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A Guide to the Papers of Walt Whitman, 1838-1987 Whitman, Walt, Papers 3829, etc., 5604

A Guide to the Papers of Walt Whitman, 1838-1987

A Collection in
The Clifton Waller Barrett Library
Special Collections
The University of Virginia Library
Accession Number 3829, etc., 5604


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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession number
3829, etc., 5604
Title
Papers of Walt Whitman 1838-1987
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Papers of Walt Whitman, Accession #3829, etc., 5604, Clifton Waller Barrett Library of American Literature, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

All deposits were made gifts on July 1, 1991.

Processing Information

Some entries for literary manuscripts include the "Bowers" number, originally assigned by Fredson Bowers.

Many letters in the correspondence series were subsequently used by Whitman to draft poems. The originals of these items are filed in the manuscripts series and photocopies inserted in appropriate folders in the correspondence series.

The description of the photographs includes the "Saunders" number, when known. An extensive description of the method used by Henry S. Saunders for cataloging photographs of Whitman is printed in The Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, Fall/Winter 1986-1987, which can be found in Box 5, Folder 50 of this collection.


Biographical/Historical Information

For detailed biographical information, see the biography and chronology pages at the Whitman Archive.

Scope and Content

Literary Manuscripts (Series I) includes numerous drafts, editions, and revisions of many of Whitman's poems and articles. Included are manuscripts of Leaves of Grass, Song of Myself, Sea-Drift, As I Sit in Twilight, A Carol for Harvest for 1867, and biographical writings on Emerson, Carlyle, and Elias Hicks.

Miscellaneous Manuscripts (Series II), consists of legal documents, multiple versions of Walt Whitman's last will and testament, autograph signatures and envelopes, his Civil War diary written while visiting hospitals of the wounded in 1863, and a flower and pin he attached to his coat.

Correspondence (Series III), consists chiefly of Walt Whitman's personal correspondence; correspondents include Ellen C. Ahern, H. M. Alden, Jack Biriss, Richard Maurice Bucke, John Burroughs, Edward Carpenter, Edward Clifford, Peter Doyle, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charles E. Feinberg, Charley Eldridge, Horace Howard Furness, Ann Gilchrist, J. B. Gilder, J. L. Gilder, Joseph Jackson, J. Johnston, Thomas Hancock Nunn, Jacob Klein, Edwin Miller, Albert B. Otis, James Parton, Abby H. Price, Ernest Rhys, T. W. Rollerston, J. H. Rome, Charles Rowley Jr., Oscar Wilde, and D. W. Zimmerman.

Miscellaneous Documents (Series IV), includes an advertisement for his lecture on Abraham Lincoln, publications, a mounted leaf from his tomb, the "Official Walt Whitman stamp and envelope" released in 1940, and a broadside for one of his poems: "Poem describing a Perfect School."

Photographs, Engravings, and Prints (Series V), consists of numerous photographs of Walt Whitman taken throughout his life, ranging from 1854 to 1892. There are also photographs of Mary Davis, Horace L. Traubel, Louisa Van Velsor Whitman (Whitman's mother), Walter Whitman (Whitman's father), Walt Whitman's dog, and various photographs of his house, the Walt Whitman statue, and the beaches he frequented.

Odds and Ends (Series VI), consists of the wrappers in which Leaves of Grass was housed when acquired by Clifton Waller Barrett and an unbound copy of Whitman's Manuscripts: Leaves of Grass (1860): a parallel text by Fredson Bowers.

Arrangement

The Papers of Walt Whitman are arranged in six series: Series I: Literary Manuscripts (arranged alphabetically by title); Series II: Miscellaneous Manuscripts (arranged chronologically); Series III: Correspondence (arranged chronologically by author); Series IV: Miscellaneous Documents (arranged chronologically); Series V: Engravings, Prints, and Photographs (arranged chronologically); and Series VI: Odds and Ends.


Contents List

Series 1: Literary Manuscripts
  • Box-folder 1:1
    "The Absolute" 1872 June
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l. #3829-w.

    Notes for a lecture on Homer and Emerson possibly given at Amherst College.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    "After the Supper and Talk" [ca. 1885]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 25 cm. x 20 cm. #3829-i.

    A draft of "After the Supper and Talk " on one composite leaf comprising at least seven irregularly cut fragments of different types of white paper pasted to each other and, collectively, to one leaf (25 x 20 cm.) of blue-ruled white laid paper with a partly visible watermark. In brown-black and black ink with extensive revisions in the same inks, in pencil, and in lighter brown ink. This poem was rejected by Harper's in 1885 but published in Lippincott's Magazine in November 1887, after which it eventually became the final poem in the "first annex" titled "Sands at Seventy. " To the verso are pasted sections 16 and 18-19 of "Poem of Joys " (final title: "A Song of Joys ") clipped either from the independent book Passage to India (1871) or from the "Passage to India " supplement to Leaves of Grass. The section numbers of these lines are deleted in orange crayon, and the whole paste-on is deleted in pencil, with the pencil note, in a hand other than Whitman's, "Original mss/ Walt Whitman/ Poet" appearing to the right of it.

    This is an earlier draft than manuscripts located in the Feinberg Collection at the Library of Congress. The order of inscription seems to have been as follows, as deduced from incision patterns, paper types, and the overlap of letters on transferred sections of paper. First Whitman inscribed and heavily revised a draft of the poem on a section of gray-ruled wove paper. Wanting to avoid rewriting the clearest lines, he excised these (comprising the first two verses and the words "Shunning the..." from the original third verse) and pasted them to a section of blue-ruled wove paper with letterhead reading, in part, "Attorney.../ Washington...," apparently discarding the section of gray-ruled paper upon which the rest of the original verses appeared. These excised verses he drafted again on the blue-ruled paper. He then used a paste-on fragment of laid paper to revise the second half of the verse beginning "Shunning..."; at the end of the sentence, however, he deleted the period and added the words "so hard to unclasp his hand[s?]!" (That he added this as an afterthought is indicated by the fact that the half-line is crowded in over a preexisting curve along the lower edge of the laid fragment). Unsatisfied with the addition, he deleted part of it, tested and deleted the phrase "release those hands", deleted "so hard to," and then, out of space, squeezed a revision of this line in on the gray-ruled paper after the verse "Good-bye...repeating." It next occurred to Whitman to add an explanatory line beginning "(No more will they meet...)" after "hands," but since he had no space in which to do so he cut apart the composite leaf and pasted the two halves to a small section of wove paper—just large enough to hold the pieces together and afford room for the parenthesis. In revising the parenthesis, however, he ran out of space again. It was at this point that he obtained the large section of blue-ruled laid paper upon which the other sections are all overlaid, and, cutting away the second half of the parenthetical verse, pasted both of what were now composite half-leaves to the blue-ruled leaf. He then inscribed on this leaf the title, his revision of the rest of the parenthetical verse (in space he left between the composite halves), and the revised final verse. (It is difficult to determine at what point Whitman excised the title and last verse from the composite leaves, beyond noting that he did so before pasting the leaves to the blue-ruled section).

  • Box-folder 1:2-a
    "And that was war..." n.d.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., mounted. #3829-ac.
  • Box-folder 1:3
    "Another Day at Central Park" [1879]
    Physical Location: Slipcase #1
    AMs, 5 pp. on 5 l., with typed transcript and engraving of Walt Whitman. #3829-k.
  • Box-folder 1:4
    "As I Sit in Twilight, Late..." [ca. 1865 or 1888]
    Physical Location: Slipcase #2
    AMsS, 6 pp. on 5 l. Brown bound volume measuring 34.5 cm. x 27.5 cm. #3829-k.

    Pasted to leaves in the volume are five variations on the poem "As I Sit in Twilight, Late. " A transcription of the final version begins the volume.

    • Page 1: As I Sit in Twilight, Late, or twilight song, ca. 1865 or 1888,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 30 cm. x 22 cm. Written in pencil.
    • Page 2: As I sit in twilight alone by the flicker, ca. 1865 or 1888,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 26 cm. x 20 cm. Written in pencil.
    • Page 3: As I sit in twilight, ca. 1865 or 1888,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 27 cm. x 20 cm. Written in pencil.
    • Page 4: Unknown (As I sit in the twilight), ca. 1865 or 1888,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 28.5 cm. x 19.5 cm. Written in pencil.
    • Page 5: Unknown (A million hidden names), ca. 1865 or 1888,
      1 leaf, 27.5 cm. x 21 cm. Written in pencil.
  • Box-folder 1:5
    "As of Forms" n.d.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., 21.5 x 13 cm., with transcription, Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #1).
  • Box-folder 1:6
    "Asthetics-Arts-Science" after 1857
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 21 cm. x 12 cm. #3829-i.

    This manuscript contains notes about the intellects of Plato and Aristotle. According to Floyd Stovall in The Foreground to Leaves of Grass (Charlottesville, U of Virginia P, 1974, p. 176), these notes are based on F.W. Schlegel's Lectures on the History of Literature (NY, 1841, 99f. or London [Bohn ed.], 1859, 82ff).

  • "Audobon [sic] proposed..."
    on same leaf as "Paul Jones."
  • Box-folder 1:8
    "A Backward Glance O'er Traveled Roads" [ca. 1888]
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., Barrow. Written in ink with color pencil revisions. With transcription. #3829-a.

    Noted as the preface to November Boughs of 1888.

  • Box-folder 1:9
    "the best parts of literature and religion..." [1874]
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 14 cm. x 19.5 cm. #3829-i.

    A partial draft of prose considering the nature of God and religion written on the verso of letter from Johnston dated 1874. The relationship of this prose to Whitman's published work is unknown.

  • Box-folder 1:10
    "The Bible as Poetry" [ca. 1883]
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 21 cm. x 13.5 cm. #3829-i.

    This manuscript is a draft of part of Whitman's essay "The Bible as Poetry, " which was published first in The Critic on February 3, 1883 . On the verso is letter dated January 13, 1883 from D.M. Zimmerman of the Camden and Atlantic Railroad, which offers Whitman a complimentary rail pass.

  • Box-folder 1:11
    "Biographical Note of Walt Whitman" [ca. 1888]
    AMs, 3 pp. on 3 l. #3829 (Bowers #29).
  • Box-folder 1:12
    "British human beings-Wild Men-the 'koboo'" [late 1850's]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 22 cm. x 12 cm. #3829-i.

    This manuscript contains notes about certain aboriginal peoples. A short article entitled "The Wild Men of Borneo " is pasted toward the bottom of the leaf. The relationship of this manuscript to Whitman's published work is unknown.

  • Box-folder 1:13
    "Broadway" [ca. 1888, March 3]
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l., 22.5 cm. x 20 cm. #3829-a.

    Note at top of page states "Sent Herald March 3—sent again April 9 '88." Written in purple pencil.

  • Box-folder 1:14
    "A Carol for Harvest for 1867" n.d.
    AMs, 29 leaves. #3829 (Bowers #2).

    Including "The Return of the Heroes." On 29 pages, many of them composite leaves, comprising five different cuttings or packs of paper on which two or more leaves are inscribed, and other cuttings on which only one leaf is inscribed. All but a handful of the leaves are inscribed on white laid paper ruled in light blue-green on both sides or on all of one side and some of the other. In his 1954 edition and study of the manuscript in Modern Philology (vol. 52, no. 1), Fredson Bowers grouped the leaves by cutting-type as follows (letters having been added here for convenience). Type A: Leaves 1 and 21. Type B: Leaves 2-3. Type C: Leaves 4-5 and 15-16. Type D: Leaves 6-9, 12-14, and 19. Type E: Leaves 17-18. As Bradley and Blodgett note, this poem was first published in the September, 1867 issue of The Galaxy and reprinted in the London-based Tinsley's Magazine in October of that year. After appearing with various revisions in the 1871 Passage to India and the 1876 "Passage to India " supplement to Two Rivulets , the poem was permanently retitled "The Return of the Heroes. " This took place in the 1881 edition of Leaves , where the poem appeared without its original first two verse paragraphs. At one point this manuscript was in the possession of Whitman scholar Clara Barrus, who clipped to Whitman's title page a note including these lines: "...Precious souvenirs, given me by Thos. B. Harned, one of Whitman's literary executors. You can almost feel Walt's heart beat in these lines." This and other short notes by Barrus have been unclipped from the leaves. Annotations by Barrus (or another collector with a similar hand) are mentioned when significant enough to warrant attention, but are otherwise left undescribed.

    • Page 1: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5

      On a section of type A paper measuring 19.5 x 12.5 cm. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in pencil on both sides, with no revisions on the recto (title page) but some on the verso, where the lines (beginning "As a huge muse[eum?] mowing") are deleted with a single vertical pencil stroke. The title is underscored three times. The lines on the verso were revised to constitute verse paragraph 29 in section 12 of the 1871 published version of the poem; in 1881 the verse paragraphs were not numbered and this section was permanently renumbered 8.

    • Page 2: 1 leaf, handwritten, 10.5 x 12.5 cm. pasted to 6.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a composite leaf, type B, formed by joining the upper section of verses excised from what is now the lower section of Leaf 3 to the head of another set of verses by means of a section of the same paper pasted to the verso. The upper section measures 10.5 x 12.5 cm., the lower section measures 6.5 x 12.5 cm., and the backing strip measures 8 x 12 cm. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in black ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Whitman's boxed pencil note "Harvest carol for 1867" runs up the left margin, followed by the unboxed note "1867—the great/ Harvest." (The second line at the top of the leaf, deleted, reads "The great Harvest of 1867"). After further revision these sections became, respectively, verse paragraphs 1 and 2 (together comprising section 1) of the 1871 version of the poem. In 1881, this entire section, as noted above, was deleted from the poem.

    • Page 3: 1 leaf, handwritten, 11 x 12.5 cm. pasted to 9.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a composite leaf, type B, formed by joining the section of verses beginning "For the Lands..." to the lower set of verses excised from what is now the upper section of Leaf 2. The sections measure as follows: 11 x 12.5 cm. (upper); 9.5 x 12.5 cm. (lower); 8 x 12 cm. (backing). Inscribed in black ink, with revisions in the the same ink and in pencil. Barrus jotted down the 1881 title and page number at the top of the leaf, along with the note "I—." With further revision—including the deletion of the last line, beginning "O theatre of Time,..."—these sections became verse paragraphs 3 and 4 (comprising section 2) of the 1871 version of the poem. In 1881 these paragraphs went unnumbered and, with the deletion of the original first section, together formed section 1 of the poem (hence the "I" added by Barrus).

    • Page 4: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type C paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), inscribed in black ink, with several revisions in the same ink. Whitman penned in the note "?unfailing" in the upper right corner of the leaf. Someone else, it seems—most likely Barrus—added the pencil note "—2—" in the top center of the page. Multiple pinholes in center. With a few small revisions these verses together with those on Leaf 5 became verse paragraph 5 (section 3) of the 1871 published version of the poem. In 1881 section 3 became section 2.

    • Page 5: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type C paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), inscribed in black ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Multiple pinholes in center. The first few deleted lines on the page constitute false starts. After further revision the remaining lines joined revised lines from Leaf 4 in section 3 (verse paragraph 5) of the 1871 version of the poem, and stayed with the Leaf 4 lines in section 2 of the 1881 version.

    • Page 6: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.). Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised in pencil, with a single revision in brown-black ink. Barrus or another annotator, it seems, added the number "—3—" in the top center of this leaf. With some small revisions these lines became verses 1-6 of verse paragraph 6 (section 4) of the 1871 version, and in 1881 they comprised verses 1-6 of section 3. Leaves 7-9 contain the verses that would eventually complete this section, and, as Bowers notes, leaves 6-9 come from the same pack of paper, are all inscribed and revised in the same media, and feature matching pinhole patterns.

    • Page 7: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12 cm.). Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and extensively revised in pencil. Two deleted false starts appear at the head of the leaf. With some slight further revisions these lines became verses 7-9 of section 4 (verse paragraph 6) in the 1871 version of the poem; in 1881 they comprised verses 7-9 of section 3.

    • Page 8: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised in pencil, with one correction in brown-black ink. With slight revisions these lines became verses 10-12 of section 4 (verse paragraph 6) in the 1871 version of the poem; in 1881 they constituted the same part of section 3.

    • Page 9: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper measuring 19.5 x 12.5 cm., with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and heavily revised in pencil. All of the verses below the half-point of the page are deleted with a diagonal pencil stroke. The remaining line was incorporated in the 1871 version of the poem as the final verse (13) of section 4 (verse paragraph 6), a position it maintained in section 3 of the 1881 version.

    • Page 10: 1 leaf, handwritten, 10 x 12.5 cm. pasted to 13.5 x 12.5 cm. pasted to 6 x 12.5 cm.

      On a composite leaf formed by pasting together three sections (10 x 12.5, 13.5 x 12.5, and 6 x 12.5 cm.) of the white laid blue-ruled paper. Multiple pinholes in the area that becomes the center of the leaf when the bottom section is folded up. All three sections are inscribed in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Barrus or another annotator has added the number "—4—" in pencil at the head of the leaf. With some small revisions these lines became section 5 (verse paragraphs 7-10) of the 1871 version of the poem, and in 1881 they constituted the first three verse paragraphs of section 4.

    • Page 11: 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 13 cm.

      On a leaf of white laid paper (20 x 13 cm.) formerly creased in the middle and bearing a papermaker's seal (which appears to read "W.H."[?]) in the upper left corner. A very small fragment of newspaper or other printed matter (reading "All hea.../ Made") is affixed to the verso. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed very tightly in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Whitman's pencil number 2 appears to the left of the verse beginning "Pass;—then rattle drums again..." This section was originally the beginning of an independent poem with the title "Pass and room O proud brigades/ By Walt Whitman " (deleted in pencil here), indicating, as Bowers and others have noted, that "A Carol of Harvest, for 1867 " began life as two poems, one celebrating the abundant harvest of that year and another dealing with the human costs of the Civil War. With some small revisions the contents of this page became section 6 (verse paragraphs 11-12) of the 1871 version of the poem, and in 1881 they comprised the second two unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 4.

    • Page 12: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in (badly smudged) pencil, with extensive revisions in pencil and in brown-black ink. These lines were revised to constitute verse paragraphs 13 and 14 (section 7) of the 1871 version of the poem; in 1881 they comprised the first two unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 5.

    • Page 13: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and heavily revised in pencil, with several revisions in brown-black ink. These lines were revised to constitute verse paragraph 15 (section 7) of the 1871 version of the poem, and in 1881 made up the final unnumbered verse paragraph of section 5.

    • Page 14: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.
      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with three pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised in pencil on both sides. The recto lines represent a relatively early draft of what would become verse paragraphs 16 and 17 (the first part) in section 8 of the 1871 version of the poem, which would go on to make up the first two unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 6 in the 1881 version. The verso lines (beginning "But I must bring/ the dead"), deleted with a single curved pencil stroke, constitute an earlier version of the lines on Leaf 12.
    • Page 15: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type C paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. The recto lines were revised to constitute the second part of verse paragraph 17 and all of verse paragraph 18 (section 8) in the 1871 version of the poem. In 1881 they made up most of the second and all of the third unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 6. The verso lines (beginning "Now a passage/ of/ Exultation"), deleted with a single vertical pencil stroke, seem more like a note from Whitman to himself than a draft of poetic verses, but the word "Exult" does appear on leaves 15 and 16, as in verse paragraph 20 (section 9) of the 1871 version.

    • Page 16: 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type C paper (20 x 12.5 cm.), with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in black ink and in pencil, with extensive revisions in pencil. The ink verse "Exult O lands! under/ the powerful sun!" (which was revised on Leaf 17), along with other trial verses in pencil, are all deleted with several pencil strokes. The remaining verses at the foot of the leaf were revised to form verse paragraph 19 (section 9) in the 1871 version of the poem, which became the fourth unnumbered verse paragraph in section 6 of the 1881 version.

    • Page 17: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 11 cm.

      On a section of type E paper (19.5 x 11 cm.), irregularly torn, like Leaf 18, along the left margin. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and extensively revised in pencil. Whitman's deleted note "remember the word—'deploy,'" flanked by two cartoon hands, appears at the head of the leaf. His number "2" appears to the left of the verses beginning "Melt, melt away,/ ye armies!...," which became the first part of verse paragraph 21 (section 9) in the 1871 version of the poem. The lines beginning "Exult" were slightly revised to form verse paragraph 20. In the 1881 version these lines made up the entire fifth unnumbered verse paragraph, and part of the sixth, in section 6.

    • Page 18: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 11 cm.

      On a section of type E paper (19.5 x 11 cm.), torn irregularly, like Leaf 17, along the left margin. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised in pencil, with the word "henceforth" added in brown-black ink. With slight revisions these lines became the second part of verse paragraph 21 (section 9) in the 1871 version, and in 1881 they constituted the final lines of section 6 (in the sixth unnumbered verse paragraph in the section).

    • Page 19: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type D paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in pencil. The verses on the leaf are divided in two with a horizontal pencil stroke; the upper verses are heavily revised and deleted (individually in many cases but also collectively, with two pencil strokes), while those below represent an unrevised fair copy of the upper ones. With small revisions these lines became verse paragraph 22 (section 10) in the 1871 version of the poem, and in 1881 they constituted the first unnumbered verse paragraph in section 7.

    • Page 20: 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of white laid paper (20 x 12.5 cm.), ruled in blue on one side, and more widely ruled than the other types of paper. A few pinholes appear in the center. Inscribed and revised in pencil, with one correction (the substitution of the word "All" for "The endless," at the beginning) in brown-black ink. With slight revision these lines became verse paragraphs 23 and 24 (section 10) in the 1871 version of the poem, and in 1881 they comprised the second and third unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 7.

    • Page 21: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of type A paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with a few pinholes in the center. Inscribed in pencil with several revisions in pencil and in brown-black ink. With slight further revision these lines made up verse paragraph 25 (section 11) of the 1871 version, which in 1881 became the fourth unnumbered verse paragraph of section 7. The deleted line "Busy the far, the sunlit/ panorama" was incorporated in Leaf 22 and in the verse paragraph following this one in the published versions.

    • Page 22: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of white laid paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), ruled in blue on both sides, with a few pinholes in the center. Inscribed in pencil, with several revisions in pencil and in brown-black ink. Whitman's number 2 appears to the left of a section of verses beginning "Lo! prairie, orchard,/ & the yellow grain...," from which it is separated by a diagonal pencil stroke. The verses on this leaf were condensed to form the first part of verse paragraph 26 (section 11) in the 1871 version, and in "The Return of the Heroes " they comprised the unnumbered fifth verse paragraph in section 7 of the poem. The unused second verse (beginning "The horse-ploughs and/ steam-ploughs") appears to represent an intermediate stage between the deleted notes on the verso of Leaf 1 and the lines on Leaf 25.

    • Page 23: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of white laid paper, ruled in blue on the recto and part of the verso (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), with a few pinholes in the center. Inscribed in pencil, with extensive revisions in pencil and in brown- black ink. With slight further revision these lines made up the second part of verse paragraph 26 (section 11) in the 1871 version of the poem, and in 1881 they completed the fifth and last unnumbered verse paragraph of section 7.

    • Page 24: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of white laid paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), ruled in blue on one side. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil, with one correction of several words made to the recto in brown-black ink. Whitman placed pencil "x" marks by each of the two verse paragraphs on the recto. The two sections of notes on the verso (beginning "hops/ Sugar of Louisiana/ honey" and "The measureless/ pasturage") are collectively deleted with a single diagonal pencil stroke. They represent early stages of lines on leaves 23 and 22, respectively. The recto lines became verse paragraphs 27 and 28 (section 12) in "A Carol of Harvest, for 1867, " and in 1881 they comprised the first two unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 8.

    • Page 25: 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 13 cm.

      On a section of white laid paper (20 x 13 cm.), ruled in blue on one side, with two pinholes in the center. Inscribed in pencil, with many revisions in pencil and in brown-black ink. These verses were revised to form almost all of verse paragraph 29 (section 12) in the 1871 version, and in 1881 they made up all but one line of the third unnumbered verse pargraph in section 8. Compare with leaves 1 (verso) and 22.

    • Page 26: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of white laid paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), ruled in blue on one side and a small part of the other, with several pinholes in the center. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. The heavily revised verso lines, deleted with a single wavy pencil stroke, begin with three drafts of the title "Harvest Carol for 1867. " The lines were further revised on the current Leaf 20, and eventually became verse paragraphs 23 and 24 (section 10) of the "A Carol of Harvest, for 1867, " and the second and third unnumbered verse paragraphs of section 7 in "The Return of the Heroes. " The single line on the recto was revised to constitute the last verse of verse paragraph 29 (section 12) in 1871, a position it maintained in the third verse paragraph of section 8 in 1881.

    • Page 27: 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of thick white laid paper (20 x 12.5 cm.), ruled in blue on one side, with wider rules than the majority of the other leaves. Two pinholes in center. Inscribed and heavily revised in pencil, with one correction in brown-black ink. With further revision these lines became verse paragraphs 30 and 31 (section 12) of the 1871 version, along with the first two verses of paragraph 32 (section 13). In 1881 the lines constituted the unnumbered fourth and fifth verse paragraphs of section 8, along with the first two verses of the sixth paragraph.

    • Page 28: 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 12.5 cm.

      On a section of thick white laid paper (20 x 12.5 cm.), whose wide ruled lines correspond to those on Leaf 27. Two pinholes matching those in Leaf 27 appear in the center. Inscribed and revised on the recto in pencil (badly smudged towards the bottom), with one correction in brown-black ink. On the verso appear the last few lines of a draft of a letter by "JMB[?]/ ActgAdjGl[?]," deleted with a diagonal brown ink stroke. The recto lines became verses 3-6 of verse paragraph 32 (section 13) of the 1871 version of the poem, a position they maintained in the sixth and final verse paragraph (section 8) of the 1881 version.

    • Page 29: 1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 13 cm.

      On a section of thin white unruled laid paper (19.5 x 13 cm.), badly worn or damaged by insects, with multiple pinholes in the center. Part of a watermark, reading "NSON/ 862," is visible. The recto is inscribed and extensively revised in pencil, with two corrections in brown-black ink; the verso is inscribed and deleted (with two parallel strokes) in pencil. The recto lines became the final verses of the poem in both 1871 (7-11, verse paragraph 32, section 13) and 1881 (7-11, sixth verse paragraph, section 8). The trial line on the verso, beginning "Actively moving, the curious/ machines..."—followed by Whitman's note "(list)"—represents an early draft of lines on leaves 1 (verso), 22, and 25, which were revised to form verse paragraph 29 (section 12) in 1871 and the third verse paragraph of section 8 in 1881. Following this leaf is a blank section of white wove paper (20 x 14.5 cm.), ruled in blue on both sides with a red and blue vertical rule, and featuring a thin section of hand-annotated printed matter affixed to the left margin. The strip, only printed on one side, has been folded in half and pasted together; the only legible word on it is the holograph note "(England)" in dark brown ink, which may not be in Whitman's hand.

  • Box-folder 1:15
    "A Carol-Cluster at 69," 1887
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., 21 cm. x 20 cm. #3829-a.

    Written in pencil with ink revisions. Includes ADS.

  • Box-folder 1:16
    "Carols Closing Sixty-nine," [ca. 1887]
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l., 28 cm. x 21.5 cm. #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 1:17
    "Cervantes, 1547 ... 1616...contemporary with Shakespeare and Don Quixote," n.d.
    AMs, 10 pp. on 10 l. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:18
    "the city as well as country. Other wars..." n.d.
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l. #3829-i.

    Originally enclosed in John H. Johnston letter to Mr. Watson, March 11, 1912.

  • Box-folder 1:19
    "A cluster of poems" and "Living Pictures," n.d.
    AMs, 2 pp. on 1 l., handwritten, 19.5 cm. x 15.5 cm. #3829-i.

    On one leaf (19.5 x 15.5 cm.) of blue laid paper, in medium brown-black ink, with minor revisions in the same and a check mark(?) in pink ink. These notes for a cluster of poems, "(in the/ same way as Calamus Leaves")/ expressing the idea and/ sentiment of/ Happiness,/ Extatic life, (or moods,)..." appear on the verso of a page of half-prose, half-poetic notes, inscribed, revised, and deleted in pencil, for a poem or essay to be titled "Living Pictures " or "America. " As Edward F. Grier observes in his notes to Whitman's Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (the fourth volume in The Collected Writings of Walt Whitman ; New York: New York University Press, 1984), the similarity of "Living Pictures " to "A Song for Occupations "—first published, untitled, in the original 1855 edition of Leaves —combined with Whitman's use of the old long "s" in the word "less," indicates that the leaf was inscribed quite early in Whitman's poetic career. Whitman's use of the title "Calamus Leaves " on the other side of the leaf, as in some very similar notes currently housed at Duke University that point towards the 1860 cluster "Enfans d'Adam, " dates the notes for this "cluster," as Grier observes (referring to Fredson Bowers's system of dating), to some point in the late spring of 1859. The line beginning "Strong, well-fibred, bearded,/ athletic[,] full of love..." calls to mind the verse "If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,/ And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,/ And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful/ than the most beautiful face" from the untitled 1855 poem that would become "I Sing the Body Electric " in 1867.

  • Box-folder 1:20
    "Come, said my soul...,"
    AMs, on verso of two pages within "Song of the Redwood Tree."
  • Box-folder 1:21
    "Continuities (No birth-identity)," [ca. 1888,]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l, 25.5 cm. x 19.5 cm. #3829-a.

    Note at bottom states "Sent to H March 17." Whitman also notes at bottom: "from a talk I had lately with a German spiritualist." Written in ink on lined paper.

  • Box-folder 1:22
    "A Country Auction," [ca. 1878]
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 19.5 cm. x 17.5 cm. #3829-i.

    This manuscript is a draft of an apparently unpublished essay about a country auction, written in pencil. On the verso is an AL fragment, [Walt Whitman] to "My dear friend," [1878?] December 12.

  • Box-folder 1:23
    "The Dalliance of the Eagles," [ca. 1880]
    AMs draft, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 12 cm. x 19 cm., Barrow. #3829-i.

    On one leaf (12 x 19 cm.) of light brown laid paper, inscribed and extensively revised in pencil, with multiple pinholes in the center of the leaf. The poem was first published in the November 1880 issue of Cope's Tobacco Plant , and became one of the new poems in the 1881 edition of Leaves of Grass , where it appeared in the cluster "By the Roadside. " At some point this leaf was pasted to an enclosed cardboard print of a photograph of Whitman stamped "Thomas C. Watkins" on the verso, but almost identical to one attributed by Henry Scholey Saunders, author of 100 Walt Whitman Photographs , to the studio of Frederick Gutekunst in Philadelphia, and reproduced in the 1889 pocket edition of Leaves .

  • Box-folder 1:24
    "Dates referring to China," 1857 June 23
    AMs, 7 pp. on 7 l. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:25
    "The Dead Carlyle," [ca. 1881]
    Physical Location: Slipcase #3
    AMsS, 3 pp. on 3 l. #3829-i.

    Includes Drawing of Walt Whitman and portrait of Thomas Carlyle.

  • Box-folder 1:26
    "The Dead Emerson," [1882]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 24.5 cm. x 15.5 cm., with attached news clipping, "Portraiture" of Ralph Waldo Emerson, with autograph revisions. Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #16).

    In black ink, the top two-thirds of the leaf seems to be a preface to a short sketch written by Whitman, which is pasted to the bottom third of the leaf. The sketch, detailing Whitman's visit to Emerson, was inserted into Specimen Days , a volume of prose published in 1882, under the title "A Visit, at the Last, to R. W. Emerson." Emerson died in 1882.

  • Box-folder 1:27
    "The Dead Emperor," [ca. 1888]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l, handwritten, 11 cm. x 21 cm. #3829-a.

    Note at top states "sent Herald March 8." Written in purple pencil with ink revisions on verso of letter with Houghton Mifflin Publishers letterhead.

  • Box-folder 1:28
    "Death's Valley, (to accompany a picture, by request)," 1892 April
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 35.5 x 21.5 cm. #3829-w.

    On a very large composite leaf (35.5 x 21.5 cm.) of white wove paper, with the watermark L.L. Brown, formed by pasting an extra section of paper (11 x 21.5 cm.) to the top of the main leaf (26 x 21.5 cm.), and then adding two paste-ons (roughly 5.5 and 4 x 21.5 cm.) to this extra section. Inscribed and revised in dark brown-black ink, with Whitman's signature and the note "You can put the name W[alt] W[hitman?] either at the top or/ bottom as you prefer" at the foot of the leaf. On the verso appear the notes "Death's Valley" (twice) and "Magazine/ April, 1892" in Whitman executor Horace Traubel's[?] hand. Whitman's correspondence indicates that the poem was written and sold to Harper's New Monthly Magazine in 1889, although it did not appear there until April 1892, after the poet's death. Bradley and Blodgett note that Whitman originally included the poem in his 1891 manuscript for the "second annex" "Good-Bye My Fancy, " and Traubel grouped it in the cluster "Old Age Echoes, " which he added to Leaves in 1897. The "picture" of the subtitle is "The Valley of the Shadow of Death " by American painter George Inness, an engraving of which appeared in Harper's facing the poem. An engraving of a painting of Whitman by J.W. Alexander appeared in the same issue. Included in this folder along with Whitman's verses are a copy of the Inness engraving on a piece of cardboard, along with the Alexander reproduction and the table of contents page, both removed from the April 1892 issue of Harper's.

  • Box-folder 1:28a
    "Diagnosed strictly therefore the War was a result ..." 1878 February 20
    Physical Location: Original tipped in An American Primer, Barrett PS3222.A5 1904 COPY 3
    AMs, 1 pp. on 1 l., handwritten, 12 cm. x 12.5 cm.

    A prose note regarding the Civil War. The relationship of this manuscript to Whitman's published work is unknown. On verso a note from N. W. Hunt, Canton, N.Y., requesting an autograph.

  • Box-folder 1:29
    "Down by the Creek," 1878 February 20
    AMs, 4 pp. on 4 l., handwritten, 17 cm. x 10 cm. #3829-i.

    This manuscript is a draft of an apparently unpublished essay about a country auction, written in pencil on four leaves of lined notebook paper. The manuscript is dated February 20, 1878 .

  • Box-folder 1:30
    "Elias Hicks," [ca. 1888]
    AMs, 5 pp. on 5 l., handwritten, 12 cm. x 18.5 cm. #3829 (Bowers #15).

    A biographical note about Elias Hicks, a late eighteenth, early nineteenth century religious leader and abolitionist. Whitman published "Notes (such as they are) founded on Elias Hicks " in November Boughs in 1888. Written in pencil on irregularly cut paper.

