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A Guide to the Papers of Carter Glass 1858-1946, and n.d. Glass, Carter, Papers 2913

A Guide to the Papers of Carter Glass 1858-1946, and n.d.

A Collection in
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The University of Virginia Library
Accession Number 2913


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Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession number
2913
Title
Papers of Carter Glass 1858-1946, and n.d.
Physical Characteristics
This collection consists of ca. 215,000 items.
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Papers of Carter Glass, Accession #2913, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

This collection was a gift of Carter Glass and Mrs. John Boatwright on March 29, 1948.


Biographical/Historical Information

Perhaps the most telling comment about Carter Glass came from President Franklin Roosevelt, who called Glass an "Unreconstructed Rebel." Roosevelt meant exactly what the capital "R" on Rebel implies. As the Senate's last surviving member born in the antebellum South, Glass unapologetically fought to retain a society in which property-owning, white males sat at the top of the pyramid. In that regard, he was a man of his times.

Carter Glass was born just as the year 1858 began, into a newspaper family that did not back away from a fight. Robert Henry Glass, Carter's father, owned the Lynchburg Daily Republican, the dominant Democratic newspaper in southwestern Virginia. In the summer of 1860, while Robert was away on business, his associate editor, George Hardwicke, killed a rival newspaperman who accused Glass of using his position as postmaster of Lynchburg to prevent the delivery of his competitor's papers. The elder Glass himself almost got into a duel, but his wife swore out warrants on both parties, and the matter was settled with canes rather than pistols. These lessons were not lost on Carter Glass, a scrapper in his youth who, as the eventual publisher of his own newspaper, almost came to a duel with a cross-town rival.

During Reconstruction, there were few opportunities for the younger Glass to receive much formal education. At the age of 13, he was taken out of school and apprenticed as a printer with his father. From that point on, he learned on his own, reading Plato, Edmund Burke and Shakespeare, and his love of such intellectual pursuits never waned. Later, when he owned his own papers, he published articles about the true identity of Shakespeare, the meaning of the biblical stories as history and other such topics.

Carter worked six years for his father, then moved with him to Petersburg, Va., to work on The Petersburg News. When the reporting job young Glass wanted did not materialize, he took a job as a clerk in the auditor's office of the Atlantic, Mississippi and Ohio Railroad back in Lynchburg. Robert accepted one of his son's political editorials, and soon after, 22-year-old Carter was offered a job as reporter on the Lynchburg News. Within a few years, he became the paper's editor and also served as clerk for the city of Lynchburg. With what looked to be a bright future, at the age of 28, Glass married his landlord's daughter, a school teacher from Lynchburg, and they eventually had four children.

In 1888, with the help of some friends, he bought the Lynchburg News, and two years later, he purchased the Daily Republican, once owned by his father. In the meantime, the elder Glass returned to Lynchburg and took over the editorship of The Advance, becoming Carter's rival. During a family feud, Robert stormed over to his son's offices and asked him where he had come up with the nonsense printed in the News. Carter pointed to a clipping his father had written earlier and said, "In my boyish pride of my father, I used to keep a scrapbook."

Eventually, he bought the paper his father was editing and became the only publisher in town. Well respected both inside and outside his community, he used his influence to champion politicians who ran against what he felt were Democratic politicians promoting bad fiscal policy. Two important events occurred in 1896: his father died, and Carter went as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. There he heard William Jennings Bryan speak for free silver in his famous speech: "Thou shalt not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns. Thou shalt not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold!" Glass would later repudiate Bryan's philosophy, but the adventure hooked him on politics. As a politician, he was never in doubt

In 1899, Glass was elected to the Virginia Senate. Two years later, as a delegate to the State Constitutional Convention, Glass became instrumental in pushing through the convention a proposal to proclaim a new state constitution outright without submitting it to anyone, thus disenfranchising those who had gained the right to vote under the 14th and 15th amendments. Almost four decades later, when President Franklin Roosevelt wanted to abolish poll taxes throughout the South, Glass defended the plank he himself had put into the Virginia Constitution and stated that "the President displays a very superficial knowledge of the subject."

Even as he worked to disenfranchise certain segments of society, he had a soft spot in his heart for individual blacks. In the midst of the fight over the Federal Reserve Bill, Glass made a special trip home to Lynchburg to appear at the manslaughter trial of his black servant. He took the witness stand, "swore that William was the best Negro that ever lived in the United States" and pleaded to keep him from imprisonment. When William was fined $200, Congressman Glass reached into his pocket, pulled out a roll of bills, paid the fine, then rushed back to Washington, D.C.

In 1902, at the age of 44, Glass was elected to the United States House of Representatives. To those who did not know him, he appeared sickly and frail. The 5-foot-4-inch Glass had dropped to 100 pounds and walked around on tiptoes to avoid jarring his sensitive stomach. This malady was not uncommon for Glass. Four years earlier, doctors warned him that his irregular eating habits and intense working habits had almost ruined his digestion, as well as caused a number of other bothersome ills. "Rest," his doctor ordered; but it was a futile request.

His colleagues in the House soon learned that this little man was not to be taken lightly. Within two years, he was appointed to the Committee on Banking and Currency and threw himself into the study of finance just as heartily as he had earlier delved into questions about Shakespeare when he was a newspaper editor.

The Banking Panic of 1907 put the Banking and Currency committee in the spotlight, and Glass found himself chairman when his friend Woodrow Wilson was elected president. Initial efforts at resolving the problems raised by the 1907 panic, though, were met with frustration. Essentially, legislators were concerned about two issues: a banking system that was prone to panics (1907's event was not rare), and a currency that was not responsive to changes in demand. On the makeup of a reserve system to address those problems, there was disagreement over the control of such an institution: Should private banks have control over the eventual Federal Reserve System, or should their input be confined to decentralized banks within the system?

Carter Glass--who favored decentralized power--was particularly adamant on this question, and his role in developing the legislation is an example of how his Jeffersonian ideas of democracy, along with his tenacious spirit, helped shape one of the country's most important pieces of financial legislation. After working tirelessly on the subject for five years, the election of 1912 brought an opening: not only did it usher Wilson into the White House, but it also gave Glass' party control of both the House and Senate.

Glass wasted no time. He began drafting legislation with Wilson before the newly elected president even took office, and by December of the following year, the Federal Reserve Act was passed and signed into law. Glass was thrilled: "The thing which had been vainly discussed and intermittently attempted for 20 years had finally been accomplished!"

Essentially, in constructing the Federal Reserve Act with Wilson, Glass had repackaged the previous Republican administration's proposal, the economist Milton Friedman would later write, making it even more conservative. Instead of a centralized bank under private banker control, Glass, of course, wanted decentralized banks under private control. (The claim that the Federal Reserve Act was a modified form of the Aldrich plan was also made in Glass' day, and it was a notion he detested. In a 1922 speech before the Senate, Glass called the idea "a total misunderstanding," and said "no greater misconception was ever projected in this Senate Chamber ...") It was Wilson who suggested an altruistic board of governors appointed by the executive branch. Even though he may not have entirely liked that idea, Glass and his sharp tongue helped guarantee the bill's passage.

During the coming European war, Glass supported Wilson and the struggle for a lasting peace. At the end of 1919, he was named Wilson's Secretary of the Treasury, the first cabinet officer from Virginia since the elder Glass' commander, John Floyd, was Secretary of War in Buchanan's administration. As such, Glass favored rebuilding Europe, including the defeated Germany, and pushed for American financial assistance. Although as head of the Treasury, Glass was in charge of enforcing prohibition laws, his greatest domestic concern had to do with the vast amount of borrowing for stock market speculation. Glass wanted the banks voluntarily to restrict their lending for stock purchases and warned about the consequences if nothing was done.

Exactly one year after he took over at the Treasury, the popular Glass was appointed to the Senate in 1920 to succeed Thomas S. Martin of Virginia, who died in late 1919. Glass would remain a Virginia senator until his death.

When Glass' predictions about the economy came true in 1929, he first went to work defending his original Federal Reserve legislation, then proceeded in 1931 to write a banking reform bill to provide the Federal Reserve Board with greater control over speculative credit. Thus began an important period wherein Glass and the rest of the nation, reeling from a series of financial panics and rampant bank closures, reconsidered what type of financial system was best for the country.

Briefly, some of the laws enacted:

* Glass-Steagall Act of 1932: The piece of legislation that keeps Glass' name in the news today, largely because of its provisions that separated commercial and investment banking; current reformers hope to mend that split. The Act also permitted the use of U.S. government securities as collateral for Federal Reserve notes.

