July 1857.
    1 page.ALS.

    Reassures her that any check that Mr. Mann writes is good; explains that he has not written because he has been expecting to find out whether Mr. Wright, a previous owner of her land, has paid the taxes on it; assures her not to worry as someone did pay the taxes, according to the City Collector.

    Bears ALS from John Mann, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Julianna [sic] Dorsey, n.p., 31 July 1857.Describes the statement of Mr. Tho[ma]s B. Flower's bond to her in the amount of $423.10; is enclosing a check for that amount; asks that she send a receipt for it at her earliest convenience as he wishes to send it to Mr. Flower before he [JM] leaves for the mountains. 1 p. ALS.

    Bears ALS from John Mann, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Julianna [sic] Dorsey, n.p., 31 July 1857.Statement of account of Juliana Dorsey with Thomas B. Flower. ALS.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Jno. [John] Leyburn, Philadelphia, [Penn.], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 3 Aug[us]t 1857.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Regrets to inform her he must decline her call to form a Presbyterian church in Williamsburg; at present he desires to remain in Philadelphia; mentions the difficulty in establishing a church in Williamsburg and instead suggests that she ask a local presbytery to send someone to preach; the five dollars she sent arrived safely and he will send a receipt as soon as he can.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    E. Ruffin, Jr., Beechwood, to Juliana [Dorsey], n.p., 4 May 1859.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Received her draft for $300 and the statement of the deposit of $150 in credit; will go to Petersburg in a few days to draw the money and credit; describes Father's bruised hand which has given him great pain for many days; Mrs. L. seems well again and he hopes that she escapes her spring attack of neuralgia this year; all at the Glebe and at Julian's are well; asks when she will come visit as John [R. Coupland] and his wife can take care of the farm and house while she is gone.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    E. Ruffin, Jr., Beechwood, to Juliana [Dorsey], n.p., 1 June 1859.
    1 page.ALS.

    Explains his cashing of the draft she sent him; has no more houseguests as they have all left; asks if she can come up to fill their places.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 14 Sept[ember] 1859.
    ALS.

    Discusses his cotton crop; informs her that he cannot pay as yet the $1500 he promised John R. Coupland for "value received" and encloses a note for that amount.

    Bears ALS from J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 16 Sept[ember] 1859.Note of promise to pay John R. Coupland in the amount of $1500. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 29 Sept[ember] 1859.
    1 page.ALS.

    Explains that "money (what the merchants sometimes call) is 'tight'" and cannot pay off the note as yet; is sure that he will be able to pay it off if it were extended another four months; sends check for $979; discusses cotton prices.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    John [R. Coupland], Willoughby, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 14 Nov[ember] 1859.
    1 page.ALS.

    Will attempt to get all done that she wishes him to do; Charles has been sick with the chills for several days and so he [JRC] has been very busy in the fields; mentions the arrival of Mr. Buck; writes chiefly to tell her that Mr. Coke's contract is out; mentions there is no hack from Allen's Wharf at King's Mill; will go down to meet Cousin Leward when she goes to the Grove or else will send Miles; sends his love.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    J.Y. Russell, at Petersburg, to [Juliana Dorsey], 18 November 1859.
    1 page.ALS.

    Advises her to take the 100 bales of cotton; informs her that she should have taken his offer for $1500; has received a letter from Mobile that she must pay taxes and doctors' bills for her men.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter [Coupland], aboard Steamer Dalman, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 1 Jan[uar]y 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has some time to write to her now that he is finished with his duties for the night and the passengers have retired; spent Christmas dinner with John Marshall and enjoyed it immensely; mentions that Mollie is looking thin, but is still cheerful; explains that "old Rheumatism has got me still; I can manage to creep about, but suffer a great deal"; hopes that the rheumatism stays in his legs because if it moves up to his arms "the thing will be out with me and no mistake."

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 18 Jan[uary] 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Explains that his last letter was to inform her that the board will let her pay $300 to $500 and extend the balance to the first of June; sends a note to be signed by her and endorsed by John R. Coupland.

    Bears ALS from J.Y. Russell, James City County, Virginia, to [Juliana Dorsey], 18 Jan[uar]y 1860.A blank note addressed to John R. Coupland to pay for value received. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 25 Jan[uary] 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Received her check for $389.96 for curtailment of her note of $1000; has paid that amount on the old note and filled up the new note for $626.29 for next June 1st; encloses the pen he bought; expects to go to Mobile in the spring but is still unsure of the exact time.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    H. Emory, Suffolk, Nansemond County, Virginia, to [Juliana] Dorsey, n.p., 28 Jan[uar]y 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Suggests that she pay the amount due him to his brother.

    Bears ALS from H. Emory, Suffolk, Nansemond County, Virginia, to his brother, [?], 28 Jan[uar]y 1860.Fears that his last letter was miscarried; asks him to write soon. 1 p. ALS.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Galveston, to [Mrs. John R. Coupland], n.p., 1 April 1860.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Describes his passage across the Gulph [sic]; tells her he misses her greatly and is suffering from loneliness at having to be separated from his loved ones; asks if there is sickness at home because "something I know is the matter" as she has not yet written; will travel soon to Indianola and then on to Goliad, where Judge Hughes lives; fears that he "shall make nothing out of the Judge" because though he has money, others say he is always "hard up"; describes Galveston and the high price of land; tells her to expect him on the 25th; asks her to send a boat for him to Jamestown, theirs if it is fixed, otherwise Mrs. Jones'; asks her to write him at Richmond.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 17 May 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has arranged that she should only have to pay $200 and the balance will be extended four months; asks that she sign the note, have it endorsed, and send it and the $200 to him; is not yet sure of the amount of the note, so would like her to leave the date and the amount blank for him to fill in; asks that she leave him alone when it comes to cotton; sends the $500 canceled note and encloses one for $600 that he may use.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, , [Virginia] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 17 July 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has paid the $200 she sent on the note, which leaves a balance of $430.43; has not yet used the $600 note she sent; informs her that the cotton operations have lost much more than the $1000 she put into his hands and tells her that she should therefore keep quiet about it to him until he says something to her.

    Enclosure: note for $626.29 from Juliana Dorsey to John R. Coupland.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Selden and Miller, Richmond, [Virginia], to Jno. [John] R. Coupland, n.p., 5 Oct[ober] 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has sold his wheat for a total of $997.17, half cash and half four months' note; sends him the cash and has discounted the note; feels the sale a good one and hopes he finds it satisfactory.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J[ohn] H. Marshall, Mobile, [Alabama], to Juliana [Dorsey], n.p., 3 Dec[ember] 1860.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Has waited for the receipt of the $100 from J.W. Mann in order to write; mentions that "money matters here are in a terrible fix, no one paying anything that can possibly help it"; Anna M. has been quite sick and one of their negroes is in the bedroom and hourly expected to die; everyone is getting better and expected to pull through; informs her that their church is full and has a popular preacher; Geo[rge] W. Tarleton took Communion the day before; Charles Hopkins is either dead or dying.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Charles Lively, n.p., to John R. Coupland, n.p., 1860.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has sent the goods ashore for his mother; could not get the salt for there was none to be found in Richmond; put the money for the wheat in the bank.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    R. R. Banks, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, Williamsburg, Virginia, 2 Jan[uar]y 1861.
    1 page.ALS.

