A Guide to the Papers of Susanna Rowson, 1770-1879 Rowson, Susanna, Papers 7379, -a, -b, -c

A Guide to the Papers of Susanna Rowson, 1770-1879

A Collection in the
Clifton Waller Barrett Library of American Literature
Special Collections
The University of Virginia Library
Accession Number 7379, -a, -b, -c


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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession number
7379, -a, -b, -c
Title
Papers of Susanna Rowson 1770-1879
Physical Characteristics
This collection consists of 140 items.
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Papers of Susanna Rowson, Accession #7379, -a, -b, -c, Clifton Waller Barrett Library of American Literature, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

7379, 7379-a, and 7379-b were deposited by Clifton Waller Barrett on December 21, 1963, and changed to gifts in 1970. 7379-c was purchased from the Seven Gables Bookshop on April 25, 1966.


Biographical/Historical Information

Susanna Rowson is known today as the author of America's first best-selling novel, Charlotte. A Tale of Truth (1791). But in addition to this remarkably popular work, Rowson published nine other novels, two volumes of verse, a lengthy critical poem, five theater pieces, six textbooks, numerous essays, and successful song lyrics. Actress, playwright, novelist, and songwriter, Rowson also founded one of New England's best-known academies for young women. Throughout her varied professional life, Rowson exhibited a Franklinian energy, succeeding in a number of pursuits commonly unavailable to genteel women. Her achievements as an early American writer and public figure belie the modern perception of her as a mere sentimentalist.

Rowson's early years exposed her firsthand to the tumult of the Revolutionary era. She was born in Portsmouth, England, to Susanna Musgrave (or Musgrove) Haswell, who died in childbirth. The motherless Susanna was taken at age five to settle in America with her father, William Haswell, who had by then remarried. Haswell, a revenue collector for the British Royal Navy, remained a Loyalist during the Revolution; his property was soon confiscated, and the impoverished family, after being interned at Hingham and later Abington, was finally deported to England in 1778. Thus by age eighteen, Susanna had experienced stormy transatlantic crossings, the sudden reversal of family fortunes, and the anguish of divided cultural allegiance--events which later figured in her novels of the trials facing young women in the world.

Back in England, Susanna soon showed her gift for attracting the notice of influential people. She became governess to the children of the Duchess of Devonshire and under her patronage published her first novel, Victoria (1786), at age twenty-four. That same year she married William Rowson, a merchant and trumpeter in the Royal Horse Guards. Following the failure of his business in 1792, the couple embarked on a stage career. Mrs. Rowson continued to write during this period, publishing her long poem, A Trip to Parnassus (1788) and five new novels in rapid succession.

In 1793, the Rowsons accepted Thomas Wignell's offer to join his New Theatre Company just opening in Philadelphia. The Continental Congress's ban against theater had been repealed in 1789, and Philadelphia--a city just recovering from a yellow-fever epidemic--greeted Wignell's company with enthusiasm. As a character actress in a troupe of well-known performers and musicians, Mrs. Rowson also completed her first play before the year was out. With music by America's leading contemporary composer, Alexander Reinagle, Rowson's Slaves in Algiers, or A Struggle for Freedom (1794) was an immediate hit. Dealing with the topical issues of Barbary piracy and white slavery, Rowson voices her devotion to American liberty and women's rights, and closes on a bold note: "Women were born for universal sway,/Men to adore, be silent, and obey."

Success came on another front that same year with the publication of her first song, "America, Commerce and Freedom." A sample verse of this popular sea song reveals Rowson at her patriotic best:

Then under full sail we laugh at the gale
And the landmen look pale; never heed 'em
But toss off the glass to a favorite lass
To America, Commerce and Freedom.

Rowson continued to write lyrics until her death; many of her love songs, ballads, patriotic songs, and dirges were scored by prominent composers of the early national period and achieved immediate popularity.

Having moved to Boston in 1796 to join the Federal Street Theatre Company, Susanna Rowson abandoned the stage a year later to become an educator. The Young Girls' Academy, which she established there and directed for the remaining twenty-five years of her life, was soon enrolling the daughters of New England's elite. The childless Rowson, who had raised her husband's younger sister, Charlotte, his illegitimate son, William, and one adopted daughter as well, poured her energy into this new educational venture. She hired a notable faculty, introduced Boston's first pianoforte, and designed a demanding curriculum for her young American pupils. Never one to let her career interfere with her literary output, Rowson also published two new novels and a series of textbooks for her students. Her work as an editor on the Boston Weekly Magazine and her later essays for the New England Galaxy increased her reputation in the Boston community all the more.