* Banking Act of 1933: Established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.-set the insurance level at $2,500 per depositor; placed control of open market operations under the Federal Reserve.

* Reconstruction Finance Corp. (1933): Permitted Federal Reserve to issue loans directly to businesses.

* Securities and Exchange Act: Provided for minimum margins on purchases of securities on credit.

* Banking Act of 1935: Created the Federal Open Market Committee; Federal Reserve Board becomes the Board of Governors, with terms set at 14 years; Secretary of the Treasury and Comptroller of the Currency were removed from the Board.

Glass was not always on the winning side of these new laws, including in his opposition to federal deposit insurance. As Friedman and Anna Schwartz tell it in their Monetary History of the United States: "[Glass] had opposed a similar provision at the time of the passage of the original Federal Reserve Act. Glass believed that the solution was reform of the practices of commercial banks and introduced several bills to that end. None received the support of the administration or of the Reserve System, and none was passed."

In 1932, the political party he had been a member of for many years began to head down a path Glass did not care to take. Although he was said to like Franklin Roosevelt personally, he could not bring himself to trust anyone who sought public office with Roosevelt's vigor. Glass had also locked horns with Roosevelt when the latter was assistant secretary of the Navy and wanted to keep the Coast Guard under the Navy's jurisdiction after the end of World War I. Glass, as the head of Treasury, insisted it return to Treasury's control and won the point. Despite his misgivings, Glass got out of his sickbed to defend Roosevelt against Hoover's attacks. Roosevelt, in turn, offered Glass the Treasury. In poor health, Glass turned down the office, but he also knew that he and Roosevelt did not agree on fundamental economic issues. Glass tried to keep their disagreements private, but in a very short time, the Roosevelt administration would give him fits. The New Deal came along and took his mind off everything else, according to a flattering biography, even his prized Jersey cows at his home at Montview Farm, Va.

Although in public Glass continued to support the Roosevelt administration, he openly fought some Roosevelt initiatives and worked tirelessly to fight against what he considered unconstitutional interference by the federal government in private affairs. But the fact that the New Deal carried all but two states in 1936 did not surprise Glass: "It is well nigh impossible to beat a five billion dollar campaign fund," he quipped.

For the first time in years he did not participate in the construction of the party platform in 1936, and he spent the next four years working for a balanced budget and states' rights, usually behind the scenes. In 1937, however, he went on the radio to attack the White House's attempt to pack the Supreme Court. Glass won the battle. In 1940, as he had done four years earlier, he fought against the nomination of Roosevelt, but gave his support when the Democrat was nominated for a third term.

Having been a widower for the previous three years, Glass remarried in 1940 at the age of 82. Although Glass' character had been "carved out of unblemished granite," according to Harry Byrd, the junior senator from his home state, the man himself had begun to allow the illnesses which had plagued him for most of his life to slow him down. For all intents and purposes, the father of the Federal Reserve System retired from public life within two years.

Finally, at the age of 88, Glass died of congestive heart failure in his apartment at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. Out of respect for the senator from Virginia, the Senate suspended business and adjourned for the day. "A link with the Old South is broken in the passing of your distinguished husband," President Truman wrote to the second Mrs. Glass. "To the end he glorified in the title of 'Unreconstructed Rebel.'"

Scope and Content Information

The papers of Glass consist of personal and professional papers including correspondence, speeches, notes and memoranda, documents, printed matter, photographs, clippings and miscellaneous material. Much of the collection centers on banking and currency legislation, in the enactment of which Glass was active while in both Houses of Congress and while serving as Secretary of the Treasury.

Subjects include: the Federal Reserve Bank Act and Federal Reserve system; the Federal Farm Loan Act; branch banks; currency [reform] bill of 1913; Emergency Banking Act, 1933; the Banking Act of 1933 (Glass- Steagall Act) to establish the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; the Bank Bill of 1935; opposition to the National Industrial Recovery Act; the National Labor Relations Act; the Bank Holding Company Bill; and the Office of Price Administration.

Additional topics include World Wars I and II, particularly their domestic economic aspects; the League of Nations; the World Court; Democratic Party platforms and policies; the presidential elections of 1912, 1920, 1924, 1928, and 1940; Senator Huey P. Long; Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal; the attempted packing of the Supreme Court , 1937; neutrality legislation; disarmament; regulation of the coal industry; child labor; anti-lynching law; immigration restriction (especially Chinese in Hawaii); Muscle Shoals; trade with Russia; diplomatic relations with the Vatican; Four-Power Treaty; soldiers' bonus bill; tariffs and protectionism; and national defense.

Virginia topics of concern to Glass or his constituents include poll tax elimination; Negro suffrage; highways; the University of Virginia Board of Visitors; patronage requests from Lynchburg, Roanoke, and Bedford, Campbell, Floyd, Montgomery, and Roanoke Counties, Va.; the Woodrow Wilson Foundation; a national Patrick Henry shrine at "Red Hill"; the gubernatorial election of 1924; Bishop James Cannon, prohibition and the Anti-saloon League; the Skyline Drive; Spotsylvania Battlefield Park; the Woodrow Wilson Foundation; the Virginia Fight For Freedom Committee; and operation of the Lynchburg News and Advance.

Miscellaneous items of interest include a letter describing the early life of Booker T. Washingrton, election tickets for 1848, a 1906 recipe book, and letters concerning Glass' belief in the Baconian theory of Shakespeare authorship.

In addition to speeches by Glass there are speeches by Edwin A. Alderman, Harry Byrd, Sr., George M. Coffin, Gilbert M. Hitchcock, Henry Cabot Lodge, Francis Pickens Miller, Al Smith, and Henry St. George Tucker.

Among the many correspondents are: Edwin A. Alderman, Newton Baker, Ray Stannard Baker, Alben Barkley, Bernard Baruch, William E. Borah, Chester Bowles, John Stewart Bryan, William Jennings Bryan, Harry F. Byrd, Richard E. Byrd, Calvin Coolidge, John W. Daniel, Josephus Daniels, Colgate W. Darden, Westmoreland Davis, F. A. Delano, the Democratic National Committee, Marriner S. Eccles, James A. Farley, Douglas Southall Freeman, James A. Garfield, Samuel Gompers, Cary Grayson, Charles S. Hamlin, W. P. G. Harding, Warren G. Harding, J. Edgar Hoover, Herbert Hoover, Edwin M. House, Cordell Hull, Harold Ickes, Hugh S. Johnson, Jesse Jones, Joseph P. Kennedy, Walter Lippmann, Huey Long, William G. McAdoo, G. Walter Mapp, Andrew Mellon, Eugene Meyer, Andrew J. Montague, R. Walton Moore, Henry Morgenthau, Robert L. Owen, George C. Peery, John G. Pollard, A. Willis Robertson, Eleanor Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dave E. Satterfield, C. Bascom Slemp, Rixey Smith, Billy Sunday, Claude A. Swanson, Harry S. Truman, Joseph P. Tumulty, Oscar W. Underwood, Samuel Untermeyer, Arthur H. Vandenberg, Robert F. Wagner, Henry A. Wallace, Paul Moritz Warburg, Richard S. Whaley, William Allen White, John Skelton Williams, H. Parker Willis, Edith Bolling Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, Clifton A. Woodrum, and Walter Wyatt.

Contents List

Correspondence
Box: 1

Personal correspondence of Carter Glass and Bernard Baruch extending over a period of years to about 1922; Newton D. Baker to Carter Glass regarding Wilson's "Confidential Documents" sent with letter, 20 January 1924, Baker to Carter Glass to obtain Glass' opinion of the use of the document in connection with the platform framed at the Democratic National convention of July 11, 1924; Carter Glass to Newton D. Baker asking him to examine Glass' book; Letters between Bernard Baruch and Carter Glass, 1920-22, 1936, regarding Baruch's book, Taking the Profits Out of War, and other matters; Folder of correspondence with Dr. [Edwin] Alderman; Carter Glass to Bernard Baruch, 29 March 1927, regarding the book, The Real Colonel Houseby Arthur Howden Smith; Carter Glass to Bernard Baruch regarding Arthur Howden Smith's article in the New York Herald Tribune, 2 April 1927; Bernard Baruch to Carter Glass regarding Carter Glass' book. An Adventure in Constructive Finance; Bernard Baruch to Carter Glass, 24 March 1926, in reference to Glass' piece on currency reform; Carter Glass to Baruch, 24 March 1926, regarding Colonel House; Carter Glass to Bernard Baruch, 18 October 1926, regarding Carter Glass' narrative on Federal Reserve legislation, written to destroy both Seymour and House; Bernard Baruch to Carter Glass suggesting that Glass write an article for "some magazine" refuting House; Folder of correspondence with John Stewart Bryan, 1932 regarding politics, speeches, personal friends, includes a few letters from Bernard Baruch; Folder of correspondence with Bernard Baruch; Folder of Bob Ainsworth letters, personal and political; Folder of Harry F. Byrd letters regarding state politics; Memorandum from correspondents of Harry F. Byrd and Carter Glass, said to be a statement of the Democratic platform of 1924, as Wilson desired it. "RS" initials on attached slip. Baker letters are also in this folder.

