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A Guide to the Additional Papers of Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1874-1953 Beardsworth, Ada Bantz, Additional Papers 8884-h

A Guide to the Additional Papers of Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1874-1953

A Collection in
Special Collections
The University of Virginia Library
Accession Number 8884-h


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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession Number
8884-h
Title
Additional Papers of Ada Bantz Beardsworth 1874-1953
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Additional Papers of Ada Bantz Beardsworth, Accession #8884-h, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

This collection was purchased by the University of Virginia Library from Crown Collectibles on October 8, 2007.


Biographical/Historical Information

Ada Bantz Beardsworth (1877-1965) was a very popular and upstanding woman who lived in the small town of Winchester, Virginia. She was the only child of T. Marion Bantz (?-1911) and Ann Eades "Mddie" Bantz (?-1905) nicknamed "Muddie," "Cam," and "Toodle-Doo," of Winchester, Virginia. T. Marion Bantz was the son of Gideon Bantz and had several brothers: Eugene, Ernest, Merle, Julius, and a sister, Ada Bantz Dukeheart. Ada's mother, Ann "Muddie" Bantz had several sisters, Helen [Schley], Lou, and Alice [Shriner]. Mr Bantz was a free lance journalist who was very interested in politics and may have owned a store in Winchester, Virginia. He was a very close friend of Charles Broadway Rouss and their friendship made the Bantz family very popular. There are many letters from Mr. Rouss to the Bantz family in the collection.

Ada loved politics, travel, socializing and was often in the company of people with wealth and influence even though her family had a modest income. She was strong minded and wanted to find employment during a time in which society did not encourage women to work outside of the home. She took stenography and typing and applied for positions at the post office, but had to give up after four years of pursuing contacts and making a less than ideal score on the postal examination. She was very concerned about being a financial burden on her father or a husband. Her father was also in favor of her finding a career. She eventually married Professor Thomas Beardsworth after a long courtship. (1897-1902). Many of her letters during the courtship reflect her concerns about not having enough money and being dependent on others. However once she was married she maintained her independence and helped her husband to tutor the boys at the Staunton Military Academy, creating a second home for them.

Ada was very knowledgeable about fashions and travelled often to Baltimore, Washington D. C., New York, and abroad. Many of her friends sought her advice on fashion for their clothes and home. She was also very talented in music and art. After her father's death in 1911 she opened an art store in her home in Staunton, Virginia.

Ada's husband, Professor Thomas Beardsworth, (1877-1947) was an Englishman who grew up in Buena Vista, Virginia, and became the music director at Staunton Military Academy (1908-1941). He also was employed by Mary Baldwin Seminary, Staunton Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind. He was a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music and was well known around the country for his music. He had three brothers, William H. Beardsworth, Richard Beardsworth, John Beardsworth and two sisters, Lavinia Proctor and Matilda "Tillie" Topping.

William Beardsworth worked for Columbia Paper Company and tried to start his own store with financial help from Tom but he returned to work at the paper company.

Richard Beardsworth wrote love letters to Ada Beardsworth before she met his brother Tom. Richard worked for Ada's father at Mr. Bantz's store in Winchester, Virginia and lived with the Bantz family. He also worked for The West Side Lumber Yard, Burrill, Strickler & Company General Merchandise and E. Dillon's Sons, and was also a member of the Knights Templar.

John Beardsworth was the youngest son and after school he lived with his brother Tom and studied music. Ada encouraged Tom to have John attend college but without financial support he had to find employment. He worked for H. L. Gildeson Hardware and for Pianos & Player Pianos in Lynchburg, Virginia.

Lavinia Beardsworth Pryor, the sister of Thomas Beardsworth married Gilmer Pryor in 1898 at age 20. According to Ada, Lavinia was very dependent on her mother for her sewing and other chores and Ada felt that she fretted over trivial issues and wore her mother out with extra work. The Pryor's had one daughter, Mary.

Matilda "Tillie" Beardsworth Topping, the youngest sister of Thomas Beardsworth was very outspoken as a young girl. She became a nurse for the Sheltering Arms Free Hospital in Richmond, Virginia. Her husband, John, died of consumption. They had three daughters: Mary, Elizabeth, and Matilda.

William Baker Powell, a frequent correspondent in this collection, was a favorite godson of Ada and her mother, Ann "Muddie" Bantz. He was also a cousin of the famous classical pianist, composer and eugenicist, John Powell. "Billy" Powell wrote Ada and her mother, letters as a little boy and was a very close friend of Ada's throughout her life. He was passionate about fashion and was friends with many famous artistic and dramatic people. and worked in the field of advertising. His letters reveal a charming and clever man who easily made friends in high places although he earned very little money for himself. He gave motivational speeches and wrote plays for his sales staff at Sherwin-Williams and he invented a game about companies and their products called "Going to Market."

The collection contains extensive correspondence with Ada Bantz Beardsworths' many friends. There is significant correspondence from her cousins Mame Shriner and her sister Blanche Shriner Ross. In 1901 Mame was employed with the United States Government Printing Office and was hoping to get a job with the U. S. Postal Service. She married Arthur Johnston who travelled to England and the Far East often leaving her behind. Mame encouraged Ada to continue pursuing her efforts to find employment with the Postal Service. Mame also worked in Washington D. C. for United States Senator Levi Ankeny. She wrote often about the Washington social scene, including plays and performance as well as soirees. Ada felt that she was not a sincere person and did not trust her. Ada was fond of Mame's sister, Blanche Shriner, who was married to an attorney, Richard "Dick" Ross. Ada often vacationed with the Rosses' at their beach house in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Ada was also close to the Hall family who lived in Brooklyn, New York after they left Winchester, Virginia. Paul Hall and his sisters Dora and Bertha "Bert" Hall often invited Ada to visit them in New York. Paul was also a close friend of Tom Beardsworth even though Paul was enamored with Ada. She often corresponded with him but she felt that he was unstable. He worked for Standard Oil in Washington, D. C., Adam E. Schatz (attorney), Long Island Brewery and D. Appleton & Company in New York. He took a "may the best man win" approach with Tom concerning Ada.

"Bert" Hall worked at the office of Elms & Johnson (a Dry Goods Commission Merchants-Sole Agents for Standish Mills) She corresponded on the subject of fashion, fabrics, politics, arts, and performances with Ada.

Dora Hall studied at the Brooklyn-Queens Conservatory of Music and was good friends with Ada and Tom Beardsworth.

Harry and Nan Krebs were also frequent correspondents of Ada. Harry Kreb was a cousin of Ada's who lived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a pharmacist in nearby Mercersburg, Pa. His wife, Nan, taught piano. Harry Kreb interned in Roanoke in 1900 and his letters continued when he moved to Philadelphia and after the birth of their son Douglas. He attended Lafayette College and in 1929 was employed at H. K. Mulford Drug Co. in Philadelphia. Nan and Ada discussed fashion trends and Nan shopped for Ada in Philadelphia stores.

In addition to correspondence with friends and relatives Ada corresponded with male pen pals she found after placing an advertisement in a New York paper using the alias Marie Bradford. She became friends with some of the men who responded to her advertisement, several of whom fell in love with her. The pen pal letters were written on hotel stationery from across America, many with interesting vignettes and covers and contain discussions of current events, business trends, and etiquette. Among these pen pals were Thomas Nolan, Frank Joliffe, Frank Gillis, J. Gilpatric, and Thomas Jefferson Manning. She also corresponded with were George Schoenfelt and a friend of her father's named "Mac."

Scope and Content

The papers of [Julia] Ada Bantz Beardsworth of Winchester, and Staunton, Virginia consist of family correspondence from 1874 to 1953, the bulk of which are love letters (some very explicit) written from 1897 to 1924 between Ada and her husband, Thomas Beardsworth of Buena Vista and Staunton, Virginia; correspondence with her many friends; and information about the Staunton Military Academy, The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind, Mary Baldwin Seminary, Virginia Female Institute, and the Stonewall Band Brigade, where Professor Thomas Beardsworth was the music director and band leader.

The letters of Ada Bantz Beardsworth paint a portrait of a young woman who wanted to have the same employment opportunities as a man in the early twentieth century. She wanted to be independent and have her own income. She was also very feminine and embraced the New York style of fashion and rules of etiquette. Her letters reveal that she was very flirtatious and expressive. Prior to her marriage, she placed an advertisement in a New York paper for male pen pals so that she could learn more about the world outside of Winchester through her correspondence and friendships with men.

Also of interest are the letters from her godson and cousin, William Baker Powell, a quick-witted, and highly social gay man. He worked in the advertising business and was well known among many famous people, including prize fighter Gene Tunney, playwright Noel Coward and musician, Cole Porter. Powell travelled around the world with wealthy friends and wrote articles for home decorating magazines. He invented and patented an advertising game "Going to Market," which has been incorrectly attributed to Charles B. Knox, of the Knox Gelatin Company.

The correspondence in this collection illuminates daily life in the early twentieth century and mentions many important historic events such as, the Spanish-American War, the Boer War, the two World Wars, and the Great Depression.

The letters also highlight cultural fads such as wheel (bicycle) riding, the invention of ping pong, the mysteries of Sherlock Holmes, the performance of the opera, The Wizard of Oz, and many other popular activities of the time.