  • Box-folder 1:31
    "Embers of Ending Days," [ca. 1880 - 1888]
    AMs,1 leaf, handwritten, 9.5 cm. x 11 cm. #3829.

    Written in ink with revisions in purple pencil. The manuscript appears to be a draft of a title or titles. The lines on the manuscript—"Embers of Ending Day," "Embers of day-fires mouldering"—are echoed in the partial line "the embers left from earlier fires" in the 1888 poem, "Continuities. " On the verso is a note, dated December 28, 1880, confirming a request for a set of WALT WHITMAN's books: "Dear Sir, I shall be glad to supply you with a set (Two Volumes) of my books—There is only one kind of binding—Walt Whitman."

  • Box-folder 1:32
    "Emory. Valley of the lower Rio Bravo," n.d.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:33
    "Essay on Emerson," [ca. 1888]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., 27.5 cm. x 20 cm. #3829-a.

    Note pasted to bottom states "Page from Walt Whitman's Essay on Emerson." Written in ink on lined paper.

  • Box-folder 1:34
    "A Family Dinner," [1882]
    Autograph revisions, 2 pp. on 2 l., handwritten, 22 cm. x 15.5 cm. and 19 cm. x 14 cm. #3829 (Bowers #69).

    An article pasted to grey paper with a few revisions written in black ink, this manuscript is a continuation of the manuscript entitled "The Dead Emerson," described above. The sketch, detailing Whitman's visit to Emerson, was inserted into Specimen Days , a volume of prose published in 1882, under the title "A Visit, at the Last, to R. W. Emerson." Emerson died in 1882.

  • Box-folder 1:35
    "The First Dandelion," [ca. 1888]
    , 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 26 cm. x 20 cm. #3829-a.

    Note on bottom states "sent to Herald March 11." Written in purple pencil on verso of letter from Witcraft.

  • Box-folder 1:36
    "For there is another Truth than the literal truth," n.d.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 22 cm. x 13.5 cm., Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #7).

    A prose note regarding the nature of truth. The relationship of this manuscript to Whitman's published work is unknown.

  • Box-folder 1:37
    "General Ideas for Essays and Lectures: Democracy, Inertia, Unity and Progress, and An Idea," n.d.
    Physical Location: Slipcase #7
    4 pp. on 4 l. #3829 (Bowers #17)
  • Box-folder 1:38
    "Glimpses of Walt Whitman from 1877 to '87," 1877-1887
    Physical Location: Slipcase #5
    AMs, 22 items and title page. #3829-i.

    Includes photograph of Walt Whitman, 1887, by George C. Cox and news clipping regarding the saving of Whitman's birthplace.

  • Box-folder 1:39
    "A Glint inside of Abraham Lincoln's Appointment-one item of many," 1865
    Physical Location: McGregor Slipcase #20
    AMs fragment, 2 pp on 2 l, mounted. #9778 item 5.

    This manuscript contains most of the account of President Lincoln's appointment of James Harlan as Secretary of the Interior, as published in November Boughs. It was Harlan who so disapproved of Leaves of Grass that he removed Whitman from his position as clerk in the Department of the Interior. With typed transcription.

  • Box-folder 1:40
    "The Great Armies of the Sick," [ca. 1863 February 26]
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., Barrow. #3829-i.

    Notes on Military Hospitals in Washington, D.C. appearing in the New York Times [1863 February 26] and eventually published in Specimen Days.

  • Box-folder 1:41
    "Hast never come to thee an hour?" [ca. 1881]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 14 x 22 cm., Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #11).

    On one leaf (14 x 22 cm.) of blue laid paper, in pencil, with heavy revisions in pencil and two additions in brown ink. This leaf contains two drafts of the poem "Hast Never Come to Thee an Hour, " the first draft having been deleted with two horizontal and two diagonal pencil lines. The partly erased word "Interp[ellation?]" appears in the lower left corner. After further revision the poem appeared for the first time in the 1881 Leaves , in the cluster "By the Roadside. "

    Seller's note: "Apparently the first two drafts of the poem, on one sheet. Published in the Complete Works, but differently worded."

  • Box-folder 1:42
    "Homer and Shakespeare," [ca. 1857]
    Physical Location: McGregor Slipcase #19
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, with typed transcription. #9778 item 4.
  • Box-folder 1:43
    "How I made a book," [ca. 1885]
    Physical Location: Slipcase #6
    AMsS, 37 pp. on 37 leaves. #3829-f.

    Includes 1888 copy of Samuel Hollyer engraving of Walt Whitman, 1855 Samuel Hollyer engraving of Walt Whitman, and typed transcription.

  • Box-folder 1:44
    "How often I have fancied...," [1878]
    AMs with autograph envelope signed, 3 pp. on 3 l., handwritten, 8.5 cm. x 14 cm. #3829-h.

    This manuscript is a prose note describing Whitman's longing to lecture to an audience of Civil War veterans and to speak about the death of Abraham Lincoln, written on two leaves of lined paper which are pasted to the verso of a AL fragment, [unidentified autograph seeker] to Walt Whitman, 1878 March 27.

  • Box-folder 1:45
    "I go around among these sights...," n.d.
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:46
    "Inscription" to "Leaves of Grass," between 1855 and 1867
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l.handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm., with typed transcription and explanatory note, Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #14).

    On one leaf of white wove paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), irregularly cut along the left margin. Inscribed in dark brown ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in a fine pen, and in pencil, apparently in that order. The subtitle has a horizontal pencil line through it, but a zig-zag pencil line through it seems to have been erased, along with the phrase "(at the entrance)" below it. The title "Inscription " and the words "One's-self" and "For You" are inscribed in an ornamental style. This appears to be a revision of other "Inscriptions " Whitman gathered in a notebook, along with prose drafts for a never-finished introduction to Leaves of Grass , and attached to his copy of the 1855 paper-bound edition of Leaves . (The entire collection of draft "inscription" and introductory material is currently housed at the New York Public Library.) In the 1867 Leaves Whitman culled material from this poem and the other "Inscription " poems to create an italicized "Inscription " that he placed before "Starting from Paumanok " at the beginning of the book; in that edition he also transferred part of verse 2 to "As I Sat Alone by Blue Ontario's Shore " (later the line was dropped and the title was revised to "By Blue Ontario's Shore "). From 1872 onward, this poem, revised and retitled "One's-Self I Sing, " was printed as the first of several poems in the "Inscriptions " cluster that opened the book. In the 1888 November Boughs , however, Whitman reprinted the 1867 version as "Small the Theme of my Chant. " Note: This draft may have been written before the Civil War, since it does not include the 1867 line "My Days I sing, and the Lands—with interstice I knew/ of hapless War."

  • Box-folder 1:47
    "Is Walt Whitman's Poetry Poetical?" [ca.1874]
    AMs, 8 pp. on 8 l., handwritten, 25 cm. x 19.5 cm., with typed transcription, Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #23).

    Walt Whitman's response to criticism from The Nation , mailed to John Burroughs whom Walt Whitman asks to edit the MS and submit it under his own name. Consists of 8 leaves written in ink, pasted to archival paper, and bound together with string. Transcription of letter from Walt Whitman to John Burroughs reads: Dear John Burroughs, I enclose you an article from the Nation of Jan. 29. How will the MS. article I have scratched off do in the main as an answer to it? (to help keep the pot a-boiling.) Do you feel like making up an article out of said MS—adding or excising what you see fit—signing your name to it—and sending to the Nation man?

  • Box-folder 1:48
    "Last of the War Cases," [1863 October 13]
    AMs, 2 pp. on 2 l., Barrow. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 1:49
    Leaves of Grass, [ca. 1855-1856]
    AMs, 12 fragments on 7 leaves, #3829. (Bowers #20).

    These notes, inscribed on scraps of paper of diverse types and sizes, went into the making of a number of poems used in Leaves of Grass , although some of them never seem to have been used, and some are prose notes. In several cases a collector has pasted two or more leaves to the same sheet of more contemporary paper, but for convenience and accuracy the leaves are described individually here.

    • Fragment 1: After death, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7 x 15 cm.

      On a small section of light yellow wove paper (7 x 15 cm.) with all four corners cropped for mounting. Four pinholes appear in the center. Inscribed and revised on the recto in pencil; the first line on the verso (beginning "I have all lives, all effects, all/ causes,...") is inscribed and revised in the same brown ink as Leaf 2, and the two lines that follow it (beginning "This is the earth's word—the round/ and compact earth's,") are inscribed, revised, and deleted (with a single vertical stroke) in pencil. Bucke prints both sets of lines on p. 32 of Notes and Fragments . Whitman apparently never used the recto lines, but the deleted lines on the verso bear a strong resemblance to the opening of his 1856 "Poem of The Sayers of The Words of The Earth, " titled in successive editions (as Bradley and Blodgett note) "To the Sayers of Words " (1860 and 1867), "Carol of Words " (1871, 1876), and, finally (in the 1881 edition of Leaves ), "A Song of the Rolling Earth. " The undeleted ink line on the verso is a later(?) draft of a line inscribed in Feinberg notebook #697 at the Library of Congress, transcribed by Blodgett in Walt Whitman: An 1855-56 Notebook Toward the Second Edition of "Leaves of Grass" (1956) and reprinted in his and Bradley's Comprehensive Reader's Edition of Leaves .

    • Fragment 2: As to you, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7 x 15.5 cm.

      On a small section of the same light yellow wove paper as Leaf 1, cut and cropped irregularly down to 7 x 15.5 cm. Multiple pinholes appear in the center. This section was evidently pasted to and then pulled away from another page; some fragments of that other page remain affixed to the top. Beneath them can be discerned the ink number 2. In the upper left corner appears an "X" within parentheses, which was formerly covered by the other page. Inscribed in the same brown ink as the undeleted line on the verso of Leaf 1; revised in that ink and in pencil. Whitman apparently never used this poem or fragment, but Bucke prints it (combined with other verses) on p. 29 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Fragment 3: Poem of, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4 x 8 cm.

      On a very small section of tan wove paper (4 x 8 cm.). All four corners are cropped for mounting. What seems to be a pinhole appears in the upper right corner. Inscribed in brown ink with no revisions. These notes, along with those on Leaves 4 and 5, could have represented an early stage of a number of poems. One possibility is poem 18 in the "Calamus " cluster, new to the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. This poem was permanently retitled "City of Orgies " in 1867 (see Leaf 4). Bucke prints the notes on p. 171 with an ellipses not present in the manuscript, and they are republished with the note "Manuscript not found" on p. 1372 of Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (vol. 4).

    • Fragment 4: A City Walk, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4.5 x 12 cm.

      On a very small section of uncropped white wove paper (4.5 x 12 cm.). No pinholes. Inscribed (hurriedly) in black ink using a thin nib. A bright pinkish-red ink check mark(?) appears in the upper right corner of the note. A faint horizontal line beneath part of "A City Walk," along with the words' capitalization and central position on the page, indicate that Whitman may have contemplated using the words as the title of an independent poem. The closest he came to this title was "City of Walks and Joys, " the name he originally assigned to "Calamus " 18 in his "Blue Book " revisions of the 1860 edition of Leaves . This title was changed in the "Blue Book " to "City of orgies, walks and joys " and finally became "City of Orgies " in the 1867 edition. These notes, written in the form of a single poetic verse, could represent an intermediate stage between the notes on Leaf 3 and those on Leaf 5. Bucke prints the lines in prose form on p. 120 of Notes and Fragments . Bucke's transcription is republished, accompanied by the note "Manuscript not found," on p. 1292 of the Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (vol. 4).

    • Fragment 5. Walks Down This Street; The Houses Duly Numbered., ca. 1856,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7 x 16 cm. paster to 4 x 15.5 cm.

      On a composite leaf comprising two sections of white wove paper (7 x 16 and 4 x 15.5 cm.) pasted together. The majority of the eight corners are cropped for mounting; the upper section was apparently cropped before being pasted to the lower section. Inscribed in dark brown-black ink with no revisions. The trial verses on the lower section (beginning "Poem—As of walking along a street") are fragmentary and hurriedly inscribed, but the upper section is written in ornamental script, and both parts of the title are underlined. A wavy line appears at the foot of that section. The word "Original" at the head of the upper section suggests that Whitman was sketching out a new poem for a revised edition of Leaves of Grass . If it was the 1860 edition, as his style of inscription here appears to indicate, it is possible that this leaf, like Leaves 3 and 4, could represent an early stage of the poem that would eventually become "City of Orgies. " Bucke prints the lower set of notes on p. 45 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Fragment 6. Europe ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 14 cm.

      On a section of off-white wove paper (16 x 14 cm.) with all four corners cropped for mounting. Many pinholes cluster to the left of the center of the page. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. The lines on the verso are deleted with a single vertical pencil stroke. They originally occupied the lower half of a full leaf of verse; after deleting these (current) verso lines and discarding the upper half of the leaf Whitman turned the page ninety degrees and flipped it over to use for the current recto notes. The recto notes represent an early stage of lines partially incorporated in "Poem of Salutation, " the new third poem in the 1856 edition of Leaves of Grass , which was permanently retitled "Salut au Monde! " in the 1860 edition. If the note or title "Europe" suggests that Whitman might have first intended to divide his salutations into discrete sections based on the different continents, this is a plan he did not follow in the published version(s). The more polished (but deleted) lines on the verso represent a recasting in poetic form of several lines from the 1855 Preface to Leaves . These were further revised for the 1856 "Poem of Many in One, " after which the first verse drafted on this page (cut off here, and beginning "over the Texan, Mexican, Florid[ian,]/ Cuban seas...") was dropped. The two verses below this, however, were preserved relatively unchanged through the poem's many transformations until the text was essentially fixed under the title "By Blue Ontario's Shore " in 1881. Bucke prints the top section of notes (incorrectly) on p. 157, and the lower section of verses (beginning "And the tough Scotch sailor crosses the Minch...") on p. 10 of Notes and Fragments . On p. 1980 of the Notes and Unpublished Manuscripts (vol. 5) Grier reports that this manuscript has not been found.

    • Fragment 7. And as the shores of the sea I live near and love are to me, ca. 1855
      1 leaf, handwritten, 13 x 14 cm.

      On one section of thick white wove paper (13 x 14.5 cm.) apparently taken from a sheet used for trial printings of a book engraving; a plate mark can be clearly seen on the verso. The lower corners are cropped for mounting. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Like the contents of Leaf 6, these two verses represent a draft (possibly a slightly later one than Leaf 6) of lines that would be further revised and incorporated in the new 1856 poem "Poem of Salutation, " permanently retitled "Salut au Monde! " in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. The second line (beginning "And as the mountains of my land/ are to me..."), greatly expanded, would become lines 49-54 (section 4) of "Salut au Monde! " in Bradley and Blodgett's edition of the poem, and the first line seems to have been expanded even more in that section's description of the oceans of the world. Bucke transcribes the leaf on p. 11.

    • Fragment 8. Poem of Pictures, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 6.5 x 15.5 cm.

      On a small section of white wove paper irregularly cut down to 6.5 x 15.5 cm. Inscribed and revised in dark brown ink. A phrase beginning "Picture of one of/ the Greek games" appears in the upper right corner, delimited from the rest of the notes with two curved lines. The words "Spanish bull fight" appear in their own semicircle (damaged by Whitman's cutting) in the lower right corner. Bucke transcribes the notes on p. 177, and Grier (p. 1294, vol. 4) republishes them, describing the manuscript as "not found." To build on Grier's notes, the lines seem to occupy a middle space between the very early notebook poem "Pictures " and the 1856 "Poem of Salutation " (ultimately "Salut au Monde! ").

    • Fragment 9. My two theses, ca. 1856,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4 x 16 cm. pasted to 10.5 x 16 cm.

      On a small composite leaf of white wove paper, ruled in blue on one side, formed by pasting a section (4 x 16 cm.) containing one line of notes (beginning "runs through all the poems...") below the set of notes transcribed above, which were written on a section measuring 10.5 x 16 cm. Multiple pinholes in both sections. Both sections are inscribed in pencil, with one revision in black ink. Bucke transcribes these notes on p. 167 of Notes and Fragments , and Grier republishes them (with the note "Manuscript not found") on p. 383 of the Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (vol. 1).

    • Fragment 10. The circus boy is riding in the, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 10.5 x 14 cm.

      On a section of off-white wove paper (10.5 x 14 cm.). Multiple pinholes cluster towards the top of the page. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. The lines on the verso are deleted with a single vertical pencil stroke. Those on the recto are separated by a horizontal line. The verso lines (beginning with the individually deleted line "O Walt Whitman, show us some/ pictures!" and continuing "America, always Pictorial!") represent a later draft of the beginning of the poem "Pictures " than the most complete extant version, which is contained in the pre-1855 "Pictures " notebook currently housed at Yale University. Bucke dates the lines to around 1880, when Whitman was working on a short version of "Pictures " both for magazine publication and for the 1881 edition of Leaves , where it was published as "My Picture-Gallery. " (See the entry for "My picture gallery " below.) But Whitman's early style of inscription in this draft, along with the line "It is round—it has room for America, north and south" and his use of his own name in the deleted first line, all suggest that Whitman may have inscribed this draft around the same time that he was working on the new 1856 "Poem of Salutations " (eventually "Salut au Monde! "). This draft also suggests that at one point he may have considered linking what would become "Poem of Salutations " and the formally and thematically similar "Pictures " more directly. Bucke prints the verso and recto lines, with several deleted words restored, on p. 27 of "Notes and Fragments. "

    • Fragment 11. How can there be immortality, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4.5 x 14.5 cm.

      On a very small section of white laid paper cut and cropped irregularly down to 4.5 x 14.5 cm. Multiple pinholes run up the center of the section. The recto lines are inscribed and heavily revised in brown ink, and deleted (en masse) with a single vertical pencil stroke. Along the lower edge can be seen the tops of words discarded after cutting. These trial verses bear a strong resemblance to the (eventual) second verse paragraph in section 6 of "Starting from Paumanok, " first published in 1860 as "Proto-Leaf. " Bradley and Blodgett note other relationships to the fragment "The Body—, " published on p. 37-8 of Notes and Fragments and housed at Duke University, and to the poems that would eventually become "Song of Myself " and "I Sing the Body Electric. " The fragmentary lines on the verso (beginning "Downward, buoyant, swif[t]"), which are inscribed and revised in pencil, represent a different version of a line incorporated in the pre-1855 notebook poem "Pictures " and of one inscribed in the 1854 notebook [I know a rich capitalist...], currently housed at the New York Public Library. Bucke prints incomplete transcriptions of the contents of both sides of Leaf 11 on p. 38 of Notes and Fragments , and presents a different version of the recto lines (transcribed from the same manuscript?) on p. 48. Bradley and Blodgett's new transcription, under the title "[Divine Is the Person], " appears on p. 602 of the expanded and revised edition of the Comprehensive Reader's Edition of Leaves .

    • Fragment 12. Pure water, ca. 1855
      1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 13 cm.

      On a section of light yellow wove paper (16 x 13 cm.) with all four corners cropped for mounting. Four pinholes appear in the center. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Below these trial verses, separated from them by a diagonal pencil stroke, appears a cartoon hand pointing to the annotation "I must have/ Poem[.]" Bucke prints the verses (without the prose note) on p. 49 of Notes and Fragments .

  • Folders 50-51
    "Leaves of Grass," 1857-1871,
    230 leaves, handwritten (Bowers #31).

    These descriptions follow the present arbitrary but longstanding physical arrangement of the manuscripts, first collected in a series of folders, and now in two boxed binders. This arrangement groups manuscripts according to their position in and out of the "clusters" comprising the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass , although the 1860 order of the clusters themselves has not been followed by the collector who arranged the poems. "Sparkles from the Wheel " and "Fables " (both 1871; see [Vol. 2, p. 163] and [Vol. 2, p. 164]) are included in the list by virtue of being housed with earlier poems in the second binder.

    All of these poems except for "Sparkles from the Wheel " and "Fables " were published in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. The manuscripts are generally followed by print versions of the poems disbound by a collector from the 1860 edition. Since Whitman apparently had no contact with the printed pages they have not been described here. Neither have the annotations made by collectors on many of Whitman's leaves. The measurements given below are taken at the points of greatest height and width, in that order, for each page. Following Fredson Bowers's practice in describing the manuscripts, the location of major pinhole clusters in each page, where present, has also been noted. (The pinholes, as Bowers argues, can yield helpful clues as to Whitman's practices of revision. Intact pages have multiple pinholes in the middle; thus, pinholes at the top of a small page indicate that the fragment was removed from the lower section of a full leaf, and vice versa). The types of paper and writing implements used by Whitman in each case have been documented for the same reasons. Since, in many cases, after 1860 Whitman changed the poems' titles and revised and transferred them elsewhere, a brief narrative of each poem's post-1860 evolution accompanies its description.

    The entry after the page numbers is the first autograph line at the top of the page. Beginning at page 34 of volume 1, the corresponding published poems are removed from 1860 edition and interleaved with the manuscripts.

    • Premonition,
      pages 1-33, Volume 1:

      On thirty-three leaves comprising four types of paper (in a variety of shapes and sizes): pink, blue wove, white wove, and light blue Williamsburgh (Brooklyn) tax forms—inscribed, Bowers argues, in that order. Each leaf is numbered consecutively by Whitman, in pencil, in the lower left corner. Each leaf is also stabbed in the left margin and punctured with numerous pinholes. Bowers has identified at least four stages of revision based on the writing implements and ink used by Whitman to make his corrections: first pencil, then dark ink with a fine pen, once again pencil, and finally thin light-brown ink. "Premonition " was published as the introductory poem to the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass under the title "Proto-Leaf. " In the 1867 and later editions it appeared directly after the opening "Inscriptions " cluster as "Starting from Paumanok. "

      • Page 1, Volume 1. "Premonition," 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm.

        On verso of light blue Williamsburgh tax form (21.5 x 12 cm.), in black ink, with corrections in the same ink and in pencil. Multiple pinholes in center. This is a revision of the fragment that appears at the top of Leaf 2, and corresponds to section 1 of "Proto-Leaf " in the 1860 edition.

      • Page 2, Volume 1. Mannahatta-boy of, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 12 x 13 cm.

        On a small pink sheet (12 x 13 cm.), in original black ink, with extensive deletions and revisions in fine pen (black ink) and pencil. Pinholes near top. This seems to have been the original first leaf of "Premonition. " In drafting the revised version of this first section on a Williamsburgh tax form (see Vol. 1, p. 1) Whitman excised and apparently destroyed the verses at the top of this leaf, striking through the verses (beginning "[Boy of the] Mannahatta—boy of/ the prairies,...") below the cut. He then left a revised section of verses on the lower part of the leaf (beginning "Victory, union, faith, democracy,/ prudence,...") undeleted. These lines correspond to section 2 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 3, Volume 1. This then is life, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 12 x 13 cm.

        On pink leaf (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with extensive revisions in fine pen, pencil, and light ink. Pinholes in the center. The three verse sections—beginning "This then is life," "How curious! How real!," and "Take my Leaves America! Make/ places..."—correspond to sections 3, 4, and 13 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 4, Volume 1. I returned to old times, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 10.5 x 12 cm.

        On verso of light blue Williamsburgh tax form cut down to 10.5 x 12 cm., in black ink, with revisions in pencil and light ink. Pinholes in the center. A revision of lines deleted from the top of Leaf 5; corresponds to section 14 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 5, Volume 1. I do not discredit old times, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 22 x 13 cm.

        On pink leaf (22 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with deletions and revisions in pencil and fine pen. Pinholes in center. Whitman struck through the section beginning "I do not discredit old times," the revised version of which appears on Leaf 4, and which corresponds to section 15 of "Proto-Leaf. " Below a horizontal line he left revised but undeleted the section beginning "Antiques of men," which corresponds to section 16 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 6, Volume 1. Here lands female and male, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On a pink leaf (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with extensive revisions in medium fine pen, pencil, and fine pen to the first section, corresponding to section 17 of "Proto-Leaf. " Pinholes in center. In the next two sections—[The Soul!] and [I will make the poems of materials,...]—corresponding to sections 18 and 19 of "Proto-Leaf, " only minor revisions have been made, these in fine pen.

      • Page 7, Volume 1. I will make a song for these, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 17 x 13 cm.

        On pink leaf cut down to 17 x 13 cm., in black ink, with revisions in pencil, medium fine pen, and light ink. Pinholes below center. Corresponds to section 20 of "Proto-Leaf. " The excised portion contained several verses and was moved to Leaf 8 (see Vol. 1, p. 8).

      • Page 8, Volume 1. I will be the preparer of what is, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 17 x 13 cm.

        On a torn sheet of blue wove paper (17 x 13 cm.), with the excised portion from pink Leaf 7 (beginning "I will be the preparer of what is/ to come...") pasted to the foot of the leaf. Pinholes mostly in center of composite leaf. The pasted-on section became the first three verses of section 21 in "Proto-Leaf. " Whitman struck through six unaltered lines (beginning "I am the child of Democracy,") in light-brown ink on the upper portion of the original blue leaf; these, Bowers observes, represent an intermediate stage between verses on a leaf used for "Enfans d'Adam " and verses on Leaf 12 of "Premonition " (see Vol. 1, p. 47 and Vol. 1, p. 12). After appearing on Leaf 12, the verses—much altered from their earliest iteration on the "Enfans d'Adam " leaf—next became section 23 of the published "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 9, Volume 1. And employments! I will make, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 11 x 13 cm.

        On pink leaf, cut down to 11 x 13 cm., written in black ink with no revisions. Pinhole clusters are located both at the foot of leaf, dating from before Whitman's cutting of it, and in the current center. The excised portion was renumbered Leaf 17 (see Vol. 1, p. 17). Leaf 9's remaining verses correspond to the second two verses of section 21 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 10, Volume 1. I will make the song of companionship, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 13 cm.

        On blue wove page torn down to 16 x 13 cm. In light-brown ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink. Pinholes in center. Corresponds to the first six lines of section 22 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 11, Volume 1. I will make the new evangel, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 9 x 13 cm.

        On blue wove page cut down to 9 x 13 cm., in light-brown ink with no revisions. Pinholes in the current center and at the foot of the page (the original center). Incision patterns indicate that the blank portion cut from the foot of the leaf was pasted to the back of Leaf 17 for reinforcement (see Vol. 1, p. 17). Corresponds to verses 7-9 of section 22 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 12, Volume 1. I am all credulous, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 6.5 x 16.5 cm.

        On two sections (6.5 x 16.5 cm.; 14 x 16 cm.) of the same leaf of white wove paper cut apart and pasted back together in reverse order. In brown-black ink, with revisions in same ink and in pencil. Pinholes in center of the composite leaf and in the original center. The current first section represents the latest extant draft of the verses that would form section 23 of "Proto-Leaf. " The second section of the leaf ("Here myself I give,") corresponds to section 24. The verso contains two deleted drafts, heavily revised in the same brown-black ink and pencil, of the first few verses of what would grow to become sections 25-36 of the published poem. An annotation, "very crude," appears in the left verso margin.

      • Page 13, Volume 1. I dart forth religion, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove paper (20 x 16 cm.), in dark-brown ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Pinholes in center. This is a later version of the drafts on the verso of Leaf 12 with additional materials, all of which would grow to become sections 25-36 of "Proto-Leaf. " The verses at the foot of this leaf (corresponding to the first part of section 35) are continued in the same ink on Leaf 14, which is also written on white wove paper.

      • Page 14, Volume 1. This extasy touching and thrilling me, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove paper (20 x 16 cm.), in dark-brown ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Pinholes in center. A continuation of the lines on Leaf 13, corresponding to the last three lines of section 35 and all of section 36 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 15, Volume 1. States!, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 16.5 x 16.5 cm.

        On white wove paper cut down to 16.5 x 16.5 cm., in brown-black ink, with revisions in the same ink. Pinholes from center downwards. Written on the verso of a deleted draft of what would become section 11 of "Calamus " in the 1860 Leaves (see Vol. 1, pp. 78 - 79; this draft begins, "When I heard at the close of/ the day how I had been/ praised in the Capitol,..."). The section excised from the foot of the page has been pasted to the top of Leaf 16. The first verse section on Leaf 15 was abandoned or transformed beyond recognition in "Proto-Leaf, " but the next three long verses ("As I have walked my walk through the rows of the/ orchard-trees," "I have seen the he-bird also—I heard him," "And I have perceived that what he really sang") became sections 38-40 of the published poem.

      • Page 16, Volume 1. Democracy!, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 4 x 16.5 cm.; 10 x 16 cm.

        On two small joined sections of white wove paper (measuring 4 x 16.5 and 10 x 16, for a total of 13 x 16.5 cm.), the top one taken from Leaf 15, with a fragment of the same "Calamus " draft on its verso as on Leaf 15's (see Vol. 1, p. 15 and Vol. 1, pp. 78 - 79). Pinholes in center of composite leaf. Both sections are written in the same brown-black ink as Leaf 15, with revisions in this ink and in pencil. The upper verses correspond to section 41 of "Proto-Leaf, " and the lower ones ("Ma femme!/ Our offspring shall be provided for,") to section 42.

      • Page 17, Volume 1. I will make the songs of passions, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 11 x 13 cm.

        On a small leaf of pink paper (11 x 13 cm.) removed, as Bowers notes, from the foot of Leaf 9, and pasted for reinforcement to a blank piece of blue wove paper (7 x 13 cm.) aken, incision patterns indicate, from the foot of Leaf 11 (see Vol. 1, p. 9 and Vol. 1, p. 11). In black ink, with revisions and a paragraph mark at the beginning of the verses in light ink. Pinholes at top (original center) and near current center. These two long verses (the second one beginning "And I will make the true/ poem of riches,...") correspond to sections 43-44 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 18, Volume 1. And I will effuse egotism, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and, apparently, in a finer pen. Pinholes in center. A continuation of Leaf 17, these verses correspond to section 45 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 19, Volume 1. And I will not make poems, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in a finer pen. Pinholes in center. The first section continues the verses on Leaf 18, but the second ("Was somebody asking to see the soul?") constitutes an independent unit on the page. The two parts correspond to sections 46 and 47 of "Proto-Leaf, " respectively.

      • Page 20, Volume 1. All hold spiritual joys, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in light ink. Pinholes in center. These verse paragraphs (the second and third ones beginning with the lines "Of that which is really you, and/ of any part of you," and "Not the types set up by the/ printer...") correspond to sections 48-50 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 21, Volume 1. Behold! the body includes and is the, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a finer pen. Pinholes in center. These verse paragraphs (with those after the first one beginning "Whoever you are! to you endless/ announcements!," "Daughter of the lands, did you wait/ for your poet?," and "Toward the female of The States, and/ toward the male...") correspond to sections 51-54 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 22, Volume 1. O the Lands!, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in pencil, in finer pen, and in light ink. Pinholes in center. These lines correspond to the first seven verses of section 55 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 23, Volume 1. Lands!, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 12.5 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21 x 12.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a finer pen. Pinholes in center. These lines correspond to verses 8-15 of section 55 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 24, Volume 1. The great women's land! The, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a finer pen and in light ink. Pinholes in center. These lines correspond to verses 16-24 of section 55 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 25, Volume 1. Listening to the orators and oratresses, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13.5 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21 x 13.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a finer pen and in light ink. Pinholes in center. These lines correspond to verses 25-31 of section 55 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 26, Volume 1. Yet the true son either of Maine, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13.5 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21 x 13.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in pencil, in a finer pen, and in light ink. Pinholes in center. The first section of verses corresponds to verses 32-36 of section 55 of "Proto-Leaf, " and the second and third verse paragraphs ("With me, with firm holding, yet/ haste, haste on!" and "For your life, adhere to me,") correspond to sections 56 and 57.

      • Page 27, Volume 1. No dainty dolce affettuoso, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 8 x 13.5 cm. pasted to 12 x 11.5 cm.

        Consists of a section of pink paper (8 x 13.5 cm.) torn from the top of Leaf 30 (see Vol. 1, p. 30), numbered 26 1/2 by Whitman and pasted to the inscribed verso of a section of a blank, cut-down Williamsburgh tax form (12 x 11.5 cm.), numbered 27. In black ink, with heavy revisions (to the top section) in a finer pen and in light ink. Pinholes mostly in the center of the pink section and in the center of the composite leaf. The pink section's verses correspond to section 58 of "Proto-Leaf, " and the tax form verses ("On my way a moment I/ pause,") to section 59.

      • Page 28, Volume 1. The red aborigines!, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13.5 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in finer pen and in light ink. Pinholes in center. Originally titled "Aborigines, " this section corresponds to section 60 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 29, Volume 1. Elements, breeds, turbulent, quick auda-, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm.

        On a full light-blue Williamsburgh tax form (21.5 x 12 cm.), in black and light ink, with revisions in light ink. Pinholes in center. The top verse section corresponds to section 61 of "Proto-Leaf, " and the lower verses ("These! These, my voice an-/nouncing—...") became section 62.

      • Page 30, Volume 1. See! steamers steaming through my poems!, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 14 x 13.5 cm.

        On a torn section of pink paper (14 x 13.5 cm.), in black ink, with heavy revisions in pencil, in a finer pen, and in light ink. The section torn from the top ("No dainty dolce affetuoso I,") was renumbered "26 1/2" and pasted to leaf 27 (see Vol. 1, p. 27). Pinholes in original and current center. These verses became the first five verses of section 63 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 31, Volume 1. See, in my poems, old and new cities, solid, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On a full leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions and deletions in pencil, in a finer pen, and in light ink. Pinholes in center. Whitman corrected the leaf number from 30 to 31. The first verse on the page, deleted, begins "See, by the sea-side bathing, free/ from costumes,..." and the third verse, also deleted, begins "See, the President, ashamed, scouted/ at by the people,..." The undeleted lines correspond to verses 6-8 of section 63 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 32, Volume 1. See, ploughmen plough's, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 17.5 x 13 cm.

        On a torn pink leaf (17.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in pencil, in a finer pen, and in light ink. Pinholes in the current and original centers. The verse or verses removed from the foot of the page, of which only the word "at" is legible, have apparently been lost. The remaining lines correspond to verses 9-12 of section 63 of "Proto-Leaf. "

      • Page 33, Volume 1. O rendesvous at last! O, 1 leaf, handwritten, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm.