Personal correspondence (C-D)
Box: 2

A. Correspondence with Calvin Coolidge.

B. Correspondence relating to state politics.

C. Correspondence concerning the 1924 Democratic State Convention.

D. Copy of the Virginia Democratic platform for 1924, which Carter Glass sent to several people, including George W. Norris at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

E. Copies of newspaper articles dealing with Bishop James Cannon.

F. Political and personal correspondence with Ed A. Christian : Answer to letter from Christian on October 1, 1928, Carter Glass stating that Robert L. Owen had nothing to do with the Federal Reserve Act other than to "permit it to be mangled in the Senate, which necessitated restoring. . . . its integrity in the conference committee of the two houses," despite the claims of Robert L. Owen to the contrary.

G. Miscellaneous articles: Copy of a Virginia Democratic platform; Copies of several speeches by Carter Glass, including, "A Menacing 'Group Alliance'," and "Truth About the Federal Reserve System " (January, 1922); Congressional address made on December 15, 1924, by Edwin A. Alderman in memory of Woodrow Wilson; Editorial presenting the position of Carter Glass on agricultural loans by the Federal Reserve System; Article, January 18, 1922, in a Memphis newspaper, defending the Federal Reserve System against the critics claiming that system policies caused deflation following the war; Newspaper article, including figures, commenting briefly on a statement of the position of the Federal Reserve; Announcement of the opening of hearings under guidance of the Senate Banking and Currency Committee, aimed at changing banking laws to meet the severe depression condition of the 1930's.

H. Correspondence with the Josephus Daniels, editor of a Raleigh, North Carolina, newspaper: Article describing the argument between Carter Glass and L. M. Williams, a Richmond, Virginia, banker, concerning Federal Reserve policy with respect to stock speculation; Editorial stating that, despite the opposition of bankers, Carter Glass should be entrusted with responsibility for perfecting legislation relating to banking; Answer to Josephus Daniels, Carter Glass expressing the opinion that real estate mortgages should not be made eligible for rediscount, since, "if that and kindred projects were followed, we would soon transform the Federal Reserve banks into investment banks, when they would no longer be liquid or able to respond to the demands of commerce"; Request made by Daniels for an opinion on a letter regarding real estate securities from the president of the American Mortgage Company occasioned Glass' remark.

I. Envelope containing a series of memoranda concerning the Anti-Saloon League of America.

Personal Correspondence (D-G)
Box: 3

A. Personal References: Summary of the Carter Glass bill on banking of 1932 with special reference to changes which had been made or attempted; Memorandum showing Carter Glass' unfavorable attitude toward devaluation of the dollar; Copy of a statement by the Mississippi legislator refusing to vote on the question of remonetizing silver in the way that the State Senate had instructed.

B. Honors and citations bestowed upon Carter Glass.

C. Letter from H. D. Flood, State Democratic Committee.

D. Personal correspondence with Robert Glass, E. C. Glass, Mrs. Woodrow Wilson, and Claude Swanson.

E. Statements by Carter Glass, prepared for publication during the period of Congressional consideration of the Glass-Steagall Act; includes is a list of the changes on the Glass-Steagall bill.

F. Newspaper clipping concerning the impartial position of Carter Glass toward the hope of J. G. Ferneyhough to become state commissioner of agriculture.

G. Correspondence with Theodore M. Gowans.

H. Correspondence with E. C. Folkes.

I. Booklets about Carter Glass, one which suggests that he would be the best Democratic presidential nominee. Also a handwritten editorial by Carter Glass.

J. Expressions of regret by Carter Glass upon the death of Admiral Cary F. Grayson.

K. Letter to G. C. Glass from James A. Garfield on March 15, 1879, discussing concept of "party spirit."

L. Letters, memoranda, and speeches concerning the Federal Reserve System : Copy of a speech by Carter Glass before the House of Representatives on June 14, 1917, concerning the Hardwick amendment; Story of the opposition of Carter Glass to a Roosevelt appointee for a Virginia judgeship, when the President tried to prove that the appointive power carried greater weight than did the concept of senatorial courtesy; Copy of the speech made by Carter Glass, expressing unqualified opposition to the attempt by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his political adherents to pack the Supreme Court with men who favored New Deal proposals; Answer from Adolph A. Miller, of the Federal Reserve Board, to Carter Glass on November 20, 1934, upon receipt of an expression of regret at his retirement from public service; Letter from Carter Glass to the editor of a Texas newspaper on April 16, 1929, citing the unfavorable effects on "legitimate business," which would result from action by the Federal Reserve Board along the lines suggested by Mitchell with respect to stock speculation; Letter of December 19, 1919, Benjamin Strong to Russell C. Leffingwell, discussing the relationship between the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve System, which he feels should be considerably strengthened as a result of the end of the war, rather than deteriorating still further, as he fears will be the case; Note from Carter Glass to John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, thanking Williams for sending him the first Federal Reserve note to be issued; Letter, Carter Glass to Neil M. Cronin on August 26, 1920, stating that the Federal Reserve Act did not represent a modification of Aldrich plan and that the Republicans opposed the measure in Congress; Memorandum regarding certain important changes in the Glass-Steagall bill; An article by Carter Glass, "The Service of the Federal Reserve System, " sent to a member of the Democratic National Committee; Article from the Lynchburg News, February 9, 1930, "Bankers of the Nation Consider Senator Carter Glass'Strong Man' in shaping New Banking Law"; Letter from Senator Champ Clark on August 16, 1913, praising Carter Glass for his oratorical endeavors; Letter from R. E. Byrd commending Carter Glass for his part in formulating currency legislation; Congratulatory note from R. Walton Moore on September 17, 1913, on the passing of the currency measure by the House; Letter from Carter Glass to Senator Arthur Capper on April 16, 1920, giving reasons for rejecting any plan to base currency issues on government bonds; Carter Glass to Robert W. Woolley on March 22, 1921, listing certain Republicans who opposed the Federal Reserve Act, including Senators Burton and Penrose, ex-Congressman Robert W. Bonynge, and A. Platt Andrew.

M. Correspondence with Mrs. Dillard S. Boatwright.

N. Copy of portions of the Congressional Record, December 3, 1923, to June 7, 1924, containing statements by Carter Glass on several issues of importance at the time.

O. Correspondence relating to certain honors and degrees conferred upon Carter Glass : Correspondence with Richard E. Byrd, including announcement by Admiral Byrd that he was sending to Carter Glass a small rock, taken from a mountain range near the South Pole that had been named after Carter Glass.

P. Notes from Leo T. Crowley, Jesse Jones, Jim Farley, Francis Pickens Miller, Henry Morganthau, Ronald Ransom, of the Federal Reserve Board, the associates of Carter Glass in the Fight For Freedom, Inc., and others congratulating Carter Glass upon his selection as a President Pro Tem of the Senate.