Other correspondents include William Wood Glass, Jr., who wrote Ada when he was a student at the University of Virginia about the great fire at the Rotunda on October 27, 1895; famous playwright, Frank R. Gillis who wanted to leave his wife for Ada and wrote songs about her; Senator John Warwick Daniel and Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, who tried to help Ada to obtain a job in the post office; and Charles "Broadway" Rouss who was a close family friend and often hosted Ada during her trips to New York.

There are about 9,000 items and 40 hollinger boxes, (17 linear feet).

Arrangement

The collection is arranged into Series I Correspondence which is alphabetical by correspondent and chronological within each folder, and Series II Topical which is alphabetical by subject and chronological within each folder.

Contents List

Series I: Correspondence
  • Box-folder 1:1
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1874-1893
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 1:2
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1894-1896
    13 items.
  • Box-folder 1:3
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1897-1898
    13 items.
  • Box-folder 1:4
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1899
    14 items.
  • Box-folder 1:5
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1900-1901
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 1:6
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1902
    14 items.
  • Box-folder 1:7
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, 1904-1906; [1914]
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 1:8
    Ann Eades "Muddie" Bantz correspondence, n. d.
    13 items.
  • Box-folder 1:9
    Bantz family correspondence Aunts Ada, Alice, Annie and Uncle Merle, 1880-1916
    30 items.
  • Box-folder 1:10
    Bantz family correspondence Aunt Helen Schley, 1886-1894
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 1:11
    Bantz family correspondence Aunt Helen Schley, 1895-1899
    20 items.
  • Box-folder 1:12
    Bantz family correspondence Aunt Helen Schley, 1900-1902
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 1:13
    Mr. and Mrs. Gideon Bantz correspondence with their son, T. Marion Bantz, 1874; 1887-1888
    3 items.
  • Box-folder 2:1
    Gideon Bantz receipts and miscellaneous letters and receipts, 1849-1897
    51 items.
  • Box-folder 2:2
    Julius A. Bantz correspondence, 1912-1920
    5 items.
  • Box-folder 2:3
    T. Marion Bantz correspondence, 1878-1909
    8 items.
  • Box-folder 2:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1882-1894
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 2:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1895-1899
    29 items.
  • Box-folder 2:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1901
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 2:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents including wedding plans, 1902 January-September
    26 items.

    Thomas Beardsworth wrote to Ada's father, T. Marion Bantz requesting his permission to marry Ada.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents correspondence, 1902 October-December
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 2:9
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1903 January-April
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 2:10
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1903 June-December
    14 items.
  • Box-folder 3:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1904 January-July
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 3:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1904 August-December
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 3:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, 1905-1910
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 3:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth correspondence with her parents, n. d.
    30 items.
  • Box-folder 3:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1881-1891
    31 items.

    Correspondence includes W. D. Sydnor.

  • Box-folder 3:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1892-1893
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 3:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1894-1895
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 3:8
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1896
    35 items.
  • Box-folder 4:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1897
    25 items.
  • Box-folder 4:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1898
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 4:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1899
    23 items.
  • Box-folder 4:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1900
    20 items.
  • Box-folder 4:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1901
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 4:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1902
    27 items.
  • Box-folder 4:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1903
    17 items.
  • Box-folder 4:8
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1904-1905
    40 items.

    There are condolence letters to Ada regarding her mother's death.

  • Box-folder 4:9
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1906
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 5:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1907
    27 items.
  • Box-folder 5:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1908-1909
    23 items.
  • Box-folder 5:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1910-1912
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 5:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1913-1914
    43 items.
  • Box-folder 5:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1915
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 5:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1916 January-June
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 5:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1916 July-December
    23 items.
  • Box-folder 6:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1917 January-June
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 6:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1917 July-December
    30 items.
  • Box-folder 6:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1918 January-June
    17 items.
  • Box-folder 6:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1918 July-December
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 6:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1918 July-December
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 6:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1920
    36 items.
  • Box-folder 6:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1921
    34 items.
  • Box-folder 7:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1922
    34 items.
  • Box-folder 7:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1923
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 7:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1924
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 7:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1925 January-August
    32 items.
  • Box-folder 7:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1925 September-December
    24 items and negatives.
  • Box-folder 7:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1926
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 7:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1927
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 7:8
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1928
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 8:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1929
    14 items.
  • Box-folder 8:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1930-1933
    33 items.

    A letter dated January 3, 1932 from Ada's friend Etta, who mentioned how she was "crazy about my telephone."

  • Box-folder 8:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1934-1936
    25 items.
  • Box-folder 8:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1937-1938
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 8:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1939-1940
    23 items.
  • Box-folder 8:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1941-1944
    25 items.
  • Box-folder 8:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1945-1948
    30 items.
  • Box-folder 8:8
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1949-1956; 1960
    39 items.
  • Box-folder 9:1
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 9:2
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    40 items.
  • Box-folder 9:3
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    29 items.
  • Box-folder 9:4
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 9:5
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    27 items.
  • Box-folder 9:6
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    39 items.
  • Box-folder 9:7
    Ada Bantz Beardsworth General Correspondence, n. d.
    68 items.
  • Box-folder 10:1
    Lavinia Beardsworth [Pryor] correspondence, 1896-1933
    28 items.

    Lavinia Beardsworth Pryor wrote about the hard times in 1912 but praised President Wilson. "We are certainly in troublesome times as I wrote Mother we are very fortunate in having such a safe man as Wilson in as President."

  • Box-folder 10:2
    Matilda Beardsworth "Tillie" [Topping] correspondence, 1896-1941
    23 items.
  • Box-folder 10:3
    Richard Beardsworth to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1897
    6 items.
  • Box-folder 10:4
    Beardsworth family correspondence: Richard Beardsworth, John Beardsworth, William Beardsworth, 1889-1921
    34 items.

    Includes letters from Will Wood.

  • Box-folder 10:5
    Beardsworth Family to Ada and Tom Beardsworth, 1899-1938
    29 items.

    Letters are mostly from Tom's mother to Tom and Ada Beardsworth.

  • Box-folder 10:6
    Tom Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1898-1910
    36 items.

    Correspondence includes R. A. Evans, Southern Manufacturers Club; [Carl Fischer Co.]; J. Madison Spurr, Secretary, Union Cornet Band; J. M. Steffey, Cliffwood Concert Band; P. Duval, Virginia Female Institute; L. S. Evans, Stonewall Brigade; Fred R. Klicker to play clarinet for his band; Rohlfing Sons Music Company; W. H. Joyce; Ellen Carpenter, Clifton Forge School of Music & Expression.

  • Box-folder 10:7
    Tom Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1911-1917
    38 items.

    Correspondence from Shenandoah Collegiate Institute & School of Music; letters from boys and parents; Muskogee Real Estate Corporation; Invitation to commencement at Lafayette College; Claude A. Gette; F. B. Spiker, The Bingham School Department of Music; Danguard Player Action School.

  • Box-folder 10:8
    Tom Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1918-1919
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 11:1
    Tom Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1920-1921
    27 items.

    Correspondence includes Mrs. C. R. Dunn who mentioned that Tom had resigned from the Virginia School of the Deaf and Blind; Red Triangle Association; Camp Lee; Harry Von Tilzer; Standard Pneumatic Action Company; Letters from parents about boy's tuition.

  • Box-folder 11:2
    Tom Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1922-1923
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 11:3
    Tom Beardsworth General Correspondence, 1926-1943; n. d.
    27 items.

    Includes notes from class on Technical Work in Ear Training for the Piano; and correspondence from H. Richardson, Stuart Hall; Frank R. Caputo, Director of Music, Shenandoah Valley Academy; R. T. Hall, Superintendent Staunton Military Academy; Gibson Morrisey, Contest Chairman, The West Virginia Federation of Music Clubs.

  • Box-folder 11:4
    Beardsworth obituaries, 1901; n. d.; 1941
    3 items.
  • Box-folder 11:5
    Tom Beardsworth personal information, 1913-1937; n.d.
    9 items.
  • Box-folder 11:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1896-1897
    12 items.

    Included is a piece of Tom's hair and correspondence from Ada Bantz to Tom Beardswoth about her Aunt Lou dying. Tom mentioned a position he was considering at the Virginia Military Institute.

  • Box-folder 11:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 April-June
    12 items.
  • Box-folder 11:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 July 1-19
    19 items.

    Tom was teaching music for the summer at Rockbridge Alum Springs. He wrote to Ada that there was no one like her. He also wrote about playing golf and bicycling "wheeling."

  • Box-folder 11:9
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 July 20-31
    12 items.

    Ada wrote about Lavinia breaking up her engagement and she mentioned that Lavinia's fiancé went off to fight in Cuba [July 22, 1898 in the Spanish-American War].

  • Box-folder 11:10
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 August 1-14
    14 items.

    Ada mentioned Dr. Hunter Holmes McGuire and treatment for her eyes as well as her trip to Atlantic City. She wrote about their friend, Paul Hall, who was infatuated with her and criticized him for wanting to fly off to Cuba. She also mentioned a flood in Winchester.

  • Box-folder 11:11
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 August 19-30
    14 items.

    Correspondence is about daily events and friends, including William Powell. She mentioned that scarlet fever had broken out at Capon Springs.

  • Box-folder 12:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 September
    12 items.