    Received the turkeys she sent and sold them all; asks how many she sent so that he can reimburse her for the ones that did not make it; sends a check for $26.05; thanks her for her "sympathy in these hard times that are trying the souls of our best men."

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, Williamsburg, Virginia, 11 Jan[uary] 1861.
    1 page.ALS.

    Informs her that their friend Mr. W[illia]m Sayre is dead; paid the note with the $100 she sent.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J.Y. Russell, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, near Williamsburg, Virginia, 27 Feb[ruary] 1861.
    1 page.ALS.

    Encloses the old note for $400; the new note is filled up for $150 less the $4.19 he owes her; informs her that the balance of $145.81 is due 6 June 1861.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Smyth, Stone, and Banks, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, at Williamsburg, Virginia, 30 March 1861.
    1 page.ALS.

    Informs her that she can pay the balance of the bill at her convenience.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Cha[rle]s L. C. Dupuy, New Orleans, [Louisiana ], to Juliana Dorsey, Williamsburg, [Virginia], 18 May 1861.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Writes to inform her that the Battalion of Washington Artillery, of which he is a member, has been accepted into service for the President of the Confederate States for the war; will leave next Thursday equipped with six six-pound guns and two twelve-pound howitzers, along with ammunition.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Henri W. Perrin, at Camp De Soto, Virginia, to Mattie Pierce, Williamsburg, Virginia, 13 Sept[ember] 1861.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Informs her that his haversack is missing and prevails upon her to make him another; had a severe chill on Wednesday but feels well this morning; mentions that Camp De Soto is a very lonesome place and hopes that he will soon be stationed near Williamsburg; sends his regards.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Henri W. Perrin, at Pelican Camp, Virginia, to Mattie Pierce, Williamsburg, Virginia, 6 Nov[ember] 1861.
    9 pages.ALS.

    Describes the death of a past lover of his caused by a strange man he met in Spain, and his feud with him ending in a duel that caused the man to lose his right arm; asks her if he is still worthy to be her friend; feels that he is not the kind of man she would want to associate with because of this feud that has controlled his past.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    A.M. Dupuy, Richmond, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 18 Nov[ember] 1861.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Informs her that Brother George has arrived, but as a fugitive from Lincoln's troops, who have "proscribed him as an Arch Traitor"; mentions that his wedding has been put off because his bride could find no wedding finery as "nothing could be got be obtained now in Eddyville"; informs her that George was robbed of $550 in gold on his way to Virginia; reassures her that the check for $25 came safely; will send her $10 when she is able to build her church; the price of burning fluid is up to $2.25 per gallon.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    H[enri] W. Perrin, Williamsburg, Virginia, to Mattie Pierce, Williamsburg, Virginia, 21 Nov[ember] 1861.
    1 page.ALS.

    Sends regrets that he cannot go on the ride planned for this morning due to a severe chill he received after their walk this morning; will call tomorrow if possible.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter [Coupland], aboard Steamer Beulah, to Mother, Juliana Dorsey, Williamsburg, Virginia, 23 Nov[ember] 1861.
    1 page.ALS.

    Had a rather unpleasant trip to Montgomery, [Alabama] as he was put in the car with sick soldiers; feels better after having had a bath and put on clean clothes; informs her that his cold is better.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    T. Witherspoon, Greensboro, to Aunt [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 4 Dec[ember] 1861.
    10 pages.ALS.

    Grieves for her [TW] husband's death on the first of December after a lingering illness; gives details of his decline; shares her unhappiness and her uncertainty about the future.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Exchange Bank of Virginia, Petersburg, [Virginia], to Juliana Dorsey, n.p., 10 Feb[ruar]y 1862.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has received the bank notes and checks amounting to $200; has placed the amount to the credit of Capt. Edmund Ruffin, Jr.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    T. Witherspoon, Greensboro, to Aunt [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 24 Feb[ruary] 1862.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Describes the "desperate sickening desolation of widowhood with its pressure and responsibilities"; finds her consolation in God; mentions that she is "very well, considering my recent confinement -- my baby being just four weeks old"; describes her baby as being sixteen pounds, two ounces with red hair and blue eyes; has named the baby William, her "dear Alfred's first name"; informs her that Mobile is expecting an attack, and families are leaving and sending away their valuables; another company is forming in her town; her household now numbers twenty-eight with her mother's servants who had no other refuge.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    W. R. Chew, Clifton, Louisiana , to Juliana Dorsey, n.p. 5 Ap[ri]l 1862.
    1 page.ALS.

    Bears the sad news that their mutual friend A. Sidney Robertson's daughter died when the bank on which she was standing gave way and she drowned; her body has yet to be recovered; assures her that her last letter to Robertson was received, and he will reply in person "so soon as he can compose himself sufficiently to do so."

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Sister of Edm. Ruffin [Jane S. Dupuy], at Windrow, to Mary [?], 4 March 1863.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Reassures her that she is thought of on a daily basis; apologizes for her long neglect, which resulted from her [JSD] giving up her room to houseguests, and also to the fact that she could not procure any stamps for a period of weeks; shares news of family and friends; mentions that Lottie is "quite alone in the County [Prince George] all the residents having fled to Petersburg many of whom have died"; describes the many cases of diphtheria in her area; Freeman returned from college with scarlet fever; mentions an outbreak of smallpox but due to the vaccinations there have been no deaths; returns again to the subject of family and friends.

    Bears ALS from Jane S. Dupuy, at Windrow, to Sister [?], n.p., 13 March 1863.Hopes that she is doing well now that she is "out of the reach of Lincoln's minions"; feels sad when she thinks of Anna and Mattie and "their confinement & the innumerable privations & annoyances they have had to endure & yet I wonder that they have not suffered more from such wretches"; is distressed that such a large area of the Confederacy is occupied by Union forces; feels that the Confederacy will gain independence but is sure that the war will last for years.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter [Coupland], Mobile, [Alabama] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 21 M[ar]ch 1863.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has been ill with a chill and a high fever but feels fine now; received a letter from Brother [John R. Coupland?] this morning and reports they had been sick after she left their house; informs her of the high prices in Mobile -- flour at $80 a barrel, turkeys at $6-7 each, beef from $0.50 to $0.75 a pound, and all else in proportion; has received letters from Jno. [John] Henly [sic] and Miles who especially wish to be remembered to her; will go up to see Mollie this evening.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Mattie [Pierce], Warrenton, James City County, Virginia, to Harriett Cary, Richmond, Virginia, 15 April 1863.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Did not realize how much she loved her home until she was forced to leave it under "such trying circumstances"; describes her departure under shelling from Union troops; was very happy to see the Confederate troops on Saturday; mentions shaking hands with Col. Tabb and receiving an introduction to Col. Shinglar; informs her that one of her negroes has been arrested and others are "quite cool indeed to us"; fears that the Yankees will "fire the town when our men leave."