Personal Correspondence (H-L)
Box: 4

A. Correspondence with William Proctor Gould Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board : Letter from W. P. G. Harding on January 13, 1930, concerning the best method for getting bonds used as security for circulation out of national banks and into Federal Reserve banks, and opposing the suggestion by Representative Louis T. McFadden that the Comptroller of the Currency examine Federal Reserve banks at their expense; Letter, February 2, 1929, from W. P. G. Harding, concerning the division of the surplus of the Federal Reserve banks, and mentioning that he would prefer to see reserve requirements against time deposits increase from 3% to 5%, but fears the resulting loss of membership would be too great to warrant such an increase in cost; Letter from W. P. G. Harding on January 13, 1930, stating that he finds the McFadden Bill unacceptable, because of the supervisory element involved and the requirement that member banks pay the expenses of examinations. It is suggested that the excess profits of a reserve bank be more equitably distributed; Correspondence with Harding, concerning a speech to a group of New England bankers, which Carter Glass failed to present on November 8, 1929,, because of more pressing obligations; Attempted explanation by W. P. G. Harding of a $2,700,000 item in the budget, presented to Congress by the President in 1928, covering expenses of the Federal Reserve Board; Letter of January 28, 1929, from Harding, presenting a plan for participation by member banks and the government, in any excess profits of the Federal Reserve banks, amending section 7 of the Act, and offering a tentative plan for retiring national bank notes from circulation; Letter from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding on January 30, 1929, accompanying a copy of a proposed amendment to Section 7 of the Federal Reserve Act. Glass requests Harding to write a bill, which Carter Glass would introduce in Congress, providing for the effective retirement of national bank notes; Note from Carter Glass to Harding on March 27, 1926, expressing favor for a plan, whereby Federal Reserve banks would be given indeterminate charters; Letter from W. P. G. Harding, enclosing a copy of a memorandum sent to Representative James G. Strong on January 16, 1928, concerning his proposed stabilization bill and particularly the limitations of Federal Reserve policy with respect to the level of interest rates and prices; Note of a personal nature from W. P. G. Harding on March 26, 1926, offering unofficial backing for Carter Glass in working for revision of the McFadden Bill to include indeterminate charters for Federal Reserve banks and listing the persons and groups, including Irving Fisher, who oppose the charter amendment offered by Carter Glass, and the reasons for their opposition; Letter of December 10, 1925, from W. P. G. Harding, expressing opposition to the McFadden Bill, and including the statement that he was "unalterably opposed to having the Federal Reserve System used as a club in the settlement of the branch banking question; Letter from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding on October 8, 1927, noting that he and Harding are in agreement, along with Governor Norris, on an unspecified matter; Letter, October 5, 1927, from W. P. G. Harding pertaining to a letter from Carter Glass to Norris, concerning the foreign transactions of the New York Federal Reserve bank, expressing the opinion that the Federal Reserve Act has not been violated, but that it would be better for certain of the larger member banks to carry on business with foreign banks with the support of the Federal Reserve bank; Letter from Harding to Carter Glass on September 22, 1927, expressing great pleasure at the appointment of Roy A. Young, who is said to favor the "regional principles of the Federal Reserve Act," to the Federal Reserve Board; Copy of a letter sent to W. P. G. Harding on October 27, 1925, complimenting him on the objective treatment of the problems considered in his book, The Formative Period of the Federal Reserve System. Carter Glass comments at length on the incapacity evidenced by Robert L. Owen in his handling of the Federal Reserve legislation, states that Senator Robert L. Owen was "a positive obstruction to the preparation of the bill," and further admits the mistake of the House conferees in placing the Comptroller of the Currency upon the Federal Reserve Board, since the men who have filled this office had been of such uniformly poor character; Telegram from W. P. G. Harding on January 28, 1925, stating that, while national bank standards should not be lowered, these banks should be able to compete with the state banks with respect to the establishment of branches; Letter of November 9, 1925, from Harding, responding to a query by Carter Glass to say that, although he does not possess certain incriminating telegrams, sent by Senator Robert L. Owen in connection with foreign exchange speculation during a period of inflation, he thinks copies can be found at the Federal Reserve Board and that Fred I. Kent possibly has the originals; Letter from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding on October 29, 1923, stating that he will probably not accept speaking engagements to oppose those, including Congressman Tom Heflin, who wanted to ruin the system, whereby checks were cleared at or near par; Letter, October 23, 1923, W. P. G. Harding suggesting that Carter Glass actively oppose those persons who sought to destroy the check collection system; Letter of October 8, 1923, W. P. G. Harding to Carter Glass, enclosing a copy of a letter from Harding to Edmund Platt, in which opinions of Harding are rendered against interference by the Federal Reserve Board with the situation with respect to branch banking, created by the state laws of California, and in favor of the Dallas Federal Reserve bank engaging in open market transactions, involving bill of lading drafts endorsed by non-member banks; Carter Glass responds on October 10, 1923, that he does not feel that the Board has any power to limit the number of branches operated by state banks, which also belong to the Federal Reserve System; Letter from W. P. G. Harding on January 29, 1923, stating that there is some reason for doubt as to the future of the Federal Reserve System, largely because of the policies and administrative powers which may be employed by those in positions of responsibility. Harding expresses the opinion that, given a continuation of the conservative lending policies of the Board, wise management of the Federal Reserve banks offers solution to the problems; Personal letter from W. P. G. Harding on January 29, 1923, opposing Senator Tom Heflin's proposed amendment to the Federal Reserve Act, whereby progressive rates of interest would not be charged by Federal Reserve banks. Harding fears that the next move by Tom Heflin would be to attempt to place an upper limit on the discount rate through legislative action; Letter from Carter Glass on January 24, 1923, congratulating W. P. G. Harding on becoming governor of the Boston Federal Reserve bank, stating that it was a pity that a President had not been elected, who would have been ready to protect the banking system of the country from political attacks, and suggesting that, given the recent appointments, it would be impossible for the system to remain intact; Letter of October 18, 1922, Carter Glass to George W. Detrick of Hopwell, Virginia, stating that he had done nothing about getting W. P. G. Harding reappointed as governor of the Federal Reserve Board, largely because he felt that his opinion carried no weight with the President, although he would prefer to see Harding remain at the job; Handwritten note from W. P. G. Harding to Carter Glass on September 2, 1922, stating that he has learned that the President refuses to place Harding's name in nomination for reappointment to the Board, because of his fear that Senator Tom Heflin will carry out his threat to invoke senatorial courtesy; Copy of a newspaper article praising Carter Glass for a speech in behalf of the Federal Reserve System is sent to him by Harding; Correspondence pertaining to the attacks by Senator Tom Heflin on the Federal Reserve bank; Letters relating to par clearance of checks, including a report by Charles A. Peple, deputy governor of the Richmond Federal reserve bank, on a controversial question, involving the collection system; Several complimentary letters from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding upon important occasions in the career of the governor; Newspaper report of a combination of bankers in opposition to the policies of the Federal Reserve System; Memorandum on November 17, 1919, from W. P. G. Harding to Senator Robert L. Owen, relating to speculative activities by the Federal Reserve banks; Response by Carter Glass to Harding's statement dispatched to Senator Robert L. Owen.

B. Correspondence with Charles S. Hamlin : Letter, Carter Glass to Charles S. Hamlin on December 18, 1934, concerning the impropriety of the Federal Reserve Board, the Insurance of Deposits Corporation, or any institution, other than Congress, placing limits on the rate of interest charged on time deposits by state banks, which were not members of the Federal Reserve System; Copy of a November 7, 1929, letter from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding, discussing the distribution of a greater portion of the earnings of the Federal Reserve System to the member banks, rather that the government, as an incentive to membership in the System, and setting forth the desirability of preventing stack gambling through punitive legislation; Note from Governor Eugene Meyer, of the Federal Reserve Board, on December 6, 1932, accompanying a statement to the effect that " Congress has the constitutional power to establish a unified commercial banking system under national supervision;" Letter, Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, June 7, 1935, quoting an entry in his diary, expressing the opinion that Carter Glass was in a position to strengthen the Federal Reserve Board and to make it a legally independent body, if he would work to have the Federal Reserve Act amended in the manner proposed at that time. Charles S. Hamlin offers to discuss this matter at the convenience of Carter Glass; Letter from Carter Glass to Secretary of the Interior, Harold L. Ickes, on March 31, 1935, defending certain government loans merely as a means of increasing employment, and not, according to the interpretation of Harold L. Ickes, as a method of revising the social structure. The question of whether projects are to involve work relief, or mere relief, is part of the discussion; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass on January 22, 1926, listing the names of some men to whom positions on the Federal Reserve Board had been offered.

C. Correspondence with Cordell Hull, Secretary of State.

D. Correspondence with Pat Harrison, of the Democratic National Committee : Correspondence concerning defense in Congress by Robert L. Owen of certain special oil interests.

E. History of connection between Carter Glass and the Lynchburg News.

F. Correspondence concerning Herbert Hoover : Note from President Hoover on November 13, 1931, enclosing a statement of his concerning Mortgage Discount Banks, about which he and Carter Glass had talked; Several letters involving Carter Glass and Josephus Daniels, North Carolina newspaper editor, which reflect unfavorably on Hoover; Note from President Herbert Hoover to Carter Glass on December 2, 1931, enclosing an opinion, submitted to him by the Attorney General, stating that Congressional power to regulate interstate commerce did not include the power to regulate commercial banking. Thus, commercial banks could not be compelled to become members of the Federal Reserve System.