        On verso of a full light-blue Williamsburgh tax blank (21.5 x 12 cm.), in light ink, with no revisions. Pinholes in center and at top. Although these verses were written as one section, Whitman changed a semicolon at the end of the fourth verse (before "O a word to clear one's path/ ahead endlessly!") to a period, creating sections 64 and 65 of "Proto-Leaf. " An earlier draft of the last four verses appears, upside-down, on the verso of the top section of composite leaf 2:1:4 in "Chants Democratic. "

      • Page 34, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Proto-Leaf"
    • Pages 35-48, Volume 1:

      The following pages are in the order in which the poems appeared, after revision, in the 1860 Leaves. These pages contain drafts of poems that would become five of the main numbered sections of the new cluster "Enfans d'Adam " in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. In the 1867 and later editions these poems appeared, with individual titles, under the group title "Children of Adam. "

      • Page 35, Volume 1. "Leaves-Droppings," 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 10 cm.

        On a white wove leaf (16 x 10 cm.), in light ink, with no revisions. Pinholes mostly in center. An earlier draft of this poem appears on the verso of Vol. 1, p. 99 ("City of my walks and joys!") the leaf that would become section 18 of "Calamus " in the 1860 Leaves . After being incorporated as the first main section of "Enfans d'Adam " in 1860, this poem received its own title, "To the Garden, the World " in the 1867 Leaves .

      • Page 36, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Enfans d'Adam" #1
    • "You and I," Pages 37-39, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      3 leaves, all leaves 21 x 13 cm.

      On three pink leaves (all roughly 21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in pencil, fine pen, and light ink. Multiple pinholes in the center of each leaf, with two at the top where the leaves were pinned together. Originally numbered 84. This poem appeared in the 1860 Leaves as main section 7 of "Enfans d'Adam, " and was retitled "We Two—How Long We Were Fool'd " in 1867.

      • Page 37, Volume 1. "You and I"
      • Page 38, Volume 1. We are also the coarse smut
      • Page 39, Volume 1. We are seas mingling-we
      • Page 40, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Enfans d'Adam" #7
    • [Now the hour has come upon me] Pages 41-42, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, leaf 1 18.5 x 16 cm., leaf 2 11 x 16 cm.

      One and one-half white wove leaves, the first 18.5 x 16 cm. (with a narrow section of the upper-right corner torn off) and the second roughly cut down to 11 x 16 cm. In brown-black ink, with revisions in the fine pen. Pinholes in the center of both leaves, but also near the original center of the second leaf and in the left margins of both. This poem, numbered 82 in pencil (presumably by Whitman) became main section 8 of "Enfans d'Adam " in 1860, and was permanently retitled "Native Moments " in 1867.

      • Page 41, Volume 1. Now the hour has come upon me
      • Page 42, Volume 1. I will play a part no longer
      • Page 43, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Enfans d'Adam" #8
      • Page 44, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Enfans d'Adam" #8, continued.
    • Page 45, Volume 1. Once I passed through a populous, 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

      On a leaf of white wove paper (20 x 16 cm.), in brown-black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink and in pencil. On the present verso appear, in pencil, two fragments: an undeleted verse that would be used in Satan's section of "Chanting the Square Deific " in "Sequel to Drum-Taps" (1865-66); and the earliest draft in the Barrett collection of what would become section 23 of "Proto-Leaf" (deleted; see Vol. 1, p. 8 for an intermediate version of the section and Vol. 1, p. 12 for the last version before publication). The undeleted verse is upside-down relative to the deleted section. The recto verses became main section 9 of "Enfans d'Adam" in 1860, and were retitled "Once I Pass'd Through a Populous City" in 1867.

    • Page 46, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Enfans d'Adam" #9
    • Page 47, Volume 1. "Hindustan," 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 12.5 cm.

      On pink leaf (21 x 12.5 cm.), in black ink, with extensive revisions in fine pen and light ink. Very few pinholes in center. The number 80 appears above the deleted 79 (both in ink) above the title, along with a pencil question mark in parentheses. This poem was revised to form main section 10 of "Enfans d'Adam" in 1860, and in 1867 was given two new opening lines and retitled "Facing West from California's Shores. "

    • Page 48. 1860 edition as published: "Enfans d'Adam" #10
    • "Calamus," Pages 49-55, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      7 leaves, handwritten.

      Pages generally follow the order in which the poems appeared, after revision, in the 1860 Leaves.

      These pages contain drafts of poems that would become main sections 1-2, 4, 7-18, 20-23, 25-27, 30-32, 34, and 36-45 of the "Calamus " cluster, which first appeared in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. In 1867 the poems received individual titles, and in that and subsequent editions a small number of poems were removed from and added to the cluster; but, with the exceptions noted below, the great majority of the original poems remained in "Calamus " through all the versions of Leaves . Twelve of the manuscript poems are taken from a small notebook and marked with ornamental Roman numerals, which Bowers used to reconstruct the original sequence upon which "Calamus " was apparently built. This nucleus of poems is known as "Live Oak, with Moss. "

      • Page 49, Volume 1. I do not know whether, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove half-sheet (20 x 16 cm.), in dark brown ink, with heavy alterations in the same ink, in light ink, and in pencil. Appears on the verso of the second fragment of a pencil draft of an editorial, "Important Questions in Brooklyn.—, " which Whitman apparently never published but which seems to have inspired at least two published editorials on the Brooklyn Water Works and the political quarrels surrounding control of the project. The editorials appeared in the Brooklyn Times of March 15 and 16, 1859, supplying important clues to the dating of the Barrett manuscripts (see Bowers xxviii-xxix). Pinholes mostly in center. These verses became lines 6-10 of section 2 of "Calamus " in the 1860 edition.

      • Page 50, Volume 1. Yet you are beautiful to me, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove half-sheet (20.5 x 16 cm.), in dark brown ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink, in lighter ink, and in pencil. On verso of the first, titled half-page of "Important Questions in Brooklyn—. " Pinholes mostly in center. These lines became verses 11-14 of section 2 in the 1860 version of "Calamus. "

      • Page 51, Volume 1. Death or life, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove half-sheet (20 x 16 cm.), in dark brown ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in a lighter ink, and in pencil. On verso of the third half-page of "Important Questions in Brooklyn—. " Pinholes mostly in center. These lines became verses 15-20 of section 2 in the 1860 version of "Calamus. "

      • Page 52, Volume 1. Do not remain down there, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove half-sheet (20 x 16 cm.), in dark brown ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in a lighter ink, and in pencil. On verso of the fourth and (apparently) final half-page of "Important Questions in Brooklyn—. " Pinholes mostly in center. These lines became verses 21-29 of section 2 in the 1860 version of "Calamus. "

      • Page 53, Volume 1. Give me, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

        On white wove half-sheet (20 x 16 cm.), in dark brown ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in a lighter ink, and in pencil. Pinholes mostly in center. These lines became the final verses (30-40) of section 2 in the 1860 version of "Calamus. "

      • Page 54, Volume 1. Long I was held by the life, 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, 16 x 10 cm.

        On white wove leaf (16 x 10 cm.), in light brown ink, with no revisions. Pinholes at top and in center. This became section 1 of "Calamus " in 1860, and was retitled "In Paths Untrodden " in the 1867 Leaves .

      • Page 55, Volume 1. Was it I who walked the, 1857-1859,
        2 pp. on 1 leaf, 21.5 x 16 cm.

        This leaf comprises two sections of a poem inscribed (with very few alterations) on the first and third sides of a folded half-sheet (21.5 x 16 cm.) of the same white wove paper used for "Long I was held by the life." Whitman also used the same light-brown ink for these passages as for [Long I was held by the life/ that exhibits itself,], and, as Bowers notes, the pinholes in the two leaves match up. On the first side of the folded leaf a blue pencil was used to correct a pencil number 7 to a 1, and on the third side the blue pencil corrected a pencil 8 to a 2. The five verses beginning "Was it I who walked the/ earth..." were not used in "Calamus, " but the five lines beginning "Scented herbage of my breast" became the opening verses of section 2 of the cluster in the 1860 Leaves . In the 1867 and later editions the first line was used as the title of the poem. See the following five entries for drafts of the remaining verses in the section, written on larger leaves (roughly 20 x 16 cm.) of the same paper, in darker ink, and all heavily revised.

      • Page 56, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #1 and #2
      • Page 57, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #1 and #2, continued.
      • Page 58, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #45
    • These I, Pages 59-60, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      pp. on 2 l., 20 x 16 cm.

      These leaves comprise four sections of a poem inscribed on the first and third sides of two folded half-sheets (20 x 16 cm.) of the same white wove paper used for 1:3:1 and 1:3:2, in the same light brown ink and, like them, with only minor revisions. The pages were folded and pinned together to form a small pamphlet. Pinholes mostly at center-top and in what was the left margin of the pamphlet. The lines on page 1 became verses 1-8 of section 4 of "Calamus. " in 1860; page 2 ("Solitary, smelling the earthy/ smell,...") became verses 9-14; page 3 ("Here lilac with a branch of/ pine,") became verses 15-22; and page 4 ("And stems of currants, and/ plum-blows,") became verses 23-28. From 1867 on the poem was titled "These I, Singing in Spring. "

      • Page 59, Volume 1. These I
      • Page 60, Volume 1. Solitary, smelling the earthy
      • Page 61. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #4
    • Of the doubts, pages 62-63, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten.

      On two light blue Williamsburgh tax blanks (21.5 x 12 cm.), in light brown ink, with minor revisions. A few pinholes at the head and in the center. A blue pencil question mark appears to the left of the first line on the second form. The lines on the first leaf became verses 1-9 of section 7 of "Calamus " in 1860, and the second leaf's lines ("To me all these, and the/ like of these,..."] became verses 10-16. Retitled "Of the Terrible Doubt of Appearances " in 1867.

      • Page 62, Volume 1. Of the doubts, the uncertainties
      • Page 63, Volume 1. To me all these, and the
      • Page 64, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #7
      • Page 65, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #7, continued.
    • Long I thought that knowledge, pages 66-68, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      3 leaves, leaves 1 and 2 15 x 9.5 cm.; leaf 3 6.5 x 9.5 cm.

      On three pieces of white wove paper (the first two 15 x 9.5 cm., the third 6.5 x 9.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Whitman also penciled in the numbers 7, 8, and 8 1/2 in the lower-left corner of each page. Pinholes at the head and in the center of each page. This was the fifth poem of the original sequence "Live Oak, with Moss "; the poem number is inscribed ornamentally, as with the Roman numerals Whitman used for other "Live Oak " poems, and a wavy line appears after the last verse. The lines on the first leaf became verses 1-5 of section 8 of "Calamus " in 1860; the second leaf's lines ("Take notice, you Kanuck woods") became verses 6-10; and the lines on the half-page ("I am indifferent to my own/ songs—") became verses 11-12. There were no further appearances of this poem during the poet's lifetime, Whitman having canceled it in his "Blue Book Copy " of the 1860 Leaves.

      • Page 66, Volume 1. Long I thought that knowledge
      • Page 67, Volume 1. Take notice, you Kanuck woods
      • Page 68, Volume 1. I am indifferent to my own
      • Page 69, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #8
      • Page 70, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #8, continued.
    • [Hours continuing long, sore], pages 71-72: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, leaf 1 (9.5 x 9 cm.); leaf 2 (14.5 x 9 cm. pasted to 5 x 9.5 cm.).

      On two pieces of white wove paper, the first cut down to 9.5 x 9 cm. and the second comprising two sections (14.5 x 9 and 5 x 9.5 cm.) joined by means of a strip of pink paper. In brown-black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Pinholes mostly at top and in center of leaves. Whitman penciled in the numbers 11 and 12 (apparently over other numbers) in the lower-left corner of each page; his partly erased pencil note "(finished in/ the other city)" appears on the first page. The ornamental number "VIII" replaces a deleted ornamental "IX" on the first page, and the top of another "IX" appears at the foot of the second page, beneath a wavy line indicating the end of the poem. Whitman removed the lower section of page 2 from the top of current leaf Vol. 1, p. 132 ("I dreamed in a dream of a/ city..."). This poem, the eighth in the sequence "Live Oak, with Moss, " became section 9 of "Calamus " in 1860. This was its only appearance in Leaves . The first page contains what would become verses 1-3 in 1860, and the second ("Hours discouraged, distracted,") contains lines 4-12.

      • Page 71, Volume 1. Hours continuing long, sore
      • Page 72, Volume 1. Hours discouraged, distracted
      • Page 73, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus " #9
    • You bards of ages hence, Pages 74-75, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, leaf 1 (8 x 9 cm.); leaf 2 (14.5 x 9.5 cm. pasted to 5.5 x 9.5 cm.).

      On two sections of white wove paper, the first cut down to 8 x 9 cm. and the second a composite of two pieces pasted together, the top measuring 14.5 x 9.5 and the bottom 5.5 x 9.5 cm. In black ink, with a few revisions in the same ink. Pinholes at top and in center of both pages. Whitman numbered the first 9 1/2 and the second 10, in pencil, in the lower-left corner of each leaf. The Roman numeral is inscribed in an ornamental style, and the poem terminates with a wavy line. The seventh poem in the sequence "Live Oak, with Moss, " became section 10 of "Calamus " in 1860 and was permanently retitled "Recorders Ages Hence " in 1867. The lines on the first page correspond to verses 1-3 of the 1860 version, and those on the second page ("Publish my name and hang up/ my picture...") to lines 4-11.

      • Page 74, Volume 1. You bards of ages hence!
      • Page 75, Volume 1. Publish my name and hang up
      • Page 76, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus " #10
      • Page 77, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus " #10, continued.
    • When I heard at the close of, pages 78-79, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, 15 x 9.5 cm.

      On two leaves of white wove paper, both measuring 15 x 9.5 cm.; the lower half of the second page is pasted over with a section of white paper (8 x 9 cm.) containing four revised verses. In black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Pinholes mostly at top of both pages. Whitman numbered the pages 4 and 5, in pencil, in their lower-left corners. The third section of "Live Oak, with Moss " (with ornamental Roman numeral), this poem became section 11 of "Calamus " in 1860 and was permanently retitled "When I Heard at the Close of the Day " in 1867. For an earlier draft of the poem numbered V please see the verso of leaves 15-16 of "Premonition " (Vol 1, pp. 15-16). Bowers (p. 88) supplies the three earlier lines concealed by the paste-on revision to the second leaf. The lines on the first page correspond to verses 1-5 of the 1860 version, and those on the second page ("And when I thought how/ my friend,...") to lines 6-13.

      • Page 78, Volume 1. When I heard at the close of
      • Page 79, Volume 1. And when I thought how
      • Page 80, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #11
    • "To a new personal admirer," pages 81-82, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, leaf 1 (13 x 11.5 cm.); leaf 2 (20 x 16 cm.).

      On two pieces of white wove paper, 13 x 11.5 and 20 x 16 cm., in brown-black ink, with substantial revisions in the same ink. Pinholes mostly at center and in left margins of both pages. This poem, featuring a new first line, became section 12 of "Calamus " in 1860; in 1867 Whitman dropped the last 2 1/2 lines and permanently retitled it "Are you the New Person Drawn Toward Me? " The first page contains verses corresponding to lines 2-3 of the 1860 version, and the lines on the second page ("Do you suppose you can easily/ be my lover,...") became verses 4-11.

      • Page 81, Volume 1. "To a new personal admirer"
      • Page 82, Volume 1. Do you suppose you can easily
      • Page 83, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #12
      • Page 84, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #12 continued.
    • "Buds," page 85, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

      On pink leaf (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with minor revisions in the same ink.A few pinholes at top and near center. A pencil question mark appears in parentheses in the upper-right corner. The number 52 appears to have been revised from 51. After adding several verses, Whitman designated this poem section 13 of "Calamus " in the 1860 Leaves , and, after dropping the first two and last three lines of the 1860 version, permanently retitled it "Roots and Leaves Themselves Alone " in 1867.

    • Page 86, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #13
    • "Calamus-Leaves," page 87, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15 x 9 cm.

      On white wove leaf, 15 x 9 cm., in black ink, with the title "Live Oak, with Moss " stricken out and "Calamus-Leaves " added in light brown ink, and with one small revision in blue pencil. Whitman numbered this page 1 in pencil. The first section of the original sequence "Live Oak, with Moss, " this became section 14 of "Calamus " in 1860 and was permanently retitled "Not Heat Flames up and Consumes " in the 1867 Leaves .

    • Page 88, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #14
    • "Confession-Drops," page 89, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm.

      On verso of light blue Williamsburgh tax blank (21.5 x 12 cm.), in light ink, with no revisions. Pinholes at top and in center. This poem became section 15 of "Calamus " in 1860, and, with the addition of a new first line, was retitled "Trickle, Drops " in 1867.

    • Page 90, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #15
    • "Leaf," pages 91-92, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

      On two pink leaves (both 21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in fine pen. Pinholes mostly in center of both leaves, but also at top and in left margins. The original title was "Leaflet. " On the second page Whitman added, in a combination of normal and blue pencil, the number 43 (1/2). With the addition of a new first line ("1. Who is now reading this?") the poem became section 16 of "Calamus " in 1860; the lines on the first draft page correspond to verses 2-8 and those on the second page ("Or as if interior in me") to verses 9-10. This was the first and last appearance of the poem during Whitman's lifetime: he rejected it from his "Blue Book Copy " of Leaves in 1860.

      • Page 91, Volume 1. "Leaf"
      • Page 92, Volume 1. Or as if interior in me
      • Page 93, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #16
      • Page 94, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #16, continued.
    • "Poemet," pages 95-96, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

      On two pink leaves (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in light ink. Pinholes in center, at top, and in top-left corner. This poem was originally titled "Leaf " and apparently numbered 78; Whitman inscribed its new title, "Poemet, " in light ink. It became section 17 of "Calamus " in 1860, with the lines on the first leaf corresponding to verses 1-7 and those on the second ("And what I dreamed I will/ henceforth tell...") to verses 8-13 of the first published version. Retitled "Of Him I Love Day and Night " in 1867, it was transferred to the "Whispers of Heavenly Death " cluster in Passage to India in 1871. In 1881 Whitman incorporated it, with the rest of the cluster, in the main body of Leaves .

      • Page 95, Volume 1. "Poemet"
      • Page 96, Volume 1. And what I dreamed I will
      • Page 97, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #17
      • Page 98, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #17, continued.
    • City of my walks and joys!, page 99, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8.5 x 10 cm. pasted to 20 x 16 cm.

      On a composite leaf consisting of two pieces of white wove paper, 8.5 x 10 and 20 x 16 cm.; the smaller section (in light brown ink, with few revisions) is pasted over some lines in the top-left corner of the larger piece (in dark brown ink), from the top of which other lines were cut off. Whitman made extensive revisions to the larger piece in the same dark brown ink and in pencil before adding the smaller section. On the verso of the larger piece appears an extensively revised pencil draft of the first poem in "Enfans d'Adam " (see Vol. 1, p. 35; the lines on the composite page's verso represent an earlier draft of the poem). The verses on the current recto of the composite leaf became section 18 of "Calamus " in 1860; the poem was permanently retitled "City of Orgies " in 1867.

    • Page 100, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #18
    • I saw in Louisiana a, Pages 101-102, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 15 x 9.5 cm.

      On two leaves of white wove paper, both 15 x 9.5 cm., in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in light brown ink, and in pencil. Pinholes mostly at top and in center of both pages. Whitman numbered the pages 2 and 3 in pencil. This was originally the second section of the sequence "Live Oak, with Moss " (one of the deleted lines reads "I write/ these pieces, and name/ them after it [the Louisiana live-oak];"), with ornamental Roman numeral. It became section 20 of "Calamus " in 1860; the lines on the first manuscript page correspond to verses 1-7, and those on the second ("It is not needed to remind/ me...") to verses 8-13. The poem was retitled "I saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing " in 1867.

      • Page 101, Volume 1. I saw in Louisiana a live oak growing
      • Page 102, Volume 1. It is not needed to remind
      • Page 103, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #20
      • Page.104, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #20, continued.
    • "As of Eternity," pages 105-106, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

      On two leaves of pink paper, both 21 x 13 cm., in black ink, with minor revisions in the same ink. Pinholes mostly in center and at top of both pages. This poem became section 21 of "Calamus " in 1860; the lines on the first manuscript page became verses 1-6, and those on the second ("I hear not the volumes of/ sound merely—...") became 7-9. Retitled "That Music Always Round Me " in 1867, it was transferred in 1871 to the "Whispers of Heavenly Death " cluster in Passage to India. In 1881 Whitman incorporated it, with the rest of the cluster, in the main body of Leaves .

      • Page 105, Volume 1. "As of Eternity"
      • Page 106, Volume 1. I hear not the volumes of
      • Page 107, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #21
      • Page 108, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #21, continued.
    • "To A Stranger," pages 109-110, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, 21 x 13 cm.

      On two leaves of pink paper, both 21 x 13 cm., in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in light ink. Pinholes mostly in center and in left margin of each page. This poem was first numbered 94, and the first word was "Stranger"; Whitman penciled in a question mark, in parentheses, next to the title. It was numbered section 22 of "Calamus " in 1860: the lines on the first page correspond to verses 1-6 of the 1860 version, and those on the second ("You give me the pleasure") to verses 7-10. Whitman reintroduced the title "To a Stranger " in the 1867 Leaves .

      • Page 109, Volume 1. "To A Stranger"
      • Page 110, Volume 1. You give me the pleasure
      • Page 111, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #22
      • Page 112, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #22, continued.
    • This moment as I sit alone, page 113, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14.5 x 9.5 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper, in dark brown ink, with revisions in pencil. Pinholes in center and at top. Whitman penciled in the number 6 in the lower-left corner. The fourth poem in the original sequence "Live Oak, with Moss " (with ornamental Roman numeral), it became section 23 of "Calamus " in 1860 and was permanently retitled "This Moment, Yearning and Thoughtful " in 1867.

    • Page 114, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #23
    • "Prairie-Grass," page 115, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in an even blacker ink and in pencil. Pinholes in center. The poem was originally numbered 53. In 1860 Whitman designated it section 25 of "Calamus, " transforming the title into a new first line and expanding the original first line into verses 2-4. In 1867 he further revised it, permanently retitling it "The Prairie-Grass Dividing. "

    • Page 116, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #25
    • "Razzia," page 117, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 12.5 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 12.5 cm.), in black ink, with minor revisions in the same ink. Pinholes in center. This poem was originally numbered 83. With the addition of the new first lines "We two boys together clinging,/ One the other never leaving..." and attendant revisions it became section 26 of "Calamus " in 1860, and was permanently retitled "We Two Boys Together Clinging " in 1867.

    • Page 118, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #26
    • "Leaf (O dying! Always dying!)," page 119, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm.

      On one light blue Williamsburgh tax blank (21.5 x 12 cm.), in dark brown ink, with revisions in fine pen and pencil. Whitman penciled in a question mark, in parentheses, next to the title. With the addition of the new first line "O love!" this became section 27 of "Calamus " in 1860. In the 1867 Leaves it was retitled "O Living Always—Always Dying! " Whitman next transferred it to the "Passage to India " supplement bound in with Leaves , where it reappeared in 1876; in the 1881 Leaves Whitman permanently added it to the cluster "Whispers of Heavenly Death. "

    • Page 120, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #27
    • "Leaf (A promise to Indiana)," page 121, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 22 x 13 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (22 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink. Pinholes mostly in center. The original title was "Leaflet, " and the original number seems to have been 70. After substantial revision (including the addition of the new first line "A promise and gift to California,") this poem became section 30 of "Calamus " in 1860. Whitman further revised the poem before including it, permanently retitled "A Promise to California, " in the 1867 Leaves .

    • Page 122, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #30
    • "Leaf (What place is besieged)," Page 123, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with a fair copy of the poem at the bottom of the leaf and a deleted draft featuring heavy revisions in the same ink and in pencil at the top. This poem was originally numbered 68, and its title was "Leaflet—. " In 1860 it became the second numbered verse paragraph of section 31 of "Calamus. " In 1867 Whitman split up the two paragraphs and made them separate poems; these verses were moved to a position between the "Calamus " and a "Leaves of Grass " cluster and permanently retitled "What Place Is Besieged? " In 1881 the poem was transferred to the cluster "Inscriptions. "

    • Page 124, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #31
    • Here the frailest leaves of me, page 125, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15 x 9.5 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper (15 x 9.5 cm.), in medium-brown ink, with one revision in the same ink. Pinholes mostly at top and in center. The two sets of verses are divided by a short horizontal line. In 1860 the first set, with the addition of a new first line ("Here my last words, and the most baffling,") became section 44 of "Calamus "; the poem was permanently retitled "Here the Frailest Leaves of Me ", and the new first line dropped, in 1867. The second set was revised to form section 38 of "Calamus " in 1860; in 1867 it was further revised and retitled "Fast Anchor'd, Eternal, O Love. "

    • Page 126, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #44
    • Page 127, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #38
    • A leaf for hand-in-hand, page 128, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14.5 x 9 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper (14.5 x 9 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in pencil. Pinholes in center and at top. A blue-pencil number 3 appears in the upper right corner over an erased 9. With substantial additions and revisions this evolved into section 37 of "Calamus " in 1860; after further revision it became "A Leaf for Hand in Hand " in 1867.

    • Page 129, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #37
    • Earth!, page 130, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14.5 x 9.5 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper (14.5 x 9.5 cm.), in brown-black ink, with revisions in lighter ink (including the deletion, undone in 1860, of the phrase "My likeness!" after "Earth!"). Pinholes mostly at top and in center. Whitman penciled in the number 15 in the lower-left corner. Originally poem XI in the sequence "Live Oak, with Moss " (with the Roman numeral ornamentally drawn), this was revised to become section 36 of "Calamus " in 1860. In 1867 Whitman retitled the poem "Earth! My Likeness! "

    • Page 131, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #36
    • I dreamed in a dream of a, page 132, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 9.5 x 9 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper cut down to 9.5 x 9 cm., in brown-black ink, with revisions in pencil. Pinholes at top and in center. Whitman numbered the leaf 13, in pencil, in the lower-left corner. The excised top portion of the leaf became the bottom section of page 2 (Vol. 1, p. 72), the poem (eighth in the sequence "Live Oak, with Moss ") beginning "Hours continuing long, sore/ and heavy-hearted..." In 1860 this poem was substantially revised to form section 34 of "Calamus "; in 1867 it was retitled "I Dreamed in a Dream. "

    • Page 133, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #34
    • What think you I have, page 134, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8.5 x 9 cm. pasted to 6.5 x 9 cm.

      On a composite leaf of white wove paper consisting of two sections (8.5 x 9 and 6.5 x 9 cm.) pasted together. Both sections are in black ink but, as Bowers notes, the lower verses were inscribed using a darker, thicker pen; the upper section is unrevised, but the lower section bears several alterations in the original ink. Pinholes at top of both sections and in the current center. Whitman numbered the page 9, in pencil, in the lower-left corner. Originally the sixth section of the sequence "Live Oak, with Moss, " this poem was revised to form section 32 of "Calamus " in 1860, and in 1867 was retitled "What Think You I Take My Pen in Hand? "

    • Page 135, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #32
    • Sometimes, page 136, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15 x 9.5 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper (15 x 9.5 cm.), in light brown ink, with one revision in the same ink. Pinholes at top and in center. A blue pencil mark, possibly the number 4, has been inscribed in the upper right corner. Bowers notes that the page bears the imprint of a papermaker's lozenge die, perhaps that of Platner and Smith of Lee, Massachusetts. This poem became section 39 of "Calamus " in 1860; in 1867 Whitman replaced the third line with a new one and permanently retitled the poem "Sometimes with One I Love. "

    • Page 137, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #39
    • Page 138, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: Calamus "#39," continued.
    • To the young man, page 139, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15 x 9 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper (15 x 9 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Whitman also penciled in the page number 16 in the lower-left corner. Pinholes in center and at top. This page bears the same papermaker's mark as Vol. 1, p. 136. Twelfth in the original sequence "Live Oak, with Moss " (with ornamental Roman numeral), it became section 42 of "Calamus " in 1860. In 1867 Whitman changed the poem to an apostrophe, adding the first line "O Boy of the West!" (later removed) and permanently retitling it "To a Western Boy. "

    • Page 140, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #42
    • "To One Who Will Understand," page 141, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in fine ink (in that order). Pinholes mostly in center. Originally titled "To Those Who Will Understand " and numbered 100 (then 101, then the current ?100 in the fine pen). This was revised to form section 41 of "Calamus " in 1860 and was permanently retitled "Among the Multitude " in the 1867 Leaves .

    • Page 142, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #41
    • O you whom I often and silently come where you are, page 143, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14.5 x 9 cm.

      On one leaf of white wove paper (14.5 x 9 cm.), in brown-black ink, with revisions in the same ink. Pinholes mostly at the top, with a few lower down. The tenth section of the original sequence "Live Oak, with Moss " (with ornamental Roman numeral), this was reformatted and renumbered but otherwise left unrevised as section 43 of "Calamus " in 1860. In 1867 Whitman permanently retitled it "O You Whom I Often and Silently Come. "

    • Page 144, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #43
    • That shadow, page 145, Volume 1. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 17 x 9.5 cm.

      One one leaf of lined light blue wove paper (17 x 9.5 cm.), in pencil, with one pencil revision. Only two sets of pinholes, both in center. This was revised to become section 40 of "Calamus " in 1860; in 1867 it was retitled "That Shadow, My Likeness. "

    • Page 146, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Calamus" #40
    • "To one a century hence, or any number of centuries hence," 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 10 x 13 cm. pasted to 11.5 x 13 cm.

      On one composite leaf of pink paper formed of two sections (10 x 13 and 11.5 x 13 cm.) of the same page cut apart and pasted together in a new order. The poem number was originally 101 and then changed to 102; this number was deleted and the current ?101 added in fine pen. Bowers explains that the poem, in two discrete verse sections and inscribed in black ink (with title), originally occupied one full side of this leaf. When Whitman wanted to expand the first section without having to retranscribe the second one, he simply cut the two sections apart, flipped the first section over (turning it upside-down in the process), pasted the second section to the lower edge of the verso of the first section, and wrote his new first section (beginning "Throwing far, throwing over the head/ of death" and incorporating the original title as verse 3) in the blank space now created above the second section. The new first section is written and revised in light ink. As Bradley and Blodgett observe, the words "thirty-eight years old the/ eighty-first year of The States" indicate that Whitman composed the poem in 1857; these were revised to read "I, forty years old the Eighty-third Year of The States" in the 1860 Leaves , in which this poem constituted section 45 of "Calamus. " In 1867 Whitman retitled the poem "Full of Life, Now. "

    • "Chants Democratic and Native American," pages 148-163, Volume 1:

      These fourteen poems were revised to form sections 4, 7-14, and 16-20 of the new cluster "Chants Democratic and Native American " in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass. In 1867 Whitman disbanded the cluster, and each poem then or later on received an individual title. This grouping carries over into Volume 2.

      • "Feuillage," pages 148-163, Volume 1: 1857-1859,
        16 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On sixteen leaves of pink paper, all basically the same size (21.5 x 13 cm.) and all in black ink, with a fair number of revisions in the same ink, in a darker ink, and in pencil. Multiple pinholes in the center, and also some at the top, of each leaf. This poem was originally numbered 89. Whitman also numbered each leaf in the lower-left corner in pencil: the leaves follow the order 1-9, 9 1/2 (a full page despite its number), and 10-15. The expression "the Eightieth year of/ These States" at the top of leaf 2 indicates, as Bradley and Blodgett note, that Whitman was working on this poem as early as 1856. It became section 4 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860. In 1867 Whitman ungrouped it and retitled the poem "American Feuillage, " a name it kept until being permanently retitled "Our Old Feuillage " in 1881. The lines on the manuscript leaves correspond to these verses in the 1860 edition: leaf 1 to verses 1-6; leaf 2 ("The area the Eightieth year of/ These States,...") to 7-12; leaf 3 ("Always The West, with strong native/ persons,...") to 13-18; leaf 4 ("In their northerly wilds, beasts of/ prey...") to 19-24; leaf 5 ("On solid land what is done/ in cities...") to 25-29; leaf 6 ("Rude boats descending the Big/ Pedee—...") to 30-34; leaf 7 ("Southern fishermen fishing—...") to 35-38; leaf 8 ("In Virginia, the planter's son/ returning..." to 39-42; leaf 9 ("Northward, young men of/ Mannahatta—...") to 43-45; leaf 9 1/2 ("The Texas cotton-field and/ the negro-cabins—...") to 46-50; leaf 10 ("The drama of the scalp-dance") to 51-58; leaf 11 ("The country-boy at the close/ of the day...") to 59-61 and 63; leaf 12 ("The athletic American matron") to 64-70; leaf 13 ("Otherways there, atwixt the banks/ of the Arkansaw,...") to 71-73; leaf 14 ("The migrating flock of wild-/geese...") to 74-75; and leaf 15 ("In the Mannahatta, streets, piers,") to verses 76-77 and 79-83.

        • Page 148, Volume 1. "Feuillage"
        • Page 149, Volume 1. The area the Eightieth year of
        • Page 150, Volume 1. Always the West, with strong native
        • Page 151, Volume 1. In their northerly wilds, beasts of
        • Page 152, Volume 1. On solid land what is done
        • Page 153, Volume 1. Rude boats descending the Big
        • Page 154, Volume 1. Southern fisherman fishing-the
        • Page 155, Volume 1. In Virginia, the planter's son
        • Page 156, Volume 1. Northward, young men
        • Page 157, Volume 1. The Texas cotton-field and
        • Page 158, Volume 1. The drama of the scalp-dance
        • Page 159, Volume 1. The country-boy at the close
        • Page 160, Volume 1. The athletic American matron
        • Page 161, Volume 1. Otherways there, atwixt the banks
        • Page 162, Volume 1. The migrating flock of wild geese alighting in autumn
        • Page 163, Volume 1. In the Mannahatta, streets, piers,
        • Page 164, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic" (pp. 159-160)
        • Page 165, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic" (pp. 161-162)
        • Page 166, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic" (pp. 163-164)
        • Page 167, Volume 1. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic" (pp. 165-166)
      • "Evolutions," pages 1- 6, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        6 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On six leaves of pink paper, all 21 x 13 cm. in size, and all in the same black ink, with revisions in that ink, in a fine pen, in pencil, and in light ink. Each leaf has a pinhole cluster in the center and a few pinholes in the left margin. The deleted title is "Poemet—. " As Bowers notes, "Evolutions.— " is written in the light ink, and the number "41—" in a darker ink than the text. Whitman numbered each leaf in pencil in the upper right corner. As Bradley and Blodgett note, this poem was first published in the January 14, 1860 issue of the New York Saturday Press under the title "You and Me and To-day, " after which it became section 7 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 Leaves . In 1867 Whitman ungrouped it and permanently retitled it "With Antecedents "; in 1881 it was permanently transferred to the new cluster "Birds of Passage. " The manuscript leaves correspond to the published verses in the 1860 Leaves as follows: leaf 1 to verses 1-7; leaf 2 ("With the sale of slaves—") to verses 8-13; leaf 3 ("With this year, sending itself/ ahead...") to verses 15-22; leaf 4 ("I have the idea of all, and/ am all,...") to verses 24-30; leaf 5 ("I promulge that all past/ days...") to verses 31-38; and leaf 6 ("And that there is no untruth/ in time...") to verses 40-41.