    Bears ALS from Mattie [Pierce], Warrenton, James City County, Virginia, to Harriett Cary, Richmond, Virginia, 18 April 1863.Received a visit from Mr. Hansford as they were about to retire but stayed up and talked with him; rode down to Uncle's, where they were cooking food to send to Richmond; Uncle wishes her to stay with them; saw four Confederate officers while there; has learned that General Wise has left "dear old W[illiam]sburg again in the Yankee hands"; met Tom Barlow and Johnie Maupin as they were going into town and learned later they made it into town; wishes she [HC] were with her so they could console one another.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter [Coupland], Mobile, [Alabama] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 21 M[ar]ch 1863.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has been ill with a chill and a high fever but feels fine now; received a letter from Brother [John R. Coupland?] this morning and reports they had been sick after she left their house; informs her of the high prices in Mobile -- flour at $80 a barrel, turkeys at $6-7 each, beef from $0.50 to $0.75 a pound, and all else in proportion; has received letters from Jno. [John] Henly [sic] and Miles who especially wish to be remembered to her; will go up to see Mollie this evening.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Mattie [Pierce], Warrenton, James City County, Virginia, to Harriett Cary, Richmond, Virginia, 15 April 1863.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Did not realize how much she loved her home until she was forced to leave it under "such trying circumstances"; describes her departure under shelling from Union troops; was very happy to see the Confederate troops on Saturday; mentions shaking hands with Col. Tabb and receiving an introduction to Col. Shinglar; informs her that one of her negroes has been arrested and others are "quite cool indeed to us"; fears that the Yankees will "fire the town when our men leave."

    Bears ALS from Mattie [Pierce], Warrenton, James City County, Virginia, to Harriett Cary, Richmond, Virginia, 18 April 1863.Received a visit from Mr. Hansford as they were about to retire but stayed up and talked with him; rode down to Uncle's, where they were cooking food to send to Richmond; Uncle wishes her to stay with them; saw four Confederate officers while there; has learned that General Wise has left "dear old W[illiam]sburg again in the Yankee hands"; met Tom Barlow and Johnie Maupin as they were going into town and learned later they made it into town; wishes she [HC] were with her so they could console one another.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Harriette [?], Centre Hill, Petersburg, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 21 April 1863.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Informs her that she "left the Williamsburg captives well and doing as well as possible under the trying circumstances"; had left Mrs. Coupland's family as they were all improving from their illness; was shelled during General Wise's attack on the south side of the James River but little damage was done; has decided with her family "to remain till the last extremity, which I very much fear will not only be persecution but starvation"; gives details of the movements of General Wise and the situation of the war in her area.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John Coupland, Richmond, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 26 April 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Left Willamsburg twelve days before after being ordered by General Wise to report to Richmond; still subject to conscription as he is not yet forty years old; was upset to leave his "dependent family in the hands of the Yankees... and at this particular time with dear Sue expected daily to be confined, and not a physician in the place"; his family and Ma [Henley]'s are dependent on his efforts to find something to keep them all from starving as the Yankees forbade the citizens from going to the mill for some weeks; describes the Yankees as "stringent" and "diabolical"; informs her that if the Yankees relinquish the Lunatic Asylum there is a need for officers there, and as he has secured a clerkship there he is exempt from military service; describes the shelling of Williamsburg; escaped injury from the shells even though they fell quite close to his house; will sell Mac for her as horses are high in price; advises that her hands Edmund and John should be sold as they will sell for $4,000 and the family has nothing to live on now.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Juliana [Coupland], n.p., to her father John R. Coupland, Richmond, Virginia, 28 April 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Informs him that Uncle William Hancock has heard that they "were crying for bread"; has been told that everything is in plenty at Richmond and that there are many people there as if there were no war going on; is sorry to tell him that the Yankees will not let them go out without taking the oath of allegiance in one fashion or another; was excited that he was to get an office in the Asylum but was very disappointed that the Yankees kept hold of it; tries to help Mother as much as possible; asks after her relatives; informs him of the birth of his son on the first of May that they named Carter.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J[uliana] Dorsey, n.p., to John R. Coupland, Richmond, Virginia, 8 May 1863.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Distressed to hear that he has to leave his family to serve in the military; hopes he can be stationed at the Asylum so as to be closer to his family; he is welcome to the money she sent; would like to send more money but she is barely scraping along on Carter's kindness; will send more money if he secures the clerkship in Richmond; encloses $50 and is sure Mr. Beechtrout [?] will take Confederate money.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to [Sue H. Coupland], [Williamsburg, Virginia], 13 May 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Expresses his sadness at having to be separated from her; asks after his children and gives instructions for their upbringing; is disappointed that the Yankees have not relinquished the Asylum, and so he is without an appointment there; will try to remain out of the Army and secure a clerkship for her sake; expresses his anxiety to serve, but "now that I am exempt I must see what can be done for our good"; is sure that the war will soon be over and will lead to "the establishment of our people among the nations of Earth as an independent republic"; describes the gloom cast over the South as a result of the death of [Stonewall] Jackson, for "He was a grand specimen of all that was great and good in human nature"; describes the funeral procession.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to [Sue H. Coupland], [Williamsburg, Virginia], 3 June 1863.
    8 pages.ALS.