Throughout her varied career, Rowson dedicated her literary works to the young female reader. Her lifelong concern for educating young girls to become self-reliant and accomplished women informs her tales of feminine adventure and tribulation, her magazine essays, and her textbooks. Rowson saw herself as a didactic realist whose "tales of truth" were meant to educate as well as entertain her readers. Working within the conventions of the sentimental novel, Rowson's fiction proclaims her democratic and Protestant vision. Egalitarianism, familial obedience, and piety were the ideals she advocated for the growth of her beleaguered female heroines into model Republican women.

By the time Rowson published Charlotte, A Tale of Truth, better known as Charlotte Temple, in 1791 she was a practiced writer whose previous novels showed a competent handling of contemporary genres: the Richardsonian seduction narrative, the digressive sentimental sketches of Laurence Sterne, and the conventional Gothic adventure tale. Her prose, and to a lesser extent her poetry, had met with moderate success. But when Charlotte was reprinted in America three years after its publication in England, Rowson, still early in her career, made literary history. Hardly read in England, the novel went through more than two hundred editions by the mid-nineteenth century in America and spawned a "Charlotte cult." Charlotte's supposed tombstone in Trinity Churchyard, New York, became a pilgrimage site for generations of readers.

The novel has long challenged critics to explain its success. Most likely a Roman à clef about Rowson's cousin, John Montrésor, who eloped with a young woman named Charlotte Stanley, Rowson's story of the pathetic Charlotte Temple gave mythic form to the famous scandal. In Rowson's fast-moving narrative, a British soldier, off to fight in the American Revolution, persuades the fifteen-year-old Charlotte to elope with him to America. Abandoned by her lover in New York, Charlotte dies in childbirth, having gained her father's forgiveness in a tearful deathbed reunion. In true sentimental fashion Charlotte's aggrieved father refrains from killing her seducer, choosing instead to punish him with guilt: "Look on that little heap of earth, there hast thou buried the only joy of a fond father."

Although Rowson's classic seduction fable, replete with nostalgia for the Old World and indignation over lost innocence, captured the American reading public, her relationship with the critics has always been an uneasy one. As early as 1795, she came under attack by William Cobbett, a celebrated gadfly of the day. Singling out her play, Slaves in Algiers, Cobbett bitterly criticized "our American Sappho" for her feminism and her "sudden conversion to republicanism." Since then, Rowson has been generally ignored as yet another "female scribbler." Recently, however, she has benefited from current critical reappraisals of American women writers. Her versatile efforts as novelist, essayist, lyricist, and teacher are increasingly appreciated as a notable contribution to early American culture.

Scope and Content

The Papers of Susanna Rowson consist of literary manuscripts, correspondence, biographical information, miscellaneous documents, and portraits and engravings.

Literary manuscripts include a number of Susanna Rowson's poems, such as "On the Death of Miss Eliza Bradley," "Hark, Hark the Woodlands catch the strain...", and "To Make Mock Turtle." Also present is a notebook, owned by Rebecca C. Haswell, which includes numerous handwritten poems by Susanna Rowson and others.

Correspondence is comprised of both Rowson and Haswell family correspondence. Some Susanna Rowson correspondence deals with requests for teaching or writing materials. Correspondents include: R. C. Clarke, Manton Eastburn, Edward Everett, M. Haswell, Mary Haswell, Rachel Haswell, Robert Haswell, W. R. Haswell, Charles Lean, and William Rowson.

The collection also includes extensive biographical information gathered by Elias Nason for his book, A memoir of Mrs. Susanna Rowson, with elegant and illustrative extracts from her writings in prose and poetry. Also included are numerous letters, 1859-1871, from Susanna Rowson's students providing Elias Nason information for his biography.

Miscellaneous documents include legal records, printed material, and Rowson's student evaluations. Of interest is an 1807 Commission signed by Thomas Jefferson for the appointment of John Montresor Haswell into the United States Navy.

The collection includes includes prints, silhouettes, and engravings of Susanna Rowson, William Rowson, and Charlotte Temple.

Arrangement

The Papers of Susanna Rowson are arranged in five series: literary manuscripts, correspondence, biographical information, miscellaneous items, and prints.

Series I: Literary manuscripts are arranged alphabetically by title or first line. Series II: Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by correspondent. Series III: Elias Nason Biographical Materials are arranged chronologically. Series IV: Miscellaneous documents are arranged chronologically. Series V: Portraits are arranged chronologically.