    Correspondence about Tom planning to take instruction for violin under Professor Van Hulsteyn at the Peabody Institute. Poetry enclosed.

  • Box-folder 12:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1898 October-December
    9 items.

    Ada traveled to Mercersburg for Nan and Harry Kreb's wedding. Tom wished that they could be married and wrote that the waiting was very hard. Ada wrote that life was not worth living without Tom.

  • Box-folder 12:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 June 28-July 15
    20 items.

    Ada wrote that she was miserable and lost without Tom. She also wrote about William Powell, Frank Joliffe, Warren Rice and Mame Shriner. Ada also met with J. Madison Spurr to persuade him to return to the band, but he had to remain home to take care of his wife. Tom hired a sixteen year old cornet player named Nelson Kratz to replace Mr. Spurr. Ada wanted to know if he was good looking!

  • Box-folder 12:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 July 16-31
    21 items.

    Tom wrote that he missed Ada so much he might break the steels on her corset if she were with him. Ada wrote that she wished he could find her a governess position so she could make some money.

  • Box-folder 12:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 August 1-August 10
    12 items.

    Ada wrote that her eyes hurt and that he was the "dearest, truest, best and noblest man on earth."

  • Box-folder 12:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 August 13-August 31
    21 items.

    Ada mentioned working at [her father's] store and that in years to come their letters would stand as a diary and tell about old times. She also professed her love to Tom.

  • Box-folder 13:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 September
    10 items.

    Ada wrote from her trip to New York and about William Powell. Tom went to Alum Springs, Buena Vista and Winchester. Ada mentioned that Mr. Charles Broadway Rouss was coming for a visit with her father. She ordered Tom to make up a "yarn" to get out of playing in J. Madison Spurr's band because she didn't think it good enough for him.

  • Box-folder 13:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 October-December
    12 items.

    Tom was in a parade with the F. Fire Company and [Union boys] and Ada and her mother felt that he looked too "pure" for the Company. Ada spent Christmas in Baltimore shopping and visited her friends. Tom wrote that he thought that his prospects in Staunton were very good.

  • Box-folder 13:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1899 n. d.
    2 items and a small unidentified photograph.
  • Box-folder 13:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 January 1-15
    19 items.

    Tom wrote that the band had a meeting and an election of officers and appointed Tom as the Assistant Director of the Stonewall Brigade Band and Mr. Joseph M. Brereton as Director. He met with the Principal of the Mary Baldwin Seminary. Tom wrote that he would be directing the band when Brereton was away.

  • Box-folder 13:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 January 16-31
    22 items.

    Ada discusses why they could not get married yet. Tom wrote that the people in Staunton were much better educated in music than in Winchester. Tom planned to meet with the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind He praised Brereton as being better than Mr. Spurr. Boer War mentioned.

  • Box-folder 13:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 February 1-14
    20 items.

    There are news clippings about The Commonwealth Club of Richmond presenting The Stonewall Brigade Band with a banner and an announcement that Professor Beardsworth would assist in the music for the Ladies Auxillary at the Y.M.C. A. Tom described his busy schedule. He also sent her a program for one of their performances. He told her that he thought that his chances at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind were good. He met with three music teachers at the Mary Baldwin Seminary, Professors Aymn, Eisenburg and Ide. Ada wrote more about the Boer War. She also wrote about her father's bad moods burdening her mother.

  • Box-folder 13:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 February 16-28
    18 items.

    Ada wrote to wish Tom luck on his minstrel concert and he responded that it was "the best one that he ever had." She mentioned that the Charles Broadway Rouss Fund Club were having a meeting at her house. Tom wrote that after the minstrel show there was a parade and party at the Elks Lodge of Charlottesville until two o'clock in the morning. Ada also wrote about their friend, Paul Hall, and his love life and career.

  • Box-folder 13:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 March 1-8
    15 items.

    Tom wrote that the band was going to Atlantic City in July with the Elks; Louisville, Kentucky in May; and Washington D. C. with the Knights Templar; the University of Virginia for Easter; and Lynchburg. He also wrote that Professor Ide helped him with the music for the story of the reformation. Ada encouraged Tom to be the leader for the Stonewall Orchestra. Tom mentioned that a friend was getting an "absolute" divorce where one does not have to pay alimony.

  • Box-folder 13:9
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 March 9-13
    10 items.

    Tom sent in his application to the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind. Ada wrote him that she had almost made up her mind to marry him as soon as he made a "little headway" financially. Tom wrote that he was ecstatic and that they were both twenty-five with their best years being spent in loneliness. He said that he would give up his music for her so that he could get a better job, but she wrote him that she would not mind at all having to work.

  • Box-folder 13:10
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 March 14-21
    9 items.

    Tom wrote to Ada explaining that the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind did not pay as much as she seemed to think. With classes and the band Tom made thirty dollars per month including board and washing. Ada wanted to find someone to sell her art work for her. She also mentioned that Dick Byrd [Richard Evelyn Byrd] joined the Virginia Club.

  • Box-folder 13:11
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 March 22-31
    12 items.

    Tom wrote that he lost over a hundred dollars in stock and was very upset about it. He did not get the position at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind because they reelected the person that resigned. Tom also mentioned that Mr. King was the secretary at the Mary Baldwin Seminary, and Mr. Webb was the principle music teacher at Miss Duvals. Ada wrote she would be interested in earning money as a personal companion.

  • Box-folder 14:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 April 2-12
    19 items.

    Ada asked Tom's advice on what to tell Paul Hall about their engagement and their desire to keep it secret. Tom wrote that he didn't understand why they couldn't get married and that he would come to get her as soon as she consented. He told her how much he missed her, even making sexual reference to his physical desire for her. He also wrote about his concern about the "B & Loan." [Baltimore Building and Loan Associates] He enclosed a program for his concert at the Mary Baldwin Seminary. Ada wrote about how the house was a little more peaceful since her Uncle Julius was away in Baltimore.

  • Box-folder 14:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 April 13-23
    11 items.

    Tom directed a concert at the University of Virginia and attended a University of Virginia baseball game against Yale. Tom tried to obtain advice from Doug Fuller regarding the stock of the Baltimore Building and Loan Associates. There is a printed letter to the shareholders explaining what had happened with the company. He also made explicit references regarding some of Ada's physical attributes and requested that Ada burn that part of his letter.

  • Box-folder 14:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 April 24-30
    8 items.

    Ada wrote to Tom reassuring him that his concert would be a success and that it would be good for him to stop by Buena Vista and see his mother who had not been well. She also advised Tom that he should tell his brother John to be sure and stretch as that would make him taller. Tom wrote that he attended the Virginia Female Institute recital and also the Mary Baldwin Seminary performance. There are programs for each of these events.

  • Box-folder 14:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 May 1-14
    16 items.

    Tom travelled to Lexington, Clifton Forge, Lynchburg, Buena Vista and Richmond, Virginia giving concerts and visiting his family. He wrote that he was busy writing music for marches such as "Old Kentucky Home,""Bonnie Blue Flag," and "Maryland."

  • Box-folder 14:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 May 15-31
    25 items.

    Ada wrote about the Mason's parade and enclosed the program. She mentioned news about various friends and acquaintances including information about how someone was wearing a new style of underwear that absorbed all moisture. She told Tom that it cost eight dollars for "a set of these drawers." In addition to his music, Tom also sold pictures as a photographer.

  • Box-folder 14:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 June 1-11
    14 items.

    Ada received a letter from Paul Hall inviting her to Washington D. C. Tom wrote about his trip to Louisville Kentucky and after his concert, the town people gave him a key to the city. He also told her that he was performing with a [Charlottesville] Band on the Lawn of the University of Virginia the following week. Ada wrote about her intense desire to be independent and earn her own living.

  • Box-folder 14:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 June 12-31
    21 items.

    Ada feared that the summer would be the hardest yet for them to be apart. She complained that no one in the house cared for her and that she was more lonesome every day. Tom met Ada in Winchester for a dance which they both enjoyed. Ada promised that she would marry Tom that year. Tom met Mr. Paul Bowles from the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind and was given encouragement that they would have a place for him next year. Ada wrote that she saw Will Glass but did not really care one way or the other if he was cordial or not.

  • Box-folder 15:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 July 1-18
    13 items.

    Tom gave a concert in Clifton Forge, Virginia and had a great time bicycle riding, playing cards (whist) and picnicking with beer, whiskey, cigars, lemon ice, and cake. His band played songs like "Home Sweet Home" and "Sunrise." Tom also gave several concerts in Atlantic City. Ada severely reprimanded Tom for playing whist on Sunday in Clifton Forge and for drinking in Atlantic City.

  • Box-folder 15:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 July 19-31
    19 items.

    Tom's mother visited Ada and her mother and the three of them became very good friends. Ada apologized for accusing him of drinking too much. Tom wrote about his photographs and his plans for setting up a dark room to develop his own pictures. Ada worried that Tom's father might move to Staunton and harm Tom's reputation. Ada wrote that William [Powell] visited her with his class pin and cap.

  • Box-folder 15:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 August 1-11
    14 items.

    Ada wrote that Thomas Jefferson Manning had been sick all summer. Tom wrote about buying a camera and supplies for developing his own pictures. Ada wanted Tom to come to Winchester for the summer and tried to entice him with descriptions of her in full "undress."