        • Page 1, Volume 2. "Evolutions"
        • Page 2, Volume 2. With the sale of slaves--
        • Page 3, Volume 2. With this year sending itself
        • Page 4, Volume 2. I have the idea of all, and
        • Page 5, Volume 2. I promulge that all past
        • Page 6, Volume 2. And that there is no untruth
        • Page 7, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #7"
        • Page 8, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #7," continued.
        • Page 9, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #8."
    • "A Sunset Carol," pages 10-15, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      6 leaves, leaf 1 (25.5 x 12.5 cm.), leaves 2-6 (21.5 x 12.5 cm.).

      On six leaves of pink paper, the first a composite leaf measuring 25.5 x 12.5 cm. and the rest standard-sized leaves of 21.5 x 12.5 cm. In black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and, finally, in light ink. Whitman also numbered each leaf, in pencil, in the upper right corner. Each leaf has a pinhole cluster in the center and a few holes in the left margin. The first leaf consists of an expanded opening section (title and three verses) in light ink inscribed on a small section of pink paper (9.5 x 12.5 cm.) pasted to what Whitman left (18 x 12 cm.) of the original leaf after apparently excising the original opening verse(s). The lower left corner of this first leaf, with part of two or three words, has been worn away. In the 1860 edition of Leaves Whitman published this poem as section 8 of "Chants Democratic. " In 1867, Bradley and Blodgett note, he gave it the permanent title "Song at Sunset " and moved it to the supplement "Songs Before Parting "; in 1871 it was finally transferred to the cluster "Songs of Parting " within the main body of Leaves . The leaves correspond to the verses in the 1860 "Chants Democratic " version as follows: leaf 1 to verses 1-12; leaf 2 ("Illustrious the yet shining light!") to verses 13-25; leaf 3 ("To speak! To walk! To/ seize something by the/ hand!") to verses 26-34; leaf 4 ("How the water sports and/ sings!...) to verses 35-42; leaf 5 ("I too throb to the brain...") to verses 43-49; and leaf 6 ("As I roamed the streets of/ inland Chicago—...") to verses 50-59.

      • Page 10, Volume 2. "A Sunset Carol"
      • Page 11, Volume 2. Illustrious the yet shining light!
      • Page 12, Volume 2. To speak! To walk! To
      • Page 13, Volume 2. How the water sports and
      • Page 14, Volume 2. I too throb to the brain
      • Page 15, Volume 2. As I roamed the streets of
      • Page 16, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #8"
      • Page 17, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #8"
    • "Thought," pages 18-19, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, leaf 1 (21.5 x 13 cm.), leaf 2 (18.5 x 12.5 cm.)

      On two leaves of pink paper, in black ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink, in pencil, in fine pen (very black ink), and in light ink. With the fine pen Whitman inscribed and circled the note "2d/ piece/ in Book" in the upper-right corner of the first leaf. The first leaf is a standard page measuring 21.5 x 13 cm., while the second is a composite of two sections pasted together, the top section measuring 6 x 13 and the bottom one 18.5 x 12.5 cm. The small top section is inscribed in light ink on the verso of some deleted draft verses excised from "So Long! " (see Vol. 2, pp. 153-159); Bowers observes that Whitman seems to have cut away the original first verse(s) in order to attach this expanded verse (in light ink) to the main body of original verses. "Thought " became section 9 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860. In the 1867 Leaves Whitman combined it with the second "Thought " (Vol. 2, pp. 21 - 22) to form the poem "Thoughts " in the supplement "Songs Before Parting. " (This particular "Thought " was numbered section 1 of the composite poem.) In 1871 "Thoughts " appeared in the cluster "Songs of Parting " within the main body of Leaves , and in 1881, Bradley and Blodgett note, it achieved its final position within that cluster. The leaves correspond to the verses in the 1860 "Chants Democratic " version as follows: leaf 1 to verses 1-6, and leaf 2 ("How the great cities appear—") to verses 7-14.

      • Page 18, Volume 2. "Thought"
      • Page 19, Volume 2. How the great cities appear-
      • Page 20, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #9"
    • "Thought (Of closing up my songs by these)," pages 21-22, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, leaf 1 (9 x 12.5 cm. pasted to 17.5 x 13.5 cm.), leaf 2 (21 x 13.5 cm.).

      On two leaves of pink paper, the first a composite leaf consisting of a small section pasted to a larger one (9 x 12.5 and 17.5 x 13.5 cm.), and the second a normal leaf measuring 21 x 13.5 cm. In black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in fine pen, and in light ink. The paste-on revision is in light ink, and contains an expanded version of the original lines Whitman cut away and apparently discarded. The verso of the paste-on section contains, as Bowers notes, five undeleted draft lines that would become the final verses of "Proto-Leaf " in the 1860 Leaves ; Whitman's small note in the lower-right corner, in a semi-circle, reads "end of Poem" (see Vol. 1, p. 33 for a later version of these lines). This "Thought " became section 11 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860; in 1867 Whitman made it section 2 of the composite poem "Thoughts ", and the two "Thought " poems were indivisible from that point on (see 2:1:3 for details). Leaf 1 corresponds to verses 9-15 in the "Chants Democratic " version and leaf 2 ("Of the new and good names—") to verses 16-22.

      • Page 21, Volume 2. "Thought. (Of closing up my songs of these)"
      • Page 22, Volume 2. Of the new and good names
      • Page 23, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #11
      • Page 24, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #11," continued.
    • "To a Historian," Page 25, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm. pasted to 11 x 16 cm.

      On one large composite leaf of white lined laid paper, consisting of two pieces (measuring 20 x 16 and 11 x 16 cm.) pasted together. In dark brown ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink, in a darker ink, and in pencil. On the verso of both pieces appear fragments of extensive pencil notes for a speech or essay Whitman wrote (most likely) in 1856, and revised in 1858, under the working title "Slavery—the Slaveholders—/ —The Constitution—the/ true America and Ameri-/cans, the laboring persons—. " The lines seem to represent fragments of an earlier, discarded draft of a manuscript currently housed at Duke University. See p. 2185 in vol. 6, Notes and Index , of Edward F. Grier's edition of Whitman's Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts in The Collected Writings of Walt Whitman (New York: New York University Press, 1984). See the verso of "To a Cantatrice.— " (Vol. 2, p. 92), inscribed on the same paper, for an additional fragment of the draft. After undergoing extensive revisions, in 1860 "To a Historian " became section 10 of "Chants Democratic. " In 1867 Whitman deleted five verses, transferred the poem to the supplement "Songs Before Parting, " and permanently retitled it "To a Historian. " It appeared as the fifth poem in the opening cluster "Inscriptions " in the 1872 and all later editions of Leaves .

    • Page 26, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #10"
    • "Orators," pages 27-31, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      5 leaves, handwritten, 22 x 13.5 cm.

      On five leaves of pink paper (all roughly 22 x 13.5 cm.), in black ink, with extensive alterations in the same ink, in pencil, and in light ink. Pinhole cluster in center of each leaf. As Bowers notes, the poem was originally numbered 67, and the partly erased pencil note "Needs to be/ re-written/ or excluded" appears in the upper-right corner of the first leaf. Whitman also numbered the leaves in pencil in their lower- left corners. The leaves correspond to verses in section 12 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 Leaves as follows: leaf 1 to verses 1-7; leaf 2 ("Come duly to the divine/ power to use words?") to verses 8-13; leaf 3 ("Then toward that man or/ that woman...") to verses 14-16; leaf 4 ("O Now I see arise orators/ fit for America,") to verses 17-19; leaf 5 ("Of a great vocalism, when/ you hear it,...") to verses 20-26. After excising and altering numerous verses of the poem and numbering different verse paragraphs for the "Chants Democratic " version, Whitman next made the poem the second numbered section of the last "Leaves of Grass " cluster in the 1867 edition of Leaves . From 1872 to 1876 it bore the title "To Oratists. " Then, in 1881, Whitman deleted several lines, joining this poem with a previously unconnected poem known as "Voices " to form "Vocalism " in the cluster "Autumn Rivulets, " a position and identity the now-composite poem retained from that point on.

      • Page 27, Volume 2. "Orators"
      • Page 28, Volume 2. Come duly to the divine
      • Page 29, Volume 2. Then toward that man or
      • Page 30, Volume 2. Now I see arise orators
      • Page 31, Volume 2. Of a great vocalism, when
      • Page 32, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #12"
      • Page 33, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #12," continued.
    • "American Laws," pages 34-36, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      3 leaves, handwritten, leaf 1 (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), leaves 2-3 (21.5 x 12.5 cm.)

      On three leaves of pink paper (the first cut down to 19.5 x 12.5 cm., the second two measuring 21.5 x 12.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in fine pen, in pencil, and in light ink (including the title). A partial horizontal line at the top of the first leaf indicates that Whitman cut away the original title and number; Bowers notes that in a list of his poems Whitman refers to this poem as "38. Walt Whitman's Laws. " Pinholes clustered mostly in center of each leaf, with some in the left margins and at least one pair in the upper right corner. Whitman numbered each leaf in pencil in the lower left corner. These pages were transformed into section 13 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 Leaves as follows: Leaf 1 to verses 1-6; Leaf 2 ("Statements, models, censuses,") to verses 7-12; Leaf 3 ("What do you suppose Creation/ is?") to verses 13-18. A pencil paragraph mark appears in the upper left corner of the third leaf; the verses on it formed the third numbered sub-section of the poem in 1860. In 1867 it was greatly shortened and transferred to the final "Leaves of Grass " cluster in Leaves . In 1872 the poem was permanently retitled "Laws for Creations " Its final position was in the cluster "Autumn Rivulets " Three earlier pencil drafts of most of the lines on Leaf 1 and some on Leaf 2 are housed under accession number 3829-i (see "[Laws for Creations] ").

      • Page 34, Volume 2. "American Laws"
      • Page 35, Volume 2. Statements, models, censuses,
      • Page 36, Volume 2. What do you suppose Creation
      • Page 37, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #13"
    • "To Poets to Come," page 38, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
      2 pp. on 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 16 cm.

      On two sides of a single page of white wove paper (20 x 16 cm.) folded to form a pamphlet. In light brown ink with only one minor revision. Pinholes in the left margin when folded. Whitman numbered the inscribed sides of the leaf 1 and 2, in pencil, in the upper right corners. Side 1 corresponds to verses 1-9 of section 14 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 Leaves ; side 2 ("I expect that Kanadians,") became verses 10-16 of that version. In 1867 it was shortened to make up section 4 of the final "Leaves of Grass " cluster in Leaves . In 1872 it was permanently retitled "Poets to Come " and transferred to the cluster "The Answerer, " where it stayed until being moved to the "Inscriptions " cluster in 1881.

    • Page 39, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #14"
    • Page 40, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #14," continued.
    • "Mediums," pages 41-42, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On two leaves of pink paper (21.5 x 12.5 cm.), in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in a fine pen, and in light ink. Pinholes in center and at top of both leaves. This became section 16 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860, with Leaf 1 corresponding to verses 1-6 and Leaf 2 ("They shall train themselves/ to go in public,...") to verses 7-11. In 1867 Whitman restored the title "Mediums "; in 1871, Bradley and Blodgett note, it was transferred to Passage to India , and in 1881 took its final position in the cluster "From Noon to Starry Night. "

      • Page 41, Volume 2. "Mediums"
      • Page 42, Volume 2. They shall train themselves
      • Page 43, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #16"
    • "Wander-Teachers," pages 44-45, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

      On two leaves of pink paper (both 21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in a fine pen, and in light ink. Pinholes in center and in left margin. The poem was originally numbered 50. Whitman penciled in a question mark, in parentheses, in the upper-right corner. This became section 17 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 Leaves , with leaf 1 corresponding to verses 1-6 and leaf 2 ("We confer on equal terms with/ each of The States,") to verses 7-13. Although he dropped it from Leaves in 1867, Whitman nonetheless used the poem, permanently retitled "On Journeys through the States, " in Passage to India in 1871. In 1872 and 1876 it appeared in the "Passage to India " annexes to Leaves and Two Rivulets , respectively, and in the 1881 Leaves it took its final position in the cluster "Inscriptions. "

      • Page 44, Volume 2. "Wander-Teachers"
      • Page 45, Volume 2. We confer on equal terms with
      • Page 46, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #17"
      • Page 47, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #17," continued
    • "Leaf (Me imperturbe!)," Page 48, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in a blacker ink. A few pinholes in the center and left margin. Originally numbered 73. This became section 18 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860; in 1867 it was permanently retitled "Me Imperturbe, " and after various repositionings was finally transferred to the cluster "Inscriptions " in 1881.

    • Page 49, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #18"
    • "Leaf (I was looking a long while)," page 50, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

      On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink and pencil, with revisions in the same ink, in fine pen (blacker ink), and possibly one more type of ink. Originally numbered 75; the pencil title "Leaflet " appears, deleted, in the upper-right corner. Pinholes in center and in left margin (towards center and top). This became section 19 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860; in 1867 it was permanently retitled "I Was Looking a Long While, " and in 1881 was assigned to the cluster "Autumn Rivulets. "

    • Page 51, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #19"
    • "Mouth Songs," pages 52-53, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      2 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

      On two leaves of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in a lighter ink, and in the final light ink. Originally numbered 54 and titled "Leaf.— "; Bowers notes that the title was next "Songs—always wanted " and then "Mouth-Songs. " Pinholes in center and upper-left corner of each leaf. This became section 20 of "Chants Democratic " in 1860, with leaf 1 corresponding to verses 1-6 and leaf 2 ("The delicious singing of the/ mother...") to verses 8-10. In 1867 Whitman revised the first line and permanently retitled the poem "I Hear America Singing "; in 1881 it achieved its final position in the cluster "Inscriptions. "

      • Page 52, Volume 2. "Mouth Songs"
      • Page 53, Volume 2. The delicious singing of the
      • Page 54, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #20"
      • Page 55, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Chants Democratic #20," continued.
    • [Leaves of Grass] pages 56-81, Volume 2:

      These eight poems were revised to constitute sections 13, 15-19, and 21-22 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 edition of Leaves ; in later editions they were revised and transferred to different clusters.

      • "Confession and Warning," pages 56-58, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        3 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm.

        On the verso of three light blue Williamsburgh tax blanks (21.5 x 12 cm.), in medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink and a lighter one. Pinholes in center and top of each leaf. After undergoing substantial deletions and revisions this poem became section 13 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in 1860, with the manuscript leaves corresponding to the published version as follows: leaf 1 to numbered verse paragraphs 1 (now beginning "O bitter sprig! Confession sprig!") through 3 and 5; leaf 2 ("You felons on trial in courts,") to 4 and most of 6; and leaf 3 ("And I say I am of them—") to the rest of 6. In 1867 Whitman permanently retitled the poem "You Felons on Trial in Courts " and further shortened it by removing the first three verse paragraphs. The poem's final position, in 1881, was in the cluster "Autumn Rivulets. "

        • Page 56, Volume 2. "Confession and Warning"
        • Page 57, Volume 2. You felons on trial in courts
        • Page 58, Volume 2. And I say I am of them
        • Page 59. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass " #13
      • "Night on the Prairies," pages 60-62, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        3 leaves, handwritten, 20 x 13 cm.

        On three leaves of pink paper (all roughly 20 x 13 cm.), in medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in black ink, and in light ink (including the title). As Bowers notes, Whitman cut off and flipped over the top section of the first leaf, gluing it to the rest of the leaf, in order to transform the original first line into the title. (The current verso of the top section still bears, undeleted, the first line "Night on the prairies[,]" along with the title "Leaf.— " and the number 73, originally 72). Pinholes in center and in upper-left margin of each leaf. Whitman deleted the pencil numbers 16, 17, and 18 in the lower-left corner of the leaves, substituting the numbers 1 through 3. This poem became section 15 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in 1860, with the leaves corresponding to the published lines as follows: leaf 1 to numbered verse paragraphs 1-3 and half of 4; leaf 2 ("I was thinking this globe/ enough for me...") to the second half of 4, and 5; leaf 3 ("O I see now that life/ cannot exhibit all...") to verse paragraph 6. In 1867 Whitman restored the title "Night on the Prairies " and revised the poem, transferring it and the two poems that follow it here to a different "Leaves of Grass " group. After other repositionings it achieved its current place in the cluster "Whispers of Heavenly Death " in 1881.

        • Page 60, Volume 2. "Night on the Prairies"
        • Page 61, Volume 2. I was thinking this globe
        • Page 62, Volume 2. O I see now that life
        • Page 63, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass " #15
      • "Leaf (Sea-water, and all breathing)," pages 64-65, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        2 leaves, handwritten, 22 x 13 cm.

        On two leaves of pink paper (both roughly 22 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with no revisions in the verses. (The poem itself was originally numbered 71). Pinholes in center and upper half of left margin of both leaves. Leaf 1 corresponds to verses 1-5 in section 16 of the 1860 Leaves cluster "Leaves of Grass, " in which the poem was first published; leaf 2 ("Vast sluggish existences/ grazing there,...") corresponds to verses 6-11. In 1867 Whitman transferred this to a different "Leaves of Grass " group with the poems that would become "Night on the Prairies " and "I Sit and Look Out. " After receiving the title "The World Below the Brine " in the 1871 "Sea-Shore Memories " group of Passage to India , Bradley and Blodgett note, the final change was its transfer to the cluster "Sea Drift " within the main body of Leaves in 1881.

        • Page 64, Volume 2. "Leaf. (Sea-water, and all breathing)"
        • Page 65, Volume 2. Vast sluggish existences
        • Page 66, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass" #16
      • "Leaf (I sit and look out upon all)," pages 67-68, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        2 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On two leaves of pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in pencil and fine pen. Pinholes in center and at top of both leaves. Originally numbered 77. This became section 17 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 Leaves , with leaf 1 corresponding to verses 1-6 and leaf 2 ("I observe a famine at sea—") to verses 7-10. In 1867 it was transferred to the same new "Leaves of Grass " group as Vol. 2, pp. 57 - 59 and Vol. 2, pp. 61 - 62, in the original order. In 1872 Whitman placed it in a different "Leaves of Grass " group under the title "I Sit and Look Out, " and in 1881 it took its final place in the cluster "By the Roadside. "

        • Page 67, Volume 2. "Leaf. (I sit and look out upon all)"
        • Page 68, Volume 2. I observe a famine at sea
        • Page 69, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass" #17.
      • "As of The Truth," Pages 70-73, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        4 leaves, handwritten, leaf 2 19.5 x 13 cm., all other leaves 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On four leaves of pink paper measuring roughly 21.5 x 13 (leaves 1 and 3-4) and 19.5 x 13 cm. (leaf 2). In medium-black ink, with extensive deletions and revisions in the same ink, a blacker ink, light ink, and pencil. The second leaf is a composite formed when Whitman deleted and cut away the original first two verses on the leaf, flipped the new small section (7 x 13 cm.) over and upside-down, pasted it to the foot of the remaining original verses (14.5 x 13 cm.), and inscribed a verse in light ink on the newly created blank space. Pinholes at top, in left margin, and in original and (in the case of the second leaf) current center of each leaf. This poem became section 18 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 Leaves , with leaf 1 corresponding to part of numbered verse paragraph 1, leaf 2 ("Discovering to-day there is/ no lie,...") to the rest of paragraph 1 and to 2, leaf 3 ("Where has failed a perfect/ return indifferent of lies or the truth?") to paragraph 3 and part of 4, and leaf 4 ("And that the truth includes/ all,...") to the rest of paragraph 4. In 1872 the poem received the title "All is Truth, " and in 1881, after various repositionings, it was finally transferred to the cluster "From Noon to Starry Night. "

        • Page 70, Volume 2. "As of The Truth"
        • Page 71, Volume 2. Discovering today there is
        • Page 72, Volume 2. Where has failed a perfect
        • Page 73, Volume 2. And that the truth includes
        • Page 74, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass" #18
      • "As of Origins," page 75, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, three pasted sections of 6.5 x 13 cm., 8 x 13 cm., and 12.5 x 13 cm.

        On one composite leaf formed by the pasting together of three sections of pink paper (6.5 x 13, 8 x 13, and 12.5 x 13 cm.). The top section (consisting of the title and first verse) is inscribed in the light revising ink, and the lower two sections are in the same black ink. The bottom section contains revisions in fine pen (very black ink). As Bowers notes, pinholes towards the foot of the bottom section indicate that it was originally the top of a full leaf; the only other pinholes appear near the top of the middle section. This poem became section 19 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 Leaves ; in 1867 Whitman moved it to a different "Leaves of Grass " group in the "Songs Before Parting " annex. In 1872 it was retitled "Germs " and was ultimately transferred, in 1881, to the cluster "By the Roadside. "

      • Page 76, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass" #19
      • "Voices," pages 77-78, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        2 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On two leaves of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a fine pen (blacker ink) and the light ink. Pinholes in center and towards middle-left margin of both leaves. This became section 21 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 edition of Leaves , with leaf 1 corresponding to the first three numbered verse paragraphs and leaf 2 ("Now I believe that all/ waits for the right voices;") to numbers 4-5. In 1867 Whitman placed it after what would eventually become "All is Truth " and "Germs " (see Vol. 2, pp. 70 - 73 and Vol. 2, p. 75) as section 3 of a "Leaves of Grass " group in the annex "Songs Before Parting. " In 1872 Whitman restored the title "Voices. " In 1881 he dropped the first two verses and added "Voices " (as verse paragraph 2) to the previously unrelated poem "To Oratists " to form "Vocalism " in the cluster "Autumn Rivulets " (see Vol. 2, pp. 27 - 31).

        • Page 77, Volume 2. "Voices"
        • Page 78, Volume 2. Now I believe that all
        • Page 79, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass" #21
      • "Leaf (What am I after all but a)," Page 80, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), with the title and first verse in black ink and the remaining section in light black ink or fine pen. Heavy revisions in the same inks, pencil, and a fine pen (very black ink). Pinholes mostly in center and upper-left margin. This became section 22 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 edition of Leaves . In 1867 Whitman dropped the second 1860 verse and made it section 4 of a "Leaves of Grass " group in the annex "Songs Before Parting " (see Vol. 2, pp. 70-78). Whitman gave it the title "What Am I After All " in Passage to India (1871), and in 1881 it was finally transferred to the cluster "Autumn Rivulets. "

      • Page 81, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Leaves of Grass" #22
    • Messenger Leaves, pages 82-94, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
      8 leaves, handwritten.

      These poems were revised for publication, with independent titles, in the cluster "Messenger Leaves " in the 1860 edition of Leaves . Between 1860 and the next edition, in 1867, Whitman disbanded the cluster and transferred the poems elsewhere in the book.

      • Pages 82-83, Volume 2: "To One Shortly To Die," 1857-1859,
        2 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On two leaves of pink paper (both 21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in fine pen. Pinholes in center and at top of both leaves. Originally numbered 95. This was published under the same title, with only minor revisions, in the 1860 "Messenger Leaves " cluster. In 1871, Bradley and Blodgett note, Whitman made small but significant additions to the poem and transferred it to the supplement "Passage to India. " In 1881 it was finally moved to the cluster "Whispers of Heavenly Death. "

        • Page 82, Volume 2. "To One Shortly to Die"
        • Page 83, Volume 2. I absolve you from all except
        • Page 84, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "To One Shortly to Die"
      • "To Rich Givers," page 85, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink on recto and verso (in a finer pen), with revisions in the same inks and, on the recto, pencil and the light revising ink. A very few pinholes toward center. The interesting deleted verses on the back of the leaf represent an earlier version of the manuscript poem "To the Future, " unpublished until 1959 and currently housed in the Huntington Library. "To Rich Givers— " was originally numbered 98. In 1860 it formed part of the "Messenger Leaves " cluster under the same title. After being ungrouped (1867) and transferred to the cluster "Songs of Parting " (1872 and 1876), it finally appeared, in 1881, in the cluster "By the Roadside. "

      • Page 86, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "To Rich Givers"
      • "To a Pupil," page 87, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 12 cm.

        On one light blue Williamsburgh tax blank (21 x 12 cm.) in black ink (fine pen) with revisions in the same ink and the title in light ink. The original title, it seems, was cut away. No pinholes. This was revised somewhat and published under the same title in the "Messenger Leaves " cluster of the 1860 Leaves . It was ungrouped in 1867, transferred to a "Leaves of Grass " group within the "Passage to India " supplement in 1872 (also 1876), and finally moved to the cluster "Autumn Rivulets " within Leaves in 1881.

      • Page 88, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "To a Pupil"
      • "A Past Presidentiad, and one to come also," Pages 89-90, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        2 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On two leaves of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink and pencil, with revisions in pencil, in the original ink, and in fine pen. Whitman wrote and deleted the date 1858 in blue pencil in the upper right corner of the first leaf, and inscribed the same date in normal pencil in the lower left corner of the second leaf. Multiple pinholes in center and left margin of both leaves. This became "To The States,/ To Identify the 16th, 17th, or 18th Presidentiad " in the cluster "Messenger Leaves " in the 1860 Leaves . Ungrouped in 1867, it was transferred in 1872 to a "Leaves of Grass " group within the main body of Leaves . In 1881 it was finally transferred to the cluster "By the Roadside " Bradley and Blodgett observe that in his 1860 "Blue Book Copy " edition of Leaves Whitman gave the dates of composition for the poem as "1857-8-9"; these editors also recommend comparing the poem with Whitman's pamphlet "The Eighteenth Presidency!, " edited by Edward F. Grier.

        • Page 89, Volume 2. "A Past Presidentiad and one to come also."
        • Page 90, Volume 2. Then I will sleep awhile
        • Page 91, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "To the States"
      • "To a Cantatrice," page 92, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 9 x 16 cm.

        On one section (9 x 16 cm.) of the same leaf of white ruled laid paper used for "To a Historian, " in the same dark-brown ink, and with another fragment of the same pencil draft of the speech or essay "Slavery—the Slaveholders—/ —The Constitution—the/ true America and Ameri-/ cans, the laboring persons.— " on verso (see Vol. 2, p. 25). Revisions in the same ink and in pencil. This was first titled "To an artist, " then "To an architect "; the smudged-out words "Lecture[s]/ To" appear in light ink in the upper-left corner. This was revised and published under the same title in the "Messenger Leaves " cluster of 1860. After being ungrouped and permanently retitled "To A Certain Cantatrice " in 1867, it was revised for inclusion in the cluster "Songs of Insurrection " in the 1872 and 1876 Leaves . In 1881 it was finally transferred to the cluster "Inscriptions. "

      • Page 93, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "To a Cantatrice"
      • "To You," Page 94, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 9 x 12.5 pasted to 20 x 13 cm.

        On one composite leaf consisting of two sections of pink paper (9 x 12.5 and 20 x 13 cm.) pasted together. Both sections in black ink (the upper section with a finer pen), with revisions in the same ink, in fine pen, and in light ink (the section numbers). Beneath the pasted-over section can be discerned a second title, also "To You, " with the number 91 (mended from 90). In the 1860 Leaves Whitman divided the poems again, publishing them in reverse order under the same titles at the end of the cluster "Messenger Leaves. " Section 1 was eventually published (1881) as one of the poems in the cluster "Inscriptions, " but Whitman dropped section 2 from his published poems after an 1876 appearance in the supplement "Passage to India. "

    • Pages 95-163, Volume 2: Ungrouped Poems, 1857-1859,
      56 leaves.

      These poems were published without a group title, roughly in the following order, after the "Messenger Leaves " cluster in the 1860 edition of Leaves . In later editions they were transferred to different positions in the book.

      • Page 95, Volume 2: "Mannahatta," 1857-1859,
        5 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On five leaves of pink paper (all 21 x 13 cm.) mounted on white paper stubs and joined into a booklet with linen tape. In black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in fine pen (blacker ink), and in light revising ink. Originally numbered 56; Whitman numbered each leaf in pencil in the lower-left corner from 1 to 5. Pinhole clusters mostly in center of each leaf. The leaves correspond to the 1860 published version as follows: leaf 1 to verses 1-4; leaf 2 ("Rich, hemmed thick all around with sailships") to verses 5-9; leaf 3 ("The down-town streets,") to verses 10-14; leaf 4 ("The mechanics of the city,") to verses 15-19; leaf 5 ("The beautiful city! The city of hurried and sparkling waters...") to verses 20-23. In the 1872 Leaves it was transferred to a "Leaves of Grass " group, and in 1881 took its final position in the cluster "From Noon to Starry Night. "

      • Page 96, Volume 2: 1860 edition as published: "To You," "Mannahatta"
      • Page 97, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Mannahatta," continued.
      • Pages 98-117, Volume 2: "Poem of Joys," 1857-1859,
        20 leaves, handwritten, 14.5 x 13 cm. to 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On eighteen leaves of pink paper and two of white wove paper, numbered in pencil by a collector (in the upper-right corners), and described individually as follows. (See Bowers 196-215 for more details.) Leaf 1 (21.5 x 13 cm.): pink paper, in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, a blacker ink (the number 36), and the light revising ink. Multiple pinholes in center and left margin. Corresponds to verse paragraphs 1- 4 in the 1860 published version. Leaves 2-3 (21.5 x 13 cm.): pink paper, in black ink, with revisions in pencil, in blacker ink, and in the light ink. Multiple pinholes in center and left margin. Whitman penciled in the numbers 56a and 56b at the top of the leaves, and also (possibly) a number 5 in the upper-left corner of leaf 2. These leaves correspond to verse paragraphs 5-8 and 9-12. Leaf 4 (21 x 13 cm.): pink paper (21.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and light ink. Originally titled "Contact " and inscribed, as Bowers notes, as if it were the beginning of a major independent poem. The final verse was deleted with pencil strokes, but these strokes were erased. Multiple pinholes in center and at top. Corresponds to verse paragraphs 13-14 in the published version. Leaves 5-8 (all roughly 21 x 13 cm.): pink paper, in black ink, with revisions in pencil, in blacker ink, in fine pen (very black ink), and in light ink. Multiple pinholes in center and at top. Leaves 5-7 bear the deleted pencil numbers 2-4 in the lower left corner; leaf 8 bears the undeleted number 5, as well as the pencil number 2 at the top. Leaf 7 has an undeleted pencil 1 in the same position, as well as Whitman's pencil note "Fifth Month" above the word "May" in the first line. These leaves correspond to verse paragraphs 14 through 16 (verses 1-3); 16 (verse 4) through 18 (verse 1); 18 (2-5) through 19 (1-2); and 19 (3-6) through 20. Leaves 9-10: pink paper (the first 21 x 13 cm., the second cut down to 14.5 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in fine pen (very black ink), in pencil, and in light ink. The section excised from leaf 10 was pasted, as Bowers notes, to the foot of what is now leaf 12. Multiple pinholes in the (original) center and at the top of both leaves. These leaves bear the deleted pencil numbers 6 and 6 1/2 (lower left corner) and the undeleted numbers 3 and 4 (at top). They correspond to verse paragraphs 21 through 23 (verses 1-3) and 23 (verses 4-8). Leaves 11-12: white wove paper (both 20 x 15.5 cm., with a 7.5 x 13 cm. pink-paper section from leaf 10 pasted to leaf 12), in dark ink (thick pen), with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in light ink. Multiple pinholes in center and at top. These leaves bear the deleted pencil numbers 15 and 16 (lower left corner) and the undeleted numbers 5-6 (at top). The lines inscribed on the white pages correspond to verses 1-10 and 11-13 of verse paragraph 24; the three pink-paper verses correspond to paragraph 25. Leaves 13-14: pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and fine pen. Multiple pinholes in center and at top. These leaves bear the deleted pencil numbers 7-8 (lower left corner), and leaf 13 still carries the number 7 at the top. They correspond to verse paragraphs 26-27 (verse 1) and 27 (verses 2-6). Leaves 15-20: pink paper (all roughly 21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, in fine pen (very black ink), and in light ink. Multiple pinholes in center and at top. These leaves bear the deleted pencil numbers 14 and 9-13 (lower-left corner), although the number 11 on leaf 18 is undeleted. They correspond to verse paragraphs 28-29, 30-31, 32-34 (with a pencil X to the right of the last lines on this leaf [leaf 17]), 35-36, 37-39, and 40-41. "Poem of Joys, " which was never grouped in a Leaves cluster, became "Poems of Joy " in 1867, but reverted to the original title in its next two iterations (in the "Passage to India " supplement of 1872 and 1876). In 1881 it was finally titled "A Song of Joys " and left independent of any cluster.

        • Page 98, Volume 2. "Poem of Joys"
        • Page 99, Volume 2. O the engineer's joys!
        • Page 100, Volume 2. O the joy of that vast elemental
        • Page 101, Volume 2. O male and female!
        • Page 102, Volume 2. O the streets of cities!
        • Page 103, Volume 2. I laugh and work with them
        • Page 104, Volume 2. O the sweetness of the May morning
        • Page 105, Volume 2. Or another time fishing for
        • Page 106, Volume 2. O something pernicious and dread!
        • Page 107, Volume 2. To go to battle! To hear
        • Page 108, Volume 2. O the whaleman's joys! O I voyage
        • Page 109, Volume 2. Again we back off-I see him
        • Page 110, Volume 2. O the ripened joy of womanhood!
        • Page 111, Volume 2. O my soul, vibrated back to
        • Page 112, Volume 2. O the farmer's joys!
        • Page 113, Volume 2. O death!
        • Page 114, Volume 2. O to realize space!
        • Page 115, Volume 2. O to attract by more than attraction!
        • Page 116, Volume 2. O the gleesome saunter over
        • Page 117, Volume 2. O the joy of a manly selfhood
        • Page 118, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Poem of Joys,"
        • Page 119, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Poem of Joys," continued.
        • Page 120, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Poem of Joys," continued.
        • Page 121, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Poem of Joys," continued.
        • Page 122, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Poem of Joys," continued.
      • "France, the 18th Year of These States," pages 123-127, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        5 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm. to 22.5 x 13.5 cm.