    Shares in the joy of the birth of their new baby; wishes he could be with her to share the burden of keeping the family since she has no servants to assist her; intended to send her some Virginia money, but was told that "there was no passing below, and no goods to be purchased in Williamsburg"; asks her what currency she can use and he will convert all he can to send to her; has yet to secure a position of employment but expects one daily in the Department for the settlement of deceased soldiers' claims with a salary of $125 per month; board is $100 a month in Richmond, but will endeavor to live as cheaply as possible to send her the most money he can; describes the war as lasting "until children yet unborn shall grow to be men, and their children and children's children shall raise up in turn to demand the rights for which their fathers fought, unless our enemy in the meantime be overpowered, or, ashamed of his wickedness, shall award that justice he has so long withheld"; shares his faith in the people, army, and President of the Confederacy; describes the area surrounding Richmond as being quite beautiful; intends to visit the fort of James Semple; sends love to all, especially the children.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 19 July 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Thanks her for her letter; declares that "could Vicksburg have been succored in time, and Meade not been fortunate enough to have found a stronghold when driven before our irresistible army, 6 months would have found us in the enjoyment of Peace"; assures her that she need not worry about Mobile as he believes it will not be attacked; has not heard from anyone behind Yankee lines since last he wrote her; informs her that the Yankees have allowed the residents of Williamsburg to receive supplies, and that they are furnishing the needy in town with provisions; has learned that "Greenbacks" are worth about six times that of Confederate money; worries about his family's money problems, as they are in need of many things but have no money with which to buy them; thanks her for the shirts she and Carter sent, but cannot accept them as a gift; does not wish to take her money, but she is welcome to any of his that will be useful to her; will write brother Carter soon.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J[ohn] R. C[oupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to [Sue H. Coupland], [Williamsburg, Virginia], 26 July 1863.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Enclosed $50 southern money in his last letter which took $125 Confederate money to purchase, and the rates are going up sharply, it now taking $300 Confederate to purchase $100 State Bank; expects to procure some "Greenbacks" from a man who is coming from General Lee's army, as the Confederate soldiers take them from the pockets of dead Yankees; has heard that the Yankees have let Mr. Spear through to the front lines of Williamsburg with provisions and hopes that he brought her butter, vegetables, and fowl; suffers greatly at the thought of his wife and young children suffering; excuses her for not writing because he knows it is difficult for her to know who is going outside Williamsburg; hopes that she will be able to get out a letter soon; asks her to send a list of what she needs and cannot procure herself, and he will get the items for her; declares his faith that "Genl. Lee and his Army are invincible"; asks after his children; has sold Mac for $1200 and asks if she can use Virginia Treasury notes in Williamsburg.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Huguenot Springs, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 16 Aug[ust] 1863.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Went to Huguenot Springs after suffering a headache and pain in the liver for two weeks; hopes to recover fully in a short time even though he is still suffering from bowel complaint that has "defied the kind attentions of both Cousin John [Dupuy] and Dr. W[alker]"; received the box she sent with the shirts she made him; informs her that he pays the least amount for board of any clerk in this area, being $70 a month while most rooms go for $100-$125 per month; tells her that $3 Confederate buys $1 of State Bank money and $10 of the same will buy $1 Yankee funds; hears that the Yankees are still allowing provisions into Williamsburg and that his family is well, though he has not yet had a letter from them; believes that his sickness results from "hard & hot marching around Richmond where the 20,000 Yankees at the White House threatened the city"; marched one night from 11 p.m. to daybreak, being 16 miles, and slept on the ground with no blankets.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    [John R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to Sue [H. Coupland], [Williamsburg, Virginia], 19 Aug[ust] 1863.
    10 pages.ALS.

    Understands that the only way she can get a letter out to him is if the content would not offend their enemies; advises her to write in a "plain, cold, business way" in order that it may be allowed to be sent; gives details of his sickness and convalescence at Huguenot Springs; assures her that he is strengthening daily, so not to worry; is upset that she cannot use the $50 State Bank money he sent her after paying $125 Confederate for it; could not procure Yankee money from the source he expected to; informs her that the exchange rate is $900 Confederate to $100 Yankee; asks her for a list of necessities so that he can procure them for her rather than try to convert his money to send to her; suggests that she sell whatever beef, fowls, etc., she can in order to raise money for the family; speaks of the letter Cousin John [Dupuy] received from Uncle Edmund Ruffin; informs her that Nannie Ruffin is dead, and Thomas, Cousin Ed's oldest son, was taken prisoner in Pennsylvania and has not been heard from since, and that the "old man [Cousin Ed]... says he desires to live long enough to see his country free, and then he would willingly die"; shares news of family and friends; asks after his children.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to Sue [H. Coupland], [Williamsburg, Virginia], 24 Aug[ust] 1863.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Has heard that camp fever is raging at Yorktown; advises her that if it reaches Williamsburg to pack up both her and Ma's family and go to the farm; describes his only consolation as writing to her and thereby feeling her presence with him; was able to hear Mr. Leyburn speak at Dr. Hoge's church; asks if it is possible that she sell things from the farm to Mr. Blassingham or some other shopkeeper and obtain the supplies he may have in his store; hopes that his newborn son is called Carter Harrison.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J[ohn R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia] to [Sue H. Coupland], [Williamsburg, Virginia], 27 Aug[ust] 1863.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Has received with joy the first letter she has written since they were separated; is distressed at the news that "that old scoundrel [Mr. Spear] should have failed, in the most brutal manner, to perform the only thing that comforted me with respect to your situation" in neglecting her in her time of need; hopes that he will be able to get them out of Williamsburg but cannot reveal his plans as yet; informs her that Molly Marshall has arrived in Virginia from Mobile, fearing that the enemy will take the city soon, and that Mother has gone up to Greensboro where General Cocke has offered her his nice place.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Richmond, [Virginia], to [Carter Coupland], n.p., 7 Sept[ember] 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Has put off writing to him till he could see Harriet; saw her at church and was told that Harriet has written both Mother and him and finds it strange that they have not received her letters; assures him that Harriet is quite well as she weighs 150 pounds and "looks better than anyone I have seen since the War commenced"; informs him of Mr. Spear's neglect, which has resulted in his [John's] family not having any flour or bacon in the house for weeks; fears for the citizens of Williamsburg, for "What with Yankee restrictions and scarcity of fuel, cold and starvation stares them in the face" once winter arrives; hopes to rent a cottage at Ashland where he can move his family; will make do with a plank bedstead and table if he cannot also bring up his furniture; discusses military matters and the movements of various generals.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Daniel Wheeler, Mobile, [Alabama] to Jane Dorsey, n.p., 7 Sept[ember 18]63.
    1 page.ALS.

    Sends the $150 check from Messrs. Bull and Foster; hopes it reaches her safely.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    [John R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to [Sue H. Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia], 15 Sept[ember] 1863.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Asks her to apply to the Federal authorities to be allowed to leave Williamsburg and to bring whatever furniture and baggage she can; gives instructions for his plans for getting her out of the town.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Dr. J.J. Dupuy, (nephew of Edmund Ruffin), Assistant Surgeon, 15th Georgia Infantry, at the Confederate hospital at Huguenot Springs, to his aunt, [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 22 Sept[ember] 1863.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Thanks her for her letter of the 1st; describes Cousin John [R. Coupland]'s visit to the Huguenot Springs and the cheer which he brought by his presence; knows that John is attempting to secure a home on the railroad, and Dr. Walker has been trying to find one, but without success; visited Nattoway recently and saw all the family; mentions that all are well, except Julia who still suffers from headaches.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    J[uliana] D[orsey], Greensboro, to John [R. Coupland], n.p., 23 Sept[ember] 1863.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Suggests that he make inquiries of Mr. Saunders about securing a cottage for his family in the village where they now reside if his plans cannot be carried out; also suggests going to Danville to see Dr. Th[om]as Atkinson, who was his doctor at the Springs, about relocating his family to that town; would greatly prefer the family to come to Greensboro with her to stay at General Cocke's place, where she and Carter could take care of them.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    John [R. Coupland], Richmond, [Virginia], to Mrs. John R. [Sue H.] Coupland, Williamsburg, Virginia, 1 Oct[ober] 1863.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Has learned from Col. Dupuy that it would be possible for her to be allowed to leave Williamsburg once proper application is made to the authorities, encourages her to take this step so that she is able to leave Williamsburg; warns her that though Mr. Darlington is supplying her with provisions, it is certainly possible that her source may unexpectedly cease and leave her in the same position she was in just a few weeks ago; has secured a cottage in Ashland about eighteen miles from Richmond for his family; mentions the offer of living with his mother at the place of General Cocke; gives her the option of choosing where she wants to live but would rather she move to the Ashland cottage; will give this letter to Col. D[upuy] who will make application for her if she decides to leave.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter [Coupland], Greensboro, to [John R. Coupland], n.p., 11 Oct[ober] 1863.
    1 page.ALS.