  • Box-folder 15:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 August 14-31
    16 items.

    Tom wrote that he was waiting to hear more details about the position at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind from Mr. Paul Bowles.

  • Box-folder 15:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 September 1-13
    22 items.

    Ada wrote to Tom at the White Sulphur Springs at the Greenbrier about how hateful her father was to her mother. She also mentioned that Mame Shriner was going to visit her mother. Tom wrote that he missed her and made explicit references about his desires for her. They also mentioned some photographs that Tom took of Ada which he burned because they were afraid someone might see them.

  • Box-folder 15:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 September 14-30
    20 items.

    Tom wrote that he received a position with the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind. Ada mentioned that her father was hateful and drunk. Ada asked Tom who he would vote for and he responded that he would support Bryan [William Jennings Bryan, Democratic candidate for the presidential election].

  • Box-folder 16:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 October 1-16
    16 items.

    Ada wrote about Richard Beardsworth giving her father two weeks notice if he was going to leave the store and take another job. She also wrote that Paul Hall was sick with malaria. Tom wrote about furnishing his room and about teaching the blind students using point music.

  • Box-folder 16:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 October 17-31
    18 items.

    Tom wrote that keeping eight pianos in shape was very time consuming and he was very grateful for the work. He also mentioned that he was getting along very well with the blind boys and girls. He praised them saying that they were as good as any other mandolin and guitar clubs that he had.

  • Box-folder 16:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 November 1-14
    19 items.

    Ada and Tom wrote about the election of President William McKinley. Tom also wrote that the best claret could be found at the Monticello Claret for thirty five cents a quart. Tom wrote explicitly about his desire for Ada. He also wrote about how they both longed to have a little boy after they married and how eating too many sweets while pregnant could cause the baby to be a girl. There are also some braille music cards enclosed.

  • Box-folder 16:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 November 15-30
    20 items.

    Tom wrote to Ada that it would be nice to be married for awhile before having children but that they could not consider birth control unless it was safe. Ada wrote that Thomas Manning was very ill with typhoid fever. She also wrote that he would not recognize Winchester with all of its new storefronts and a new City Hall. Tom went to a school dance where girls were doing the "jig" and the "cakewalk." Tom wrote that he was still learning the point system and there is a braille music card included with his correspondence.

  • Box-folder 16:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 December 1-14
    15 items.

    Tom wrote that he didn't understand why Ada would not marry him yet, and she responded that they would marry when everything was right. The Board of the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind gave Tom a raise of fifty-four dollars per month. Ada was making dolls and selling them at the drugstore. Tom gave a performance at the Asylum for the Insane and at the Opera House. Tom wrote about wanting to see her when she was "washing" and inquired about her wanting him.

  • Box-folder 16:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1900 December 15-30
    20 items.

    Ada wrote to Tom encouraging him to help his brother John save his money to get a better education. Ada was concerned that Tom's mother was doing all of Lavinia's sewing and that it was affecting her health. Tom mentioned that a factory in Staunton burned causing many people to be out of work. Ada's mother fell during Christmas and sprained her ankle.

  • Box-folder 17:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 January 1-14
    17 items.

    Ada wrote that she was taking care of both of her parents, her mother for her ankle and her father's complaints. Tom's brother, Richard, stopped working for the Bantz's store and moved out of their house so that he could learn a new job. Ada wanted to obtain a good position in Washington D. C.

  • Box-folder 17:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 January 15-31
    22 items.

    Ada took care of her mother's ankle and her father had the grippe. Her cat named Mark Hanna [after the wealthy industrialist Mark Hanna] died. Tom taught classes for Professor Ide at the Mary Baldwin Seminary because the professor became ill. Tom lent his brother William "Willie" one hundred and fifty dollars so that he could go into business for himself.

  • Box-folder 17:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 February 1-13
    14 items.

    Tom mentioned Professor Minor at the Mary Baldwin Seminary. He also wrote that Professor Ide died of cancer. She encouraged Tom to ask Mr. Bowles about Professor Ide's position.

  • Box-folder 17:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 February 14-28
    14 items.

    Ada told Tom to deposit his money in the bank and not give it to his brother, Willie. Tom reassured her that his family was not imposing on him. He was giving ninety lessons per week and attending band practice twice a week. He sent Ada a program for his students' recital with their names underlined by him.

  • Box-folder 17:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 March 1-16
    15 items.

    Ada travelled to Washington D. C. for her birthday, to see the presidential inauguration of William McKinley and to visit with the Halls and Mr. Rouss. Ada wrote that she went out to dinner with a famous photographer of the time, Barnett Mcfee Clinedinst. She was also still trying to find a job at the Post Office. Tom wrote about his strong physical desires for her.

  • Box-folder 17:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 March 17-31
    14 items.

    Tom mentioned playing benefit concerts for the Y.M.C.A. He also described his friend, Mr. Minor as a young lawyer, a member of his Bible class and the son of a teacher at the Virginia Female Institute. Ada wrote about her typewriting class and an exam for the Post Office.

  • Box-folder 17:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 April 1-13
    13 items.

    Ada explained to him that she wanted to be able to earn money for herself so that she could buy things and that her father was delighted that she was trying to get a position. Ada wrote that she would still love Tom if he did not get his position for next winter. Included in the correspondence are programs for Carpenter's "Quo Vadis" at the Staunton Opera House and Mr. Carr's recital of Popular Classical Songs.

  • Box-folder 17:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 April 15-29
    16 items.

    Ada wrote to Tom about how strongly she wanted to obtain a position but did not want to write her reasons on paper She received a letter from General Thomas L. Rosser who was helping her to obtain a position with the Post Office in Washington D. C. for seventy five dollars per month. She mentioned wanting to see the performances of Joseph Jefferson and the Maurice [Glian] Opera Company in New York and not having enough money to attend. She also enclosed a lock of her hair from when she was five years old. On a personal note she wrote to Tom, "Your pretties are all the same and waiting for you to love them a lot. Heaven knows they want it bad enough." Tom wrote that he voted for the [1902 Constitutional Convention of Virginia] represented by [Julian Minor] Quarles and [Allen Caperton] Braxton which imposed barriers for African Americans to vote. There is also a music program for the West Augusta Guards.

  • Box-folder 17:9
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 May 3-24
    12 items.

    Ada went to visit the Hall family in Brooklyn, New York and was so busy going to plays and seeing friends that she did not write Tom very much. Tom pled with Ada to write more and threatened to go to New York to make sure everything was alright. Ada decided to stay in New York and take shorthand classes. Tom wrote that he had an Alumni meeting at Mary Baldwin Seminary.

  • Box-folder 18:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 June-July
    11 items.

    Tom received a promotion at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind and went to New York to visit Ada. He also had lunch with Walter Damrosch. Tom felt that he was taking second place to Ada since she stayed in New York.

  • Box-folder 18:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 August-September 10
    23 items.

    Tom went to Buffalo, New York with the Stonewall Brigade Band for the [Pan American Exposition in August where President William McKinley was later assassinated on September 6 but the letters do not mention this incident]. Ada returned to Winchester and wrote about Blanche and Richard Ross visiting her. Tom wrote about the [Entre Nous] Club which was composed of the nicest young people in town. He also wished that he and Ada could be together "for always."

  • Box-folder 18:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 September 11-30
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 18:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 October
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 18:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 November 2-29
    23 items.

    Ada wrote that she did not care for Paul Hall and that she wanted to marry Tom but could not yet come to Staunton to be with him because his position as a teacher would not allow his reputation to be questioned. Ada went back to New York to take classes. Ada wrote that he must not make himself ill for not having her.

  • Box-folder 18:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1901 December
    15 items.

    Ada wrote that she would give Tom an answer before the end of the next summer. She also mentioned that the windows of Macy's store were a moving panorama.

  • Box-folder 18:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 January 1-21
    15 items.

    Ada wrote to Tom about his father's death. She also wrote about her visits with her friend, George Schoenfelt but did not tell Tom that George was in love with her. George collected money for an insurance company and took her with him on his drives to collect the money. Ada wrote that she would marry Tom later in the year. Tom wrote that he was sorry that she would have to work after they were married but she responded that she wanted to work. He was delighted that he could tell his mother about their plans to marry.

  • Box-folder 18:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 January 22-31
    10 items.

    Tom mentioned the St. Louis Exposition.

  • Box-folder 18:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 January 22-31
    10 items.

    Tom mentioned the St. Louis Exposition.

  • Box-folder 18:9
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth, 1902 February 1-14
    21 items.

    Tom bought a house for him and Ada in Staunton for twenty five hundred dollars. Tom wanted to write to Ada's father about marrying her. Ada wrote that her family didn't have any money to give him when they would marry. She did not want Tom to write to her father until she went to Baltimore because she expected that he "will raise the roof." She also wrote that he was taking a burden by getting married and that he did not realize all of the expenses that it would incur.

  • Box-folder 18:10
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 February 15-28

    Ada wrote that Water Street and Main Street in Winchester were still flooded. She also mentioned a public hanging. Tom wrote that the mandolin club played at the Asylum for the Insane. Tom also wrote that the Institute for the Deaf and Blind would vote on the teachers for the next two years.

  • Box-folder 19:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 March 1-14
    14 items.