        On five leaves of pink paper (all between 21-22.5 x 13-13.5 cm.), in black ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink, in fine pen (blacker ink), in pencil, and in light ink. Multiple pinholes in center, and a few in left margin, of each leaf. Originally numbered 86; Whitman also numbered the leaves 1-5 (in pencil, lower left corner), with the 1 replacing a 6 and the 2 written over what looks like a 7. The leaves correspond to the 1860 published version "France,/ The 18th Year of These States " as follows: leaf 1 to numbered sections 1 through 2 (verses 1-3); leaf 2 ("I was not so deadly/ sick...") to sections 2 (verses 4-5) through 4 (verse 1); leaf 3 ("I myself keep the blaze,") to sections 4 (verses 2-5) through 5 (verses 1-3); leaf 4 ("And from to-day, sad and/ cogent,...") to verses 4-8 of section 5; and leaf 5 ("O I think now/ The east wind...") to the remaining four verses of section 5. Although Whitman never changed the title, and did not revise the poem much, he did transfer it twice, grouping it in the cluster "Songs of Insurrection " within the main body of Leaves in 1872 and 1872, and in 1881 finally transferring it to the new cluster "Birds of Passage " within Leaves .

        • Page 123, Volume 2. "France the 18th year of these States"
        • Page 124, Volume 2. I was not so deadly sick
        • Page 125, Volume 2. I myself keep the blaze
        • Page 126, Volume 2. And from today, sad and
        • Page 127, Volume 2. O I think now
        • Page 128, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "France," verse 4, verse 5.
      • "Unnamed Lands," pages 129-133, Volume 2: 5 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm. 1857-1859,
        5 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On five leaves of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in a blacker ink (fine and thicker pen), and in light ink. Originally numbered 81, with the note "?/(Leaf of)" above the number and title. Whitman numbered the leaves 1-5 in pencil in the lower left corners. Pinholes in center and left margin of each leaf. The leaves correspond to the numbered sections of the 1860 published version (same title) as follows: leaf 1 to section 1 (verses 1-6); leaf 2 ("What of liberty and slavery/ among them,") to the remaining three verses of section 1 and to section 2; leaf 3 ("Afar they stand—yet near/ to me they stand,") to section 3; leaf 4 ("Are they gone? those/ billions of men?") to sections 4 through 5; and leaf 5 ("I believe that was not the/ end of those nations") to section 6. In the 1872 Leaves Whitman transferred the poem to a "Leaves of Grass " group, and in 1881 it was finally moved, after several revisions through the different published versions, to the cluster "Autumn Rivulets. "

        • Page 129, Volume 2. "Unnamed Lands"
        • Page 130, Volume 2. What of liberty and slavery
        • Page 131, Volume 2. Afar they stand-yet near
        • Page 132, Volume 2. Are they gone? those
        • Page 133, Volume 2. I believe that was not the
        • Page 134, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Unnamed Lands"
        • Page 135, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Unnamed Lands," continued.
      • "Kosmos," Pages 136-137, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        2 leaves, handwritten, 21.5 x 12.5 cm.

        On two leaves of pink paper (21.5 x 12.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, in blacker ink, in fine pen (very black ink), and in light ink. Originally numbered 55. Pinholes in center and left margin. Leaf 1 corresponds to verses 1-6 of the 1860 version, and the lines on leaf 2 ("Who out of the theory of the/ earth,...") correspond to verses 7-10. Revised very little through the different editions, "Kosmos " appeared in 1872 and 1876 in a "Leaves of Grass " group in the supplement "Passage to India. " In 1881 it was finally transferred to the cluster "Autumn Rivulets " within the main body of Leaves .

        • Page 136, Volume 2. "Kosmos"
        • Page 137, Volume 2. Who out of the theory of the
        • Page 138, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Kosmos"
        • Page 139. 1860 edition as published: "Kosmos," continued.
      • "A hand-mirror," Page 140, Volume 2. 1857-1859
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a fine pen (blacker ink) and light ink, including the title. Originally titled "Looking-Glass " and numbered 82. A few pinholes in center and left margin. This poem was titled but ungrouped until 1881, when Whitman finally placed it in the cluster "By the Roadside. "

      • Page 141, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "A Hand-Mirror"
      • "Savantism," page 142, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 21 x 13 cm.

        On one leaf of pink paper (21 x 13 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in a fine pen (blacker ink) and pencil. Only two or three pinholes in center. Originally numbered 52. Ungrouped in the 1860 and 1867 Leaves , this poem, according to Bradley and Blodgett, was transferred to Passage to India in 1871 and from there to "Leaves of Grass " groups in the "Passage to India " annexes of the 1872 Leaves and the 1876 Two Rivulets. From there it was moved, finally (in 1881), to the "Inscriptions " cluster within the main body of Leaves .

      • Page 143, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Savantism"
      • "Says," pages 144-148, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        5 leaves, handwritten, 21 x 12.5 cm. to 21.5 x 13 cm.

        On five leaves of pink paper (all between 21 and 21.5 x 12.5 and 13 cm.), in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in fine pen (very black ink). Multiple pinholes in center, and a pair at top, of each leaf. These poems were revised to form numbered sections of the ungrouped poem "Says " in the 1860 edition of Leaves . According to Bradley and Blodgett, Whitman cut four verse paragraphs in the 1867 Leaves version; from that point on the shortened poem appeared, ungrouped, under the title "Suggestions " until its final appearance in 1876. Leaf 1: originally numbered 85. Verses 3 and 4 went unpublished, but 1-2 and 5 became sections 1, 2, and 3 (verse 1) of the 1860 version. Leaf 2, [I say the least developed/ person on earth...]: these lines became sections 3 (verse 2) and 4, with the second line remaining unpublished. Leaf 3, "87—/ Say. " [I say the human shape/ or face is so great,...]: first numbered 86. This became section 5. On the verso appears the deleted line "And though I lie dead." Leaf 4, "88—/ Say.— " [I say the word of a land/ fearing nothing—...]: first numbered 86, then 87. This leaf became section 6. Leaf 5, "89—/ Say " [I have said many times/ that materials...]: this leaf was originally numbered 88 and titled "Thought, " with two verses that Whitman deleted along with the first title. Below a horizontal pencil line he inscribed, at some point, verses that became section 7 of "Says " in 1860.

        • Page 144, Volume 2. "Says"
        • Page 145, Volume 2. I say the least developed
        • Page 146, Volume 2. "Say (I say the human shape)"
        • Page 147, Volume 2. "Say (I say the word of a land)"
        • Page 148, Volume 2. "Say (I have said many times)"
        • Page 149, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Says"
        • Page 150, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "Says," continued.
      • "Nearing Departure," page 151, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        2 pages on 1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 20 cm.

        On the first and third sides of a folded leaf of white wove paper (16 x 20 cm.), in light ink, with minor revisions in the same ink. A few pinholes in the upper left corner when folded up. Whitman retitled the poem "To My Soul " in the 1860 edition of Leaves . The first inscribed page corresponds to numbered sections 1 through 3, verses 1-3, of the 1860 version, and the second ("The unspeakable love I inter-/changed with women,") to section 3, verses 4-13. In 1867 Whitman cut eight lines and revised others, retitling the poem "As Nearing Departure " and moving it to an untitled group of poems in the supplement "Songs Before Parting. " In 1872 it was finally retitled "As the Time Draws Nigh " and transferred to the cluster "Songs of Parting " within the main body of Leaves .

      • Page 152, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "To My Soul"
      • "So Long!," pages 153-159, Volume 2: 1857-1859,
        7 leaves, handwritten, 15 x 9 cm.

        On seven leaves of blue lined laid paper, three of them composite leaves, with leaf 7 including a paste-on of white wove paper. Multiple pinholes in center of each leaf. Whitman numbered the leaves 75-81 in the upper right corner, with the exception of leaves 6 and 7, which are numbered at top center. In tiny script and various inks, with very heavy revisions, as follows. Leaf 1: plain leaf (15 x 9 cm.) in medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, in fine pen (very black ink), and in light ink. Corresponds exactly in terms of the number of lines used to the first page of the poem as published (under the title "So long! ") in the 1860 Leaves . This first page comprised numbered sections 1 through 3, verses 1-6. Leaf 2 ("When fathers, firm, unconstrained, nonchal-/ant, open-eyed—..."): plain leaf (15 x 9 cm.), in medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in the fine pen (very black ink). Corresponds to sections 3 (verses 7-8) through 7 (verse 1) in the 1860 version. Leaf 3 ("Once more I proclaim the whole of/ America..."): plain leaf (15 x 9 cm.), in medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Corresponds to sections 7 (verse 2) through 10, along with section 12, in the 1860 version. On the verso appear two deleted sections, comprising nine verses (beginning "Yet, old throat, one loud/ cadenza!") revised from the bottom of original leaf 4, which Whitman compressed and reversed on the leaf 4 paste-on to eventually form sections 15 and 16 in the published version. Leaf 4 ("I announce the continued union of/ The States,"): composite leaf measuring 15 x 9 cm., with a faded blue paste-on of 5.5 x 9 cm. covering several water- damaged and heavily revised verses on the original leaf. In medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in a slightly browner ink (thicker pen), in pencil, in fine pen, and in light ink. Corresponds to sections 11 and 13-16 of the 1860 version. Leaf 5 ("Screaming electric, the atmosphere using,"): plain leaf (15 x 9 cm.), in medium-black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in light ink. Corresponds to section 17 in the 1860 version. Whitman cut up a deleted earlier pink-paper draft of the first three verses for use as a paste-on in the poem "Thought " (section 9 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 Leaves ; see 2:1:3). On the verso appear heavily revised draft verses, in pencil and only partly deleted, for sections 22 and 23. Leaf 6 ("What is there more that I lag and pause?"): full leaf (15 x 9 cm.) with six paste-ons in light ink and black ink, and with heavy revisions in the same inks and in pencil. The final paste-on corresponds to sections 18-20 of the 1860 version, but the other paste-ons and the original leaf contain drafts for the rest of the poem (sections 21-23). Leaf 7 ("O how your fingers drowse me!"): full leaf (15 x 9 cm.) with two paste-ons, the first a large section (13 x 9 cm.) of the same blue paper and the second a small section (6.5 x 10.5 cm.) of white wove paper. The white paste-over is inscribed in light ink with no revisions; the blue paste-over is inscribed in medium-black ink, with extensive revisions in pencil and in the same ink, as with the deleted verses on the original page. The white paste-on corresponds to section 21 in the 1860 version, and the blue paste-on contains the latest draft of what would become sections 22 and 23. In 1860 this was the final poem in Leaves ; in 1867 Whitman cut twenty-one lines (according to Bradley and Blodgett) and transferred it to the end of the last Leaves supplement "Songs of Parting. " In 1872, with the transformation of this supplement into the cluster "Songs Before Parting, " it was permanently fixed as the final poem in the main body of Leaves .

        • Page 153, Volume 2. "So Long!"
        • Page 154, Volume 2. When fathers, firm, unconstrained, nonchal-
        • Page 155, Volume 2. Once more I proclaim the whole of
        • Page 156, Volume 2. I announce the continued union of/ The States,
        • Page 157, Volume 2. Screaming electric, the atmosphere using,
        • Page 158, Volume 2. What is there more that I lag and pause
        • Page 159, Volume 2. O how your fingers drowse me
        • Page 160, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "So long!"
        • Page 161, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "So long!" continued.
        • Page 162, Volume 2. 1860 edition as published: "So long!" continued.
      • "Sparkles from the Wheel," page 163, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
        2 pages on 1 leaf, handwritten, 25.5 x 20 cm.

        First published not in the 1860 Leaves but in a "Leaves of Grass " group in the separate publication Passage to India in 1871. On two leaves (25.5 x 20 cm.) of thick, ruled, white laid paper joined with paste in the left margin. In black ink with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Whitman penciled in the note "Long Primer/ middling wide measure" in the upper left corner of the first leaf, and on the verso of the second wrote and deleted (also in pencil) the note "The worship of God is, honoring his gifts/ in other men, each according to his genius, &/ loving the greatest men best. Those who/ envy or calumniate great men, hate God/ William Blake[.]" After being bound with the rest of the Passage to India poems as a supplement to Leaves of Grass , in 1881 this was permanently transferred to the cluster Autumn Rivulets within the main body of Leaves .

    • "Fables," page 164, Volume 2. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 23 x 20 cm.

      On one leaf (23 x 20 cm.) of thick, ruled white laid paper, in medium-black ink, with minor revisions in pencil and in the same ink. This became numbered verse paragraph 4 of section 2 of the title poem in the separate 1871 publication "Passage to India. " In 1881 the poem "Passage to India " was transferred, ungrouped, to the main body of Leaves.

  • Box-folder 1:52
    Proposed table of contents for "Leaves of Grass," on verso of "To An Exclusive."
  • Box-folder 1:53
    . Leaves of Grass & Two Rivulets: Draft of Advertisement for Centennial Edition, 1876,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 11 cm. x 18.5 cm., mounted. #3829-a.

    Note in folder states that for the centennial of the United States WW had 100 Centennial Editions of Leaves printed, which he then sold in a booth at the Centennial Celebration in Philadelphia. Written in ink. With typed transcription.

  • Box-folder 1:54
    "Living Pictures" on same leaf as "A cluster of poems."
  • Box-folder 1:55
    "Lo, where arise three peerless stars...," 1886 April 19,
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l. #3829-i.

    From "Thou Mother With Thy Equal Brood," verse 6.

  • Box-folder 1:56
    "Marked Hollandic Elements," [ca. 1881?],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten. #9778.

    Whitman, in third person, describes the ethnic heritage of his mother and father which contributes to the writing of Leaves of Grass. Written on verso of an autograph seeker's letter. See McGregor Autograph Collection, Box 8.

  • Box-folder 1:57
    "Memoranda of a Year," 1863,
    AMs, 3 pp. on 2 l., Barrow. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:58
    "My Picture Gallery," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 10 x 15.5 cm., mounted. #3829 (Bowers #26).

    On one fragment (10 x 15.5 cm.) of white wove paper, in brown-black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink and in pencil. The pencil notes "? for children" and "extend this/?" appear in the upper left corner. The final verse, also in pencil, appears in the upper right corner. There are also two or more ink squiggles on the leaf. Originally titled "Pictures, " this is a revision of the first four verses of a draft poem by that name, inscribed by Whitman in a twenty-nine page notebook before the first edition of Leaves appeared in 1855. (The "Pictures " notebook is currently housed at Yale University.) Bradley and Blodgett note that after further revision Whitman published these verses in the October 30, 1880 issue of The American under the title "My Picture-Gallery, " after which he placed it in the new cluster "Autumn Rivulets " in the 1881 edition of Leaves .

  • Box-folder 1:59
    "The Mystic Trumpeter," [ca. 1872],
    AMs draft, 9 pp. on 9 l., handwritten, 25 x 19.5 cm. #3829-i.

    On nine leaves of different types of white paper, all measuring roughly 25 x 19.5 cm., described individually as follows. Other drafts of the poem are housed in the Charles E. Feinberg Collection at the Library of Congress, the Trent Memorial Collection at Duke University, and the T.E. Hanley Collection at the University of Texas. "The Mystic Trumpeter " was first published in the February 1872 issue of The Kansas Magazine , after which Whitman published it in the 1872 book As a Strong Bird on Pinions Free , in Two Rivulets (1876), and in the 1881 edition of Leaves of Grass . There and in later editions of Leaves the poem was included in the cluster "From Noon to Starry Night. " Leaf 1: on the verso of a sheet of laid, gray-ruled Department of Justice letterhead, dated "Washington...187[ ]" (see leaves 2 and 8). Inscribed in black ink, with extensive revisions first in pencil and then in black ink. This is a later draft than leaf 2 of verses that would eventually constitute the first numbered section of the poem. Whitman's number "1" appears in orange crayon in the upper right corner of the leaf. Leaf 2 ("Hark! some wild trumpeter—some/ strange musician!"): also on the verso (upside-down) of a leaf of the same Department of Justice letterhead. Inscribed in black ink, with heavy revisions in the same ink, then in pencil and in fine pen (original ink?). Whitman deleted most of the lines, drafting them again and shifting many of them around on leaf 1. Leaf 3 ("Come nearer mystic/ trumpeter"): on a composite leaf formed by pasting a small section (8 x 12 cm.) of unruled laid paper to a full sheet of laid paper, ruled in gray on recto. Inscribed in black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink and in pencil. After further revision these verses became section 2 of the published version. Leaf 4 ("Blow, trumpeter, free and clear—I/ follow thee,"): on a leaf of laid paper, gray-ruled on recto (see 6-7). Inscribed in black ink, with revisions in the same, in pencil, and in orange crayon. Whitman's orange-crayon note "Serenity—cool fresh/ placidity—" runs lengthwise up the left margin to the top of the page. After further revision these verses became section 3 of the published version. Leaf 5 ("Blow again trumpeter—and let/ the notes swell high,"): on one leaf of white wove paper, ruled in blue on verso. Three sets of pinholes appear in the upper left corner. Inscribed in black ink, with revisions in the same. This is an early draft of lines Whitman would revise and expand in Leaf 6 to eventually form section 4 in the published version. Leaf 6 ("Blow again, trumpeter, and/ for my sensuous eyes"): on the same paper as leaves 4 and 7. Inscribed partly in black ink and partly in pencil; the ink section is revised in the same ink, in pencil, and in pink ink; the pencil section is revised in pencil, in brown-black ink (fine pen), and in pink ink. The pencil lines are written below the pencil note "see last part of Consuelo vol 5th," by which Whitman apparently meant the novel Consuelo by George Sand, a book from which he made frequent borrowings. This was a later draft of lines on leaf 7; the number "4" appears in orange crayon at the top of the leaf. Leaf 7 ("Blow again, trumpeter and/ bring before me now,"): on a leaf of the same paper as leaves 4 and 6. Inscribed in black ink, with revisions in the same, in brown ink, and in pink ink. At the foot of the leaf Whitman wrote the parenthetical note "(see last vol. of Consuelo)" with a cartoon hand pointing to it; at this point he revised the ink lines on leaf 6, consulted Consuelo , and drafted his new pencil verses on the other leaf. Leaf 8 ("Blow again trumpeter and/ for thy theme..."): on the verso of a leaf of Department of Justice letterhead (see leaves 1-2), inscribed in black ink, with revisions in pink ink and then black ink. The pink ink was mostly applied with a broader nib here than in earlier leaves. Whitman's note "the piece must move on/ not lag/ sentimental" runs up the left margin to the top of the page. These trial verses, many of them incomplete, were revised to form section 5 in the published version of the poem. Leaf 9 ("Blow again trumpeter/ and give/ for me/ now/ Thy war notes' magic spell"): on a leaf of white wove paper, blue-ruled on verso. Multiple pinholes in the center-left portion of the leaf. Inscribed and revised in black ink. In the lower right corner of the leaf appears a cryptic blue-crayon note in Whitman's hand: "Hah!"

  • Box-folder 1:60
    "Ned, A Phantasy," 1881 May 15,
    AMs, 4 pp. on 4 l., #3829 (Bowers #28).
  • Box-folder 1:61
    "A new doctrine," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    From "Notes on the Meaning and Intention of 'Leaves of Grass,'" sections 65. Includes "Other writers/poets look on..."

  • Box-folder 1:62
    "A Night Battle, Over a Week Since," n.d.,
    AMs rough draft, 2 pp. on 2 l., Barrow. #3829-i.

    From "Specimen Days."

  • Box-folder 1:63
    "Of all themes and of each...," [ca. 1876],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 5.5 cm. x 19.5 cm., #3829-i.

    Beginning "Of all themes and of each" contains draft lines written in pencil. The relationship between the draft lines and Whitman's published verse is unknown.

  • Box-folder 1:64
    "Of Biography and of all literature and art," [ca 1857-1859],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 21.5 x 12 cm., #3829-i.

    On one full Williamsburgh tax blank (21.5 x 12 cm.), with the corners cropped diagonally, and with two corrections in bright pink ink. Two sets of pinholes in center. These prose notes evidently preceded "To a Literat.— " (see below) in the composition of the poem. The ideas were incorporated in section 2 of the 1860 version.

  • Box-folder 1:65
    "Old Age echoes," [1891],
    Physical Location: Vault Oversize V-13.
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l. with attached woodcut engraving, #3829 (Bowers #9-10).

    Written in ink on two leaves of paper pasted together to form one long leaf. The general title appears to be "Old Age Echoes, " but beneath that title are the two poems under which titles the item is catalogued: "Sounds of the Winter " and "The Unexpress'd. " Pasted to the leaf below the second poem is a woodcut engraving of Walt Whitman along with his autograph. Under that is what has been classified as two lines from an unidentified poem. A note at top states, "intended to make one page."

  • Box-folder 1:66
    "Old Age's Lambent Peaks," [ca. 1880's],
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 25 cm. x 20.5 cm., Barrow, #3829-a.

    Note at top states "sent to Century accepted—paid." Written in ink.

  • Box-folder 1:67
    "On Samuel Johnson," [ca. 1857],
    Physical Location: McGregor Slipcase #17.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, #9778 item 2.

    With typed transcription.

  • Box-folder 1:68
    "On Shakespeare and Ben Jonson" [ca.1850]
    Physical Location: McGregor Slipcase #16
  • Box-folder 1:69
    "On Shakespeare and his Sonnets and Edmund Spencer," [ca. 1850],
    Physical Location: McGregor Slipcase #18.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, #9778 item 3.

    With typed transcription.

  • Box-folder 1:70
    "On the Composition of Leaves of Grass (Large parts of the poems...)," n.d.,
    Physical Location: McGregor Autograph Collection, box 8.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, #9778.

    A description in third person, with a number of deletions and corrections, of his manner of composing Leaves of Grass.

  • Box-folder 1:71
    "Orange buds by mail from Florida," Three variants of the poem
    • Variant 1: "Orange buds by mail," [ca. 1887],
      AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 14.5 cm. x 24 cm., Barrow, #3829-a.

      Written in pencil on lined paper. ALS on verso: [G. M.] Williamson to Walt Whitman, 1887 June 1.

    • Variant 2: "Orange Buds by Mail from Florida," [ca. 1887],
      AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 15.5 cm. x 32.5 cm., Barrow, #3829-a.

      Note at bottom states "Sent to H March 17." Written in pencil.

    • Variant 3. "A lesser proof than old Voltaires," [ca. 1887],
      AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 12.5 x 20.5 cm., Barrow, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 1:72
    Folder 72. "The origination and continuance of metre...," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:73
    "Other writers/poets look on..." on same leaf as "A new doctrine."
  • Box-folder 1:74
    "Paul Jones," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:75
    "Paumanok," [ca. 1888],
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 14 cm. x 20 cm., #3829-a.

    Notes at top state "pub'd" and "personal." Note at bottom states "sent to Herald Feb 27 '88." Written in ink on blue paper.

  • Box-folder 1:76
    "Poem of Fables," [ca. 1850's],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 20 cm. x 12 cm., #3829-i.

    On the verso of a light blue Williamsburgh (N.Y.) tax form, dated "185[ ]," cut down to 20 x 12 cm. The corners are cropped diagonally. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in pencil and revised in pencil and brown-black ink (fine pen). Two sets of deleted verses constitute adaptations of lines from Whitman's pre-1855 unpublished notebook "Pictures ": "Now this is the fable of the/ mirror:/ The mirror lay clouded, (enveloped)/ enmisted," and "And/ Now this is the fable of a/ beautiful statue:/ A beautiful statue was lost/ but not destroyed[.]" Two other deleted titles of fables(?) appear above the verses: "The trained runner" and "The five old men." At the foot of the leaf appears the note "last piece/ (still another Death Song—/ Death Song/ with prophecies[.]" All of the sections are demarcated with horizontal lines. Based on Whitman's use of the tax blank, this appears to be a set of notes he made between 1857 and 1859 while preparing the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass , although the "Poem of Fables " as such never materialized and Whitman's "Pictures " were not published in their entirety until 1925. Whitman's executor Richard Maurice Bucke published these notes on p. 176 of his Notes and Fragments (1899).

  • Box-folder 1:77
    "The Poet's Burial," by Edgar Fawcett, 1892,
    AMsS, 4 pp. on 4 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 1:78
    "Portraits and Manuscripts of Walt Whitman," n.d.,
    Physical Location: Slipcase #8.
    1 volume, #3829-l.

    In a green bound volume measuring 34 cm. x 25.5 cm. Items are pasted to pages in the volume. Item in question is a facsimile of the MS. Also included in the volume are three sections from "Calamus, " a newspaper review of Whitman and Tennyson's Maud called "An English and an American Poet, " and three editions of The Conservator from March, May and June of 1900. Includes two signed photographs of Walt Whitman.

  • Box-folder 1:79
    "A Prairie Sunset," [ca. 1888],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 14 cm. x 21 cm., #3829-a.

    Note at top states "sent to Herald March 2." Written in purple pencil.

  • Box-folder 1:80
    "The President's Proclamation," [1863 January 1 ?],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:81
    "Reading Virgil's Bucolics, Eclogues and the Aeneid," 1857 October and November,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 1:82
    "The Return of the Heroes" in same manuscript as "A Carol for Harvest for 1867,"
    #3829 (Bowers #3).
  • Box-folder 1:83
    "A Revealing Self-Analysis of Whitman the Man, the Poet, and the Thinker," n.d.,
    AMs, 3 pp. on 3 l., Barrow. #3829-i,
  • Box-folder 1:84
    "Review," [1865 May 24],
    AMs, 11 pp. on 11 l., handwritten, 15 cm. x 23.5 cm. and 12.5 cm. x 17.5 cm., #3829 (Bowers #18).

    Note on outside of folder states "Put together from bits of paper with notes on Army Parade of May, 1865." 5 leaves are folded in half into a booklet which is bound with twine, the two inner most sheets smaller than the outer three. These notes describe the Great Victory Parade of May 23-24, 1865. The relationship of these notes to Whitman's published work is unknown. Some pages unattached in notebook.

  • Box-folder 1:85
    "Sail Out for Good, Eidolon Yacht!" [ca. 1891],
    AMs early fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 27.5 cm. x 21.5 cm., #3829-i.

    This manuscript is a partial draft of the poem "Sail Out for Good, Eidólon Yacht! " which was published first in 1891.

  • Box-folder 1:86
    "Sea-Drift," n.d.,
    Physical Location: Slipcase #9.
    Autograph Revisions, 34 pp. on 20 l., #3829 (Bowers #25).

    Revision of poem cluster originally titled "Sea-Shore Memories " contained in red bound volume measuring 26 cm. x 18 cm. Revisions are made in ink and pencil on printed edition of the poem. Walt Whitman apparently used two volumes to tear the leaves from, as every other page is slightly smaller than the rest; revisions are made only on the recto side of each leaf, verso is crossed out. Several leaves are cut apart and pasted in new order on other leaves or on lined paper. Leaf 8 is a handwritten MS.

  • Box-folder 1:87
    "Shakespere-Bacon's Cipher," n.d.,
    Autograph revisions, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 1:88
    "Song of Myself," [ca. 1855-1889],
    Physical Location: Slipcase #10.
    AMs, 36 leaves. #3829 (Bowers #22).

    Many of these fragmentary notes were eventually used in or informed the long initial poem of Leaves of Grass , that became (as Bradley and Blodgett note) "Poem of Walt Whitman, an American " in the 1856 edition and "Walt Whitman " in 1860, a title which it retained until 1881, when it was permanently renamed "Song of Myself. " (Leaves apparently unrelated to the "Song " are included in this description by virtue of being bound with "Song " drafts.) Generally the dating is quite early. All but three of the leaves were at one point in the possession of Whitman's executor Dr. Richard Maurice Bucke, who transcribed them (often with significant errors or verses later removed from these fragments) in Notes and Fragments: Left by Walt Whitman... (1899) and his 1902 edition of the Complete Writings of Walt Whitman ; page numbers to his transcriptions in Notes are provided with each relevant entry here. Although Whitman used a wide range of paper-types for these fragments, five kinds of paper can be identified. These are assigned letters as follows. Type A: off-white notebook paper with light brown vertical lines running up the left and right margins, three on one side and one on the other. See Leaves 1, 8, 12, 20, and 28. A full leaf of the notebook paper seems to have measured 19 x 15.5 cm. Type B: white wove paper, ruled in light blue-gray on both sides. See Leaves 3, 5, 21-22, and 27. No full sheet of this paper is present in the volume. Type C: light blue laid Williamsburgh (N.Y.) tax forms, dated "185[ ]," and used extensively by Whitman in preparing his 1860 edition of Leaves and Grass. Described by Fredson Bowers in his work on the 1860 Leaves -related Barrett manuscripts also listed and described above. A full tax form measures 21.5 x 12 cm. See Leaves 4 and 34. Type D: yellow and green wove proof sheets used, it seems, for trial printings of the title page of the first edition of Leaves of Grass. See Leaves 7, 24-25, and 30-31. Type E: white laid paper ruled in brown on both sides. See Leaves 9-11, 13, 15-16, and 23. The dimensions of a full leaf of the paper cannot be determined from these fragments.

    • Page 1: I am a student, about 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 9.5 x 15 cm.

      On a section of type A paper (9.5 x 15 cm.), inscribed, revised, and deleted in pencil. Although, as Bradley and Blodgett note, the themes expressed in this early fragment would inform the lines that eventually became section 2 of "Song of Myself, " Whitman never used it verbatim. On the verso(?) appears an undeleted but heavily revised early draft (beginning "The spotted hawk salutes the approaching night;") of famous lines, beginning "The spotted hawk swoops by...," incorporated in what would constitute the final canto of the poem in the 1867 and later editions of Leaves . This verso fragment is revised in pencil and in brown-black ink (fine pen). Bucke published both sets of verses on p. 36 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 2: If I could speak to personified America I should, about 1865,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14 x 13.5 cm.

      On a section of blue wove paper (14 x 13.5 cm.), in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. The pencil numbers 2 and 3, although partially erased, can still be seen in the right margin. Bucke published it on p. 69, in the section (II) titled "Notes on the Meaning and Intention of 'Leaves of Grass.' " Although Whitman apparently never used it verbatim, it bears a similarity to two paragraphs on p. 10 of Whitman's 1871 publication Democratic Vistas, beginning with the sentence "It may be claim'd, (and I admit the weight of the claim,) that common and general worldly prosperity, and a populace well-to-do, and with all life's material comforts, is the main thing, and is enough..."

    • Page 3: A little sum laid aside for burial money, about 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 17 x 19 cm.

      On a section of type B paper measuring 17 x 19 cm. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Multiple pinholes at the top indicate that this was once the lower half of a full sheet, while pinholes elsewhere seem to have been made after the top section was removed. This is a poetic rendition of a long sentence on p. x of the preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass. The prose sentence begins, "Beyond the independence of a little sum laid aside for burial-money, and of a few clapboards around..." Bucke published this manuscript and what seems to be a later version on page 29 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 4. I subject all the teachings, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15.5 x 12 cm.

      On the verso of a light blue Williamsburgh (N.Y.) tax form (type C), cropped and torn irregularly down to 15.5 x 12 cm. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Features four sets of pinholes, three of them clustering around the center. Published on p. 30 of Notes and Fragments . As Bradley and Blodgett indicate in their notes to the poem, these verses seem to have been part of a larger set of verses or poems. Because of the way the page is torn the final word could read "any" (as Bucke transcribes it), providing closure to these particular verses, or it could just as easily read "an," indicating that a continuation of the lines has been lost. Although never published verbatim, these lines prefigure section 6, especially beginning with the line "Here is the test of wisdom," of what would become "Song of the Open Road, " first published in 1856 as "Poem of the Road. "

    • Page 5. I call back blunderers, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4.5 x 19.5 cm. pasted to 7 x 19.5 cm.

      On a composite leaf formed by pasting a section of type B paper (4.5 x 19.5 cm.) to a section of ruled white laid paper (7 x 19.5 cm.). The upper verses are inscribed and revised in pencil, and those on the lower (laid) section are neatly inscribed in brown ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Some pinholes appear in each section. The first few lines were never used, but the last two verses (beginning "I offer men no painted saucers...") were revised and expanded(?) to form the final verse paragraph (beginning "Stop this day and night with me and you shall possess the origin of all poems,") of what would eventually become section 2 of "Song of Myself. " Published on p. 20 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 6. Do I not prove myself, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8 x 18.5 cm.

      On a section of ruled blue wove paper (8 x 18.5 cm.) with irregularly cropped corners. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Multiple pinholes in center and towards left edge. These verses are inscribed (upside- down) on the verso of several deleted pencil lines beginning "I think there will never be any more heaven or hell/ than there is now," preceded by two undeleted lines beginning "Whatever I say of myself, you shall apply to yourself..." On p. 25 of Notes and Fragments Bucke publishes the undeleted and deleted sections together, along with lines from other manuscripts, as a single poem. An intermediate draft can be seen on p. 44. The deleted lines were revised to form what would eventually become the second verse paragraph of section 3 of "Song of Myself, " while the undeleted line above them eventually formed part of section 20. After heavy revision the undeleted recto lines were used in what would be section 41 of "Song of Myself. " Another version became an unnumbered section (beginning "I will take an egg out of the robin's nest in the orchard,") of the poem "Debris " in the 1860 edition of Leaves . It was the only appearance of these lines in any edition, and of the poem "Debris " under that title and as a unified text, although some other sections became separate poems under individual titles in later editions. But the lines also bear a strong resemblance to the poem beginning "Priests!/ Until you can explain a paving stone, do not try to explain God...," reprinted by Bucke on p. 89, and to the concluding lines of the 1855 poem that would eventually (in 1881) become "A Song for Occupations. "

    • Page 7. Never fails, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14 x 15 cm.

      On a section of yellow type D paper, measuring 14 x 15 cm. Torn through the middle but repaired by means of a strip of the same paper pasted to the verso. Pinholes towards center of backing strip and in lower half of the main leaf. These lines, deleted with a single pencil stroke, appear on the verso of undeleted pencil lines beginning (extrapolating from Bucke's transcription) "[As we are content and dumb/ the amount] of us in men/ and women is content and/ dumb," although someone has removed the words presented here in brackets, perhaps to emphasize the more finished nature of the lines on the present recto. Those verses are inscribed in brown ink, extensively revised in the same ink and in pencil deletion. After heavy revision and expansion they eventually formed part of section 21 of the cluster "Calamus " in the 1860 edition of Leaves ; in the 1867 edition this section received the title "That Music Always Round Me. " (For a later draft, titled "As of Eternity, " see entry 1:3:22 under Leaves of Grass [1860] above.) Bucke presents incomplete transcriptions of both sets of verses on p. 11.