G. Correspondence with Colonel E. M. House : Correspondence during December 15, 1919, between Carter Glass and E. M. House, concerning a successor for Carter Glass as Secretary of the Treasury. Carter Glass recommends Russell C. Leffingwell, citing his stand in opposition to the policies of Benjamin Strong and the New York Federal Reserve bank officials. House responds that he had favored Roper, of the Internal Revenue Bureau, but was inclined to concur in the opinion of Carter Glass that Leffingwell would be the best person for the job; Copy of a letter of December 11, 1919, from Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, discussing possible successors at the Treasury Department, suggesting that it would be unwise to remove Roper from his place at the Internal Revenue Bureau, looking upon appointment of Williams with favor, except that Carter Glass feels that a southerner should be appointed, Charles Hamlin is considered an excellent choice, except for the likelihood of his surrendering to outside influences, many reasons are offered in favor of Russell C. Leffingwell; Telegram dated September 18, 1913, from E. M. House to Carter Glass, congratulating him upon "the passage of the currency bill"; Copy of a letter from Carter Glass to President Wilson on September 29, 1921, concerning the situation with respect to ratification of the German treaty.

H. Foreign Affairs: Letter from Carter Glass to Andrew W. Mellon, Secretary of the Treasury, concerning certain cables from Mellon, which were of a confidential nature and which Carter Glass intended to file, although continuing to hold them in confidence; Note to President Woodrow Wilson from Carter Glass on February 26, 1919, recommending that the request of a former Treasury official to work at the forthcoming Peace Conference be favorably considered; Correspondence relating to the peace treaty with Germany, the Kellog Pact, and the Treaty of Versailles.

I. Correspondence involving David F. Houston and Charles S. Hamlin, concerning the relative positions of Great Britain and the United States, regarding certain aspects of the German peace treaty.

J. Copy of a speech by Frank Kent about Carter Glass.

K. Correspondence relating to the Democratic National Convention of 1924, at which time there was a slight possibility that Carter Glass would be nominated for the presidency.

L. Letter from Carter Glass to President Harding, March 2, 1923, Carter Glass refuses to serve on the Debt Funding Commission; a statement by Carter Glass, prepared upon request of the New York Times, expressing regret at the death of President Harding.

M. Note from Warren G. Harding on March 3, 1923, stating that he regretted that Carter Glass could not serve on the Debt Funding Commission.

N. Correspondence with Walter Edward Harris, editor of a Petersburg, Virginia, newspaper: Correspondence concerning a supposed inconsistency in the attitude of Carter Glass toward the powers of the Federal Reserve Board, Carter Glass minimizes the controversy; Correspondence relating to an article by Carter Glass, criticizing the McFadden bank bill; Brief correspondence in which Carter Glass assures Harris of his continued opposition to Colonel E. M. House.

O. Letter of November 28, 1919, to R. D. Haislip of Staunton, Virginia, concerning the German peace treaty.

P. Letter to Judge Robert C. Jackson on March 28, 1920, concerning the problems relating to the Treaty of Versailles and the positions of various persons with respect to the resulting controversies.

Q. Several relatively lengthy letters, Carter Glass to Walter Lippmann during 1933, concerning the National Recovery Act and the effect on the reserve position of the Federal Reserve System as a result of either a devaluation of the dollar or the confiscation by the government of the gold holdings of the banks.

R. Correspondence with Russell C. Leffingwell : Letters relating to the responsibility of the Federal Reserve System for the depression and the proposed course of action for the System as of July, 1933. Carter Glass and Leffingwell disagree upon the points discussed in these letters. Carter Glass criticizes the Federal Reserve policy of purchasing government securities in a futile attempt to restore the credit structure of the country, while Leffingwell states that monetary management offers the solution to economic recovery and that the return to a gold standard should await such recovery; Statements by Russell C. Leffingwell attempting to explain the loss of export trade by the United States; Letter of July 12, 1933, Carter Glass to Russell C. Leffingwell stating that three provisions of the Carter Glass bill had been included "upon urgent Administration request," but the although having accepted the suggestions of the President, Carter Glass had not changed his own views, which he had previously expressed to Leffingwell, devotes a lengthy paragraph to criticizing Leffingwell for his apparent acceptance of certain of the schemes put into effect during the Roosevelt administration, refers particularly to the gold embargo and the closing of banks.

S. Correspondence with Norman H. Davis during January, 1927, admitting that a speech, made by Elihu Root in defense of the League of Nations, was quite worthy of praise, but stating that the time to have made such remarks was during the fight in the Senate to bring the United States into the League.

T. Article entitled, "History of the Lynchburg News. "

U. Correspondence between Carter Glass and Hugh S. Johnson, administrator of the National Recovery Administration.

V. Copy of a Senate speech, made by Carter Glass on February 11, 1930, opposing the confirmation of Charles Evans Hughes as a member of the Supreme Court. One of the primary reasons for the opposition of Carter Glass to Hughes was his decision in the Shreveport case, on the basis of which states lost all vestige of control over inter-state commerce.

W. Copy of a letter, marked "strictly personal," from Carter Glass to Cordell Hull, Secretary of State, on August 3, 1936, concerning the restrictions on the conduct of foreign trade.

X. Correspondence between Carter Glass and Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, concerning the conduct of relief and work relief programs and the legislation creating these programs.

Y. Correspondence with Pat Harrison, of the Democratic National Committee, concerning party politics.

Personal correspondence (M-N)
Box: 5

A. Correspondence with Eugene Meyer, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board : Personal correspondence with both Eugene and Mrs. Meyer; Statement on March 14, 1933, by Eugene Meyer saying that it was not wise of the Federal Reserve Board to permit the reserve banks to make direct loans to state banks and trust companies; Copy of a January 9, 1933, statement by the board, citing the value of provisions whereby advances could be made to member banks which did not possess satisfactory eligible paper, on the basis of which credit might be extended. The board went further, to accept the recommendation of the Federal Advisory Council, the Federal Reserve agents, and the governors of the Federal Reserve banks, that the reserve banks retain the privilege of pledging direct obligations of the United States as collateral security for Federal Reserve notes; Statement of November 25, 1932, from Eugene Meyer, stating that an opinion from the legal advisor to the board is forthcoming, which will render the opinion that Congress has the power to create a unified banking system; Brief memoranda from the Federal Reserve Board, March 29, 1932, concerning the amount of investment securities "of any one obligor" which might be held by any national bank, and relating to the powers of the board over the establishment of discount rates by the reserve banks; Note to Carter Glass, written on June 15, 1932, by Eugene Meyer, on stationary bearing the letterhead of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation; Memoranda from Govenor Meyer on June 3, 1932, to Senator Peter Norbeck, chairman of the Banking and Currency Committee, pointing out that pending legislation would repeal the provision of an earlier bill, sponsored by Norbeck, whereby certain obligations of the Federal Intermediate Credit Banks were made eligible both for purchase by Federal Reserve banks and as security for advances by the reserve banks to member banks; Note from Meyer on March 26, 1932, reporting progress in consideration, by several members of the board, of a bill presented by Carter Glass. The bill was not felt by Meyer to be entirely satisfactory; Letter of March 21, 1932, to Eugene Meyer from Carter Glass, stating the position of the Banking and Currency Committee with respect to claims on the part of the Federal Reserve Board that its views were not given adequate consideration in the formulation of the latest banking legislation; List of suggested amendments to the Reconstruction Finance Corporation Act, compiled by Eugene Meyer on December 29, 1931; Statement by Govenor Meyer on February 10, 1931, expressing confidence n the ability of the Federal Reserve banks in those regions, experiencing drought conditions, to meet the extra requirements of member banks, and reminding Carter Glass that it was possibly for one Federal Reserve bank to rediscount another reserve bank; Memorandum from Meyer on February 6, 1931, presenting Federal Reserve policy with respect to the situation in which an employee of a Federal Reserve bank held a position as director of another bank; In response to commendation by Angus W. McLean of the approval by the Senate Banking and Currency Committee of the appointment of Eugene Meyer as governor of the Federal Reserve Board, Carter Glass states that he was certain Meyer would be confirmed, despite the current opposition of Senator Brookhart; Miscellaneous correspondence involving Eugene Meyer.

B. Correspondence with Attorney General William D. Mitchell, concerning the method of arriving at the decision that banking affiliates were legal.

C. Miscellaneous correspondence, including a telegram from Rixey Smith to Carter Glass, relating the opinion of Eugene Meyer, rendered in May, 1932, that the United States would remain on the gold standard.

D. Correspondence with Andrew Mellon, Secretary of the Treasury, January 19, 1932, wherein Mellon answers a question by Carter Glass by stating that the Treasury Department feels that no loans were made, nor were credits established to foreign governments without legal authority.