    Tom wrote that he heard the Honorable H. St. George Tucker address the Dunsmore Business College while his band played for them. The Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind offered Tom his same position with an increase of one hundred dollars per month. Ada wrote about her neuralgia and her eyes and mentioned that she would have Dr. Hunter McGuire look at them. She also wrote that Charles Broadway Rouss died.

  • Box-folder 19:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 March 15-30
    16 items.

    Ada wrote that her favorite aunt, Helen died of an angina pectoris. She also wrote that Tom's sister Lavinia was going to Buena Vista to see Tom's mother and would cause Tom's mother too much work with all of her sewing. Ada wrote that the streets in Winchester were still flooded. Tom enclosed a program from the Virginia School of the Deaf and Blind recital.

  • Box-folder 19:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 April
    24 items.

    Ada wrote that they must wait to marry until August because she did not have any money and it was not wise to marry until he had more headway financially. She also instructed him to not take anything from his mother, as Ada did not want to be dependent on anyone. Tom wrote about playing "Down in Dixie" for the West Augusta Guards at the opera house. He also wrote that she should find a "coloured girl about 14 or near" that she could train to be her servant and maid.

  • Box-folder 19:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 May
    13 items.

    Ada mentioned spending time with her friend George Shoenfelt, painting her room, and looking forward to living with Tom in Staunton.

  • Box-folder 19:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 June
    12 items.

    Ada wrote about their wedding plans and cautioned Tom not to work too hard.

  • Box-folder 19:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 July
    5 items.

    Tom went to Capon Springs to teach music for the summer. Tom wrote about his neighbor Mrs. Jaffe who was helping him to find a cook and set up housekeeping.

  • Box-folder 19:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 August
    10 items.

    Ada wrote about her wedding dress of crepe de chine, wedding rings and a trunk from her father. Tom wrote about wedding invitations to give to Mr. Bantz.

  • Box-folder 19:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 September
    8 items.

    Ada was worried about leaving her mother alone and wanted Tom to let her visit her mother often. Ada would stay with her mother for long periods of time and Tom was lonesome.

  • Box-folder 19:9
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1902 December
    1 item.

    Tom wrote to Ada when she was visiting her parents in Winchester.

  • Box-folder 19:10
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1903 January-July
    13 items.

    Ada visited her mother often because Mrs. Bantz was not well. Ada wrote to Tom that it was a "sin" that he had to work so much. She also mentioned their housekeeper, Mary Jackson.

  • Box-folder 19:11
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1903 August
    15 items.

    Ada and Tom wrote about housekeeping while Ada was in Winchester.

  • Box-folder 20:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1903 September 1-12
    19 items.

    Tom wrote her that he was so glad that she had been happy in their first year of marriage and he appreciated her telling him so. Ada wrote that her mother was having heart problems.

  • Box-folder 20:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1903 September 16-29
    13 items.

    Tom was lonesome and wondered if something were to happen to him, would anyone find him. He also enclosed a music program for his twenty-fourth Organ Recital at the Trinity Church in Staunton. Ada wrote that she was sorry she could not be home with him.

  • Box-folder 20:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1903 October
    8 items.

    Tom wrote that he was teaching at the Virginia Female Institute [Stuart Hall] and if his work remained steady at the Mary Baldwin Seminary he might have to give up working at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind.

  • Box-folder 20:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1904 January-September
    20 items.

    Ada wrote that if Tom was not feeling better, she would be coming home.

  • Box-folder 20:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1904 July-December
    11 items.

    Tom missed Ada so much when she went to Winchester.

  • Box-folder 20:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1905 March-August
    15 items.

    Ada wrote about Holmes Byrd who died from substance abuse and she thought if he had left alcohol and drugs alone he would have been one of the smartest lawyers in Virginia. Tom wrote to Ada about missing her, desiring her physically, and about wanting a child.

  • Box-folder 20:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1905 September-December
    19 items.

    Ada wrote about a monument for her mother.

  • Box-folder 20:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1906
    8 items.
  • Box-folder 20:9
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1907-1908
    20 items.

    Ada wrote to Tom from Winchester that another Sunday at her father's house would send her to Western State. She felt that she was not needed and wanted to go home to Staunton. Tom was working for the Y.M.C.A.; was the Musical Director of the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind; Director of the Stonewall Brigade Band; and Director of the Staunton Philharmonic Orchestra. Tom wrote about buying a new Ford for seven hundred dollars. On their fifth wedding anniversary Tom wrote about his physical desire for her. There is also mention of a friend who was under the care of Dr. DeJarnette, who directed Western State and was the leading proponent of eugenics.

  • Box-folder 20:10
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1909
    18 items.

    Ada wrote about her dancing classes and about how Tom's niece Tillie Topping could almost walk. They also wrote about their trips to Atlantic City for vacation.

  • Box-folder 20:11
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1910 June-November
    27 items.

    Tom wrote about hearing the Marine Band play its first concert at the White House. Ada wrote about reports of Negro troops and the question of whether they were in camps or not. Tom was teaching in Capon Springs for the summer. Ada stayed with her father in Winchester during the day. She also wrote that [Allen Caperton] Braxton was telling the people of Winchester how to run a city.

  • Box-folder 20:12
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1911 February- August
    15 items.

    Ada's father died in February 1911. Ada visited the Hall and the Rouss family in New York.

  • Box-folder 21:1
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1912-1914
    16 items.

    Tom went on vacation in Atlantic City and New York sunbathing, attending shows, and clubs.

  • Box-folder 21:2
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1915 July-August; December
    20 items.

    Tom was away at summer camp with the Y.M.C.A . from July through August. In December he wrote to Ada while he was in New York on music business.

  • Box-folder 21:3
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1915 July-August; December
    11 items.

    Tom attended the Danguard Player Action School in New York and taught summer camp at Terra Alta in West Virginia. He received a wire that his mother had passed away.

  • Box-folder 21:4
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1917-1920
    9 items.

    Tom taught in Camp Terra Alta in West Virginia during the summers; Ada traveled out west to Los Angeles, California, and Colorado.

  • Box-folder 21:5
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1922 July-August
    7 items.

    Tom taught in Camp Terra Alta in West Virginia for the summer.

  • Box-folder 21:6
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, 1924 July-August; 1926
    13 items.

    Tom taught in Camp Terra Alta in West Virginia for the summer.

  • Box-folder 21:7
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth correspondence, n. d.
    25 items.
  • Box-folder 21:8
    Tom and Ada Beardsworth general correspondence WWI, Camp Lee, 1918-1919
    27 items.
  • Box-folder 21:9
    Other correspondence, [1859]-1860
    45 items.
  • Box-folder 22:1
    Mary Baker, 1897-1918
    12 items.
  • Box-folder 22:2
    Sophye Baker, 1918; 1942
    2 items.

    [Aunt] of William Baker Powell.

  • Box-folder 22:3
    Shirley Carter to Ada (Hansborough & Carter), 1899-1920
    39 items.

    There is correspondence from Ada's attorney about real estate.

  • Box-folder 22:4
    Shirley Carter to Ada (Hansborough & Carter), 1921-1939
    28 items.
  • Box-folder 22:5
    Colonel Harry LaT Cavenaugh (WWI hero with monument in San Francisco) to Ada, 1933-1951
    7 items.
  • Box-folder 22:6
    Will R. Chapin University of Virginia, 1896-1897
    6 items.

    Roommate of William Glass.

  • Box-folder 22:7
    J. Peyton Clark, 1899
    1 item.
  • Box-folder 22:8
    Martha B. Clark "Mat," 1900-1907
    17 items.
  • Box-folder 22:9
    Mary Johnson Clark (Mrs. Theodor Megaarden), 1892-1923; n. d.
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 22:10
    Mary Judge William Clark, 1894
    4 items.
  • Box-folder 22:11
    Barnett McFee Clinedinst, 1896
    5 items.
  • Box-folder 22:12
    Floridus and John Crosby, 1913-1937
    9 items.
  • Box-folder 22:13
    Frank R. Gillis, 1894 March-December
    25 items.

    Frank Gillis was a successful and well known playwright who wanted to leave his wife for Ada. She was only interested in his friendship and his contacts.

  • Box-folder 22:14
    Frank R. Gillis, 1895 January-June
    27 items.
  • Box-folder 22:15
    Frank R. Gillis, 1895 August-1896 December
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 22:16
    Frank R. Gillis, 1897 January-May
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 23:1
    J. Gilpatric and other Pen Pals, 1894-1895
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 23:2
    William Wood Glass and Ada Bantz, 1892-1894
    22 items.

    William Glass dated Ada in high school and wrote to her while he attended the University of Virginia. His letters were about life at the University including drinking, gambling, the Glee Club, a small pox scare, and vaccinations. He also included programs for the University of Virginia Glee Club.

  • Box-folder 23:3
    William Wood Glass Jr. to Ada Bantz, 1895

    In a letter dated October 30, 1895 William Glass wrote to Ada about the fire at the University of Virginia, how great the faculty was, and how they were able to keep classes going.

  • Box-folder 23:4
    William Wood Glass Jr. to Ada Bantz, 1896-1905; n. d.
  • Box-folder 23:5
    C. H. E. Dunn and Dudley W. Gregory to Ada, 1891-1896
    10 items.

    There is correspondence about stamping from engravers who were also friends of Ada and her mother.