    • Page 8. My hand will not hurt what it holds, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 19 x 15.5 cm.

      On what seems to be a full leaf of the type A notebook paper, measuring 19 x 15.5 cm. Multiple pinholes in center. The numbers 195 and 196 are inscribed in light brown ink and deleted in pencil on the current verso and recto, respectively; these numbers, along with remnants of paste and binding tape along the left margin of the recto, suggest that the type A pages came from a notebook. The lines on the recto are inscribed, revised, and deleted (with a single stroke) in pencil, and appear on the verso of undeleted notes inscribed and revised in brown-black ink with some revisions in pencil. The verso notes begin with a list of animals and plants ("cottonwood—mulberry—/chickadee—large brown water-dog"), followed by a verse ("The suicide/ went to a lonesome place...") that Whitman revised for use ("The suicide sprawls on the bloody floor of the bedroom,") in what would eventually constitute section 8 of "Song of Myself. " This verse is followed by another section of the natural "catalogue" ("locust, birch/ cypress..."), below which appears a pair of verses (beginning "O dirt, you corpse—I reckon you are good manure—") used in what would be section 48 of the "Song. " ("And as to you corpse I think you are good manure..."). The list of flora and fauna could anticipate any number of similar lists in Whitman, but bears the strongest resemblance to section 29 of "Poem of Joys " (final title: "A Song of Joys "), which first appeared in the 1860 edition of Leaves . The deleted recto lines were revised to form what is now section 28 of "Song of Myself. " Bucke prints the poetic fragments on p. 38 and the list on p. 165.

    • Song of Myself, Page 9-12. ca. 1855,
      4 leaves, handwritten.

      These four leaves represent different stages in the evolution of a set of lines first published in the fourth main section in the 1855 edition of Leaves . In 1856 the section was titled "Night Poem " and in 1860 it became "Sleep-Chasings, " with these lines forming sections 44-46. In 1867 they appeared under the same title as section 9 (with the stanzas again divided into sections 44-46); then under the final title "The Sleepers " in 1872 (section 14, stanzas 44-46) and 1876 (also section 14, 44-46), at which point the lines were permanently removed from this poem and Leaves in general. Bucke reprints the drafts, with several errors, on pp. 15 and 19-20 of Notes and Fragments .

      • Page 9. I am a curse, ca. 1855,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 18.5 x 17.5 cm.

        On a leaf of type E laid paper (18.5 x 17.5 cm.) with three corners cropped for mounting. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. A comparison of Whitman's revisions between leaves indicates that this was probably the second of the four "Lucifer " drafts, written before he decided to merge his commentary on slavery with allusions to the fallen angel of Isaiah. The trial lines on the verso (beginning "His very aches are exstasy") seem to have been revised for inclusion in what is now section 29 of "Song of Myself. " Whitman's unusual spelling of "ecstasy" indicates not only that the lines came very early in the process of writing Leaves , but that these lines may have originally been part of the proto- "Song of Myself " before being transferred to what would become "The Sleepers. " The verso lines and the words "I am a curse" link this leaf, like leaves 10 and 11, to two sections of draft verses in the earliest Library of Congress notebook (#80) beginning "Fierce wrestler!" and "I am a curse:" (see p. 77 of Grier's Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts , vol. 1, or the digitized version of the notebook on the Library of Congress Web site).

      • Page 10. Black Lucifer was not dead, ca. 1855,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 10.5 x 19.5 cm.

        On a section (10.5 x 19.5 cm.) of the same type E paper as leaves 9 and 11, but more wrinkled, torn, and smudged than them. Fragments of tan wove paper are pasted to the verso for reinforcement of torn sections. Several pinholes are clustered at the bottom of the leaf, in the center, indicating that this was originally the upper section of a full leaf. Inscribed and extensively revised in pencil. The deleted first line reads "I am a hell-name and a Curse..." This seems to have been the last of the four "Lucifer " leaves to be inscribed, although it was further revised for publication in the 1855 edition of Leaves . The word "Sleepchaser's" appears in the upper right corner, perhaps indicating that Whitman was considering a title similar to the 1860 and 1867 title "Sleep-Chasings " even before the poem was first published in 1855, unless this is in fact a reworking of the section for the 1860 edition. The possibility of a post-1855 dating, however, appears to be slight given the similarities of paper choice and inscription techniques among leaves 9-11 and their shared similarities to drafts in the earliest Library of Congress notebook.

      • Page 11. Topple down upon him, ca. 1855,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 15.5 x 19 cm.

        On a section (15.5 x 19 cm.) of the same type E paper as leaves 9 and 10, with three of the corners cropped for mounting. Inscribed and extensively revised, like 9-10, in pencil. Pinholes at the top of the leaf (in the center) indicate that this was originally the lower section of a full leaf, although the excision patterns along the top edge of this leaf and the lower edge of Leaf 10 do not seem to match up. This leaf, a reworking of the lines beginning "I am a Curse" in Library of Congress notebook #80, with verses added from Leaf 9, appears to have come third in the revision process. The only line specifically linking the poem to the theme of slavery ("I look off the river with my bloodshot eyes, after/ the steamboat that carries away my woman.—"), adapted from Leaf 9, is deleted, and Whitman apparently rejected these lines and the "curse" theme in general as he moved towards the draft on Leaf 10, which would eventuate in the 1855 published version. On the verso (upside-down) appear two sets of trial verses for what would eventually become the second verse paragraph of section 4 of the poem "Faces, " which in 1855 was published as the sixth of twelve poems in the first edition of Leaves . These verso lines are inscribed and revised in pencil, and deleted with two vertical pencil strokes. The only complete line of the first draft reads "Above the roar I hear/ the clear truth of victorious horns.—" and the second draft begins "I stand at the top of the street[.]" Bucke prints these verses on pp. 19-20.

      • Page 12. The sores on my shoulders are from his, ca. 1855,
        1 leaf, handwritten, 8 x 15 cm.

        On a section (8 x 15 cm.) of the type A notebook paper. Inscribed, revised, and deleted (with a single stroke) in pencil. Multiple pinholes cluster below and to the left of center. These verses seem to have come first or second in the process of revising the "Lucifer " verses. On the verso appear the undeleted lines "Hear my fife! —I am a recruiter/ Come, who will join my troop?" These are printed by Bucke on p. 15 of Notes and Fragments , and, as Bradley and Blodgett note, are a version of a line ("And now a merry recruiter passes, with fife and drum, seeking who will/ join his troop...") in the pre-1855 notebook poem "Pictures. "

    • Page 13. Where the little musk ox carries his, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 6 x 19 cm.

      On a small section (6 x 19 cm.) of the type E laid paper, cut irregularly on three sides, with two corners cropped for mounting. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. Multiple pinholes cluster towards the bottom-center of the page, indicating that this was the lower section of the top half of a full leaf. The right side of the page has suffered smoke damage. Curiously, the only line used from the recto ("Where the life car is drawn on the slip-noose") is deleted here; it became part of what would eventually form section 33 of "Song of Myself. " Bucke prints all of the verses on page 20. The deleted verso lines (beginning "Who knows that I shall not myself/ [...] time be a God, as pure and prodigious/ as any?") constitute a poetic revision of prose notes in Library of Congress notebook #85, and seem to have led up to what would eventually become section 48 of "Song of Myself. "

    • Page 14. You there!, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 12.5 x 20 cm.

      On a section of white wove paper (12.5 x 20 cm.), inscribed and revised in brown ink and pencil. Deleted with a single vertical pencil stroke. A very large number of pinholes cluster towards the bottom-center of the page, indicating that this was the top half of a full leaf, although one or more verses have been removed from the top. The left side is torn, as if the page had been removed from a notebook. This page was apparently inscribed very close to the publication of the 1855 Leaves ; with a few revisions it became part of what would eventually be section 40 of "Song of Myself. " Not in Notes and Fragments . On the verso, in very light brown ink, appear undeleted notes defining and illustrating such verse forms as "hexameters," "dactyl," "Spondee," "Iambus," and "Trochee." These notes represent an incomplete version of notes on a manuscript currently housed at Rutgers University, and printed by Bucke on pp. 162-63 of Notes and Fragments , although the Leaf 14 notes, like the "Song of Myself " verses on the recto, do not appear in Bucke. (For another version of the Rutgers notes, partially transcribed by Bucke, see Leaf 36 below.) Grier notes that the Rutgers manuscript probably dates to 1856 or afterwards, when Whitman was pursuing a self-education in poetry, suggesting that the verso notes also date to that period.

    • Page 15. And their voices, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4.5 x 19.5 cm.

      On a section of the type E laid paper (4.5 x 19.5 cm.), inscribed and revised in pencil. A pencil question mark appears above a very faint line linking "valved" and "cornet." These half-prose, half-poetic notes were revised and incorporated in two separate verses of what would become "Song of Myself ": the eventual verse 597, in section 26 ("I hear...the keyed cornet") and verse 1067 in section 42 ("Ever the vexer's hoot! hoot! till we find where the sly one hides and bring him/ forth..."). Bucke prints these notes on p. 30 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 16. The horizon's edge, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8.5 x 20 cm.

      On a section of the type E laid paper (8.5 x 20 cm.), inscribed, revised, and deleted (with a single vertical stroke) in pencil. The corners are cropped irregularly. The first line originally read "Odor of the salt marsh, and of the mud and sea-weed[.]" An earlier version of these lines is also associated with proto- "Song of Myself " verses in Library of Congress Notebook #80 ("And the salt marsh and creek have/ delicious odors..."). The "unearthly laugh of the laughing-gull" reappears in what would eventually become line 763 (section 33) of "Song of Myself. " Most of the lines on Leaf 16 were incorporated, however (after further revision), into the tenth poem of the 1855 edition of Leaves . As Bradley and Blodgett note, this poem was titled "Poem of The Child That Went Forth, and Always Goes Forth, Forever and Forever " in the 1856 edition, after which it became number 9 in the 1860 group "Leaves of Grass, " number 1 of a different "Leaves of Grass " group in 1867, and, finally, "There Was a Child Went Forth " in the 1872 edition. The lines appear on p. 48 of Notes and Fragments.

    • Page 17. Children and maidens - strong men, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7 x 21 cm.

      On a section of heavily wrinkled, torn, and smudged unruled white laid paper (7 x 21 cm.) reinforced with white wove paper. All four corners are cropped for mounting. Inscribed, without revisions, in pencil. The laid paper was originally the last page of a letter; a few illegible words and part of a signature can be seen dimly through the back of the composite leaf. Whitman wrote his lines on the verso of the page after turning it sideways. Although Whitman did not use the verses word for word, they may have been part of an early draft of the fourth poem in the 1855 edition of "Leaves, " eventually titled "The Sleepers. " The lines appear on p. 46 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 18. Full of wickedness, ca. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15.5 x 8 cm.

      On a section of white wove paper torn down to 15.5 x 8 cm., inscribed and revised on both sides in medium brown ink and also inscribed and deleted, on the recto, in pencil. Features one set of pinholes in the center. The verses on the recto, while not published word-for-word until 1897, seem to represent an early draft of the poem first published as number 13 of the cluster "Leaves of Grass " in the 1860 Leaves , and eventually titled "You Felons on Trial in Courts. " (See 2:2:1 under Leaves of Grass [1860] for a much later version of the poem.) Whitman's careful script and verse forms here also resemble the methods of inscription used for the "Live Oak, with Moss " poems dated by Bowers to the post-1856, pre-1860 period. The undeleted notes on the back are titled "Poems " and begin with the lines "A cluster, (same style, as of sonnets li[ke]/ as 'Calamus Leaves')/ of poems, verses, thoughts &c, embodying/ religious emotions/ & thoughts." A cartoon hand in the left margin points to the phrase "religious emotions." Whitman's use of the title "Calamus Leaves " dates these notes to the same pre-1860 period as the deleted verses on the recto, since "Calamus-Leaves " was what he renamed the cluster "Live Oak, with Moss " before settling on "Calamus " for the 1860 edition. A section of the notes below the rest (beginning "spirituality—the unknown,...") is inscribed in verse form. Bucke prints these, along with [Full of wickedness, I...], on p. 39 of Notes and Fragments . The rest of the notes appear on p. 165; related notes appear on 169 and 176.

    • Page 19. From wooded Maine, ca. 1889,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 11 x 18 cm.

      On the verso of a letter (11 x 18 cm.) inscribed in light black ink on (wrinkled) white laid paper, embossed with a red design. All four corners are cropped for mounting. Whitman's lines are inscribed and revised in thick pencil. The letter is dated "Aug 14th /89," and asks Whitman to send the unidentified writer a copy of the "latest special edition" of Leaves of Grass . These trial verses became part of "A Twilight Song "—subtitled, Bradley and Blodgett note, "for unknown buried soldiers, North and South"—which was first published in the May, 1890 Century and then included in the second annex "Good-Bye My Fancy " in the 1892 "deathbed" edition of Leaves . This draft does not appear in Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 20. I am become the poet of babes and, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4 x 14.5 cm. pasted to 4.5 x 15 cm.

      On a composite leaf comprising two sections of the type A notebook paper (4 x 14.5 and 4.5 x 15 cm.) pasted together. Three pinholes appear near the foot of the page. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. The verso lines (beginning "I think I could dash the girder of the earth/ away" and "Surely I am out of my head!") are deleted with several pencil strokes. The deleted number 209 (in brown ink) appears in the top right corner of the lower section. After much revision the recto lines, which are related to lines in Library of Congress Notebook #80, seem to have become part of what would be section 44 of "Song of Myself. " The verso lines represent an early draft of lines eventually incorporated in section 27 of the poem. Bucke transcribes both sets of verses, with additional lines not preserved in these sections, on pp. 34-5 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 21. American air I have breathed, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4.5 x 18 cm.

      On a small section of the type B wove paper irregularly cropped, torn, and cut down to 4.5 x 18 cm. Several pinholes appear in the center; some smoke damage appears along the right edge. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Below the verses appear the deleted phrase "Echos [sic] of voices" and the undeleted note "? Personality" beneath a faint horizontal line. Bucke prints the lines on p. 13 of Notes and Fragments . Although Whitman did not publish these verses himself, their structure and the type of paper upon which they are inscribed suggest a close relationship with the lines on Leaf 22, which were revised to form part of section 14 of "Chants Democratic " in the 1860 edition of Leaves , a set of verses eventually transformed into an independent poem under the title "Poets to Come. "

    • Page 22. Merely what I tell is not to justify me, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4 x 15 cm.

      On a small section (4 x 15 cm.) of the same type B paper as Leaf 21, with smoke damage in the upper left corner. The corners are cropped slightly for mounting. Two sets of pinholes appear in the center. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. Bucke transcribes both sets of verses on p. 39 of Notes and Fragments . The recto verses were used as noted under Leaf 21, but the lines on the verso (deleted with several vertical and horizontal pencil strokes) seem to have been rejected.

    • Page 23. Can ? make me so exuberant yet so faintish, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 6 x 19.5 cm.

      On a section of the type E laid paper (6 x 19.5 cm.) with all four corners cropped for mounting. Multiple pinholes run up the center of the page. Inscribed and revised on both sides in pencil. The recto verses bear some similarity to what would eventually form section 28 of "Song of Myself, " while the deleted lines on the verso (beginning "This mouth is pulled by some sexton for his dismalest fee,") represent a fragment of draft lines eventually incorporated in the sixth poem of the 1855 edition of Leaves , a poem permanently retitled "Faces " in the 1872 edition. Bucke transcribes both sets of verses on p. 37 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 24. To this continent comes the, ca. 1856-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 10 x 13 cm. pasted to 5 x 13 cm.

      On a composite leaf consisting of two sections (10 x 13 and 5 x 13 cm.) of light green type D paper used for trial printings(?) of the title page of the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass (see Leaf 25). (The words "Leaves o[f]," printed in a typeface similar to the one used for the 1855 edition, appear in the bottom right corner of the lower section.) All four corners of the top section, and the lower corners of the bottom section, are cropped for mounting. Multiple pinholes appear in each section. Inscribed and revised in black ink. As Bradley and Blodgett note, the lower set of verses seems to be a later draft of the upper set, even though Bucke prints them in reverse order and as separate fragments on p. 32 of Notes and Fragments . These lines foreshadow a number of poems new to the 1860 edition of Leaves , particularly "Proto-Leaf " (ultimately titled "Starting from Paumanok ") and "So long!, " as well as several of the poems grouped in the cluster "Chants Democratic and Native American. "

    • Page 25. Ships sail upon the waters, ca. 1856-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 15.5 x 14.5 cm.

      On one section of light yellow type D paper torn down to 15.5 x 14.5 cm. (Part of the word "Leaves" appears in the lower right corner of the verso.) The lower left corner is cropped. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed in black ink, with revisions in the same ink and one addition in pencil. On the verso, in blue pencil, appears a quickly scrawled note, reading "Drum Taps—City of Ships[,]" which appears to be in Whitman's hand. This may indeed have been a draft of the poem "City of Ships, " which first appeared in 1865 as part of the independent publication Drum-Taps , but its similarities to the lines on Leaf 24 and lack of references to the Civil War indicate that it was inscribed prior to the publication of the 1860 edition of Leaves . These lines bear a strong resemblance to verses inscribed on Leaf 7 of "Premonition " as described above (under Leaves of Grass [1860] 1:1:7), verses that formed section 20 of "Proto-Leaf " in 1860 and, ultimately, part of section 6 of the poem under the title "Starting from Paumanok. " Printed on p. 30 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 26. You are English, Irish, Scotch, Welsh, ca. 1856-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 10 x 15 cm.

      On one section of white wove paper torn and cut down to 10 x 15 cm., inscribed and revised in very thin brown-black ink. Two pinholes appear towards the right margin. The lower corners are cropped. Whitman's use of the word "Libertad" and way of handling the theme of immigration suggest that this might be part of an early draft of the poem eventually known as "A Broadway Pageant, " first published in the June 27, 1860 issue of the New York Times as "The Errand-Bearers. " Bucke prints the verses on p. 39 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 27. Remember if you are dying, ca. 1855-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8 x 15.5 cm.

      On a section of type B wove paper cut down to 8 x 15.5 cm. All four corners are cropped for mounting. Multiple pinholes run up and down the center. Inscribed and corrected (in only one place) on the recto in pencil, and on the verso in light brown ink and pencil. The verso lines (beginning "[sl]ueing,/...[be]nding,/...halt in the shade,") represent a fragment of a polished pre-1855-publication draft—almost a fair copy, but with interesting revisions nonetheless—of lines that would eventually belong in section 13 of "Song of Myself. " These verses are inscribed along the ruled lines. Whitman cannibalized this leaf at some point after 1855 to jot down the recto verses perpendicular to the ruled lines. These seem to constitute a complete but very early draft of the poem "To One Shortly To Die, " first published in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass in the cluster "Messenger Leaves. " (For a later draft see Leaf 28, and for an even later version inscribed shortly before the 1860 publication see 2:3:1 in Leaves of Grass [1860].) In the upper right corner of the recto appear the words "note/ last page of 'Ghost-seers'" in Whitman's hand, suggesting that he had considered forming a cluster under this title, never published, in Leaves , perhaps in the 1860 edition. The phrase "Ghost-seers" recalls a statement regarding Emerson in "Leaves-Droppings, " a section of correspondence and commentary Whitman appended to the 1856 edition of Leaves : "[Emerson] sees the future of truths as our Spirit-seers discern the future of man..." Bucke prints the recto verses on p. 13 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 28. I must not deceive you - you are to die, ca. 1855-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 4 x 14.5 cm.

      On a very small section (4 x 14.5 cm.) of the type A notebook paper. Inscribed and revised on the recto in (smudged) brown-black ink. Fragmentary lines on the verso are inscribed, revised, and deleted in pencil. Four pinholes run up from the center of the leaf towards the upper right corner. The verso lines (beginning "[I] and nobody else am the greatest traitor,") represent a later draft than similar verses in Library of Congress Notebook #80 of what would eventually become part of section 28 of "Song of Myself. " The recto lines were revised to form part of the 1860 poem "To One Shortly To Die. " (See Leaf 27 for an earlier draft and entry 2:3:1 under Leaves of Grass. [1860] for a later version.) Bucke prints the recto verses on p. 47 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 29. As procreation, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 6 x 18.5 cm.

      On a small section of white laid paper (6 x 18.5 cm.) with all four corners cropped for mounting. Multiple pinholes in center. Inscribed and revised (in one place) in brown ink. A short horizontal line appears beneath the verses, indicating (along with the finished appearance of the lines) that Whitman conceived of this when written as an independent poem. He may have used it, however, in the 1856 "Poem of Remembrances for A Girl or A Boy of These States, " which, as Bradley and Blodgett note, became the sixth poem in "Chants Democratic and Native American " in 1860. It was subsequently shortened by several stanzas (1867) and retitled (1872) "Think of the Soul " before being excluded from Leaves with the publication of the 1881 edition. The verses on Leaf 29 combine the meanings expressed in both the excluded and preserved sections of "Think of the Soul. " Bucke prints these verses and a related, longer set of verses on p. 27 of Notes and Fragments ; the other lines in Bucke were revised and expanded for use in sections 46-51 of the 1860 poem "Proto-Leaf, " permanently retitled "Starting from Paumanok " in 1867.

    • Page 30. Of your soul I say truths to harmonize, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7.5 x 20 cm.

      On a section of the type D proof sheet paper (light yellow) cut and torn irregularly down to 7.5 x 20 cm. (The words "Leaves of" appear on the verso.) Multiple pinholes appear towards the foot of the leaf, indicating—along with the damaging of the words "The gripe" in the last line by cutting and the appearance of the tops of other letters above the lower edge—that this was the upper section of a larger leaf before Whitman decided to make it an independent poem, adding his characteristic period and hyphen combination at the end of the lines to mark its separateness. Inscribed in brown-gray ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in a darker brown ink (in that order). Bucke prints the verses on p. 26 of Notes and Fragments with the annotation "Early or middle fifties, never used," but the lines bear a strong resemblance to a section of prose on p. vi of the preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass. The verses on this leaf may represent a poetic adaptation of that section.

    • Page 31. Who wills with his own brain, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 5 x 16 cm.

      On a small section of what seems to be type D light yellow paper (5 x 16 cm.). All four corners are cropped for mounting. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Bucke transcribes these verses on p. 28 of Notes and Fragments , combining them with other fragments to form a longer poem. They display some similarities to the eleventh untitled poem of the 1855 edition of Leaves , named "Lesson Poem " in 1856 and finally, beginning with 1871's Passage to India , "Who Learns My Lesson Complete? "

    • Page 32. Have I, ca. 1856,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 9 x 18 cm.

      On the verso of an irregularly cut and cropped proof sheet (9 x 18 cm.) from the 1856 edition of Leaves of Grass. A few pinholes are scattered around the page. The words "Have I" at the beginning are inscribed on a small scrap of the same paper, which Whitman pasted over some deleted words in the upper right corner that cannot be discerned through the paper. Inscribed and extensively revised in pencil, these verses were part of a larger set of lines before Whitman cut away and (apparently) discarded the rest. Although the page number and many words on the left side of the proof have been cut away, the remaining words identify it as p. 188 from the "Poem of Many in One, " which eventually became "By Blue Ontario's Shore. " These unused but also undeleted lines may have been intended for that poem or a number of other poems in Leaves . Bucke prints them on p. 30 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 33. The beef, wheat and lumber of Chicago, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 10.5 x 19.5 cm.

      On a section of white laid letter(?) paper (10.5 x 19.5 cm.) folded in two places, perhaps for mailing. All four corners are cropped, and the right margin is cut irregularly. No pinholes. Inscribed in black ink that has bled in several places from contact with water drops. A long horizontal line divides the first set of draft verses from a pair of trial verses beginning "The railroads with their hundreds/ of lines..." Although these poetic notes are difficult to date, they may represent an intermediate stage between the 1855 Preface to Leaves and the 1856 "Poem of Many in One " (eventually "By Blue Ontario's Shore "), which cast many sentences similar to these from the Preface in poetic form. Two editorial errors relating to the leaf should be mentioned: Bucke prints the fragment on p. 169 as a prose passage, and in republishing Bucke's transcription (still in prose form) Grier reports, on p. 1941 of the Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (vol. 5) that this manuscript has not been found.

    • Page 34. O I must not forget, ca. 1857-1859,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 14 x 12 cm.

      On the verso of a section (14 x 12 cm.) cut from a type C tax form. The corners are all cropped for mounting. Inscribed and revised in pencil. Multiple pinholes cluster towards the foot of the leaf, suggesting that one or more verses were cut away and discarded; this is corroborated by the fact that the final word, "gaunt," ends not with a period but with a comma. Whitman's use of the tax form and the strong similarity this fragment bears (as Bradley and Blodgett note) both to the 1856 "Poem of the Road " (later "Song of the Open Road ") and to the 1860 "Proto-Leaf " (eventually "Starting from Paumanok ") indicate that this may have been a revision of the former poem or, as seems more likely, an early draft of "Proto-Leaf " intended for the 1860 edition of Leaves . To compare this fragment with extant drafts of "Proto-Leaf, " under its original title "Premonition, " see leaves 1:1:1-1:1:33 as described under Leaves of Grass (1860) above. Printed on p. 39 of Notes and Fragments .

    • Page 35. Man, before the rage of whose passions, ca. 1855,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8 x 19.5 cm.

      On one section of white wove paper (8 x 19.5 cm.) ruled on both sides, with the upper corners cropped for mounting. Inscribed in green-black ink with no revisions. These verses seem to have been part of a larger set before Whitman decided to make them an independent poem, adding a hyphen at the end of the last line and cutting off the verses below. (The word "nothing" in the last line was partly cut away as well.) Although written in free verse, the rather conventional nature of this poem suggests an early date of inscription. Bucke does not transcribe it.

    • Page 36. Pentameter - in ancient poetry, ca. 1856,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 25 x 13 cm.

      On a full leaf of light tan wove paper (25 x 13 cm.) that seems to have been removed from a notebook; the note "Last Page" and the number 5(?) appear at the top of the leaf. The foot of the page—wrinkled, smudged with erased words, and largely worn away—has been reinforced with a strip of light brown wove paper pasted to the verso. Inscribed in pencil, with one minor revision in brown ink. The leaf is divided with horizontal lines into four sections: "Pentameter," "Anapest," "Dithyrambus/ Dithyramb/ Dithyrambic," and "Caesura." Like the contents of the verso of Leaf 14, these notes represent a version of the poetic definitions that appear in a manuscript currently housed at Rutgers University. Bucke prints the final two sections of these notes on p. 163 of Notes and Fragments , leaving the first two sections untranscribed, evidently because they so closely parallel the more complete Rutgers notes (which he prints in full). Grier lists this manuscript, on p. 357 of Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts (vol. 1), as "not found."

  • Box-folder 1:89
    "Song of the Broad-Axe," n.d.,
    Autograph revisions, 12 pp. on 12 l., 20 cm. x 12 cm., #3829 (Bowers #4).

    Revision of poem cluster "Song of the Broad-Axe ". Revisions are made in ink and blue pencil on printed edition of the poem. Walt Whitman apparently used two volumes to tear the leaves from, as every other page is slightly smaller than the rest, revisions are made only on the recto side of each leaf, and verso is crossed out.

  • "Song of the Redwood Tree," 1873,
    31 leaves, handwritten.

    These two manuscripts represent different stages, earlier and later, in the evolution of a poem written during October and November 1873 and first published as "Song of the Redwood-Tree " in the February 1874 issue of Harper's Magazine . From a note prefacing the first manuscript, as Bowers writes, it appears that Whitman personally took charge of gathering and preserving the manuscripts. In 1876, Bradley and Blodgett observe, Whitman published the poem in the independent group "Centennial Songs " and in this group as annexed to Two Rivulets , and in 1881 it appeared, ungrouped, in Leaves of Grass . For convenience these descriptions follow the ordering of the leaves presented by Bowers in his article "The Manuscripts of Whitman's 'Song of the Redwood-Tree' " in Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America , vol. 50 (1st quarter, 1956), pp. 53-85.

    • Box-folder 1:90
      "Song of the Redwood Tree," 1873 [October and November],
      AMsS rough draft, 20 leaves, handwritten, 11 x 12.5 cm. to 22.5 x 17.5 cm., #3829 (Bowers #12).

      This rough draft begins with the following note, inscribed and initialed by Whitman in brown-black ink, on one piece (17.5 x 22.5 cm.) of thin, light brown wove paper with no pinholes: "Camden,/ Oct. & Nov. '73./ Song of the Redwood Tree./ (rough draft—mems,/ printed sketch,/ letter from Harper's Mag.)/ &c./ W. W." The other leaves are described individually as follows. Unless noted otherwise, each leaf features multiple pinholes in its center. Leaf 2 ("Song of the Redwood/ Tree/ & other pieces"): white wove paper (20.5 x 12.5 cm.), apparently a flyleaf or blank page removed from a book. The undeleted title as well as the deleted titles "Eidólons " (on both recto and verso, but upside-down relative to the undeleted title) and "Waves in the Vessel's Wake " (also upside-down) are inscribed in blue crayon, while the line "Waves, undulating/ waves—" (on verso, upside-down) is in grey-black ink. "Eidólons " was the title Whitman used for a poem first published in 1876; and "Waves in the Vessel's Wake, " according to Bradley and Blodgett, was an alternate title for a poem eventually named "After the Sea-Ship, " in which the line "Waves, undulating/ waves—" can be found. Leaf 3 ( "A California song./ Song of the Redwood/ Tree "): white wove paper (20 x 12.5 cm.), ruled on both sides. The page contains four sections of pencil notes in prose and verse, with the title "A California song " (which became the first verse of the published poem) in medium black ink, and the second title, along with notes dating the second section to "Oct. '73" and the third section to "Nov. '73/ Camden," in blue crayon. In pencil Whitman also drew a cartoon hand pointing to the sentence "Use this point to express/ fully my California views" in the second section. Leaf 4 ("A mighty tree is/ falling."): white wove paper (20.5 x 13 cm.), ruled on recto. In pencil (on recto), with extensive pencil revisions. The verses on this leaf represent an early draft of numbered sections 1 and 2 of the published poem. On the verso (perpendicular to the recto verses) appear notes, deleted in pencil, for "(a sonnet)" written "for Century Verses," which appears from a Library of Congress manuscript to have been a working title of the group that became "Centennial Verses " in 1876. After heavy revision (see verso of leaf 5) the poem became the title-page epigraph to the 1876 ( "Come, said my Soul ") and several later editions of Leaves. The incomplete verso lines are in brown black ink with extensive revisions in the same ink. Leaf 5: on the same type of paper as 4, torn down to 20.5 x 13 cm. Recto is inscribed and extensively revised in pencil; these verses represent an early draft of section 3 of the published poem. On the verso ("Go said my Soul, the real Me,") appears a deleted later draft of the poem whose notes appear on the verso of Leaf 4. The verso lines are inscribed in brown-black ink with extensive revisions in the same ink, in blue crayon, and in pencil, apparently in that order. Leaf 6 ("So for a type for you, your/ race, Pacific lands"): white laid paper (20.5 x 12.5 cm.), ruled on verso. Inscribed in pencil and medium black pen, with heavy revisions in both of these, particularly the pencil, and in light ink. Whitman inscribed the pencil note "last," enclosed in a semicircle, in the upper right corner. After further revision these verses became the last italicized verse paragraph of section 4 of the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 7 ("(The teamsters, choppers, chain/ and jackscrew men/ heard not...)"): White quadrille paper (21 x 13.5 cm.), at one point folded in thirds. Inscribed and extensively revised in pencil. These lines were further revised to form the second and third verse paragraphs of section 2 in the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 8 ("Lands of the Western shore!"): inscribed in medium black ink on the verso of p. [1] of a letter (18 x 11 cm.) cut from a fold of what Bowers characterizes as fine tinted laid paper. The verses are inscribed perpendicular to the sentences of the letter. Revised in the main ink and in a lighter ink. These verses were further revised to form the closing section (6) of the 1876 version of the poem. The letter, deleted in blue crayon, is dated "Boston./ 96 Washington St/ 30 Sept '73" and was written by Boston lawyer Albert B. Otis. In it, Otis expresses his happiness on learning that Whitman's health is improving, thanks him for sending a paper with news of the recovery, and mentions his wish to obtain copies of Whitman's new works as they appear. Whitman used the verso of the second part of the letter as Leaf 3 of the second manuscript of "Song of the Redwood-Tree " (see below). Leaf 9 ("The Cascade range/ On the Pacific—..."): white wove paper (20.5 x 13 cm.), ruled on both sides, with (as Bowers notes) the embossed device of Mercury's winged hat and a caduceus in the upper left corner. Whitman began writing a letter on this page before using it for verse: deleted lines at the top read "431 Stevens st./ cor West" and "Camden,/ Saturday forenoon/ Oct. 25." These trial verses are inscribed in the same medium brown ink as the letter heading, except for the final verse, which appears finished and is written in black ink. Revisions are in the main ink and in a lighter ink. After further revision these verses were incorporated in sections 4 and 5 of the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 10 ("As of the wood-spirits'/ voices ancient, rustly, speaking,"): inscribed on the same paper as Leaf 9, with the same embossed device (reversed, in upper right corner), in medium black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in light ink and the first and last sections deleted. The top deleted section includes several false starts, along with the draft line "A new Man/ and a new empire" in the upper right corner. The undeleted verses were revised to form part of section 4 in the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 11 ("Farewell/ My time has ended, my term has/ come,—"): on the same paper as Leaf 6, also in pencil, with extensive revisions and deletions in the same. Only the verse quoted here was allowed to stand; it was used as the final line of section 1 in the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 12 ("or chorus of dryads, fading, departing"): inscribed on the verso of a letter (22.5 x 17.5 cm.) from Whitman family friend Abby H. Price to Whitman's sister-in-law Mrs. George (Louisa Orr) Whitman. The letter and verses are on blue-tinted wove paper. Whitman's lines run perpendicular to the letter's, and are in brown-black ink, with revisions in the same. Multiple pinholes at top and bottom of Whitman's verses rather than in center. The first verse became part of section 1 in the 1876 version, and the rest of the verses on the leaf were revised to form section 5. The letter is written in brown-black ink (deleted with a blue crayon stroke), and is dated "New York. Oct 17th." In it, Abby Price tells Louisa Whitman of her dismay in reading newspaper reports that Walt Whitman "'is...dangerously ill'" and asks her for more news. Leaf 13 ("Thus on the northern coast/ in the lumber-men's camp"): on white laid paper (20.5 x 15 cm.), ruled on both sides, inscribed in brown- black ink and pencil, with extensive revisions and notes from Whitman to himself in the same. After further revision these lines became the final verse paragraph of section 4 in the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 14 ("Nor these alone—not dedicate to these/ alone,..."): inscribed on the verso of a letter dated 1873 October 15 (21 x 12.5 cm.) to Whitman from his friend Charley [Eldridge]. On white laid paper, ruled on both sides, and embossed with the letters "P & P" (inside a decorative border) in the upper left corner. In medium-black ink, with three false starts, a paragraph mark, and revisions in the same. Whitman's lines run perpendicular to the letter's. After further revision these lines were incorporated in the first few verses of section 6 of the 1876 version of the poem. In the letter, dated "Washington Oct 15. 1873" and deleted with a single blue crayon stroke, Eldridge reports collecting various articles of Whitman's clothing, with Whitman's companion Peter Doyle, from a room the poet kept in Washington, D.C., and sending them via Adams Express. Leaf 15 ("(Surely I did not dream)"): on white wove paper (20 x 12.5 cm.), ruled on both sides, and embossed in one corner with the die of the Juniata Mills, Pennsylvania. Inscribed in medium black ink, with revisions in the same. These trial verses were revised and expanded to become the final italicized verse paragraph of section 3 of the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 16 ("The influences of nature,"): on white wove paper (19.5 x 12.5 cm.), ruled on recto. In pencil, with extensive revisions in the same. These verses were further revised and incorporated in the final italicized paragraph of section 4 in the 1876 version of the poem. Leaf 17 ("The tree prophecies"): on a section of white laid paper (torn down to 15.5 x 12 cm.) embossed with what appears to be the same paper-maker's die as leaf 14, but only ruled on recto. Inscribed and revised in pencil. The pinholes are positioned near the top of the leaf. These trial verses express the themes of much of the finished poem. Leaf 18 ("The spinal idea of/ the poem"): on white wove paper (19.5 x 12 cm.), ruled on both sides. Inscribed and revised in pencil. This combination of prose and poetic notes provides an overview of the entire poem. Leaf 19 ("...or seemed to say"): on white wove paper (19 x 12 cm.), ruled on both sides. Inscribed and revised in pencil. These verses were further revised and incorporated in sections 3 and 4 of the published poem in 1876. Leaf 20 ("Lessons to the/ race to grow"): on a fragment of white wove paper torn down to 11 x 12.5 cm., ruled on verso. Inscribed in pencil. Pinholes at foot of fragment, i.e., in the center of the original page, and in the current center. These trial verses provide an outline of most of the italicized passages (representing the Redwood's voice) in the published poem.

