A Guide to the Women's Suffrage Printed Ephemera Collection, 1860-1917 Women's Suffrage Printed Ephemera Collection M 71

A Guide to the Women's Suffrage Printed Ephemera Collection, 1860-1917

A Collection in
Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library
Collection Number M 71


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Virginia Commonwealth University, James Branch Cabell Library

Special Collections and Archives
James Branch Cabell Library
Box 842003
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia 23284-2003
USA
Phone: (804) 828-1108
Fax: (804) 828-0151
Email: libjbcsca@vcu.edu
URL: http://www.library.vcu.edu/about/special-collections/cabell/

© 2002 By Copyright Virginia Commonwealth University. All Rights Reserved.

Funding: Web version of the finding aid funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Betsy Pittman and Susan King

Repository
Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library, Virginia Commonwealth University
Collection number
M 71
Title
Women's Suffrage Printed Ephemera Collection, 1860-1917
Physical Characteristics
15 items
Orgination
Collection complied by Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access

Collection is open without restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Box/folder, Women's Suffrage Printed Ephemera Collection, M 71, Special Collections and Archives, James Branch Cabell Library, Virginia Commonwealth University

Acquisition Information

Transferred from the general collection and purchased from Second Life Books.

Processing Information

Collection original processed by Betsy Pittman in June 1990. Finding aid revised by Susan King in June 2002. Accession numbers: 90-Jun-79; 90-Dec-167; 91-Jul-24; 95-Oct-39


Historical Information

The first women's rights meeting in the United States was a social gathering of five women in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. The women who attended the meeting, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Ann McClintock, Martha Wright, and Jane Hunt organized a convention at Seneca Falls later the same year that included approximately 300 men and women and set the movement for women's suffrage in full motion. After seven decades of lobbying and outreach by several generations of activists, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution giving women the right to vote was ratified in 1920.

Scope and Content Information

Fifteen printed items were purchased from book dealers in the 1990's. Most of these printed handbills and pamphlets are from the state of New York circa 1917 and before. There are examples of both pro and anti suffrage materials in the collection.

Arrangement

Items arranged chronologically.

Contents List

"Advice to Young Ladies," 1860
handbill

Published in New York by Andrews

"Catholic Opinions," 1900
handbill

Published in New York by the National Woman Suffrage Association

"Dark and Dangerous Side of Woman Suffrage," undated
pamphlet

Published in New York by the Women Voters' Anti-Suffrage Party

"Don't Forget to Vote for Woman Suffrage," circa 1917
handbill

Published in New York by the New York State Woman Suffrage Party

"Extracts from Addresses of the Rt. Rev. Wm. Croswell Doane, June 6, 1894 and June 6, 1895"
pamphlet

Published in New York by the Albany Anti-Suffrage Association

"Few Words in Behalf of the Loyal Women of the United States," undated
booklet

Published in New York by the Loyal Publication Society

"How to Vote for Woman Suffrage Amendment, Election Day, November 6th, 1917"
handbill

Published in New York by the New York State Woman Suffrage Party

"Protest Against the Granting of Municipal Suffrage to Women, Chicago," 1906
booklet

Published in Chicago by the Association Opposed to the Extension of Suffrage to Women

"Think It Over," undated
postcard

Published in Michigan by the Cargill Company for the National American Woman Suffrage Association

"Votes for Women! The Woman's Reason," undated
handbill

Published in New York by the New York State Woman Suffrage Association

"Why New York Men Should Give New York Women the Vote, " 1917
pamphlet

Published in New York by the Empire State Campaign Committee

"Why Working Women Want the Vote, Mass Meeting...to Celebrate Passage of Suffrage Amendment by Legislature, " April 3, 1917
handbill
"Women in the Home," undated
handbill

Published in New York by the New York State Woman Suffrage Association

"Woman Suffrage Above Human Law. Letter from Gerrit Smith to Susan B. Anthony," August 15, 1873
handbill
"Your Vote," 1917
handbill

Published in New York by the New York State Woman Suffrage Party