Contents List

Series I: Literary Manuscripts
  • Box-folder 1:1
    "Accrostic" and "On the Death of Miss Eliza Bradley" n.d.
    AMss, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:2
    "Address Commemorative of the Genius of Shakespeare" n.d.
    AMs, 5 pp. on 2 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:3
    "For Christmas Day" n.d.
    AMs, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:4
    "Hark, Hark the Woodlands catch the strain..." untitled [1818 July 4]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:5
    "The Moonbeams" [February 1848]
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:6
    Notebook, owned by Rebecca C. Haswell, containing poems by Susanna Rowson and othe ca. 1823-1829
    AMssS, 1 vol.

    7379-b

    pp. 1-2: "To my very dear niece, Rebecca C. Haswell" / S. R.
    pp. 3-4: "Friendship, an Allegory" / S. R.
    p. 4: "Simile" / S. R.
    pp. 5-6: "Though the day of my destiny's over..." [untitled] / F. M. Mills
    p. 7: "To the Wild [Amaranth]" / [T. R.] Johnson
    p. 8: "It is the naval cannon's roar..." [untitled] / S. J. G.
    p. 9: "Balls and Bells" / S. J. G.
    pp. 10-11: "Genius" / S. R.
    p. 12: "To R. C. H." / J. P.
    p. 13: "Accrostic" / J. P.
    p. 15: "A Moral Thought" / [unidentified]
    p. 17: "Solitude" / [unknown]; quote: "Be happy today..."
    p. 19: "Whenever I see those smiling eyes..." [untitled] / L. E. C[ordis]
    p. 21: "To R. H." / J. Bartlett
    p. 23: "Fair on the Bosom of the Spring" [untitled] / M. M.
    p. 25: "O sweet is the breath of the dew sprinkled thorn" [untitled] / S. M.
    pp. 29-30: "To Miss Rebecca C. Haswell" / R. J.
    pp. 32-33: "An Elegy" / [unidentified]
    p. 35: "I saw two clouds at morning" [untitled] / A. M. B.
    pp. 37-41: "The Spirit of Joy" / H.
    pp. 44-45: "Messages to the Dead" / Maria S. Clarke
    p. 47, 49: "Lines addressed to Mrs. Mary H. Murdock by Mrs. Susanna Rowson" / S. Rowson
    p. 51: "Thoughts on the night after M. Murdock and Rebecca C. Haswell sailed for Philadelphia" / Susan Rowson

  • Box-folder 1:7
    Poems published in A Present for Young Ladies n.d.
    AMsS, 35 pp.

    7379-a

    pp. 1-4: "The Bee - A Fable"
    pp. 5-8: "A Dialogue Spoken by Three Little Misses"
    pp. 9-12: "Dialogue"
    pp. 13-18: "Dialogue"
    pp. 18-23: "Dialogue"
    pp. 24-30: "Dialogue"
    pp. 31-35: "Dialogue"

  • Box-folder 1:8
    "Susan when life's gay scene is past," untitled n.d.
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:9
    "There's not a look or word of thine," untitled n.d.
    AMs, 2 p. on 1 l.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:10
    "To Anna" n.d.
    AMs, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:11
    "To Honora Martesia" March 26, 1803
    AMs, 3 pp. on 2 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:12
    "To Make Mock Turtle" n.d.
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:13
    "To Mr. Rowson on the 25th anniversary of our wedding day" October 17, 1811
    AMsS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:14
    "To the Pink" July 1818
    AMs, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-b

Series II: Correspondence
  • Box-folder 1:15
    R. C. Clarke to Mary L. Clarke 1836 March 7
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:16
    Manton Eastburn to William Rowson 1852 August 17
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:17
    Manton Eastburn to William Rowson 1853 April 28
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:18
    Manton Eastburn to William Rowson 1855 March 7
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:19
    Manton Eastburn to William Rowson 1856 February 11
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:20
    Manton Eastburn to Mary [Rowson] 1870 December 13
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:21
    Manton Easburn to Mary Rowson 1871 February 14
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:22
    Manton Eastburn to Albert R. Walker 1872 January 1
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:23
    Manton Eastburn to William Rowson 1872 January 1
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with envelope.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:24
    Edward Everett to Susanna Rowson 1820 August 16
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:24
    Edward Everett to Susanna Rowson 1820 September 16
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:26
    M. Haswell to Mrs. Rowson 1807 April 3
    AL copy, 4 pp. on 4 l. Copied by Elias Nason.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:27
    Mary Haswell to Susanna Rowson 1804 October 26
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:28
    Robert Haswell to Mrs. Rowson 1796 January 20
    AL copy, 2 pp. on 1 l. Copied by Elias Nason.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:29
    Robert Haswell to Susanna Rowson 1796 May 19
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:30
    W. R. Haswell to W. Rowson 1793 January 14
    AL copy, 2 pp. on 2 l. Copied by Elias Nason.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:31
    W. R. Haswell to William Haswell 1801 June 1
    AL copy, 3pp. on 2 l. Copied by Elias Nason.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:32
    William and Rachel Haswell to William and Susanna Rowson 1799 July 14
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:33
    William and Rachel Haswell to William Rowson 1801 February 4
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:34
    William and Rachel Haswell to William Rowson 1801 February 4
    AL copy 5 pp. on 5 l. Copied by Elias Nason.