    • Box-folder 1:91
      "Song of the Redwood Tree," n.d.,
      AMs 2nd draft, 11 leaves, handwritten, #3829 (Bowers #13).

      Leaves described individually as follows. Unless otherwise noted, pinholes are clustered at the center of each leaf. Whitman also numbered each leaf in blue crayon in the upper right corner of the page. Leaf 1: on a composite leaf made of two fragments (12.5 x 19 and 5.5 x 12.5 cm.) of different kinds of white laid paper (the bottom fragment ruled on recto, the top not ruled) pasted together. The top set of verses is inscribed in brown-black ink and revised in pencil and in the original ink; the bottom lines are inscribed in pencil, with revisions in the brown-black ink. Whitman numbered this section in blue crayon. Pinholes in center of each part of the composite leaf. With a small amount of further revision this leaf became section 1 of the published poem. Leaf 2 ("Along the northern coast,"): on a leaf of white laid paper torn down to 12.5 x 19.5 cm.; the watermark "[HAND?]MADE" is partly visible. On the back appear pencil notes in Whitman's hand for a letter regarding a painting or photograph of Whitman(?); this draft letter is deleted in blue crayon. The verses are inscribed in brown-black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in pencil, and in blue crayon. Whitman also numbered this section in blue crayon. After a small amount of further revision these lines became the first verse paragraph of section 2 in the published version. Leaf 3 ("The choppers haply heard not—the/ camp-shanties echoed not,"): on the verso of p. [2] (17.5 x 11 cm.) of the Albert B. Otis letter, 1873 September 30, used for leaf 8 of the rough draft manuscript (see above); this part of the letter is also deleted with a blue crayon stroke. The verses are inscribed in medium black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. After further revision they became the second and third verse paragraphs of section 2 in the published version. Leaf 4 ("You untold life of me,"): on three sections of unruled white laid paper from the same page (15 x 13, 5.5 x 13, and 6 x 13 cm.) joined by means of two irregular fragments of white ruled paper pasted to the back. The ruled fragments contain ink and pencil notes for the poem, but at a very early stage of development. The recto verses are inscribed in medium black ink and revised in the same ink, in pencil, and in blue crayon. Whitman also numbered this section 3 in blue crayon: it became the first verse paragraph of that section in the 1876 version. In pencil, he added the note "ital" in the upper left corner and underlined almost every verse to indicate that the Tree's voice should be printed in italics. As Bowers notes, Whitman cut up and rearranged this page to reverse the order of the lines on the second and third sections of paper. Leaf 5 ("N[or yie]ld we mournfully, majestic brothers,"): on a composite leaf formed of two sections of paper pasted together; the top section (10 x 15 cm.), damaged along the top edge, is of the same kind of paper used for leaf 13 of the rough draft and leaves 8 and 9 of this draft, and the bottom section (18.5 x 13 cm.) is of white wove paper, ruled on one side. The verses are inscribed in brown-black ink with heavy revisions in the same ink and in pencil. After further revision these sections became the second and third verse paragraphs, respectively, of section 3 of the poem. Leaf 6 ("Then to a loftier strain/ Still prouder, more extatic rose/ the chant,"): on two sections of different kinds of white paper, the lower section (20 x 12.5 cm.; wove, ruled on one side) being pasted to the top one (10 x 13 cm.; laid, unruled). The lower section is inscribed on the verso of part of a sheet of Department of Justice letterhead with the dateline "Washington...187[ ]," under which Whitman jotted down and deleted directions to the Hydropathic Institute in Wernersville (Pennsylvania) in blue crayon. He also used blue crayon to designate the verses section 4, of which they became the first two paragraphs in the published version. The verses are inscribed in brown-black ink, with heavy revisions in the same and in pencil. Whitman added the note "ital" after joining the two paper sections, and concomitantly underlined each verse of the lower section for the same reasons as in leaf 4. Leaf 7 ("You occult, deep volitions"): on white wove paper (25.5 x 20 cm.), ruled on both sides. Inscribed in medium black ink, with revisions in the same, in pencil, and (possibly) in a lighter ink. The upper right corner is damaged, leaving the leaf number partially missing, but it seems clear that the number was a 7. As Bowers notes, the deleted title "You occult, deathless, deep volitions " indicates that this was once an independent poem (as the existence of an early draft of the lines at Duke University would seem to confirm), but Whitman revised and italicized the lines—the note "ital" and underlinings in pencil also appear here—for inclusion as the third paragraph of section 4 in the published version of "Song of the Redwood-Tree. " Leaf 8 ("For you, for man of you your characteristic race,"): on a section (21 x 16 cm.) of the same kind of paper used for leaves 5 (in part) and 9; inscribed in medium black ink, with extensive revisions in the same, in pencil, and in what seems to be a lighter ink. The verses are all underlined in the lighter ink(?) using a fine pen. At the bottom of the leaf appear the words "Idaho, Utah" in blue crayon. After further revision these lines became the fourth verse paragraph, and the final italicized one, of section 4 in the published version of the poem. Leaf 9 ("Thus on the northern coast,"): on a section (20.5 x 16 cm.) of the same kind of paper used for leaves 5 (in part) and 8; inscribed in medium black ink, with revisions in the same ink, in a lighter ink, and in pencil. The number 5 appears at the top of the leaf, obscured by the addition of new lines. In actuality these verses became the final paragraph of section 4 in the published version of the poem. Leaf 10 ("The flashing & golden pageant of California,"): on a section of white laid paper (21 x 20 cm.), in brown-black ink, with extensive revisions in the same ink, in a lighter ink, and in pencil. The blue-crayon section number 6 appears next to a deleted pencil 2 at the top of the leaf; at the bottom appears the ink note "? Yosemite" separated from the lines with a semicircle. These verses were further revised to form section 5 of the published version. Leaf 11 ("But more in you, than these, I see, lands of the western shore!"): on three sections of white wove paper (top: 7 x 20 cm., unruled; middle: 8 x 19.5 cm., unruled; foot: 10 x 20.5 cm., ruled) pasted together and jointly pasted to a paper fragment (6.5 x 20 cm.) containing an earlier, deleted set of verses that are revised in the current top section. The top and concealed sections are both inscribed on the verso of fragments of a letter, written in purple ink and deleted by Whitman in blue crayon, from the engraver W. J. Linton. As Bradley and Blodgett note, Linton produced a portrait of Whitman that the poet included in Two Rivulets and that also inspired the poem "Out from Behind This Mask. " In what remains of the letter Linton inquires after Whitman's health. The verses on this composite leaf were revised to form the sixth and final section of the published version of the poem.

  • Box-folder 1:92
    "Songs of Departure," [ca. 1881],
    AMs draft title page, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 12 x 19.5 cm., #3829 (Bowers #19).

    On one leaf (12 x 19.5 cm.) of white laid paper, ruled on recto. In light brown ink, with one deletion in the same ink. This appears to have been a trial cover leaf for the cluster "Songs of Parting, " new to the 1881 edition of Leaves of Grass . Whitman struck out the words "A few" above the current title, but left undeleted four other possibilities at the top of the leaf: "Songs of Departure/ Departing,/ Termination/ Completion. "

  • Box-folder 1:93
    "The Soul's Procession," [ca. 1869],
    AMsS, 13 leaves (3 pp. loosely inserted) with attached news clipping, "The Steamship Pereire Disaster," January 28 [1869], and partial typed excerpts from manuscript. #5604.

    "The Soul's Procession " comprises very early notes for a projected poem that Whitman inscribed in a handmade notebook (20.5 x 13 cm.). This he made by folding in half seven leaves of white laid Philp & Solomon (Washington, D.C.) paper (measuring 25 x 19.5 cm. unfolded), ruled in blue on both sides (type A), in the direct middle of which he inserted a gathering of three folded leaves of a different kind of white laid paper (type B), ruled horizontally in blue on both sides, but also featuring a single vertical rule in blue and red. This gathering is held together with a metal bracket, and is bound in with the main notebook pages by means of a pink ribbon. Three sections of type B paper are also tipped in between bound type A pages. Inscribed and revised in black ink, in pencil, and in blue crayon. Although Whitman never finished or published "The Soul's Procession " during his lifetime, Bradley and Blodgett note that the same ideas worked out here inform many of his poems, particularly the 1871 independent publication Passage to India. For a transcription of the notebook with comprehensive annotations see Grier's Notebooks and Unpublished Prose Manuscripts , vol. 4, pp. 1390-94. The earliest dating of the notebook is supplied by an 1869 newspaper clipping pasted to Leaf 3, but Grier speculates, based on the shakiness of Whitman's handwriting in later leaves, that some of the notes may have been added after the poet suffered a paralyzing stroke in 1873. On the back cover appear pencil notes detailing train numbers, times, and (apparently) amounts of money.

    • Title page: The Soul's Procession, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      This half-leaf (19.5 x 12.5 cm.) constitutes the front cover. It bears the die of Philp & Solomon in the (current) upper right corner. The title is inscribed and underlined in brown ink, and Whitman's initials appear in pencil in the center of the page, to the left of a pencil squiggle.

    • Page 1. affords a field for many, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      Inscribed on type A Philp & Solomon paper in black ink, with no revisions, on the page directly following the front cover.

    • Page 2. In Soul's Procession, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the type A page currently following Leaf 2, but originally following another type A page that Whitman bound with the other pages and later cut and tore (irregularly) out. The stub of the excised portion of the original leaf can be seen here. A piece of very thin tan wove paper was inserted here, and a newspaper clipping dated in pencil (by Whitman?) 1869, about "The Steamship Pereire Disaster," was pasted directly to the lower left section of Leaf 3. The trial verse "My ship sails the sea/ in a storm" appears at the end of Whitman's prose notes and beneath the clipping, which documents the near-sinking of a steamship in the Atlantic during a "furious gale." Inscribed in black ink, with a short horizontal line separating the note "In Soul's Procession" from the rest of the notes.

    • Page 3. The Soul's procession (The idea -after), ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 10 cm.

      On a section of type B paper (16 x 10 cm.) from the same irregular cutting as leaves 5 and 6, tipped in directly after Leaf 3. Some pinholes matching those on leaves 5 and 6—but in a way that indicates that Whitman pinned the leaves together more than once—appear in the center and near the left margin. Inscribed, like leaves 5 and 6, in pencil, with cartoon hands to emphasize key points. The title is underlined in pencil. Bradley and Blodgett publish leaves 4-6 on pp. 611-12 (2002 ed.), noting that the prose notes on Leaf 4 break into trial verses on leaves 5 and 6.

    • Page 4. itself-There is, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 10 cm.

      On a section of type B paper (16 x 10 cm.) tipped in after the type A page that follows leaf 4. See Leaf 4 description for notes on the pinholes. Inscribed in pencil, with no revisions. These lines are all formatted as trial verses rather than prose notes.

    • Page 5. The orbs of the suns, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 16 x 10 cm.

      On a section of type B paper (16 x 10 cm.) tipped in after the type A page that follows leaf 5. See Leaf 4 description for notes on the pinholes. Inscribed in pencil with heavy revisions; the first two verses (beginning "I knew the greater idea/ of Space") are deleted with a single vertical pencil stroke. The last verse ends without a period.

    • Page 6. The Soul's Procession, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the first page (20.5 x 12.5 cm.) of the type B gathering, which starts after the type A page following leaf 6. The page is blank below the title, which is inscribed and underlined in pencil.

    • Page 7. The general idea-passing, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the second page of the type B gathering (Whitman did not use the versos). Inscribed and revised in (smudged) pencil. The note "Agassiz—/ Animal Life p. 53" at the center of the page apparently refers to Louis Agassiz' The Structure of Animal Life , delivered as six lectures in 1862 and first published in 1865. A horizontal line separates the upper set of notes from lower ones, which are formatted as trial verses.

    • Page 8. The material is all, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the third page of the type B gathering. The first half of the page is devoted to pencil trial verses that represent a continuation of Leaf 8. Following these, and separated from them by a horizontal line in black ink, occurs a set of prose notes beginning with the words "Make a succession/ of splendid gorgeous/ stately pageants or/ moving panoramas."

    • Page 9. The successive developments, ca. 1869
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the fourth page of the type B gathering. Inscribed in (somewhat smudged) black ink. These notes represent an intermediate stage between prose notes and trial verses; they are formatted as verses, but contain Whitman's instructions to himself, offering an outline of future verses rather than a sketch.

    • Page 10. All these shows are for, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 20.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the sixth page of the type B gathering. Inscribed and revised in black ink. Whitman's note "Query?" appears above the first line. Several phrases, like "History," "The Wars," and "The greatest philosophers," are inscribed in very large letters and underlined.

    • Page 12. Then at the end, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the first type A page after the type B gathering. These highly fragmentary prose and verse notes are inscribed in pencil and blue crayon, with some revisions to the blue crayon section in the same medium. Different sections of the notes are separated with dashes.

    • Page 13. Piece on Greenwood Cemetery, ca. 1869,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 19.5 x 12.5 cm.

      On the second type A page after the type B gathering. Inscribed, quite shakily, in pencil. The working title is underlined. As indicated above, these lines represent an intermediate stage between prose notes and trial verses. The different sections are separated by short horizontal lines. Although Whitman wrote about Greenwood Cemetery (Brooklyn) elsewhere, he did not use these notes for the independent poem he was apparently projecting on this leaf.

  • Box-folder 1:94
    "Sounds of the Winter" under "Old Age Echoes."

    The general title appears to be "Old Age Echoes, " but beneath that title are the two poems under which titles the item is catalogued: "Sounds of the Winter " and "The Unexpress'd. " Pasted to the leaf below the second poem is a woodcut engraving of Walt Whitman along with his autograph. Under that is what has been classified as two lines from an unidentified poem. A note at top states, "intended to make one page."

  • Box-folder 2:1
    "Spenser's single objects...," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    From "Shorter Notes, Isolated Words" section #54.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    "Studies of Womanhood," [ca. 1850-1860],
    AMs, 5 pp. on 5 l., mounted, #3829 (Bowers #21).
    • Fragment 1. Poem of Names, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7.5 cm. x 12.5 cm.

      Pencil on white paper. Pasted on top half of archival leaf.

    • Fragment 2. ?Poem of different incidents, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 12 cm. x 13 cm.

      Ink on pink paper. Pasted on bottom half of archival leaf.

    • Fragment 3. Mothers precede all, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 8 cm. x 13.5 cm.

      Pencil on verso of envelope. Pasted on top half of archival leaf.

    • Fragment 4. In Poems, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7.5 cm. x 15.5 cm.

      Ink on blue paper. Pasted on bottom half of archival leaf. Verso has some notes for poem "[America, so young and so magnificent]. "

    • Fragment 5. Intersperse here and, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 5.5 cm. x 8 cm.

      Written in ink. Pasted on top third of archival leaf.

    • Fragment 6. Poem of Kisses, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 5 cm. x 9.5 cm.

      Written in ink. Pasted in middle of archival leaf.

    • Fragment 7. Song in Poem of Kisses, 1850-1880,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 7.5 cm. x 11.5 cm.

      Written in pencil. Pasted on bottom third of archival leaf.

    • Fragment 8. Poem illustrative of the Woman under the 'new dispensation', 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 17 cm. x 16 cm.

      Written in ink. Pasted to own archival leaf.

    • Fragment 9. You woman, mother of children, 1850-1860,
      1 leaf, handwritten, 24.5 cm. x 24.5 cm.

      Ink on lined paper. Pasted on own archival leaf.

  • Box-folder 2:3
    "Sustenance for the great geniuses...," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    From "Memoranda from Books" section #64.

  • Box-folder 2:4
    "They do not seem to me...," [ca. 1860],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 13 cm. x 11.5 cm., #3829-i.

    This manuscript is a draft of lines that were published in "Chants Democratic, " number 13, in the 1860 edition of Leaves of Grass . That poem was later revised and published as "Laws for Creations "; however, the lines on this manuscript are a draft of the section of the poem that was deleted after the 1860 publication.

  • Box-folder 2:5
    "A Thought of Columbus," [ca. 1891],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 12.5 cm. x 25 cm., Barrow, #3829 (Bowers #8).

    A draft of "A Thought of Columbus, " a poem first published on July 16, 1892, in Once a Week , accompanied by Horace Traubel's account of its composition, called "Walt Whitman's Last Poem." This manuscript is a draft of only the first six lines and is dated 1891.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    "Three verses-One for North, One for South, One for West," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., handwritten, 22.5 x 13.5 cm., Barrow, #3829 (Bowers #27).

    On one leaf of white wove paper (22.5 x 13.5 cm.), in very dark brown-black ink, with revisions in the same ink and in pencil. Multiple pinholes just below center. At the top, which is damaged, can be seen a title or notes for a different poem reading "[One?] Song—Come Philander "; the preliminary and incomplete draft of "Three verses " (with the note "2d or 3d verse" and a question mark at different points) appears beneath a horizontal line. Whitman apparently never revised the poem further, and it was never published. At some point the leaf was folded in half, apparently to form part of a small notebook. On the verso appear two independent texts. One is a list of names and addresses (beginning with his brother and sisters "Jeff./ Mary/ Han[nah]" and including his friends and supporters Mrs. [Anne Burrows] Gilchrist, W[illiam] M[ichael] Rossetti, and [Edward] Dowden) of people to whom Whitman had apparently mailed copies of an article or book; all but two of the names are checked off in ink or in orange crayon. On the facing half-leaf, in pencil (mostly erased or deleted) and struck through with the same orange crayon, appear what seem to be notes for a newspaper announcement, beginning "Walt Whitman, after an absence of almost three years, appeared again on Pennsylvania Avenue this forenoon." Based on this date it can be speculated that the notes were written late in 1875 (a possibility corroborated by the list of names), but the poem(s) may have been inscribed in the late 1860s or earlier.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    "Time, always without break...," 1887 March 14,
    AMsS, 1 leaf, handwritten, 27 cm. x 20.5 cm., #3839-j.

    This manuscript is a quotation from "Song of the Answerer " (from section two, two lines beginning "Time always without break") and Whitman's signature. The manuscript is dated March 14, 1887 .

  • Box-folder 2:8
    "The Time and Lands are devoted to the Real," [ca. 1872],
    AMs, 2 pp. on 2 l., handwritten, 18.5 x 18.5 cm. to 20 x 18 cm., #3829-i.

    On two sections of white, gray-ruled laid Department of Justice letterhead, the first cut down to 20 x 18 cm. and the second reduced to 18.5 x 18.5 cm. The engraved heading is missing from the first leaf but appears on the verso of the second, above the date "187[ ]." Both pages are inscribed in black ink, with revisions in the same and in brown-black ink. The first two entries on Leaf 1 appear to contain general notes for this poem; the second entry reads, "Make a demand for/ the Ideal, (or/ rather idea of the/ Ideal of the real)." This is followed by the note "in the piece," which leads up to several trial verses eventually incorporated in the second verse paragraph of numbered section 5 of "Thou Mother With Thy Equal Brood. " Leaf 2 ("? Or—a song—a chant/ which shall sing—celebrate/—America..."): these general notes, ending with a cartoon hand singling out the lines "All the states/ East & west,/ north & south/ Brotherhood/ an equal union[,]" prefigure the whole poem, but particularly such lines as "South, North, West, East,/ (To thy immortal breasts, Mother of All, thy every daughter,/ son, endear'd alike, forever equal,)" in the same section projected on Leaf 1.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    "A tip-top caricature of Walt Whitman," [ca. 1872],
    AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 15.5 cm. x 20.5 cm., #3829-h.

    This manuscript is a draft of a piece for a periodical advertising the presence of a new "burlesque portrait" of Whitman by Frank Bellew. It was apparently published in the Fifth Avenue Journal in 1872.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    "To a Literat," [1857-1859],
    AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 21 cm. x 12 cm., #3829-i.

    On a tax form trimmed down to 21 x 12 cm., with the upper corners cropped diagonally. Two sets of pinholes. The first two verses, taken more or less directly from "[Of Biography], " have no revisions, but the remaining three verses represent a significant expansion of the themes in the prose notes and are extensively revised. Two of the corrections are in brown ink. These verses, which precede "[Walt Whitman's law] " in the composition process, correspond, like "[Of Biography], " to section 2 of the 1860 version of the poem.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    "To an Exclusive," n.d.,
    AMs, 2 pp. on 2 l., 20.5 cm. x 13 cm., with typed transcription. #3829 (Bowers #5).

    Two leaves of ink on pink paper. Verso of second leaf is ordered list of poems beginning with "33 A Handful of Air" and ending with "72 Leaf." Note indicates poem as unpublished.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    "Today," [ca. 1888],
    AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 20 x 25 cm., #3829-a.

    Note on top states "sent April 21 to Herald."

  • Box-folder 2:13
    "Trent Affair," n.d.,
    AN, 1 leaf, handwritten, 14 cm. x 15.5 cm., #3829 (Bowers #68).

    On the top half of leaf is a printed, struck-through copy of the note about the Trent Affair which accompanied Whitman's poem "For Queen Victoria's Birthday, " which was published first in 1890. On the bottom half of leaf is a note written in purple pencil reading, "W.W.'s respects—/—if convenient print in paper of 24th/—no pay expected."

  • Box-folder 2:14
    "Two Rivulets," [ca. 1875],
    AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 22.5 cm. x 16.5 cm., Barrow. #3829 (Bowers #6).

    A partial draft of the Preface to Two Rivulets , a volume published in 1876.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    "The Unexpressed" under "Old Age Echoes."

    The general title appears to be "Old Age Echoes, " but beneath that title are the two poems under which titles the item is catalogued: "Sounds of the Winter " and "The Unexpress'd. " Pasted to the leaf below the second poem is a woodcut engraving of Walt Whitman along with his autograph. Under that is what has been classified as two lines from an unidentified poem. A note at top states, "intended to make one page."

  • Box-folder 2:16
    Unidentified Manuscript, ca. 1880,
    AMs fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., Barrow, #3829-y.

    Possibly Democratic Vistas.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    "The Wall about Martyrs," [1888],
    AMsS, 3 fragments attached on 1 leaf, handwritten, 11.5 cm. x 20.5 cm., Barrow, #3829-a.

    Note at bottom states "sent to Herald March 11." Written in ink and partially on verso of letter addressed to Walt Whitman from London.

  • Box-folder 2:18
    "Walt Whitman: A description of His Birthplace...," 1850 September 11, 12, 13,
    Physical Location: Slipcase #4.
    AMs, 2 pp. on 1 l., #5604.

    Includes copy of drawing, "Where Walt Whitman was Born"; printed sheet, "Walt Whitman, His Home and His Inspiring Oak"; typed description of Whitman's birthplace.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    "Walt Whitman is putting the later touches...," [1890 November 10],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    Autobiographical sketch for publication in "The Critic."

  • Box-folder 2:20
    "Walt Whitman's law...," [ca. 1857-1859],
    AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 22 cm. x 12 cm., #3829-i.

    On a full tax form (22 cm. x 12 cm.) with the corners slightly cropped diagonally. Two sets of pinholes in center. This leaf, bearing the deleted title "To an artist, literat, &c " and first line "Come, I have now to tell/ you[,]" revises and expands on "To a Literat.— " It was revised to form sections 1 and 2 of the 1860 version of the poem, after first being revised itself in the leaves described under "Chants Democratic " below.

  • Box-folder 2:21
    "Walt Whitman's Works, 1876 Edition," [ca. 1876],
    Autograph revisions to book review, initialed, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 2:22
    "We suppose it will excite the mirth...," n.d.,
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    From "Notes on the Meaning and Intention of 'Leaves of Grass,'" section #59.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    "the whale-boat, 'the harpoonersman,'" [late 1850's],
    AMs, 1 leaf, handwritten, 21 cm. x 12 cm., #3829-i.

    This manuscript contains notes about whales. The relationship of this manuscript to Whitman's published work is unknown. These notes may be a continuation of notes written on a separate leaf and held at Duke University (The Trent Collection of Walt Whitman Manuscripts, Duke University Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library), "The Whale," MS 4 to 88.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    "Whitman's Poems summed up, [ca. 1876],
    AMs, 4 pp. on 4 l., with typed transcription, #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 2:25
    "With every heaving wave," [ca. 1880's],
    AMs fragment, 1 leaf, handwritten, 24 cm. x 14.5 cm., #3829-a.

    Believed to be for or from some poem in Sands at Seventy . Final version of poem entitled, "By That Long Scan of Waves." Written in purple pencil and ink. Includes a negative photostat of manuscript.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    "You Tides with Ceaseless Swell," [ca. 1888-1889],
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l., 25 cm. x 19.5 cm. , with typed transcription. #3829 (Bowers #24).

    One leaf in ink on lined paper with pencil revisions.

Series II: Miscellaneous Manuscripts
  • Box-folder 2:27
    Mortgage signed by Walter Whitman and Louisa Whitman, 1838 January 9-February 8,
    DS, 3 pp. on 4 l., Barrow, #3829-q.
  • Box-folder 2:28
    Pocket Notebook, 1863,
    AMs, 17 pp., 8 leaves, handwritten, 12 cm. x 20 cm., #3829.

    Pocket notebook of Walt Whitman in which he made notes of his visits with patients in Civil War hospitals. Consists of notes written in pencil on 8 leaves of paper folded in half to form a booklet which is bound with a pink ribbon. The notebook lists names and details about various Civil War soldiers that Whitman met while volunteering in Washington, D. C., hospitals during the war.

  • Box-folder 2:29
    Walt Whitman's Will, 1873 May 15-16,
    ADS, 3 pp. on 1 l., measuring 34 cm. x 21 cm., written in ink on legal foolscap (lined paper), with a typed description, #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 2:30
    Walt Whitman to the U.S. Department of Justice, 1874 December 2,
    ADS fragment, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:31
    Printed Map of the United States of America, [1879],
    Physical Location: Vault Oversize V-13.
    D, 1 p. on 1 l., silking, #3829 (Bowers #67).

    With autograph lines by Walt Whitman showing his past and proposed trips.

  • Box-folder 2:32
    Autograph signature, 1881 October 18,
    1 p. on 1 l., #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 2:33
    [Walt Whitman] to J. W. Bartlett, [1884 July 6],
    Autographed envelope with enclosure and explanatory note by J. W. Bartlett on back of envelope, 1 item. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 2:34
    Flower and pin with signed inscription, "From Walt Whitman's breast 'posy,'" 1886 January 6,
    Artifact, in sealed mylar envelope, 1 item. #10204-az.
  • Box-folder 2:35
    United States 49th Congress, 2nd Session, 1886-1887, House of Representatives, Report No. 3856 on "Walt Whitman," 1887 February 1,
    D, 3 pp. on 2 l., Barrow, #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:36
    [Walt Whitman] to Talcott Williams, [1890 December 6],
    Autographed envelope, 1 item, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 2:37
    Walt Whitman's last will and testament, 1891 December 24,
    DS, 4 pp. on 2 l., in hand of Thomas B. [Harned], lawyer and literary executor to Whitman, #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:38
    Legal Document establishing Louisa Orr Whitman as Walt Whitman's executor, 1892 April 7,
    DS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:39
    Legal Document establishing Louisa Orr Whitman as Walt Whitman's executor, 1892 April 8,
    DS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:40
    Certification of Augusta Harned and Elizabeth Keller attesting to authenticity of the codicil to Walt Whitman's will, 1892 April 8,
    DS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:41
    [Walt Whitman] to Melville Phillips, n.d.,
    Autographed envelope, 1 item, #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 2:42
    [Walt Whitman] to Dion Thomas, n.y. October 16,
    Autographed envelope, 1 item, #3829 (Bowers #39).
  • Box-folder 2:43
    Self-addressed envelope, n.y. March 17,
    1 item, #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 2:44
    [Walt Whitman] to [Tal]cott Williams, n.d.,
    Autographed envelope, 1 item, #3829-a.
Series III: Correspondence
  • Box-folder 2:45
    Ellen C. Ahern to R. V. Thornton, 1949 July 21,
    TLS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    Regarding Whitman correspondence to Robert Underwood Johnson, 1879 October 29.

  • Box-folder 2:46
    H. M. Alden to Walt Whitman, 1873 November 1,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #32).
  • Box-folder 2:47
    Jack Biriss to Carroll Atwood Wilson, 1936 February 25,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-z.
  • Box-folder 2:48
    Richard [Maurice] Bucke to Walt [Whitman], 1886 June 9,
    4 pp. on 1 l., with envelope, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 2:49
    John Burroughs to [John Jay] Knox, 1873 September 14,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 2 l., with envelope, #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:50
    John Burroughs to [Clara Barrus], [1906] November 19,
    ALS, 12 pp. on 12 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:51
    Edward Carpenter to Walt [Whitman], 1878 May 13,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:52
    E[dward] Clifford to [E. R.] Pease, [1885 June 24],
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.

    Edward Clifford is an English artist.

  • Box-folder 2:53
    Mary Davis to Dr. [Raley] Bell, 1903 May 13,
    ALS, 3p. on 3 l., with envelope, Barrow, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 2:54
    Mary Davis to Dr. [Raley] Bell, 1903 December 23,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 2:55
    Mary Davis to Dr. [Raley] Bell, 1906 August 21,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 2:56
    Peter Doyle to Walt [Whitman], [1868?] September 18,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #33).
  • Box-folder 2:57
    Peter [Doyle] to Walt [Whitman], [1868] September 23,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:58
    Peter [Doyle] to Walt [Whitman], [1868] October 1,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:59
    Pete[r] [Doyle] to Walt [Whitman], n.y. October 14,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #36).
  • Box-folder 2:60
    Charley [Eldridge] to Walt [Whitman], 1873 October 15,
    Physical Location: On recto of leaf 14 of "Song of the Redwood Tree," beginning "But [struck out] Nor these alone" in Box 1, folder 90.
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.
  • Box-folder 2:61
    Ralph Waldo Emerson to Walt Whitman, 1855 July 21,
    Xerox copy of facsimile, 7 pp. on 7 l., #3829-o.
  • Box-folder 2:62
    Charles E. Feinberg to Francis L. Berkeley, Jr. 1958 May 8,
    TLS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.

    Regarding a Walt Whitman letter to Peter Doyle, 1888 November 19, proven to be a forgery.

  • Box-folder 2:63
    H[orace] Howard Furness to [Edmund] Gosse, 1892 March 29,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 2:64
    Ann Gilchrist to Walt Whitman, 1879 October 6,
    ALS, 8 pp. on 2 l., with typed transcription. #3829 (Bowers #34).

    Originally enclosed in Walt Whitman letter to John Burroughs, [1879] November 23.

  • Box-folder 2:65
    Ann Gilchrist to Edward Pease, 1885 January 24,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:66
    Ann Gilchrist to [Edward] Pease, 1885 June 28,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:67
    Ann Gilchrist to [Edward] Pease, 1885 July 1,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:68
    Ann Gilchrist to [Edward] Pease, 1885 July 3,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:69
    Ann Gilchrist to [Edward] Pease, 1885 July 4,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:70
    Ann Gilchrist to [Edward] Pease, [1885?] July 14,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:71
    Ann Gilchrist to [Edward] Pease, [1885?] July 20,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:72
    J. B. Gilder to [Walt] Whitman, 1887 March 17,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. regarding Tennyson-Whitman correspondence, #3829-i.

    SEE verso Walt Whitman to [J. B. Gilder], [1887] March 18.

  • Box-folder 2:73
    J. L. and J. B. Gilder to [Walt Whitman], 1890 November 1,
    TLS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    SEE verso of AMs, "Walt Whitman is putting the later touches...."

  • Box-folder 2:74
    Joseph Jackson to Mr. Borneman, 1943 July 28,
    TLS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #5604.

    Regarding a pencil sketch by Joseph Jackson completed at Walt Whitman's birthday dinner in Philadelphia on May 31, 1890.

  • Box-folder 2:75
    [?] Johnston to [Walt Whitman], 1874 July 16,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    See verso of manuscript fragment, "the best part of literature and religion."

  • Box-folder 2:76
    J. Johnston to James W. Watt, 1901 March 25,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #3829-l.
  • Box-folder 2:77
    J[ohn] H. Johnston to Mr. Watson, 1912 March 11,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    Includes Whitman manuscript, "the city as well as country. Other wars..." and photograph of Walt Whitman, Harry, and Kitty Johnston.