  • Box-folder 23:6
    D. B. Greigg, 1895
    There is correspondence with pastor D. B. Greigg from Baltimore, Maryland about visiting.
  • Box-folder 23:7
    Bertha (Bert) Hall, 1900-1901; 1914
    20 items.
  • Box-folder 23:8
    Dora Hall, 1897-1901
    13 items.

    An 1898 letter refers to "Hurrah for Dewey" and says New Yorkers are supportive but not showing excitement. She imagined there would be more excitement in Washington, D. C.

  • Box-folder 23:9
    Paul Allan Hall to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1896-1900 April
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 23:10
    Paul Allan Hall to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1900 May-December
    8 items.
  • Box-folder 24:1
    Hall Family (Paul, Ada, and Tom), 1897; 1901; n.d.
    12 items.
  • Box-folder 24:2
    Paul Allan Hall letters from William Powell, 1901
    2 items (which appear to be love letters from Billy to Paul).
  • Box-folder 24:3
    Hall Census Record, 1900
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 24:4
    Hartman Correspondence, 1900-1950; n.d.
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 24:5
    Hartmans, Harmans genealogical information and the University of Virginia, n.d.
    27 items.
  • Box-folder 24:6
    Frank Joliffe and Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1899; 1901
    10 items.

    Frank Joliffe, a friend of Ada's family, who answered her advertisement for a pen pal. He was divorced and was in love with Ada.

  • Box-folder 24:7
    Nan and Harry Bantz Krebs to Ada, 1888-1900
    32 items.
  • Box-folder 24:8
    Nan and Harry Krebs, 1901-1910
    37 items.
  • Box-folder 24:9
    Nan and Harry Krebs, 1911-1937; n.d
    25 items.
  • Box-folder 24:10
    Mac to Ada (friend of her father and traveling shoe salesman who was enamored with Ada), 1881-1893 June
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 24:11
    Mac to Ada (friend of her father and traveling shoe salesman who was enamored with Ada), 1893 July-1895 April
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 25:1
    Mac to Ada (friend of her father and traveling shoe salesman who was enamored with Ada), 1895 May-1896; n.d.
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 25:2
    Dr. Hunter Holmes McGuire, 1901
    4 items.
  • Box-folder 25:3
    Thomas Jefferson Manning, 1896-1897
    10 items.

    Ada's pen pal from Wooster, Massachussetts, Thomas Jefferson Manning wrote about the inauguration of President William McKinley.

  • Box-folder 25:4
    General and Mrs. Perry L. Miles to Ada, 1946-1950
    9 items.

    General and Mrs. Miles were friends of Mr. and Mrs. Beardsworth and wrote correspondence about their health and their travels.

  • Box-folder 25:5
    Correspondence miscellaneous, 1901; 1903
    2 items.

    Includes a letter from John F. Cornish to Miss Alice Young about helping the Suel family; and a letter from attorney John S. Wise to Mrs. John M. Kinney about finding her a position and another letter about her husband's death.

  • Box-folder 25:6
    Sidney Moss, 1912-1913
    2 items.

    His letters thank Mr. and Mrs. Beardsworth for their kindness and he wrote about being a student at the University of Virginia.

  • Box-folder 25:7
    Newspaper Clippings, n. d.
    36 items.
  • Box-folder 25:8
    Thomas Nolan to Ada, 1895
    13 items.

    Pen Pal, Thomas Nolan (Editor of the Weekly Sentinel, Racine & Milwaukee, Ws.) wrote to Ada "Every woman here is half a man, and would like to be the other half."

  • Box-folder 25:9
    Thomas Nolan to Ada, 1896-1897; n.d.
    27 items.

    Thomas Nolan wrote to Ada about the differences in social life between the people of the North and the South. The people of the South make "more display in wedding than we do in the North." He also wrote that bicycling for women was "unbecoming" and "immodest."

  • Box-folder 25:10
    General and Mrs. Alexander McCanell Patch (1889-1945) (WWII commander, 4-Star General) to Ada, 1920-1945; n.d.
    6 items.

    General Patch was an Assistant Professor of Military Science at the Staunton Military Academy and was a friend of Mr. and Mrs. Beardsworth. He was promoted to a four star general after his death in 1945.

  • Box-folder 25:11
    Pen Pal, n. d.
    1 item.

    Miss Laura Ranson responds to an advertisement in the newspaper for a pen pal and promised to divulge her real name if the correspondence went well.

  • Box-folder 25:12
    Ada- Postal Position, 1898-1901 April
    22 items.

    Ada wrote to political allies and influential friends asking them to help her obtain a postal position. Correspondents include State Senator John Scott, Senator John W. Daniel, Richard Evelyn Byrd, H. L. Barbour, Charles H. Bellows, General Thomas L. Rosser, S. M. Chiles, George B. Thornfelt, and James Hay. Her friends wrote letters on her behalf but she did not score well on her postal examination.

  • Box-folder 25:13
    Ada for Postal Position, 1901 May - 1903; n. d.
    30 items.

    Correspondents include General Curtis Guild, A. R. Pendleton, Louis E. McComas and George B. Shoenfelt.

  • Box-folder 26:1
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1901
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 26:2
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth and her family, 1892-1898
    20 items.

    Powell wrote to Ada and her mother and thanked them for presents and told them about his toys, dolls, and playing golf. There are also letters from Billy's father about his son's schedule and mentions that he hopes they are not spoiling him.

  • Box-folder 26:3
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth and her family, 1899-1900
    17 items.

    Powell wrote about dancing the "Boston dip," riding his bicycle, calling himself Ada's partner in wheeling.

  • Box-folder 26:4
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth and her family, 1902
    31 items.

    Powell mentioned the death of Charles Broadway Rouss (letter dated March 9, 1902) death of Ada's Aunt Helen (March 23, 1902). He also wrote about a new game called ping pong (April 19, 1902) and the Wizard of Oz as an opera (December 29, 1902).

  • Box-folder 26:5
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth and her family, 1904-1905

    Powell wrote of his concern for Ada's mother, Annie Bantz, "Toodle-Doo" who died in May 1905.

  • Box-folder 26:6
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth and her family, 1906-1907
    28 items.

    Powell wrote about going to a masquerade party as a French maid, and about his interests in books, movies, tennis, golf, horseback riding, rollerskating, banjo, dances, and plays. He also mentioned going to Amherst College in Massachusetts and a trip to the Jamestown Exposition, his initiation to Psi Upsilon House, and attractive girls at Smith College.

  • Box-folder 26:7
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz Beardsworth and her family, 1908-1910
    33 items.

    Powell wrote about college life, visits home to Cleveland, trips to Wheeling, West Virginia, and Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He also wrote about his best friend from childhood, Leonard Hanna.

  • Box-folder 26:8
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1911-1913
    18 items.

    Powell wrote about his commencement exercises at Amherst and his advertising job with Sherwin-Williams Paint Company. He mentioned that Ada opened an art shop and the passing of Ada's father, T. Marion Bantz. He published articles for The Spectrum. He also mentioned that the articles in the newspapers were all about World War I. He told Ada that he was thinking of going on the road for the Detroit White Lead Works, a minor company owned by Sherwin-Williams, but he was concerned about the amount of travel and leaving his father alone.

  • Box-folder 27:1
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1914
    15 items.

    Powell wrote in admiration of Ada's art work and inquired about her sales. He told her that he was writing for home decorating magazines. He had an article accepted by "Surburban Life" for twenty five dollars. He had a pen name or nome de plume called "Jeannette Cort." He tried to visit Ada but was sick in Winchester. He wrote, "Your letter has just come and finds me a sick woman" and wanted Ada to come see him. There is also information about plays that Billy wrote for a sales campaign waged by Sherwin-Williams. It was called "Those Happy Campaign Days" and was performed by the Sherwin-Williams staff.

  • Box-folder 27:2
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1915
    35 items.

    Billy's father, Dr. Hunter Powell died of heart failure. Billy was promoted to Assistant Advertising Manager and gave motivation talks to the sales staff of Sherwin-Williams. There is a news clipping of Powell speaking at the Dayton Advertising Club. He also wrote articles on home decorating. He mentioned his invention of a new game called, "Going To Market," similar to "Authors." ["Going To Market" exists today but is rare and the invention is loosely and inaccurately attributed to the CEO of Knox Gelatin.] Billy met with Knox Gelatin, Beech-Nut, Eastman's Kodak, Walk-Over Shoe, Libbie Food Company, Proctor and Gamble, and Welch Grape Juice to obtain their cooperation with the game. He wrote many letters describing the progress of his game and offering to sell it to her. Also in one of his letters he wrote about spending the summer with President Garfield's grandson. He wrote more articles for "House and Garden" and "Countryside." There are also unidentified photographs of cartoon figures of himself and his friends on postcards.

  • Box-folder 27:3
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1916-1917
    33 items.

    Billy wrote to Ada about his friend, Leonard Hanna, Jr., his trip to Niagara Falls, Ada's trip to Brazil, and attendance at the Yale-Harvard game. He wrote about his work for the Y.M.C.A organizing entertainment committees in various towns while he waited to hear from the Red Cross. He wrote to Ada about war, Camp Lee, red tape with the Draft Board and his eventual sailing to France for his work with the Y.M.C.A. in Paris. Mentions that Ada had taken in boarders.