    7379-b

  • Box-folder 1:35
    Charles Lean to W. J. Rowson 1819 January 12
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:36
    Susanna Rowson to Louisa Bliss 1808 January 8
    AL copy, 4 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:37
    Susanna Rowson to D. Brown n.d.
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. Written in verse form.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:38
    Susanna Rowson to Anthony Haswell 1795 May 21
    AL copy, 3 pp. on 1 l. With transcriber's note 1870 February 12.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:39
    Susanna Rowson to Mary Montgomery 1808 January 8
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:40
    Susanna Rowson to Miss [Hannah] Swan ante 1803
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:41
    Susanna Rowson to Miss Hannah Swan ante 1803
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:42
    Susanna Rowson to Miss Hannah Swan 1816 August 11
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:43
    Susanna Rowson to Mr. Francis Welsch n.d.
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 1:44
    Susanna Rowson to John West 1806 June 9
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:45
    Susanna Rowson to John West 1807 March 16
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:46
    Susanna Rowson to John West n.d.
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 1:47
    William Rowson, Jr. to parents 1811 August 11
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l. with address leaf.

    7379

Series III: Elias Nason Biographical Materials
  • Box-folder 1:48
    "A Biography of Mrs. Susanna Rowson" by Elias Nason 1859
    AMs, ca. 134 pp. and cover.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:49
    Notes regarding "Trials of the Human Heart" by Elias Nason [1860 August 23]
    AMs, 8pp.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:50
    Notes on "Anthony Haswell" by Elias Nason n.d.
    AMs, 1 p.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:51
    Notes regarding "Hull" by Elias Nason n.d.
    AMs, 6 pp.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:52
    Notes on "David C. Johnston" by Elias Nason n.d.
    AMs, 2 pp.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:53
    Notes regarding "Rebecca" by Elias Nason n.d.
    AMs, 3 pp.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:54
    Notes regarding "Mrs. Susanna Rowson" by Elias Nason n.d.
    AMs, 2 pp.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:55
    Notes regarding Haswell and Rowson Families by Mrs. J. J. Clarke n.d.
    AMss, 12 pp. on 6 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:56
    Miscellaneous notes regarding Haswell and Rowson families
    AMss, 31 items, assembled by Elias Nason.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:57
    Description of Susanna Rowson by Mr. Lord n.d.
    1 p. Copied by Elias Nason.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:58
    Notes regarding Susanna Rowson and New England Galaxy, with transcripts of published poems n.d.
    AMss, 11 pp. on 7 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:59
    Notebook cover and subscriptions to A Memoir by Elias Nason n.d.
    4 items.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:60
    "Mrs. Rowson's Scholars" by Elias Nason n.d.
    AMs, 19 pp.