  • Box-folder 2:78
    Jacob Klein to W. S. Kennedy, 1881 September 1,
    ALS photocopy, 1 p. on 1 l., with envelope, #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 2:78-a
    W. J. Linton to [Walt Whitman], n.d.,
    ALS fragment, 1 p. on 1 l. on verso of leaf 11, "Song of the Redwood Tree," 2nd draft.
  • Box-folder 2:79
    Edwin Miller to R. V. Thornton, 1957 December 24,
    TLS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    Regarding Whitman correspondence to C. F. Currie, 1890 August 1.

  • Box-folder 2:80
    Edwin Miller to C. Waller Barrett, 1960 November 4,
    TLS, 1 p on 1 l., #3829-j.

    Regarding Whitman correspondence to Oran S. Baldwin, 1883 December 15.

  • Box-folder 2:81
    Edwin Miller to C. Waller Barrett, 1960 December 24,
    TLS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-j.

    Regarding Whitman correspondence to Oran S. Baldwin, 1883 December 15.

  • Box-folder 2:82
    Thomas Hancock [Nunn?] to E. R. Pease, 1885 June 24,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:83
    Albert B. [Otis] to [Walt Whitman], 1873 September 30,
    Physical Location: Original of p. [1] on recto of leaf 8 of first draft of "Song of the Redwood Tree," in Box 1, folder 90. Original of p. [2] on recto of leaf 3 of second draft of "Song of the Redwood Tree," in Box 1, folder 91.
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.; photocopy.
  • Box-folder 2:84
    James Parton to [?], 1867 November 26,
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.

    Regarding Walt Whitman's financial state, with attached clipping from Boston Saturday Evening Gazette, November 17, 1867.

  • Box-folder 2:85
    Abby H. Price to Mrs. George Whitman, n.y. October [17?],
    ALS, on verso of page in "Song of the Redwood Trees."
  • Box-folder 2:86
    Ernest Rhys to Walt Whitman, 1887 March 29,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 2 l., #3829 (Bowers #35).

    SEE Walt Whitman to [William Sloane Kennedy?], ALS, April 11, 1887.

  • Box-folder 2:87
    T. W. Rolleston to Walt Whitman, 1888 September 1,
    APCS, 1 p., #3829 (Bowers #64).
  • Box-folder 2:88
    J.H. Rome to James W. Watt, 1900 August 4,
    ALS with envelope, #3829-l.
  • Box-folder 2:89
    [Charles Rowley, Jr.] to E. R. Pease, 1885 June 26,
    AN, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:90
    Charles Rowley, Jr. to E. R. Pease, 1885 June 29,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 2:91
    Henry S. Saunders to Elsa Barker, 1912 September 10,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #3829-d.
  • Box-folder 2:92
    W[illiam] B. Scott to [Sidney] Colvin, [1870] May 9,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:93
    William B. Scott to Sidney Colvin, 1870 September 25,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:94
    "Secretary to Mr. Barrett" to Edwin Miller, 1960 December 15,
    TL, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-j.

    Regarding Whitman correspondence to Oran S. Baldwin, 1883 December 15.

  • Box-folder 2:95
    J[ohn] A[ddington] Symonds to "My dear Clifford," 1872 February 8,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 2:96
    [folder intentionally empty]
  • Box-folder 2:97
    [unidentified autograph seeker] to Walt Whitman, 1878 March 27,
    AL fragment.

    See verso of "How often I have fancied..."

  • Box-folder 2:98
    [unsigned] to Mrs. Mary Davis, [1872],
    1 p. on 1 l., with printed copy, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 2:99
    J. W. Wallace to Mrs. [Mary] Davis, 1891 August 3,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., with envelope, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:1
    Douglas Watt to [?], 1962 July 13,
    TLS photocopy, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-l.
  • Box-folder 3:2
    [Louisa Whitman] to "beloved sons," [ca. 1873 May],
    AN, 1 p. on 1 l., with envelope, #3829-a.

    Envelope written in the hand of Walt Whitman: "Mother's last lines."

  • Box-folder 3:3
    Walt Whitman to [James Russell Lowell], 1860 January 20,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #37).
  • Box-folder 3:4
    [Walt Whitman] to [Ralph Waldo Emerson], 1863 January 17,
    AL draft, 3 pp. on 3 l., with transcription, Barrow. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:5
    [Walt Whitman] to [Ralph Waldo Emerson], 1863 January 17,
    AL draft, 4 pp. on 2 l., Barrow. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:6
    Walt Whitman to Nat [Nathanial Bloom] and Fred [John Frederick S.] Gray, 1863 March 17,
    Physical Location: Slipcase #11.
    ALS, 4 pp. on 2 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:7
    [Walt Whitman] to [unidentified], 1864 May 6,
    AL fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., mounted, #3829.
  • Box-folder 3:8
    Walt Whitman to [Charles W. Elridge], 1864 June 28,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l. with envelope sent in care of Major Hapgood, #3829 (Bowers #52).
  • Box-folder 3:9
    Walt Whitman to "Andy, my dear comrade," 1865 October 29,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:10
    Walt Whitman to [Bayard] Taylor, 1866 November 18,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., mounted, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:11
    Walt [Whitman] to "Dearest Mother," 1866 December 24,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 2 l., #3829-a.

    With dealer's note and typed transcription.

  • Box-folder 3:12
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Friend" [Moncure Conway?], 1867 July 24,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., #3829-a.

    Dr. Feinberg indicates recipient is Moncure Conway.

  • Box-folder 3:13
    [Walt Whitman] to Anderson & Archer, 1868 February 19,
    2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 3:14
    Walt Whitman to "Dearest Mother" [Louisa Whitman], 1868 August 13-17,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l., with typed explanatory information, #3829 (Bowers #50).
  • Box-folder 3:15
    Walt Whitman to James T. Fields, 1869 January 20,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., mounted, #3829 (Bowers #49).
  • Box-folder 3:15A
    Walt Whitman to F. S. Ellis, 1871 August 10,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l. #14201.

    Whitman transmits a copy of the 1871 J.S. Redfield edition of Leaves of grass for use as a dummy for a proposed English edition. Originally tipped in Barrett PS3201 1871b COPY 2.

  • Box-folder 3:16
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Friend" [Ann Gilchrist], 1871 November 3,
    ALS facsimile, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-h.

    Note: "This letter was written to Ann Gilchrist. Mrs. Gilchrist was the English widow who came to American to find Whitman. Whitman here is trying to warn her off."

  • Box-folder 3:17
    Walt Whitman to Ernest Dowden, 1872 January 18,
    ALS, [6 pp. on 1 l.], 3829-ab.

    Letter purchased in honor of Michael Plunkett, Director of Special Collections, on his retirement 2005 December 1.

  • Box-folder 3:18
    Walt Whitman to Mr. Otis, 1872 December 16,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:19
    Walt [Whitman] to "Dearest Mother" [Louisa Whitman], [1873] May 11,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:20
    Walt Whitman to Doctor [Bielby], [1873] May 20,
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 l., #10204-az.
  • Box-folder 3:21
    Walt Whitman to Mr. [John Jay] Knox, [ca. 1873 September 14],
    ANS, 1 p. on back on envelope, #3829-i.

    For original, see ALS, John Burroughs to [John Jay] Knox, 1873 September 14.

  • Box-folder 3:22
    Walt Whitman to Mrs. Bielby and Doctor [Bielby], 1873 November 4,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., mylar covering, #10204-az.
  • Box-folder 3:23
    [Walt Whitman] to John Burroughs, [1874] February [14],
    AL, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope and typed transcription, #3829 (Bowers #51).

    See "Is Walt Whitman's Poetry Poetical?"

  • Box-folder 3:24
    Walt Whitman to John and Ursula Burroughs, [1874?] May 21,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope, Barrow. #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 3:25
    Walt Whitman to John [Burroughs], [1875] April 1,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 2 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:26
    Walt Whitman to Librarian of Congress, 1875 December 20,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:27
    Walt Whitman to "Editor Commercial," 1876 February 12,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #41).
  • Box-folder 3:28
    Walt Whitman to Bram Stoker, 1876 March 6,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope and Introductory Note, mounted, #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:29
    Walt Whitman to "Editor Herald," [1876] May 7,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:30
    Walt Whitman to E. W. Gosse, [1876] May 19,
    APCS, 1 p., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:31
    Walt [Whitman] to John Burroughs, [1876] June 17,
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:32
    W[alt] W[hitman] to John Burroughs, [1877] February 13,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:33
    W[alt] W[hitman] to [John Burroughs], [1877] February 27,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:34
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Friends," [1877] March 17,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:35
    Walt Whitman to "Messrs. Scribner & Co.," [1877 March 30],
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:36
    W[alt] W[hitman] to John Burroughs, [1877] May 17,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:37
    Walt Whitman to Lt. Leypoldt, 1877 July 23,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:38
    W[alt] W[hitman] to [John Burroughs], [1878] March 29,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:39
    W[alt] W[hitman] to John Burroughs, [1878] December 23 and 25,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:40
    Walt Whitman to "My Dear Friend, [1878?] December 12,
    AL fragment on verso of "A Country Auction."
  • Box-folder 3:41
    Walt [Whitman] to John Burroughs, [1879] January 25,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:42
    Walt [Whitman] to John Burroughs, [1879?] June 11,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-e.
  • Box-folder 3:43
    Walt [Whitman] to John Burroughs, [1879?] June 20,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    With explanatory note regarding individuals mentioned and date of letter.

  • Box-folder 3:44
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir" [Robert Underwood Johnson], 1879 October 29,
    1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    See TLS, Ellen C. Ahern to R. V. Thornton, 1949 July 21, regarding discovery of this Whitman letter with an enclosure: a brief biographical sketch of R. U. Johnson.

  • Box-folder 3:45
    Walt Whitman to [John Burroughs], [1879] November 23,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope and typed transcription, #3829 (Bowers #40).

    Also see Printed Map of the United States in Vault Barrett Oversize. For original Gilchrist letter, see Ann Gilchrist to Walt Whitman, 1879 October 6.

  • Box-folder 3:46
    Walt Whitman to A. Williams & Co. Booksellers, 1880 November 1,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:47
    W[alt] W[hitman] to [John Burroughs], 1880 December 7,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:48
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir," 1880 December 28,
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.

    See "Embers of Ending Days."

  • Box-folder 3:49
    Walt Whitman to "Sister Lou" [Louisa Whitman], [1881] July 6,
    2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:50
    Walt Whitman to [Jeanette Leonard Gilder], [1881] August 6,
    ALS draft, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:51
    Walt Whitman to Mr. Sanborn, 1881 September 9,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-n.
  • Box-folder 3:52
    Walt Whitman to John [Burroughs], 1881 September 19,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:53
    Walt Whitman to Alma [Calder Johnston], 1881 September 24,
    2 pp. on 1 l., #3829-a.

    "Mrs. Alma Calder Johnston, wife of J. A. Johnston, [N. Y.?] jeweler, in whose home Whitman used to stay when in [N. Y.?]."

  • Box-folder 3:54
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Friend," 1881 September 24,
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with typed transcript and informational note, #3829-g.

    Whitman refers in this letter to the "general Death-gloom" of the nation," most likely referring to the assassination of President James A. Garfield.

  • Box-folder 3:55
    Walt Whitman to "My friends" [J. L. and J. B. Gilder], 1882 March 21,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope. #3829 (Bowers #46).
  • Box-folder 3:56
    Walt Whitman to Baxter, 1882 June 2,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-d.
  • Box-folder 3:57
    Walt Whitman to [John Burroughs], 1882 June 26, ANS,
    1 p. with envelope, #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:58
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1882 November 14,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #56).
  • Box-folder 3:59
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1882 November 15,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #57).
  • Box-folder 3:60
    Walt Whitman to Kristofer [Nagel] Janson, 1883 March 26,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-d.
  • Box-folder 3:61
    Walt Whitman to J.B. Gilder, 1883 June 18,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:62
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1883 June 19,
    APCS, #3829 (Bowers #58).
  • Box-folder 3:63
    Walt Whitman to Edward R. Pease, [1883 August 21],
    APCS, 1 p. #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:64
    Walt Whitman to [John H. Johnston], 1883 August 28,
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l. with autograph notation signed by J. H. Johnston. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:65
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1883 September 11,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #55).
  • Box-folder 3:66
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir" [Oran S. Baldwin], 1883 December 15,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 3:67
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir" [T. W. Rolleston?], 1884 January 10,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #43).
  • Box-folder 3:68
    Walt Whitman to [unknown], [prior to 1884, March 26],
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 l. on printed advertisement for Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" and "Two Rivulets," #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:69
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir" [Brooklyn Times editor?], 1885 January 19,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., mounted. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:70
    Walt Whitman to [Karl] Knortz, 1885 April 27,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope. #3829 (Bowers #44).
  • Box-folder 3:71
    Walt Whitman to [Richard] Watson Gilder, 1885 May 24,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., mounted. #3829-d.
  • Box-folder 3;72
    Walt Whitman to Sylvester Baxter, 1885 June 11,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #63).
  • Box-folder 3:73
    Walt Whitman to WRT [William Thayer], [18]85 November 25,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:74
    Walt Whitman to Herbert Gilchrist, 1885 December 4,
    ANS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #53).
  • Box-folder 3:75
    Walt Whitman to [unidentified], 1886 March 26,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., with typed transcription. #3829 (Bowers #38).
  • Box-folder 3:76
    Walt Whitman to Thomas Donaldson, 1886 May 4,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 3:77
    Walt Whitman to "My dear friend" [William Rossetti], 1886 May 30,
    ALS facsimile, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 3:78
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir" [Karl Knortz], 1886 June 14,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with enclosure and envelope, #3829 (Bowers #45).

    Envelope addressed to "Carl Knortz."

  • Box-folder 3:79
    Walt Whitman to "My dear friend," 1886 June 29,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., Barrow. #3829-r.
  • Box-folder 3:80
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir," 1886 July 20,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 3:81
    Walt Whitman to [James] Redpath, 1886 July 28, ALS,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., mounted, #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 3:82
    Walt Whitman to [Mary Whitall] Costelloe, 1886 August 2,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 3:83
    Walt Whitman to "Editor, Century Magazine" [attention of C C Buel], [1886] August 10,
    APCS, 1 item, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 3:84
    Folder 84. [Walt Whitman] to Henry [Norman], 1887 January 3,
    AL draft, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.

    Two fragments of letter glued, with one of the fragments on the back of an envelope addressed to Walt Whitman. Dealer's note: "The aging poet uses a page and the back of an envelope to draft a letter of thanks to the editor of "Pall Mall Gazette" for the gift of £81 sent by readers."

  • Box-folder 4:1
    Walt Whitman to [J. B. Gilder], [1887] March 18,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. #3829-i.

    Regarding Tennyson-Whitman correspondence. Verso: J. B. Gilder to [Walt] Whitman, ALS, 1887 March 17.

  • Box-folder 4:2
    Walt Whitman to [Karl] Knortz, 1887 March 24,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #59).
  • Box-folder 4:3
    Walt Whitman to [William Sloan Kennedy?], 1887 April 11,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829 (Bowers #42) on verso of 2nd leaf of Ernest Rhys letter to Walt Whitman, 1887 March 29.
  • Box-folder 4:4
    Walt Whitman to Edward Carpenter, 1887 May 3,
    APCS, 1 p. #5604.
  • Box-folder 4:5
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1887 May 3,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #60).
  • Box-folder 4:6
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1887 June 14,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #61).
  • Box-folder 4:7
    Walt Whitman to [Mary Whitall] Costelloe, 1887 June 25,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:8
    Walt Whitman to [Mary Whitall] Costelloe, 1887 November 1,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:9
    Walt Whitman to [Leonard M. Brown ?], [18]87 November 19,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 4:10
    Walt Whitman to Edward J. Potter, 1887 December 28,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:11
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sir," 1888 April 9,
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 ., #3829-p.
  • Box-folder 4:12
    Walt Whitman to Mary Whitall Costelloe, 1888 July 3,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:13
    Walt Whitman to Edward Potter, 1888 July 12,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:14
    Walt Whitman to [Karl] Knortz, 1888 September 10,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829 (Bowers #47) .

    Referring to T. W. Rolleston postcard to Walt Whitman, 1888 September 1.

  • Box-folder 4:15
    Walt Whitman to [Jacob Klein], 1888 September 17,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829-j.

    Also see Jacob Klein to W. S. Kennedy, 1881 September 1, for reason of Whitman's letter to Jacob Klein.

  • Box-folder 4:16
    Walt Whitman to [William Sloan Kennedy], 1888 October 7,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:17
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Lou" [Louisa Whitman], [18]88 November 19,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., with front side of envelope, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 4:18
    Walt Whitman to "Dear K" [William Sloan Kennedy], 1888 December 21,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:19
    Walt Whitman to [Karl Knortz], 1889 January 8,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829 (Bowers #48).
  • Box-folder 4:20
    Walt Whitman to Karl Knortz, 1889 February 14,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829 (Bowers #62).
  • Box-folder 4:21
    Walt Whitman to [William Sloan Kennedy], 1889 March 20,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:22
    W[alt] W[hitman] to "Lou" [Louisa O. Whitman], 1889 June 9,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 4:23
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Lou" [Louisa O. Whitman], 1889 July 12,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 4:24
    Walt Whitman to O. O. [Hemenway?], [1889 September 30],
    APC, 1 p. mounted, #3829 (Bowers #54).
  • Box-folder 4:25
    Walt Whitman to Mary Whitall Costelloe, [1889 October 27],
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:26
    Walt Whitman to [C. F. Currie], 1890 August 1,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:27
    Walt Whitman to Mary Davis, [1890] September 15-16,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., with envelope, #3829-a.

    Includes typed transcription and brief description.

  • Box-folder 4:28
    Walt Whitman to [William] Sloan Kennedy, 1890 September 16,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 4:29
    Walt Whitman to "Dear Sister" [Mary E. Van Nostrand], 1890 November 28,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-aa.
  • Box-folder 4:30
    Walt Whitman to H[orace] T[raubel?], 1890 December 13,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., with typed transcription, #3829-j.
  • Box-folder 4:31
    Walt Whitman to [William] Sloan Kennedy, 1891 February 16,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-p.
  • Box-folder 4:32
    W[alt] W[hitman] to [William] Sloan Kennedy, 1891 May 22,
    APCS, 1 p. #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:33
    Walt Whitman to [J. M. Stoddart?], 1891 June 12,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #5604.
  • Box-folder 4:34
    Walt Whitman to Dr. Johnston, 1892 February 6,
    ALS facsimile, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-l.
  • Box-folder 4:35
    Walt Whitman to J. L. Gilder, n.y. January 27,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829-m.
  • Box-folder 4:36
    Walt [Whitman] to "Dear Sister" [Louisa O. Whitman], n.y. April [14],
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope, #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 4:37
    Walt Whitman to "My dear Sir," n.y. July 19,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-h
  • Box-folder 4:38
    Walt Whitman to [unknown], n.d.,
    ALS fragment, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:39
    Oscar Wilde to [J. M.] Stoddart, [1882],
    ALS, 8 pp. on 2 l., #3829-i.

    Regarding Algeron, Charles Swinburne, and Walt Whitman.

  • Box-folder 4:40
    Mrs. Francis Howard Williams to Mary Davis, [1886 January 13],
    APCS, 1 item, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 4:41
    [G. M.] Williamson to Mr. [Walt] Whitman, 1887 June 1,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-a.

    See verso of "Orange buds by mail."

  • Box-folder 4:42
    John R. Witcraft to Mr. [Walt] Whitman, 1888 March 8,
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l, #3829-a.

    See verso of "The First Dandelion."

  • Box-folder 4:43
    D. W. Zimmerman to Walt Whitman, 1883 January 13,
    L, 1 p. on 1 l., #3829-i.

    SEE verso of AMs fragment, "The Bible as Poetry."

Series IV: Miscellaneous Documents
  • Box-folder 4:44
    Advertisement: "Walt Whitman on Abraham Lincoln," [1887] April,
    Printed announcement, 1 item, #3829-a.
  • Box-folder 4:45
    "Walt Whitman Abroad," an extract from "The Post," by Horace L. Traubel, 1891 August 7,
    Printed matter, 3 pp. on 1 l., #3829-l.
  • Box-folder 4:46
    Harper's Magazine Table of Contents, 1892 April,
    1 item, Volume 84, Number 503, #3829-w.
  • Box-folder 4:47
    Mounted leaf from tomb of Walt Whitman, 1903 April 18,
    1 item, mounted, #3829-a.

    Inscribed on top: "Walt Whitman's Card-receiver. Presented to Dr. Raley H. Bell by Mrs. Mary O. Davis, April 18th 1903." Inscribed on bottom: "Plucked from the tomb of Whitman, April 18, 1903. R.H.B."

  • Box-folder 4:48
    Official Walt Whitman stamp and envelope, first day of issue, 1940 February 20,
    D, 1 item, #3829-i.
  • Box-folder 4:49
    "Poem describing a Perfect School," n.d.,
    Physical Location: Original broadside in Vault oversize box W-5.
    1 item, photographic reproduction of framed broadside, #3829-v.

    Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall

Series V: Engravings, Prints, Photographs
  • Box-folder 4:50
    Mary Davis and Walt Whitman's dog, n.d.,
    1 photograph, #3829-h.
  • Box-folder 4:51
    Horace L. Traubel, n.d.,
    1 photograph, copy, #3829-s.

    Stamped on verso: "Life Photo by Thomas D. McAvoy".

  • Box-folder 4:52
    Louisa Van Velsor Whitman, Walt Whitman's mother, n.d.,
    1 phototype, mounted, #3829-v.

    Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Printed below image: "Photoype. F. Gutekunst. Philadelphia."

  • Box-folder 4:53
    Walter Whitman (Walt Whitman's father), n.d.,
    1 phototype, mounted, #3829-v.

    Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Printed below image: "Phototype. F. Gutekunst. Philadelphia." Also one copy of Louisa Van Velsor Whitman and Walter Whitman included on same image.

  • Box-folder 4:54
    Walt Whitman, 1854,
    5 engravings, Saunders #4, #3829, #3829-h (Bowers #70, #72).

    Engravings by Samuel Hollyer.
    c.1: Signed by Samuel Hollyer. Inscribed at bottom, "First [India] finished proof off plate-approved by W. Whitman."
    c.2: Signed, "Walt Whitman 1855"
    c.3: Signed, "Walt Whitman from life, 1855"
    c.4: Signed "Walt Whitman" by unknown hand.
    c.5: Mounted, inscribed at bottom, "Portrait noted on P. 357. Walt Whitman" in unknown hand.

  • Box-folder 4:55
    Walt Whitman, [ca. 1854],
    1 postcard, Saunders #5, #7267-a.

    Photographer unknown, probably Gabriel Harrison.

  • Box-folder 4:56
    Walt Whitman, 1859,
    4 photographs, Saunders# 11, #3829-h, #3829-v, #3829-x.

    #3829-v, Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Original photograph by Charles C. Hine.

    c.1: Mounted reproduction by "Rockwood. 1440 Broadway N.Y. (40th St.) Holland Building." Printed on verso: "N.B.-This photograph is copied from another picture and must not be takes as a sample of our work direct from life. Geo. G. Rockwood." Inscribed on verso: "Walt Whitman by Charles C. Hine" [possibly Whitman's hand]
    c.2: Print, signed "Walt Whitman"
    c.3: Print, tipped to cardboard backing, no inscription.
    c.4: Print, mounted, no inscription.

  • Box-folder 4:57
    Walt Whitman, signed, 1860,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #23, #3829.

    Inscribed, "Walt Whitman New York 1860."

  • Box-folder 4:58
    Walt Whitman, signed [?], [ca. 1860],
    copy print, 1 item, Saunders #2, #3829-i.

    Photographer unknown, but speculation is J. W. Black of Boston.

  • Box-folder 4:59
    Walt Whitman, [ca. 1862],
    copy, 1 item, by Mathew Brady, New York, Saunders #16, #3829-s.
  • Box-folder 4:60
    Walt Whitman, 1863,
    copy, 1 item, by Alexander Gardner, Washington, D. C., Saunders #21, #3829-h.

    Photograph by Gilbert & Bacon, 1030 Chestnut St. Philadelphia. Inscribed twice: "Walt Whitman taken from life 1863 wartime Washington D.C." and "to Horace L. Traubel from his friend W. W. June 1888."

  • Box-folder 4:61
    Walt Whitman, 1864,
    1 item, Saunders #22, #3829-h.

    Photograph by Alexander Gardner, Washington D.C., with typed description on back: "Hitherto unpublished photograph of Walt Whitman from the private collection of Robert Coster. This is the only photograph of the kind of Whitman known to be in existence."

  • Box-folder 4:62
    Walt Whitman, [ca 1864-1865],
    1 carte-de-visite, #3829-h.

    Photograph by Alexander Gardner, inscribed on image: "Walt Whitman 1865 ... born May 31, 1819" and on verso: "Given to a Comrade as a Memento in Washington City, June 29, 1865."

  • Box-folder 4:63
    Walt Whitman, 1866,
    signed, 1 item, Saunders #23.1, #3829-h.

    Photograph by Mathew Brady, Washington, D. C. Recto: Signed, "Walt Whitman." Verso: Signed, "Walt Whitman 1867-" Printed, "Brady's National Photographic Portrait Galleries Broadway and 10th Street New York-627 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington D. C."

  • Box-folder 4:64
    Walt Whitman, [mid-1860's],
    1 item, Saunders #35.1, #3829-z.

    Photographer unknown, possibly Mathew Brady. Inscribed on verso: "For C. A. Wilson- because he knows the hearts of books as well as their end-papers. From Jack Birso 2:25:36".

  • Box-folder 4:65
    Walt Whitman, [1867?],
    1 photograph, Saunders #24, #3829-h.

    Photograph by Mathew Brady. Note on back: "5-18-54 Purchased from W. H. [Louder?] 715 12th St. NW Washington DC for 7.00, in frame. P. A. Jones official of WHL the owner. Says he had it framed about 25 years ago at Cooper's Art Shop 1324 G St N.W. long since out of business. That's all he recollects. Believes this print was made in 1890's. Couldn't recall from where he...was born in '92."

  • Box-folder 4:66
    Walt Whitman, [late 1860's],
    1 item, mounted. Not in Saunders Series. #3829-a.

    Photographer unknown, perhaps William Kurtz. Inscribed on verso: "Presented to Mr. [C. O. Maillong ?] by Mrs. Mary O. Davis May 20th 1903."

  • Box-folder 4:67
    Walt Whitman, [1869?],
    1 item, mounted, with three copies, Saunders #70, #3829-v.

    Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Photographer unknown.

  • Box-folder 4:68
    Walt Whitman, [late 1860s],
    1 8x10 copy, Saunders #19, #3829-s.

    Photographer unknown, perhaps William Kurtz. Original signed, "Walt Whitman 1869".

  • Box-folder 4:69
    Walt Whitman, [ca. 1870],
    1 8x10 copy, 1 item, Saunders #31, #3829-s.

    Photograph by G. Frank Pearsall, Brooklyn. Original signed, "Walt Whitman Jan 1-1878".

  • Box-folder 4:70
    Walt Whitman, [early 1870's],
    2 items, Saunders #39, #3829-h.

    Photograph by J. Gurney and Son, New York.

    c.1: Mounted image, "Gurney & Son, Fifth Ave. N. Y."
    c.2: Copy, with typed description on verso: "Hitherto unpublished photograph of Walt Whitman from the private collection of Robert Coster. This is the only photograph of Whitman known to be in existence."

  • Box-folder 4:71
    Walt Whitman, 1871,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #34. #3829-a.

    Photograph by Henry Ulke and Brothers, Washington D. C. Inscribed on verso: "Presented to Mr. [C. O. Maillong ?] by Mrs. Mary O. Davis May 20th 1903."

  • Box-folder 4:72
    Walt Whitman, [1871?],
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #41, #3829-h.

    Recto: "Rockwood 1440 Broadway, N.Y. (40th St.) Holland Building. Verso: Inscribed, "Walt Whitman," in unknown hand.

  • Box-folder 4:73
    Walt Whitman, [1871?],
    1 item, mounted. #3829-a.

    Inscribed in pencil on verso: "Turney & Son Photographers." After careful scrutiny of image, although extremely similar to Saunders #41, there is slight discrepancy which indicates a different image.

  • Box-folder 4:74
    Walt Whitman, [1871?],
    1 print from wood engraving, mounted, Saunders #44a, #3829-x.

    Print by William J. Linton from a photograph of George C. Potter, Washington, D.C., with three copies.

  • Box-folder 4:75
    Caricature of Walt Whitman, 1872,
    1 print, #3829-i.

    From "Men of the Day," the Fifth Avenue Journal, (copy # 89 out of 100). Original in Vault oversize V-13.

  • Box-folder 5:1
    Walt Whitman, [1872 September],
    Signed, 4 copies, Saunders #36, #3829-i, #3829-v.

    #3829-v, Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Photograph by G. Frank Pearsall, Brooklyn.

    c.1. Photograph signed by Walt Whitman, "Walt Whitman 1877"
    c. 2. Photograph signed by Walt Whitman, "Walt Whitman"
    c. 3. Mounted photograph, without printed caption at bottom
    c. 4. Mounted photograph, with printed caption at bottom: "Photo'd from life, Sept., '72, Brooklyn, N.Y. by G. F. E. Pearsall, Fulton St. (Printed by C. F. Spieler, Phila.)
    c. 5. Mounted double photograph, without caption [possibly a stereoview]

  • Box-folder 5:2
    Walt Whitman, 1872,
    1 item, Saunders #32, #3829-t.

    Photograph by G. Frank Pearsall, Brooklyn.

  • Box-folder 5:2A
    Walt Whitman, 1876,
    1 item, #3829-v.

    Wood engraving of a portrait by Linton, 1875, with a proof title page of the 1876 edition of Leaves of Grass.

  • Box-folder 5:3
    Walt Whitman, 1878,
    2 copies, mounted, Saunders #37.1, #3829-v, #3829-j.

    #3829-v, Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, New York, with two copies.

    c.1. Photograph signed by Walt Whitman, "Walt Whitman Sept 13 1881"
    c.2 Photograph, mounted, unsigned.

  • Box-folder 5:4
    Walt Whitman, 1878,
    1 print, #9714.

    Etching by [Gribayedoff?], based on 1878 photograph by Napoleon Sarony.

  • Box-folder 5:5
    Walt Whitman, 1878,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #57, #5604.

    Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, New York, [?] 87 Union Square, N. Y.

  • Box-folder 5:6
    Walt Whitman, 1878,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #64, #3829-h.

    Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, New York.

  • Box-folder 5:7
    Walt Whitman, 1878,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #89, #3829-a.

    Photograph by Napoleon Sarony, New York.

  • Box-folder 5:8
    Walt Whitman with two children, 1879,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #68, #3829-i.

    Inscribed "Harry and Kitty-Walt Whitman, 1879." Enclosed in John H. Johnston letter to Mr. Watson, March 11, 1912.

  • Box-folder 5:9
    Walt Whitman with two children, 1879,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #67, #3829-h.

    Inscribed on verso, "Harold, 'Kittie', and 'Uncle Walt,'" by William Kurtz, New York, Madison Square.

  • Box-folder 5:10
    Walt Whitman with child (Harold Johnston),
    2 copies, mounted, Saunders #69, #3829-h.

    Photograph by William Kurtz, New York.

    c.1: grass drawn into child's hand, no inscription. Inscribed on verso: Loaned by Bertha Johnston 389 Clinton St. Brooklyn.
    c.2: grass drawn into child's hand, with inscription from "Leaves of Grass" on bottom, "'a child said to me "What is the grass?" fetching it to me with full hands. How could I answer the child!'" Inscribed on verso: "Miss Bertha Johnston 514-8" [...] Brooklyn. Walt Whitman, Harry Johnston (Harold Hugh)"

  • Box-folder 5:11
    Walt Whitman, [1880],
    1 post card, Saunders #74, #3829-h.

    Original photograph by Edy Brothers, London Ontario.

  • Box-folder 5:12
    Walt Whitman, 1880,
    1 6x8 copy with touch-up, Saunders #75, #3829-i.

    Original photograph by Edy Brothers, London, Ontario. Stamped "Walt Whitman" on verso.

  • Box-folder 5:13
    Walt Whitman, 1880,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #76, #3829-v.

    Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall. Photograph by Edy Brothers, London, Ontario, with two copies.

  • Box-folder 5:14
    Walt Whitman, 1880,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #80, #3829-a, #3829-i, #3829-v.

    #3829-v, Gift in honor of Floyd Stovall.

    c.1: Printed on bottom of phototype: "Photoype. F. Gutekunst. Philadelphia."
    c.2: Image by Thomas C. Watkins, originally enclosed with AMS draft "The Dalliance of Eagles."
    c.3: Mounted phototype, printed at bottom, "Phototype. F. Gutekunst. Philadelphia."
    c.4: Inscribed on verso: "Presented to Dr. Raley H. Bell by Mrs. Mary O. Davis. May 20th 1903."

  • Box-folder 5:15
    Walt Whitman, [1880?],
    1 item, mounted, #3829-h.

    Photographer unknown, perhaps Edy Brothers, London, Ontario. Printed on verso: "Broadbent & Taylor 914 Chestnut St. Philadelphia. S. Broadbent. W. Curtis Taylor."

  • Box-folder 5:16
    Walt Whitman, 1881,
    1 item, #3829.

    Inscribed on verso, "made by Gutekunst 1881-early copy given to H.T. by W.W.,"

  • Box-folder 5:17
    Walt Whitman, [1881?],
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #101. #3829-a.

    By Charles H. Spieler, Philadelphia.

  • Box-folder 5:18
    Walt Whitman, [1881?],
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #102. #3829-a.

    By Charles H. Spieler, Philadelphia.

  • Box-folder 5:19
    Walt Whitman seated in chair with butterfly, early 1880's,
    1 item, mounted, Saunders #48, #3829-a.

    Photograph by Phillips and Taylor, Philadelphia. Inscribed on back: "Presented to Raley H. Bell by Mrs. Mary O. Davis May 20th 1908."

  • Box-folder 5:20
    Walt Whitman, 1887,
    1 print, Saunders #80, #3829-i.

    Based on 1880 Frederick Gutekunst photograph. Printed below image: "Walt Whitman, 1887."

  • Box-folder 5:21
    Walt Whitman, 1887,
    2 prints, mounted, Saunders #93, #3829-h, #3829-i.