    Is recuperating from having typhoid fever while in Mobile; wishes he could relieve the suffering of his [JRC's] young children; strongly urges him to remove his family from Williamsburg; sends his love to Jno. [John] Henly [sic] and to Miles; informs him that Mother is healthy and that Tiff and the children are well.

    Bears ALS from J[uliana] Dorsey to John [R. Coupland], n.d.Was able to meet a man at church who will take a box to Richmond; will send the box in care of John Henly [sic] as she has learned that he [JRC] has gone to retrieve his family from Williamsburg; wishes him great success; hopes that Sue will write as soon as she is settled in her new home in Ashland; informs him that she will pay for a servant because he needs one, and that he also needs a girl; asks for his and his children's measure for shoes so that she can get some for him; is knitting him two flannel shirts; sends one shirt and six handkerchiefs. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Jane [S. Dupuy], Prince Edward [County], to her sister, [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 23 Oct[ober] 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Wishes they were together for mutual solace and consolation; worries greatly about William as his regiment has been heavily engaged and she has not yet heard from him; mentions the box sent by John M. to Mary that was robbed of everything but two tins of sardines and four cakes of soap; informs her that the tea set she [JSD] had deposited in Richmond for safekeeping has been robbed of every cup and saucer; describes the family with whom she is living; sends her love to sister's family.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter [Coupland], on board Steamer Senator, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 8 Nov[ember] 1863.
    1 page.ALS.

    Is on his way to Selma with 450 troops; has no right to complain since he is doing well, but is "sick & tired of the life I am leading!" and knows there are better days in store for him; worries about Harriett and her "dependent situation" and wishes he could be her protector; thanks her for the warm shirts she made him.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Carter Coupland, on board Steamer Reindeer, at Selma, Alabama, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 24 Nov[ember] 1863.
    1 page.ALS.

    Received her letter of the 12th, but has no time to respond to it; informs her that Capt. Baldwin has sold the Senator and that the Reindeer is one of the nicest boats on the river; mentions that John Marshall is at Mrs. Sayre's recovering after being severely wounded.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Molly Marshall, Mobile, [Alabama], to her aunt, [Juliana Dorsey?], n.p., 30 Nov[ember] 1863.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Had not expected to have to return to Mobile but was forced to after her husband John [Marshall] was severely wounded; realizes the probability of his never recovering the use of his arm; gives details of John's wounding and how the Yankees wanted to take him prisoner, but the ladies would not allow that since it appeared as though he were to die at any moment; describes the fuss being made over him at Mrs. Sayre's; asks whether it is time to plant and what should be planted.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    Char[le]s L. C. Dupuy, at Paroled Camp, 1st Louisiana Regiment Artillery, near Enterprise, to Juliana [Dorsey], n.p., 21 Dec[embe]r 1863.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Had attempted to make the acquaintance of Dr. Ruffin when he [CLCD] had returned to Demopolis from Greensboro, but Dr. Ruffin had not been home; is sorry to hear of the death of one of Mr. Witherspoon's children; had arrived "like a 'bomb-shell'" at Nottoway at daybreak as no one was expecting his arrival; escorted Annie and Cousin Jane to Cousin Emily H. Dupuy's home in Prince Edward to spend the winter; had met John Copeland [sic] in Richmond and was quite glad to hear his family was out of Williamsburg and in Richmond; expects to be ordered to Mobile for duty soon.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Major Edw[ard] B. Smith, assistant to the Chief of Ordnance, War Department, Ordnance Bureau, [C.S.A.], Richmond, [Virginia], to Mattie Pierce, n.p., 23 Jan[uar]y 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Informs her that the examination for arithmetic for clerkships in that bureau is to be held in Room 18 of the War Department at 1 p.m. on the following Monday.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Molly Marshall], Cottage Farm, to her aunt [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 4 Feb[ruary] 1864.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Shares her despair over her husband's [John] maiming in the war; he is still very much in pain and goes to Dr. Mordecai once a week, but the doctor cannot give them hope for full recovery either; is grateful to the help their neighbor Mr. S. has provided; felt it best to have their own home while John recovered as his mind was so disturbed while at Mrs. Sayre's; has purchased a buggy to carry John to and from his company, which is stationed three miles away; expects Cousin John Dupuy and his sister-in-law to arrive that day; reminds her that Cousin Asa Dupuy was beaten so badly by the Yankees that he died; shares news of friends and family.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Jane [S. Dupuy], Prince Edward [County], to her sister [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 24 Feb[ruary] 1864.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Apologizes for not writing sooner but reminds her that her [JSD] vision is very bad; is thankful she is staying with the General [Cocke]; feels anger over the boarding situation, in that there is no family willing to take on an extra person without fee, and the Confederate money is so worthless that many families do not wish to bother; seeks a place for her "poor suffering child who is not strong enough to bear this constant shifting and change of place" but has yet to be successful; regrets Sue's decision to submit to medical treatment for she is more of an invalid than before; notwithstanding Dr. Henly's "kindest feeling and the purest motives"; sends word that Charlie believes that Sherman will march on the South, attacking Mobile, Selma, and Montgomery simultaneously; hopes Mary and John [Marshall] will not remain in Mobile long; informs her that her headaches are gone, but now she cannot see well enough to do even her own mending; mentions a letter her son received from John [R. Coupland] detailing the provisions and supplies he was able to bring with his family out of Williamsburg; shares news of family and friends.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], on board Steamer Reindeer, Selma, [Alabama], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 5 M[ar]ch 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has been doing the work of two men but will not complain because these are war times; has been mostly ferrying troops for the last three weeks; mentions that John and Mollie [Marshall] had made the trip up with him on their way to Virginia; had had about 400 passengers on that trip, mostly women and children; feels that Mobile is one of the safest places in the Confederacy at this time; will dispose of the sugar he owns on his next trip to Mobile if he can double his money; feels sugar is a luxury and does not think it wrong to speculate in it.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    John [R. Coupland], Ashland, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 3 Ap[ril] 1864.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Mentions that Sue and the youngest two children have been away in King & Queen County for two weeks visiting her relatives and seeking to fill their larder; provisions are hard to come by and quite expensive; thanks her profusely for the clothes she made and sent for him and his family but tells her not to tax her eyes any more; had hoped to see her this summer but fears by then they will be behind enemy lines once more; does not know where he can go if General Lee falls back to Richmond; mentions that Sue saw John Marshall, Willie Dupuy, and Tom Ruffin a few days previously.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Eugene Desdunes, [Richmond, Virginia], to Mattie Pierce, Richmond, Virginia, 4 June 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Asks her to accept the gift of cherries enclosed and to let him know whether they reached her in good order as he neglected to pay the insurance on them.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    E.C. B[oudinot], [Richmond, Virginia], to Mattie Pierce, Richmond, Virginia, 8 June 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Informs her that she did not regret her absence last evening more than he did; came to see her last evening before he went home; hopes to see her today.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [E.C.] B[oudinot], [Richmond, Virginia], to Mattie Peirce [sic], Richmond, Virginia, 10 June 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has taken the liberty of promising that she will accompany Miss Jane, Miss Lottie, and the subscriber to Miss Wallace's this evening. Enclosure: memorandum of the addresses of E.C. Boudinot.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    E.[C. Boudinot], [Richmond, Virginia], to Mattie Peirce [sic], Richmond, Virginia, 12 June 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Hopes that his "promptness will make amends for forgetfulness" in enclosing his likeness; wanted to improve the portrait "by a few master touches with this pen but was 'afraid'." Enclosure: Portrait in watercolor of E.C. Boudinot.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Daniel Wheeler, Mobile, [Alabama] to Juliana Dorsey, n.p., 13 June 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has some more money from Messrs. Booth & Foster in virtue of her "Big Risk" and wonders how to send it to her; hopes she is well; informs her that Mr. and Mrs. Burgith[?] are at the point in the hopes of it benefiting Sarah, who is still distressed over the loss of her child.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [E.] C. [Boudinot], Meridian, Miss., to Mattie Pierce, n.p., 20 June 1864.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Has arrived in Meridian ahead of the rest of his party, who will overtake him today; met an old acquaintance from Fayetteville on the journey down that he addressed as Miss Marshall but who has since married a Mr. Boomer; informs her that every day at ten minutes to three p.m. and again about 6 p.m. his thoughts return to her and Richmond; has found a sure way for her to write to him care of Mr. Charles Watson with Major Young.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Edmund Ruffin, near Mattoax P.O., Amelia, Virginia, to "Sister" [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 20 June 1864.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Thanks her for her letter of consolation on the death of his son [Julian?]; mourns his son's death but is thankful that the death blow was instantaneous and that he died serving his country; shares information regarding his family and the escapes they had to make from the Yankee army; informs her that the total of the land that his sons own is four plantations laid to waste "by the depredations... of the enemy, and which must remain waste and unproductive as long as the war lasts."