    Alphabetical listing of Susanna Rowson's students. 7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:61
    "To Louisa" n.d.
    AMs copy, 4 pp. on 1 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:62
    "The blind girl's address to the Rose" n.d.
    AMs copy, 1 p. on 1 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:63
    "To my very dear Neice [sic] Rebecca C. Haswell" n.d.
    AMs copy, 2 pp. on 1 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:64
    "Thoughts on the night after M. M. + R. C. H. sailed for Philadelphia" and "Lines addressed to Mrs. M. M." n.d.
    AMss copies, 3 pp. on 1 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:65
    "Thoughts on the night after M. M. + R. C. H. sailed for Philadelphia" and "To her neice [sic] R. C. Haswell" n.d.
    AMss copies, 3 pp. on 2 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:66
    "Lines addressed to Mary M." n.d.
    AMs copy, 2 pp. on 2 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:67
    "On the death of Miss Eliza Bradley" n.d.
    AMs copy, 1 p. on 1 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:68
    "Accrostic - by Mrs. Rowson" n.d.
    AMs copy, 1 p. on 1 l. In unidentified hand.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:69
    Various drawings of Hull, Bunker Hill, etc. [1868 January 1]
    5 pp.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:70
    Newspaper clippings regarding Susanna Rowson and Charlotte Temple ca. 1871
    3 pp. Printed.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:71
    Mary M. Batchelder to Elias Nason 1859-1861, n.d.
    ALsS, 72 pp. on 22 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:72
    Samuel Batchelder, Jr. to Elias Nason 1859, 1871
    ALsS, 3 pp. on 3 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:73
    Isabella Child to Mrs. Batchelder [1861]
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:74
    John J. Clarke to "Dear Sir" [Elias Nason] 1859 August 10
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:75
    R. C. Clarke to Elias Nason 1859-1870, n.d.
    ALsS, 21 pp. on 10 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:76
    John W. Dean to Elias Nason 1865 August 3
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:77
    Mr. Gilbert regarding Susanna Rowson 1859 [August 18]
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:78
    [Hoppin] to Edmund G. Shaffer 1867 March 27
    ALS, 1p. on 1 l. With transcribed note on verso dated April 15, 1807.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:79
    D. C. Johnston to Elias Nason 1861 August 22-1861 September 7
    ALsS, 6 pp. on 3 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:80
    Susan R. Johnston to Elias Nason 1860 September 24
    ALS, 14 pp. on 4 l. With transcribed Susanna Rowson poetry.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:81
    Solomon Lincoln to Elias Nason 1860 January 10, 1869 July 30
    ALsS, 3 pp. on 2 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:82
    John G. Locke to [Elias] Nason 1859 October 24
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:83
    John G. Loring to Elias Nason 1870 August 30, 1871 November 9
    ALsS, 8 pp. on 2 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:84
    [ Nancy ? ] to [ "my dear Sister" ] 1860 January 23
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:85
    Elias Nason to S. A. [Allibone] 1859 October 12
    ALS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:86
    [L. F.] Smith to Elias Nason 1878 August 31
    APCS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-c

  • Box-folder 1:87
    Mrs. Spofford to Elias Nason 1859 August 25
    ALS, 4 pp. on 2 l.

    7379-c

Series IV: Miscellaneous Documents
  • Box-folder 2:88
    Naturalization papers of William Rowson, signed by Charles Cushing with seal 1802 August 3
    ADS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:89
    Susanna Rowson, bill to John Montgomery for his daughter's school expenses n.d.
    AD, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 2:90
    Commission of John Montresor Haswell in the U.S. Navy signed by Thomas Jefferson 1807 February 26
    Physical Location: Original in OS Box V-12
    DS, 1 p. on 1 l. photocopy.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:91
    Copyright agreement for Susanna Rowson's New Spelling Dictionary 1807 August 25
    DS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 2:92
    Promissory note for Richardson & Lord 1822 November 2
    ANS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 2:93
    Copyright agreement for Susanna Rowson's Charlotte's Daughter 1828 February 12
    DS, 1 p. on 1 l.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 2:94
    "Dramatic Reminiscences" 1832 July
    Detached from The New England Magazine, pp. 33-40.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:95
    "An Historical Piano" 1867 September
    Complete issue of The Historical Magazine; Susanna Rowson reference on pp. 170-171.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:96
    School reports regarding Mary Montgomery by Susanna Rowson n.d.
    6 pp. on 6 l. With 8x10 black and white photograph and 2 photocopies.

    7379-a

  • Box-folder 2:97
    Newspaper clippings regarding Susanna Rowson n.d.

    7379

Series V: Portraits
  • Box-folder 2:98
    Pencil sketch of William Rowson as a young man, in England ca. 1770
    With 4x5 black and white copy.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:99
    Watercolor miniature of Susanna Rowson, right profile ca. 1790
    With 4x5 black and white copy.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:100
    Watercolor miniature of Susanna Rowson, left profile ca. 1790
    With 4x5 black and white copy.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:101
    Portrait of William Rowson, signed by J. R. Smith 1819 November
    With 4x5 black and white copy.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:102
    Silhouette of William and Susanna Rowson by Daniel Bowen or W. M. S. Doyle n.d.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:103
    Silhouette of William and Susanna Rowson by Daniel Bowen or W. M. S. Doyle n.d.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:104
    Silhouette of William Rowson with cane by Daniel Bowen or W. M. S. Doyle n.d.
    With 8x10 black and white copy.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:105
    Silhouette of William Rowson with trumpet by Daniel Bowen or W. M. S. Doyle n.d.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:106
    Pencil sketch of William Rowson n.d.

    7379

  • Box-folder 2:107
    Engravings of "Charlotte Temple" by C. Tiebout n.d.
    2 pp. With 4x5 black and white copy.

    7379