  • Box-folder 27:4
    May William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1918-1920
    15 items.

    There is a letter from Billy's Aunt Sophye Baker to Ada telling her that he was in Glasgow and a letter from Elizabeth about him being in London. In 1919 he obtained a position with Sherwin-Williams in their London office, Fuller and Smith. There is a letter from Ada to Billy about how she wished she could obtain a secretary position there. Powell wrote about sailing on board "The Adriatic." He wrote about becoming friends with Lady Duff Gordon who had a cabin next door. He also mentioned Lord and Lady Londonderry, Nora Phipps and Pauline Astor. Also in 1919 he returned to the United States and worked for Vanity Fair Silk Mills in Reading, Pennsylvania where he wrote advertising for them. He said, "love the work and think it is going to grow into a big business someday."

  • Box-folder 27:5
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1920 June-December
    15 items.

    Powell mentioned his friend Sherwin Cottingham who was the son of the owner of Sherwin-Williams. Powell talked about Cottingham's engagement and marriage to English prima donna Maggie Teyte, an English soprano, and a well known opera singer. Billy also told Ada he was sorry to hear about Uncle Julius's death and asked if he left a will. Ada was trying to obtain a secretarial job.

  • Box-folder 27:6
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1921
    28 items.

    Powell was admitted into St. Luke's hospital in New York for pleurisy and went to Lake Placid to recover. Later he went on a trip to Cairo, Egypt and saw the crowning of King Faroud. His sentiments toward British rule were very positive as he wrote, "I hate to think what would happen here without English guidance."

  • Box-folder 27:7
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1922-1924
    23 items.

    Ada accompanied her husband to Camp Terra Alta in the summers where he taught music. Powell left Sherwin-Williams for the Tracy-Parry Advertising Company.

  • Box-folder 27:8
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1925-1926
    31 items.

    Powell gave Ada advice on taking a cruise to Europe. He also recommended that she should experience air travel at least once. Powell began a close friendship with prize fighter, Gene Tunney. He also mentioned his cousin from Virginia, John Powell, the famous pianist, composer, and staunch supporter of eugenics.

  • Box-folder 27:9
    William Baker Powell to Ada Bantz, 1927-1931; n.d.
    27 items.

    There is a news clipping from The New Yorker about how it was first erroneously reported that a boy scout had saved Gene Tunney when he fell on the ice but actually it was 5' 4" Powell who was wearing his camping clothes. Powell mentioned that he was writing for The New Yorker. He also took a cruise with Leonard Hanna, Jr., Gene Tunney, and Sherwin Coltingham to Europe on the "R M S Mauretania." Powell also mentioned the Barcelona Exposition and wanting to accompany Leonard to work in Hollywood. He attended dinners with Claudette Colbert and Ira Claire. He also got commissions for ads or articles for The Graphic and The Bystander. Often Powell would rely on Ada to gather research for him for his articles. Powell also mentioned that families were being hurt and losing so much from the unemployment and depression. He made a reference to prohibition as well.

  • Box-folder 28:1
    William Baker Powell "Billy" to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1932-1938

    Powell obtained a job rewriting the radio news each day and reporting it to the passengers on board the "S. S. Rex" of the Italian line. He also had an advertising account with the Grace Line. Powell wrote to Ada about the death of Cornelia Shriner. In 1937 Billy wrote that, "he has never been poorer and needs jobs in the worst way." Powell mentioned the war in his letter dated Sept 28, 1938. He was also writing a couple of articles for the Polish Embassy in connection with the World's Fair in New York. He also mentioned Cole's musical (Cole Porter's "Leave It To Me").

  • Box-folder 28:2
    William Baker Powell "Billy" to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1939-1947

    Powell wrote to Ada asking for information on the best hotels and restaurants in Charlottesville, Virginia for an article that he was writing. He was also asked by the Olympic Games Press Committee to write for them in Helsinki in 1940. He mentioned the "terrible news" on the radio about war starting out in Europe. In February 1941 Ada's husband, Professor Thomas Beardsworth died. Powell travelled to Ireland, England, and the Riviera. He mentioned VE day and the Médaile Militarie given to Winston Churchill. He wrote to Ada that Europe "is not normal yet" and that there was a railroad strike in France.

  • Box-folder 28:3
    William Baker Powell "Billy" to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1948-1953; n.d
    22 items.

    Powell wrote that he was commissioned by House Beautiful to do a series of articles on what to buy in Copenhagen, Brussels and Paris. He mentioned attending Cole's new show, "Kiss Me, Kate. " He travelled to London and mentioned that London was very gay for Queen Elizabeth's coronation. There is also a napkin that was made by a Russian noble woman in one of his letters.

  • Box-folder 28:4
    Pictures Powell to Ada, n. d.
    10 items.
  • Box-folder 28:5
    Warren Rice to Ada Bantz Beardsworth, 1891
    4 items.

    Warren Rice, a school friend of Ada's wrote to her from Winchester while she was in Frederick, Maryland. He mentioned Will Glass getting into trouble at school and that he did not like their teacher [Lillian].

  • Box-folder 28:6
    Albert Romero, 1891-1894
    22 items.

    Romero was a friend of Will Glass and attended the University of Virginia. He was a member of Zeta Psi.

  • Box-folder 28:7
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1903-1905
    17 items.

    Blanche was worried she was "in trouble" [pregnant?] and didn't want to have another child. She mentioned using carbolic acid for an abortion.

  • Box-folder 28:8
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1906-1917
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 28:9
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1918-1921
    17 items.

    Blanche mentioned the inauguration of President Warren G. Harding. She also wrote about being nostalgic for the "good old days of slavery."

  • Box-folder 29:1
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1922-1924
    13 items.
  • Box-folder 29:2
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1925-1932
    17 items.

    Blanche wrote about the nightmare of the stock market crash and how badly it hurt them. They lost everything and she had to get a job as a nurse. She also mentioned how "dreadful about the Lindbergh baby."

  • Box-folder 29:3
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1932-1939
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 29:4
    Blanche S. Ross and Ross Family to Ada, 1940-1954; n. d.
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 29:5
    Other Correspondence of Blanche Shriner Ross, 1881-1924
    9 items.
  • Box-folder 29:6
    Charles Broadway Rouss, 1901; n.d
    3 items.
  • Box-folder 29:7
    Rouss Family General Correspondence, 1894-1922
    42 items.
  • Box-folder 29:8
    Albert Romero, 1891-1894
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 30:1
    John Scott, 1903; 1914
    4 items.

    John Scott, a friend or acquaintance of Ada's, wrote to her giving permission to use his name as a reference for Thomas Beardsworth and offering to write a letter to his friend Paul Bowles in support of Professor Beardsworth.

  • Box-folder 30:2
    Ella Shields, 1895-1900
    16 items.

    Ella Shields was a close friend of Ada's from Winchester who moved to Baltimore, Maryland and who wrote many letters to Ada and her mother.

  • Box-folder 30:3
    Ella Shields, 1901-1951; n. d
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 30:4
    February George Shoenfelt, 1900-1902
    9 items.

    George Shoenfelt was madly in love with Ada and tried to convince her to marry him instead of Thomas Beardsworth. Ada corresponded with him frequently and encouraged his affections. She was trying to engage his help to obtain a position for her in the post office.

  • Box-folder 30:5
    George Shoenfelt, 1902 March
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 30:6
    George Shoenfelt, 1902 April
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 30:7
    George Shoenfelt, 1902 May
    9 items.
  • Box-folder 30:8
    George Shoenfelt, 1902 June
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 30:9
    George Shoenfelt, 1902 July-December
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 30:10
    George Shoenfelt, 1903-1905; n.d.
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 31:1
    Mame Shriner (Mary Johnston), 1883; 1890-1892
    14 items.

    Mame Shriner wrote to Ada and her mother Muddie about skating, and about boys in her school. There are also letters from her friends Will [Glass] and Emma [sister of William "Billy" Powell].

  • Box-folder 31:2
    Mame Shriner, 1893-1895
    12 items.

    Mame mentioned the World Fair in Chicago and described her feelings of rebellion against her strict father and related that Ada was in the same situation with her father.

  • Box-folder 31:3
    Mame Shriner, 1898-1902
    16 items.

    In December of 1900 Mame took the Postal Civil Service Exam and in 1901 Mame explained to Ada the Civil Service procedures for accepting applicants and mentioned her personal interviews with Senator Louis E. McComas from Baltimore Maryland.

  • Box-folder 31:4
    Mame Shriner, 1903-1905
    10 items.

    Mame wrote about working as a stenographer for Senator Levi Ankeny from Washington State. She also invited Ada and Muddy to the presidential inauguration of Theodore Roosevelt.

  • Box-folder 31:5
    Mame Shriner [Johnston], 1906-1931; n.d.
    13 items.

    1907 Mame was trying to help Ada find work possibly embroidering shirtwaists for the Senator's wife, Mrs. Levi Ankeny. In 1913 Mame married Arthur Johnston who did not have steady work, and borrowed money from Mame. In 1931 Mame described the serious financial troubles of her sister Blanche and the depression. She mentioned the closing of the Central Trust Company's Bank, G. Bryan Pitts of F. H. Smith Company and Emory Coblentz and their indictments of fraud.