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], Montgomery, [Alabama], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 12 July [18]64.
    1 page.ALS.

    Informs her that "Everything at present looks gloomy; but we must hope for the best"; the Reindeer has laid up and so he has made some trips on the Senator; is in Montgomery to settle the business; hopes to be able to come see her as soon as he gets through to Mobile; informs her that the "Board" has given him a full discharge.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], Selma, [Alabama] to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 9 Aug[ust 18]64.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Believes it will be several weeks before the Yankees make an attack by land in Mississippi; had business in Selma and wanted to settle it, especially since they were putting everyone in trenches in Mobile; worries that it looks "as if I was not willing to do what I could towards defending the old town, so... I must return to strife and excitement"; assures her that if his services are not needed he will come to see her soon.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [E.]C. [Boudinot], Washington, Arkansas, to [Mattie Pierce], n.p., 10 August 1864.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Does not believe that she deserves another letter as she will not write to him; informs her that he must go to work again after a long break; remembers their walks together in Richmond and pretends that he is with her now; asks if she goes to see the Cloftons now and reminds her they never paid that visit to the Jacksons.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[uliana] Dorsey, Greensboro, to John [R. Coupland], n.p., 16 Aug[ust 18]64.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Did not receive his letter for some time after he sent it, but would rather get his letters late than not at all; is sorry to hear that his family is complaining; gives suggestions for the recovery of his health; will get Carter to attempt again to send the 100 lbs. of bacon she purchased a while ago; informs him that though the Examining Board gave Carter a full discharge, he may still volunteer; asks whether his family has a cow; gives the prices of provisions in Montgomery, which are much lower than in Richmond; shares news of family and friends; mentions the difficulty faced by Brother Edmund and his son Edmund in obtaining food; informs him that in the Examinerof 26 May there was a nice piece on the death of J.E.B. Stuart; asks if he can get it for her from the office; sends him some verses that she wrote when he was attempting to rescue his family from Williamsburg; tells him Carter will send notice when he is ready to send the meat, if he can at all.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Lou [?], Richmond, [Virginia] to [?], 23 Aug[us]t [18]64.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Reminisces about their time spent together and is thankful he is loved by her; has been refreshed by the rain that has fallen to relieve the heat of the summer; gives news of many common friends that are now refugees in Richmond with him.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], on board Steamer Dixie, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 27 Aug[ust 18]64.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Guesses that his last letter to her was never received by her; has collected $160 from Mr. Wheeler; was forced to remain in Mobile and is now without funds; is surviving without shoes and nearly without clothing; informs her that the sugar she owns will pay the amount of money invested; believes that if he were to invest in a gold mine it would be worthless within a short time; was not able to get her sugar out of Mobile, but left it with a good family with instructions to sell it; is disappointed by the quality of the sugar; would love to be able to help out his Brother [John] but has not the funds at this time; informs him that the government is not paying anything, the quartermasters have had no money for six or seven months, and therefore the steamers have not been receiving any pay for their services.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Juliana [Coupland], Ashland, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 1 September 1864.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Has not heard from her in a while but guesses it is due to the lack of regularity in the mails; informs her that Father [John R. Coupland] has gone to Huguenot Springs to see Dr. Walker; he tells her that the food there is too good for a poor clerk; mentions the love felt by the children for their father; Little Carter has been sick but is recovering now; loves their house in Ashland; is excited about going to school in Richmond.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], on board Steamer Dixie, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 9 Sept[ember 18]64.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Thanks her for sending the letter from Aunt Jane as he has not heard from them in quite a while; shares news from a letter he received from Brother [John], informing him that Harriet is staying with them, as is Miss Mattie, who is quite ill, that his health is not good owing to his old complaint of the liver, and that he now weighs 117 lbs.; thanks her for her offer of mending his clothes and will send them as soon as possible; informs her that good brown sugar is selling for $4 a pound in Selma and assures her that she can do better in Greensboro; mentions the fact that the Government has not paid anyone for eight months.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Ro[bert] Saunders, Pittsylvania C[ourt] House, to John R. Coupland, n.p., 12 Sept[ember] 1864.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Asks him to give the letter enclosed to Mr. Marye; inquires about John Henley [sic] and asks if he will tell him [JH] to write to him [RS]; sends his regards to his wife and children; describes his work.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Juliana Dorsey], Greensboro, to John [R. Coupland], n.p., 23 Sept[embe]r [18]64.
    4 pages.AL. Incomplete.