E. Miscellaneous letters: Letter from A. P. Miller, of the Federal Reserve Board, on November 16, 1934, complimenting Carter Glass on his work in connection with the Federal Reserve System, Miller writes on the twentieth anniversary of the opening of the Federal Reserve banks and expresses the thought that, had it not been for the efforts of Carter Glass, the charters of the banks might on that day have expired and the history of the system might have paralleled that of the First and Second Bank of the United States; Note of November 16, 1936, from Henry Morgenthau, Secretary of the Treasury, congratulating Carter Glass upon his re-election to the Senate and assuring him of the cooperation of the Treasury Department; Social note from James A. Farley, Postmaster General, on January 10, 1940; Letter from J. Edgar Hoover, April 19, 1940; Letter from Senator Curtis on June 20, 1928; Note, November 6, 1912, to Carter Glass, asking support for the writer as speaker of the House during the coming session.

F. Correspondence with G. Walter Mapp, concerning the support of Harry F. Byrd, rather than Mapp, for Govenor of Virginia and setting forth his position favoring women suffrage only for political reasons.

G. Correspondence with William G. McAdoo : Personal and political correspondence; Correspondence relating to attacks by certain Senators against McAdoo; Answer on November 19, 1923, Carter Glass to McAdoo, criticizing the Federal Reserve Board for its unfavorable attitude toward branch banking and attempting to refute the statements by Comptroller Dawes, concerning violation of the "spirit of the Federal Reserve Act"; Letter, October 16, 1923, to William G. McAdoo, Carter Glass mentions having attended meetings of a joint Congressional committee, which was considering the reasons for failure of state banks to take advantage of membership in the Federal Reserve System; Letter of March 7, 1923, to William G. McAdoo, pertaining to certain political affairs involving Robert L. Owen and William Jennings Bryan, and strongly criticizing John Skelton Williams and Senator Tom Heflin for their attacks upon the Federal Reserve System; Personal letter to Carter Glass from William G. McAdoo on May 7, 1923, offering the opinion that "the Federal Reserve Board, as Harding has constituted it, is extremely weak and incompetent." Speaking of the branch banking situation in California, McAdoo says, " I have never been so disgusted with the incompetence and provincialism of a great administrative body as I have been with this one." The strengthening of the Board is proposed; Exchange of confidential letters between McAdoo and Carter Glass, March, April, and May, 1924, along with the correspondence, relating to political affairs; Letters relating to the German peace treaty; Letter from William G. McAdoo on July 7, 1921, expressing uncertainty about the proposal of the Secretary of the Treasury, Mellon, with respect to the funding of the foreign debt of the United States; Correspondence regarding the Federal Farm Loan System; Another copy of the letter of December 11, 1919, to McAdoo, in which Carter Glass recommends Russell C. Leffingwell as his successor as Secretary of the Treasury, in preference to several other men, including Charles S. Hamlin and John Skelton Williams; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin at the Federal Reserve Board on December 19, 1919, suggesting that Carter Glass verify the accuracy of certain figures being used by the Treasury Department; Favorable accounts about the book, An Adventure in Constructive Finance, by Carter Glass. William G. McAdoo suggests that his files might have added to the value of one of the chapters of the book; Series of letters between Carter Glass and William G. McAdoo, discussing the history of Federal Reserve legislation. In one of the letters Carter Glass accepts the explanation by William G. McAdoo that the Samuel Untermeyer - Robert L. Owen scheme, with which he had been associated by Carter Glass, had merely been one of numerous plans which he had examined; Another letter, written by Carter Glass on March 4, 1927, to William G. McAdoo, dealing with the continued opposition by Paul M. Warburg to certain of the provisions of the Federal Reserve Act, including the par clearance of checks and continuous rediscounting operations, even when no emergency situation existed; William G. McAdoo states in a letter, February 24, 1927, that, despite the opposition of Paul M. Warburg, who sought certain changes in the act, he exercised his power, as Treasury Secretary, to give the word for the opening of the Federal Reserve banks in late 1914; Note, July 19, 1927, Russell C. Leffingwell advising Carter Glass to ignore a pamphlet, prepared by Samuel Untermeyer, so as to avoid degrading controversy; Correspondence, relating to criticisms of post-war loans by the Treasury, with Russell C. Leffingwell; Note to Russell C. Leffingwell, April 12, 1928, from Carter Glass stating that " the one real disappointment of my pubic life was my failure to induce President Wilson to give the merited honor of appointment as Secretary of the Treasury as my successor;" Memorandum for the Secretary of the Treasury, September 26, 1919, concerning the refunding of loans to foreign governments; Letters and articles pertaining to the reduction of the national debt, particularly with reference to the apportionment of credit for the task of reduction.

H. Correspondence with Senator Kenneth D. McKellar : Letter from E. M. Hall, of Memphis, Tennessee, to Senator Kenneth D. McKellar on January 15, 1937, asking the National Bank Act to be amended with respect to the payment of interest on deposits of the government; Letter from Carter Glass to Kenneth D. McKellar on December 8, 1945, mentioning the exertion of influence by Govenor McKee, of the Federal Reserve Board, on behalf of a friend of Carter Glass, who wanted a job as an engineer with the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

I. Letter, Carter Glass to Nathaniel C. Manson, July 28, 1894, declining the opportunity to run for the office of Mayor, preferring newspaper work to politics. Carter Glass said at that time, "after the fullest deliberation, I have cheerfully concluded that I was not cut out for a politician in any particular."

J. Correspondence with George F. Milton, who was doing research on Stephen A. Douglas, and had found letters to Douglas from Robert H. Carter Glass, Carter's father. Milton was interested in the response made by Douglas to these letters.

Correspondence between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Carter Glass 1931-1933
Box: 6

Clipping from the Washington Postregarding Carter Glass on the New Deal, 8 April, 1934; Clipping regarding the status of gold bonds in the English courts; Clipping regarding funds for the Works Progress Administration and economic recovery; Crusaders for economic liberty to governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, warning Franklin D. Roosevelt against Carter Glass' illusion; Clipping regarding gold standard backers and the New Deal, 14 November, 1933; Letter of Nelson Cherney regarding branch banking in New York; Carter Glass to Franklin Delano Roosevelt regarding appointees to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Board, 10 August 1933; Letter to the editor of Transcript, 6 March 1934, marked important by Carter Glass, containing several significant sections of statements attributed to Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932; Carter Glass to Pierre delBoab of the State Department, 4 February 1932, regarding representation of officials at the bank of France, 4 November 1931; Letter, 29 April 1933, to the President, designated official and confidential, regarding H. Parker Willis ' statement; Letter, 6 July 1935, characterizing H. Parker Willis as affiliated with international bankers; Memo, 23 June 1936, to the President regarding Robert T. Stewart as a member of the Federal Reserve Board in which several others are mentioned; Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Carter Glass, 21 February 1935, mentioning objections to underwriting by commercial banks; Letters to and from Franklin Delano Roosevelt on various subjects but no others mention the Federal Reserve System; Dr. Terrel advising Carter Glass not to accept the position of Secretary of the Treasury, 2 February 1933; Carter Glass to Raymond Moley; Carter Glass to Harry F. Byrd regarding appointment to the Treasury, 4 February 1933; Statement by Carter Glass to the press as to why he declined to be appointed Secretary of the Treasury, 22 February 1933; Statement for the press on Carter Glass' reasons for declining the Treasury post, no date; Virginia Democratic Platform, probably written by Carter Glass, 10 June 1932; Carter Glass to Norman Hamilton regarding his editorial and Carter Glass' objection thereto, 15 December 1926; Editorial in Portsmouth paper; Woodrow Wilson's letter approving the Virginia Democratic platform, 28 May 1920; Carter Glass to Sam Small regarding Virginia Democratic platform, 18 August 1920; Release, 23 October 1928, of Democratic National Committee regarding Carter Glass on William E. Borah; Clip of letters regarding the Woodrow Wilson administration, including two on the currency system; Letter to Norman Hamilton regarding his editorial in the Portsmouth Star; Virginia delegation's support of McAdoo, 15 December 1926, replying to above letter; Woodrow Wilson to Carter Glass praising Virginia platform; Release by the Democratic National Committee of Carter Glass' radio statement on William E. Borah's position relative to Herbert Hoover, 23 October 1938; Carter Glass to Woodrow Wilson, 7 November 1912, asking for an interview regarding the currency system and other matters, which are the purpose of the desired interview; Letter to Woodrow Wilson regarding ABA backing for Aldrich Bank Bill; Carter Glass to Robert L. Owen, 28 March 1935, responding to Robert L. Owen letter of 28 April 1935 in which Robert L. Owen attacked Carter Glass; Letter to New York Times, 19 August 1920, regarding Professor Mekker's address at the Williamstown Institute, finds fault with Royal Meeker because of his ignorance of economics; Carter Glass' letter to Philadelphia Recordon the stock market speculation, margin trading, 31 October 1929, and relative to Charles E. Mitchell, a member of the Board of Governors, and his position on speculation; Statement to the New York Timesin the Carter Glass file "Letters to editors" regarding the danger that the country "was within two weeks of being driven off the gold standard." This statement attributed to Carter Glass by Senator Watson, said to have been made at a conference with the President.