  • Box-folder 31:6
    Mame Shriner, n. d.
  • Box-folder 31:7
    UVa and Thomas Beardsworth, 1899-1930; n.d.
    2 items.

    There are letters from the Secretary of the University of Virginia R. M. Price to Thomas Beardsworth, leader of the Stonewall Band Brigade (1906) requesting music for the opening of classes.

  • Box-folder 31:8
    Armistead Webb, 1915-1920; n.d.
    6 items.

    There are cards and notes from a friend and insurance broker Armistead Webb.

  • Box-folder 31:9
    Dr. T. Clayton Williams, 1894-1903; n.d.
    16 items.

    Dr. Williams wrote to Ada as a close friend of her family and as the family doctor.

  • Box-folder 31:10
    Woodrow Wilson Family General Correspondence and Other VIP's, 1884-1921
    24 items.

    Correspondents include Madison Wilson, Gilmer Schley, Mrs. George Frances Wilson, Sidney A. Moss, Hattie Wilson, A. Conan Doyle, William [Gibbs] McAdoo (1863-1941), Gerneral Fitz-John Porter. There are also news clippings of Mrs. Wilson's funeral and a program with John Fitzgerald Kennedy's signature. Also included is Robert E. Byrd, Jr's signature.

Series II: Topical
  • Box-folder 32:1
    Businesses owned by women, 1891-1914
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 32:2
    Businesses owned by women, 1915-1921
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 32:3
    Businesses owned by women, 1922-1943; n.d.
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 32:4
    Businesses owned by women- Adas's Application for Arts and Crafts Shop, 1915
    1 item.
  • Box-folder 32:5
    Church, 1887; 1900; n.d.
    3 items.

    Programs.

  • Box-folder 32:6
    Diary kept by Ada, 1895-1897; n.d.
    4 items.
  • Box-folder 32:7
    Dress design, n. d.
    3 items.

    Hand drawn design of a dress and papers doll cut outs.

  • Box-folder 32:8
    Financial, 1860-1911
    33 items.
  • Box-folder 32:9
    Financial-Ada's will, 1910
    1 item.
  • Box-folder 32:10
    Financial, 1912-1919
    32 items.
  • Box-folder 32:11
    Financial, 1920-1923
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 32:12
    Financial, 1924-1928
    39 items.
  • Box-folder 32:13
    Financial, 1930-1939
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 32:14
    Financial, 1940-1949
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 32:15
    Financial, 1950-1956; n.d.
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 33:1
    Financial Diaries and Ledgers of Thomas Beardsworth Including Music Lesson Book, n. d.
    6 items.
  • Box-folder 33:2
    Health- Medical, 1920; 1928; n.d.
    4 items.
  • Box-folder 33:3
    Miscellaneous- Lists, n. d.
    4 items.
  • Box-folder 33:4
    Miscellaneous- Map of Europe, n. d.
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 33:5
    Miscellaneous Photographs, n. d.
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 33:6
    Miscellaneous, n. d.
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 33:7
    Miscellaneous, n. d.
    5 items.

    Includes Deland cabinet maker brochures.

  • Box-folder 33:8
    Music, 1928
    1 item.
  • Box-folder 33:9
    Receipts and Orders, 1890-1899
    48 items.
  • Box-folder 33:10
    Receipts and Orders, 1900-1905
    47 items.
  • Box-folder 33:11
    Receipts and Orders, 1906-1907
    39 items.
  • Box-folder 33:12
    Receipts and Orders, 1908-1910
    13 items.
  • Box-folder 33:13
    Receipts and Orders, 1911-1913
    28 items.
  • Box-folder 33:14
    Receipts and Orders, 1914
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 33:15
    Receipts and Orders, 1915
    35 items.
  • Box 34
    Photographs, n. d.
  • Box 35
    Photographs, n. d.
  • Box-folder 36:1
    Receipts and Orders, 1916 January-August
    25 items.
  • Box-folder 36:2
    Receipts and Orders, 1916 September-December
    35 items.
  • Box-folder 36:3
    Receipts and Orders, 1917-1918
    35 items.
  • Box-folder 36:4
    Receipts and Orders, 1919-1920
    40 items.
  • Box-folder 36:5
    March Receipts and Orders, 1921-1922
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 36:6
    Receipts and Orders, 1922 April-1923
    30 items.
  • Box-folder 36:7
    Receipts and Orders, 1924
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 36:8
    Receipts and Orders, 1925
    29 items.
  • Box-folder 36:9
    Receipts and Orders, 1926-1927 March
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 37:1
    Receipts and Orders, 1927 April-1930
    28 items.
  • Box-folder 37:2
    Receipts and Orders, 1931-1936
    37 items.
  • Box-folder 37:3
    Receipts and Orders, 1937
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 37:4
    Receipts and Orders, 1938-1939
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 37:5
    Receipts and Orders, 1940-1949
    32 items.
  • Box-folder 37:6
    Receipts and Orders, 1950-1955
    12 items.
  • Box-folder 37:7
    Receipts and Orders, n. d.
    3 items.
  • Box-folder 37:8
    Receipts and Orders, n. d.
    53 items.
  • Box-folder 37:9
    Receipts and Orders, n.d.
    84 items.
  • Box-folder 37:10
    Receipts and Orders, 1894-1935; n.d.
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 37:11
    Recipes, n.d.
    10 items.
  • Box-folder 37:12
    Ada-References, 1899
    3 items.

    Handwritten letters of recommendation for Ada Bantz Beardsworth from friends.

  • Box-folder 37:13
    Ada's Report Card-Episcopal Female Institute, 1882-1883
    4 items.
  • Box-folder 38:1
    Staunton Military Academy-Ada, 1912-1948; n.d.
    12 items.
  • Box-folder 38:2
    Staunton Military Academy- Ada and Tom, n. d.
    1 item.
  • Box-folder 38:3
    Staunton Military Academy-Correspondence and Invitations, 1896-1919
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 38:4
    Staunton Military Academy-Correspondence and Invitations, 1920-1933
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 38:5
    Staunton Military Academy-Correspondence and Invitations, 1935-1941
    6 items.
  • Box-folder 38:6
    Staunton Military Academy-Correspondence and Invitations, n. d.
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 38:7
    Staunton Military Academy -Former Students and Parents, 1909-1914
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 38:8
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1915-1916
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 38:9
    Staunton Military Academy-Former Students and Parents, 1917
    26 items.
  • Box-folder 38:10
    Staunton Military Academy-Former Students and Parents, 1918-1919
    37 items.
  • Box-folder 38:11
    Staunton Military Academy-Former Students and Parents, 1920 January-September
    17 items.
  • Box-folder 39:1
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1920 October-December
    20 items.
  • Box-folder 39:2
    Staunton Military Academy-Former Students and Parents, 1921 January-September
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 39:3
    Staunton Military Academy-Former Students and Parents, 1921 October-1924 September
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 39:4
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1924 October-1926
    23 items.
  • Box-folder 39:5
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1927-1931
    19 items.
  • Box-folder 39:6
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1932
    17 items.
  • Box-folder 39:7
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1933-1936
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 39:8
    Staunton Military Academy- Former Students and Parents, 1937-1948; n. d.
    31 items.
  • Box-folder 39:9
    Staunton Military Academy- Other Correspondence, 1911; 1929
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 39:10
    Staunton Military Academy- Dance Cardbooks, n. d.
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 40:1
    Staunton Military Academy Lessons, 1917-1925; n.d.
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 40:2
    Staunton Military Academy- Lessons- Hannah A. Babcock, 1894
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 40:3
    Staunton Military Academy- Tom- List of Students, n. d.
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 40:4
    Staunton Military Academy- Notebooks, n. d.
    3 items.
  • Box-folder 40:5
    Staunton Military Academy- Procedures and Insignia, 1933; n.d.
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 40:6
    Staunton Military Academy-Tom-General Correspondence, Tuition, and Music, 1985; 1900-1919
    28 items.
  • Box-folder 40:7
    Staunton Military Academy- Tom- General Correspondence, Tuition, and Music, 1920-1921
    24 items.
  • Box-folder 40:8
    Staunton Military Academy- Tom- General Correspondence, Tuition, and Music, 1922-1923
    17 items.
  • Box-folder 40:9
    Staunton Military Academy-Tom-General Correspondence, Tuition, and Music, 1924-1925
    8 items.
  • Box-folder 40:10
    Staunton Military Academy- Tom- General Correspondence, Tuition, and Music, 1927-1934
    18 items.
  • Box-folder 40:11
    Staunton Military Academy- Tom- General Correspondence, Tuition, and Music, 1935-1938
    11 items.
  • Box-folder 40:12
    Staunton Military Academy- Concert Tickets, n. d.
    15 items.
  • Box-folder 40:13
    Staunton Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind, 1906-1919; n.d.
    16 items.
  • Box-folder 40:14
    Virginia Female Institute- Stuart Hall, 1933; n.d.
    2 items.
  • Box-folder 41:1
    Travel, 1910-1919
    13 items.
  • Box-folder 41:2
    Travel, 1920-1925
    21 items.
  • Box-folder 41:3
    Travel, 1927-1943; n. d.
    22 items.
  • Box-folder 41:4
    Writings by T. Marion Bantz, n. d.
    5 items.
  • Box-folder 41:5
    Writings miscellaneous, 1890-1895; n.d.
    52 items.