    Has heard from Harriet Cary that he is back from his trip but would like to know if it benefited him; is uneasy about his state of health; is distressed that he weighs only 117 lbs; wishes he could have gone to Coyner's Springs instead and drunk their sulfur water to help heal him; asks after the health of his family; has just finished a pair of warm gloves for him, along with 5 pairs of socks for him and 6 pairs for little Johnie [sic], but cannot find anyone to carry them up for her; gives prices of provisions; shares news of family and friends.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], on board Steamer Dixie, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 28 Sept[ember] 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Received her letter that enclosed one from Harriet; is very glad she is now well; mentions that he will be able to come see her as soon as Capt. Locklin returns from seeing his sick family, which should be after two or three weeks; will bring the clothes that need repairing when he comes.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Ro[bert] Saunders, at Pittsylvania C[ourt] House, to John R. Coupland, n.p., 28 Sept[ember] 1864.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Was extremely glad to receive a letter from him as it cheered him immensely; would find the trials easier to bear if he had one of his best friends with him; has been joined by his family and is enjoying perfect health; thanks him for helping him out in the matter of the money lent to Mr. Marye, but is upset that Mr. Marye felt the need to pay interest on the loan as he was not out to make an investment when he lent the money to him; informs him that his son Bob was home on a furlough to recover from illness but has since returned to the army as a clerk; hopes that his health returns soon; had heard with concern of the death of Mattie Pierce.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter Coupland, Demopolis, [Alabama], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 13 Oct[ober] 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Has been ordered from Selma to Demopolis and made one trip up the Bigbee River; was glad to have Capt. Locklin back in command after visiting his family as he [CC] is unfamiliar with these rivers; hopes to see her soon, but will find it difficult because they are frequently ordered to another city, and will not easily find the boat again upon his return.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter Coupland, on board the Steamer Dixie, Demopolis, [Alabama], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 18 Oct[ober] 1864.
    1 page.ALS.

    Cannot move up the Bigbee River as it is too low; expects to move down the river to pick up corn to take to Selma; hopes to get away tomorrow and will be in Selma within four or five days; wonders if "this cruel war [will] never end"; longs to see her.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Lou M. L[?], Richmond, [Virginia], to [?], 3 Nov[ember 18]64.
    6 pages.ALS.

    Warns her not to expect him till she tells him whether she is leaving soon; sends his love and affection to her; asks if she can procure two rooms for him, as his doctor highly recommends the change; shares much news of family and friends.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], Selma, [Alabama], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 1 April 1865.
    1 page.ALS.

    Arrived in Selma the day before and will leave that evening on the steamer Cherokee for Montgomery; the Dixie sunk and burnt on the 24th of March but the crew and passengers are all safe; informs her of the great excitement there over the Yankee raids.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[uliana] D[orsey], at Cousin George's Canebrake, to John [R. Coupland], n.p., 9 Sept[embe]r [18]65.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Is greatly worried about him and has no idea where he is; could not guess where he went after the evacuation of Richmond; hopes that he had gone to her place and used anything there which would benefit him, as she does not envision having money enough to go to Virginia for a long time yet; informs him that "the Yankees hold all offices and impose such insults and oppressive measures on the citizens that no one seems to feel secure, or ventures to make any but a temporary arrangement"; shares news of family and friends; sends word of Carter and his escape from the Dixieas she burned and sank.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Ashland, Hanover County, Virginia, to John [?], 20 Sept[ember] 1865.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Asks if he could secure a place for his [JRC] son in a business house in his [J] city, as business is hard to come by in his [JRC] part of the country; asks after Mother [Juliana Dorsey] and Brother [Carter] as he has not heard from him since the surrender; will not go down to Mother's farm before November.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[ohn] R. Coupland, Williamsburg, [Virginia], to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 20 Dec[embe]r 1865.
    3 pages.ALS.

    Has not written to her lately because he has been expecting to move out to the farm to live; is glad to hear of Brother's [Carter] recovery; has yet to find a job to support himself and his family; wants to move out to the farm so that he can support his family off the land and devote himself to his children's education; explains that Mr. Darlington did not owe him $2000 as she had thought, but only $700, which is almost paid off; informs her that the $700 barely bought clothing and supplies of food; wonders "What is to become of us all"; is staying at Dr.'s with Johnny while Sue, the girls, and Little Carter are at Mrs. Henley's; shares news of friends and family.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[uliana] Dorsey, Mobile, [Alabama], to [John R. Coupland], n.p., 29 May 1866.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Explains that her school is so small because she started in February, when all the scholars were at other schools, and also that the smallpox was in every house in the row, but assures him that her school will be large enough in the fall; shares news of acquaintances in Mobile; hopes that he has recovered from his fractured rib; asks why he cannot obtain labor on shares, which seems the most widely used method of obtaining labor; is seeking employment for George and asks if the apothecary's or some other business would be preferred; chastises George through him [JRC] for not writing and explains that while she teaches school and takes in sewing in addition to her and Carter's needs, she still has time to write her grandson; informs him that Carter is again serving on a steamer, this one the General Rodgers; will send him $25 on the first of June and reminds him to send for it.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [John R. Coupland], Willoughby, to [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 17 Aug[ust] 1866.
    4 pages.ALS. Incomplete.

    Has worked hard all summer in the fields and is proud of the work he has done; had told the children that once the corn crop was in they would have pones and griddle-cakes and hominy and mush, and all were looking forward to October; describes the drought that grips Eastern Virginia and fears all his crop will be scorched by the sun; despairs for his family as he is too poor to do his duty to them properly; explains that he wish the $25 she sent to him had been sent later as it was already spent by the time the sheriff came to collect taxes on the farm; was able to pay the taxes by John Morrison's kindness, where otherwise his furniture would have been impounded; informs her that George will work in the engineer corps for the railroad for $60 per month until she can secure him a better job in the mercantile line.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Carter [Coupland], on board Steamer Prairie State,Montgomery, [Alabama], to Juliana Dorsey, Mobile, Alabama, 28 Nov[ember] 1866.
    1 page.ALS.

    Writes her faithfully every week and wonders if she receives his letters; worries that she is not well or in need because she does not write; wishes that he could provide for her and make her comfortable, but he hasn't the means; informs her that "Every thing looks gloomy" as the merchants are broke or soon will be because there is no money or business in that part of the county; is not sure when the steamer will be sold, either this term or the next.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Leonora Coupland, Williamsburg, [Virginia], to grandmother [Juliana Dorsey], n.p., 13 April [1863?].
    3 pages.ALS.