Personal Correspondence (S-U)
Box: 7

A. Two folders of political correspondence with Claude A. Swanson.

B. Two typewritten copies of an answer prepared by Carter Glass, after Samuel Untermeyer had published a pamphlet purporting to present the true story of the persons responsible for the Federal Reserve Act. The title of the paper by Carter Glass appears to be "Vapor vs. the Record."

C. Miscellaneous speeches: Copy of a speech by Carter Glass at a Senate caucus, January 23, 1900; Copy of the address, made by Carter Glass before the Economic Club of New York, during the period of Congressional consideration of currency legislation; Copy of a speech by Carter Glass to a graduating class at Virginia Polytechnic Institute in [1910]; Speech by Carter Glass before a constitutional convention in Virginia, September 5, 1901, suggesting that the final product be approved by the people of the state; Speech upon the occasion of the education of the dedication of a memorial at Warsaw, Virginia; Copy of a speech by Carter Glass in the House of Representatives on March 8,1916, entitled "American Rights on the Seas;" Speech before the House on February 7, 1918, "The Truth About the War Department. "

D. Correspondence relating to Treasury matters: Samuel Untermeyer to Carter Glass, following an attack upon his record by Carter Glass; Newspaper articles discussing the acceptance by Carter Glass of the position as Secretary of the Treasury; Memoranda covering a wide variety of subjects, including a certain Treasury business; Statement about Carter Glass when he became Secretary of the Treasury; Statement of September 11, 1919, presenting the views of the Treasury Department with respect to foreign loans; A report to the President on February 28, 1919, from Carter Glass as Secretary of the Treasury; Another copy of the statement from Treasury Secretary Mellon, to the effect that no law was violated in the extension of credit to foreign governments.

E. Personal correspondence with Palmer St. Clair, of Roanoke, Virginia.

F. Correspondence with Jouett Shouse, who was at one time associated with Carter Glass in the Treasury Department, dealing with political affairs, particularly William G. McAdoo's campaign for the presidency in 1924.

G. Correspondence with George J. Seay, governor of the Richmond Federal Reserve bank : Letter from George J. Seay, May 16, 1932, approving the Carter Glass bill then under consideration, opposing the Goldsborough bill, and opposing the guarantee of bank deposits. Carter Glass says that some type of deposit guarantee is inevitable, so that he hopes to have accepted the idea of forming a liquidating corporation; Letter, April 14, 1930, Carter Glass states that his banking bill will contain provisions for branch banking and a more equal distribution of the earnings of the Federal Reserve System. Seay sent statistics showing the loss of member banks as a result of the prohibition against branches; Copy of a statement showing bank earnings, sent by Seay; Letter in which George Seay notes agreement between himself and Benjamin M. Anderson, economist of the Chase National Bank of New York; Letter from George Seay, March 15, 1928, explaining his reasons for feeling the Federal Reserve System had created too much credit. The expansion of time deposits had brought a low ratio of required reserves and the excess credit was finding its way into the security markets, said Seay. Seay disagreed with O. M. W. Sprague, who said that the excess credit in circulation arose from the investment of capital savings, rather than from Federal Reserve policy; Paper by George J. Seay, "Illustrating the Expanded Condition of Bank Credit;" Carter Glass, October 20, 1927, thanking George Seay for advising him upon the decision of the Federal Reserve Board on the Chicago discount rate case. Seay felt that the Board should continue to exercise powers of review over discount rate policy, but should not be permitted to dictate a uniform discount rate for all the banks; Letter from George J. Seay, August 12, 1927, advising against lowering the discount rate; Copy of an article from the Bankers Magazine, "Centralizing Federal Reserve Control," sent to Carter Glass by George Seay on April 12, 1927, Seay compliments Carter Glass on his own articles, designed to place credit for Federal Reserve legislation where it was due. In warning Carter Glass about renewed attempts to centralize the Federal Reserve System by some unrecognized individuals, Seay points out the extreme importance of preserving the regional aspect of the system; Copy of several amendments to the Federal Reserve Act aimed at stabilizing the general price level, forwarded by George J. Seay, who had received his copy from James. G. Strong, who planned to introduce the amendments in the House; Excellent statement by George Seay on June 1, 1926, criticizing the amendments proposed by Representative Strong. Seay doubts the wisdom of further attempts by any central body to control credit and does not feel that stabilized prices represent an appropriate goal; Brief letter from George Seay to John M. Miller, a Richmond, Virginia banker, criticizing the McFadden branch banking bill, particularly with respect to loans; Note from Carter Glass to Seay on April 20, 1929, expressing little respect for the officials of the American Bankers Association, who had been willing to sacrifice indeterminate charters for the Federal Reserve banks, if they could get the Hull amendments accepted; Seay states in a letter of April 17, 1926, that he does not feel that it is necessary to do away with branch banking; George Seay to Carter Glass, a copy of a booklet he prepared on September 15, 1925, reviewing the problem of, "Credit Expansion;" Correspondence whereby Seay obtained a copy of the report of the Pujo Committee; Figures sent by George J. Seay on February 15, 1924, purport to show the position of banks at that time, compared to what their position might have been, if the National Bank Act were still in effect; Other correspondence with George J. Seay.

H. Personal correspondence with the evangelist William A. (Billy) Sunday, who had been so impressed by the large number of favorable comments, made during his visit to Lynchburg, in September, 1921, about Carter Glass that he had spoken of Carter Glass at one of his meetings.

I. Letters to Edward M. Taylor, a member of the rotary club at Lynchburg, Virginia.

J. Correspondence of Carter Glass, Russell C. Leffingwell, William G. McAdoo, and former Assistant Treasury Secretary Kelly, concerning the authority of the Treasury Department to extend foreign loans, following the armistice which ended World War I, including a conclusive memoranda from Russell C. Leffingwell, defending the extension of the loans. (Similar correspondence with William G. McAdoo may be found filed under his name.)

K. Letter to Carter Glass from Senator Harry S. Truman, October 3, 1936, asking that Carter Glass recommend James K. Vardaman, Missouri official of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, to the President for a vacant position on the Federal Reserve Board. Carter Glass responds that he has already submitted the name of Bob Stewart, of Oklahoma, for the position.

Personal Correspondence (X-Z)
Box: 8

A. Correspondence with Woodrow Wilson : Page from a notebook kept by Carter Glass during June, 1919, concerning the possibility of a third term for President Wilson or the nomination of William G. McAdoo. Woodrow Wilson is not felt to be averse to another term. Carter Glass mentions having been asked to take the chairmanship of the Resolutions Committee; April 21, 1918, President Wilson to Carter Glass, asking him to secure immediate passage of the Silver Bill, since war conditions made such legislation imperative; Final page of the Federal Reserve Act, approved on December 23, 1913, with the signature of Woodrow Wilson; Photostats of a note from President Wilson to Carter Glass, accompanying a paper of Samuel Untermeyer, which is to be turned over to William G. McAdoo, after having been read by Carter Glass; Letter, January 9, 1913, from Woodrow Wilson, asking that the currency bill be ready for introduction before the close of the extraordinary session. The President says, "I have had some very interesting conferences about the banking and currency question recently which make it very desirable that I should see you again for a further talk"; January 1, 1913, President Wilson expressing a desire to talk with Carter Glass shortly after Royal Meeker has presented the views of the "members of the Economic Association" to him; President Wilson attempts to arrange a meeting with Carter Glass, April 4, 1912; Letter, June 18, 1913, from Carter Glass, asking that the President change his mind about government control of the Federal Reserve Board, so as to permit banker representation on the board. Carter Glass refers to the agreement of Robert J. Bulkley, "a strong man of the committee with whom we must reckon," an cites the opinion of Bulkley that government control already constituted the real weakness of the measure; Correspondence with Woodrow Wilson, while he was Governor of New Jersey; Copy of a letter, Carter Glass to President Wilson, November 16, 1919, stating that he would prefer to accept an appointment to the Senate, offered by Governor Davis of Virginia, but that, if Woodrow Wilson preferred, he would remain at the Treasury Department; Handwritten copy of a note from Carter Glass to Woodrow Wilson on January 24, 1919, suggesting that John Skelton Williams be reappointed as Comptroller of the Currency, and proposing that Jouett Shouse succeed Love as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. These suggestions were approved by President Wilson; Resignation of Carter Glass as Secretary of the Treasury, submitted to President Wilson on November 18, 1919, after Wilson had advised acceptance of the appointment to the Senate; In a note, January 29, 1914, President Wilson, having recently spoken with E. D. Hulbert, asks that Carter Glass and Senator Robert L. Owen see what could be done about removing the restriction, inadvertently placed in the currency bill, permitting only national banks to act as reserve agents for a period of three years; Note from Woodrow Wilson on June 20, 1913, thanking Carter Glass for permitting him to see a telegram from E. D. Hulbert, and expressing the hope that Hulbert will change his mind when he sees the actual bill; In a note of May 8, 1913, President Wilson thanks Carter Glass for sending him a copy of "the bill" and promises to consult with him as soon as he has finished working on it; March 23, 1920, Carter Glass presented a recommendation to the President, upon the suggestion of Secretary Houston, that Edmund Platt be appointed to fill a vacant position on the Federal Reserve Board; Secretary to President Wilson writes to Carter Glass on May 24, 1922, to say that the President is anxious to know what Carter Glass has to say about an article by Frank Vanderlip; Newspaper clipping reporting that, before William G. McAdoo resigned from his Treasury post, President Wilson offered Carter Glass an appointment to the Federal Reserve Board; Report of Carter Glass to President Wilson on June 16, 1922, criticizing the plan, intimated by Frank A. Vanderlip, for the creation of an international reserve bank, which Carter Glass considers impractical and unnecessary; Numerous other letters touching upon many subjects.