    Describes the first raid when the Confederate men came by their home and she offered them water; mentions that during the second raid the Confederates drove the enemy out of town; informs her that Cousin Hattie has gone to Richmond and that Cousin Mattie has gone away; was forced to take shelter at the hospital to avoid the cannonballs.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    J[uliana] D[orsey], Williamsburg, [Virginia] to Carter [Coupland], n.p., 31 Dec[embe]r n.y.
    4 pages.ALS.

    Informs him that Mr. Ritchie died about a fortnight previous after a long illness resulting from his injury; shares news of the family visiting her in Williamsburg; mourns Mrs. Blair's losses, for "that is human agony to see one's children, one after another, fill an early grave"; is glad that he is tired of hotel life and will join a family's fireside; asks him to raise $1180 for her if she can do without it; informs that John [R. Coupland] is at Story Point and cannot get back due to the weather.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Juliana Dorsey], Greensboro, to Sue [H. Coupland], n.p., 16 April [186?].
    3 pages.ALS.

    Worries for them because she has had no letters from them; hopes she can get an efficient cook and someone to help her; gives advice regarding the children; is sorry they had had another raid; hopes she can secure enough provisions for her family; shares that Tiff was able to get her $100 cow home after they had lost a more elegant cow, and had been living without milk and butter; will leave for Mobile the following Tuesday and will stay with Mollie [Marshall] for the summer; has recovered from her "Yankee consumption" and hopes that she [SHC] will get over her troubles.

    Including ALS from [Juliana Dorsey] to John [R. Coupland]. Hopes that he can send a wagonload up now as things are selling quite high in Richmond; suggests that Mr. Spear may thereafter be able to make regular trips; mentions that if they could get up the corn and oats they could get government prices for them, and several hundred dollars could be made. 1 p.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    [Juliana Dorsey], Mobile, [Alabama], to John [R. Coupland], n.p., 6 May [1863?].
    4 pages.ALS.

    Has improved greatly since she went up to Tiff's; informs him that Carter had had diphtheria while she was gone but is recovered; wonders what Julia means when she says that he is a conscript, whether he has been conscripted or whether he is only subject to it; asks how he is "getting on, in the domestic way" and whether he has a servant; feels safe in Mobile for although the Yankees are threatening by land, the city leaders have been drilling the citizens for a year on home defense; will go to stay with Mollie [Marshall] and informs him that John [Marshall] is stationed at Pascagoula.

  • Box-folder 1:4
    Wm. H. Sheild, to Jno. [John] R. Coupland, W[illia]msburg, [Virginia], n.d.
    2 pages.ALS.

    Informs him that the generous county of James City has provided York County with a judge, a clerk, a commonwealth's attorney, and a superintendent of schools; asks him to combat an electioneering dodge to be used against him; describes the election in which he is running.

Accounts, 1850-1866.
Box-folder: 2:5
232 items.
Series 2: Accounts
  • Box-folder 2:5
    Accounts of Carter Coupland, 1850-1860.
    83 items.
  • Box-folder 2:5
    Accounts of John R. Coupland, 1858-1866.
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 2:5
    Accounts of Juliana Dorsey, 1851-1863
    122 items.
  • Box-folder 2:5
    Accounts of other persons. 1862.
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 2:5
    Unidentified accounts. 1857-1863.
    4 items.
Miscellaneous Items.
Box-folder: 2:6-7
Series 3: Miscellaneous Items
  • Box-folder 2:6
    Statement made by Juliana Dorsey, 13 November 1851.
    1 item.

    Statement made by Juliana Dorsey, regarding her slaves and household furniture loaned by her to her son John R. Coupland.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Prayers, n.d.
    1 item.

    Prayers written by Juliana Dorsey for her sons, John R. Coupland and Carter Coupland.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Visiting cards, n.d.
    2 items.

    Two visiting cards in an envelope addressed to Mrs. Juliana Dorsey.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Will extracts, 1876.
    2 items.

    Two extracts from the will of Juliana Dorsey.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Cards written to Miss Mattie Pierce, 1856, n.d.
    5 items.

    Five cards written to Miss Mattie Pierce regarding social engagements in Williamsburg.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Invitation, n.d.
    1 item.

    Invitation to Miss Mattie Pierce to attend the annual encampment, Mobile Rifles.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Subscription list, 1860.
    1 item.

    List of subscriptions for building and organizing a Presbyterian Church in Williamsburg, Virginia.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    List of female clerks, 1864.
    1 item.

    List of ladies appointed as clerks in Ordinance Bureau, Confederate States of America, Richmond, Virginia.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Card, June 1858.
    1 item.

    Card of the "First Volunteer Regiment of Alabama, Admit Carter Coupland."

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Card soliciting aid, n.d.
    1 item.

    Card of the Ladies Southern Aid Association, soliciting aid in behalf of the family of Jefferson Davis.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Invitation to a social function, 9 February 1869.
    1 item.

    Invitation to Captain and Mrs. J. H. Marshall to attend a social function of the Order of Myths.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Letter, n.d.
    4 pages.17 cm.

    Daniel Murray... From a letter of the Hon. Francis S. Key, United States Attorney of the District of Columbia. Published by the American Tract Society.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Wedding Invitations, n.d.
    5 items.
    • Box-folder 2:6
      Wedding invitations, n.d.
      1 item.

      O.W. Brooke to Gussie M. McCoy.

    • Box-folder 2:6
      Wedding invitations, n.d.
      1 item.

      F.L. Glover to Mattie Stewart.

    • Box-folder 2:6
      Wedding invitations, n.d.
      1 item.

      John D. Freeland to Mary W. Goldthwaite.

    • Box-folder 2:6
      Wedding invitations, n.d.
      1 item.

      Leslie Marmaduke to Zemula Crawford.

    • Box-folder 2:6
      Wedding invitations, n.d.
      1 item.

      Charles O'Reilly to Alice M. Caulfield.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Memorandum, n.d.
    1 item.

    Memorandum showing the arrangement of trees in an orchard.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Verse.
    7 items.
  • Box-folder 2:6
    Advertising Card.
    1 item.

    Advertising card with cut of Ford's Hotel, Richmond, Virginia.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    Scrapbook, 1847-1853, n.d.
    136 pages. 8 x 6.5 inches.

    Scrapbook of Mrs. Juliana Dorsey and of Susan E. Henley Coupland [Mrs. John R. Coupland]. Note: The book contains newspaper clippings, a few of which are dated 1847-1853.

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Carter Coupland,
  • Coupland, Carter, fl. 1833-1866.
  • Coupland, John R., fl. 1843-1866.
  • Coupland, Susan Henley, fl. 1843-1866.
  • Dorsey, Juliana Ruffin Coupland, b. 1806?
  • Dupuy, Jane S. Ruffin, b. 1800.
  • Edmund Ruffin, Jr.
  • Jane S. Ruffin Dupuy,
  • John R.Coupland,
  • Juliana Ruffin Coupland Dorsey,
  • Ruffin, Edmund, 1794-1865.
  • Ruffin, Edmund, b. 1814.
  • Susan Henley Coupland,