B. Correspondence with Clifton A. Woodrum, Congressman from Virginia : Recommendation for assuring true legal tender characteristic for all coin and currency issued by the government, submitted for the approval of Carter Glass by Clifton A. Woodrum; Copy of a letter from a businessman in Roanoke, Virginia, on May 9, 1932, proposing that the world-wide depression would require that the United States reduce its production, until output was more in line with consumption; Copy of a letter sent from a contracting concern to Clifton A. Woodrum on April 30, 1935, regarding a controversy over wages with the Public Works Administration, from which the company had borrowed the money to construct several buildings at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Numerous letters relating to a wide variety of national and local problems.

C. Correspondence with Mrs. Edith Bolling Wilson, wife of Woodrow Wilson : Letter accompanying a portion of the newspaper series, written by Carter Glass in 1926. Carter Glass tells Mrs. Wilson that subsequent installments will relate to the diary of Colonel House and the method of obtaining the Federal Reserve legislation; In a letter, July 14, 1926, Carter Glass tells Mrs. Wilson that her influence was, to some degree, responsible for the rapid acceptance of Charles S. Hamlin as a member of the Federal Reserve Board. Carter Glass states that this appointment was "only thing I have ventured to ask of the present administration;" Considerable personal correspondence between Mrs. Wilson and Carter Glass.

D. Numerous letter urging Carter Glass to do his best to secure senatorial approval of the entry of the United States into the World Court.

E. Correspondence with Paul M. Warburg : Highly complimentary letter to Carter Glass from John Wanamaker; Letter, September 14, 1926, Paul M. Warburg expressing the hope that the extension of the charter of the Federal Reserve banks would not be lost in favor of the Hull amendments. Warburg asks that Carter Glass take the opportunity, afforded by his writing a book about the Federal Reserve legislation, to correct some of the misrepresentations contained in the book by H. Parker Willis. Paul M. Warburg states that he does not seek credit for his work in connection with the legislation, but only desires that an account of the history of the measure be presented; In a letter to Paul M. Warburg on October 18, 1926, Carter Glass notes with pleasure the reversal of position by the American Bankers Association on the proposed Hull amendments to the McFadden Bill. Carter Glass refuses to concur in the condemnation by Paul M. Warburg of the H. Parker Willis book, but does feel that certain of the personal attacks, made by H. Parker Willis, were unwarranted. Carter Glass points out that, by his connection with Dr. Edwin R. Seligman, Paul M. Warburg has made himself vulnerable to criticism. Carter Glass feels that he has been as truthful with respect the Paul M. Warburg in his book as he had been regarding Colonel House and Professor Seymour; Letter of April 25, 1930, from Paul M. Warburg, informing Carter Glass that he has found it necessary to submit for public consideration a refutation of certain statements made by Carter Glass and a correction of the numerous misstatements indulged by H. Parker Willis. Warburg expresses continued friendship for Carter Glass and hopes that the public controversy the history of the System quickly dies down, so that attention can be confined to the more important problems, involving saving the System from destruction; Correspondence with Paul M. Warburg in 1929, concerning permission to include two letters, one from Carter Glass to Senator Robert L. Owen and the other from Carter Glass to Paul M. Warburg, in the book which Paul M. Warburg was about to have published; Letter from Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis, marked strictly confidential and dated December 31, 1926. Carter Glass wants to know, whether H. Parker Willis knows anything about the Paul M. Warburg plan for a "Board of Regents," to which Paul M. Warburg has ascribed the origin of the idea for the Federal Reserve Board. Carter Glass continues to defend his position with respect to the origin of this phase of the law, tracing it to President Wilson. Paul M. Warburg feels that Wilson got the idea from him through Colonel House and Morgenthau. Carter Glass reproduces a letter from himself to Paul M. Warburg on this subject; Correspondence relating to the position taken by Carter Glass when the Senate was conducting investigations, under the leadership of Gerald P. Nye, into the part played by Woodrow Wilson in getting the United States into World War I. Carter Glass defended President Wilson.

Personal and bibliographical correspondence
Box: 9

A. Remarks by Russell C. Leffingwell on January 4, 1940, upon the presentation of the chair of government at Sweet Briar College, which had been named after Carter Glass; Copies of the Congressional Recordfor January 8, 1940.

B. Letters, newspaper clippings, memoranda, and data compiled on the subject of the attempt by the President to pack the Supreme Court; Copy of a speech by Jesse H. Jones, chairman of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation; Copy of an amendment, suggested by Carter Glass, to the law creating the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

C. Copy of a report by George N. Peek, head of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, prepared on September 12, 1933, assigning a high credit rating to the Soviet Union.

D. Newspaper clippings, relating to the speech by Carter Glass before the Senate on November 1, 1932, in which he attempted to refute the claims of the Hoover Administration that its economic program had been the salvation of the country. Carter Glass charged the Republicans with the responsibility for the depression; Requests for copies of the speech by Carter Glass.

E. Typewritten copy of speech by Carter Glass, opposing the attempt to pack the Supreme Court.

F. Photostatic copy of letter to Dr. John L. Newcomb, President of the University of Virginia, from Jesse H. Jones on October 23, 1945, offering to endow a school of international affairs.

G. Correspondence relating to the candidacy of Carter Glass for re-election to the Senate in 1942.

H. Several letters congratulating Carter Glass upon his re-election to the Senate in 1942.

Historical correspondence
Box: 10

A. Correspondence regarding the purchase by the Federal government of "Red Hill," the home of Patrick Henry; Copies of the act, whereby the Secretary of the Interior was empowered to purchase the Henry estate, and copies of the preliminary bill, introduced by Carter Glass; Correspondence suggesting that Carter Glass support legislation to enshrine Patrick Henry's birthplace in Hanover County, Virginia.

B. Correspondence involving the Thomas Jefferson Bicentennial Commission; Copies of a bill, introduced by Carter Glass, creating the commission and setting forth its objectives and powers.

Miscellaneous correspondence
Box: 11

A. Miscellaneous correspondence: Note of February 26, 1921, from Joseph P. Tumulty, secretary of President Wilson, accompanying an article in which he felt Carter Glass might be interested; Personal note of thanks from Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy; Correspondence concerning war risk insurance.

B. Miscellaneous correspondence: Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, thanking Carter Glass for sending a letter to the President through him and promising to bring it to Woodrow Wilson's attention; Correspondence with Ray S. Baker concerning the contents of the book Carter Glass was preparing for publication; Photostatic copy of a note to Carter Glass from C. B. Slemp, secretary to the President, on December 13, 1923, expressing regret that Carter Glass disapproves of the "action of the National Committee in regard to Southern representation"; Copy of a report of a joint committee of the Illinois legislature in 1911 on tuberculin tests for cattle; Copy of a letter of November 8, 1912, to Hubert D. Stevens, in which Carter Glass requests support in preventing Samuel Untermeyer from infringing upon the work of the Carter Glass sub-committee, expressing the opinion that there was a connection between Samuel Untermeyer and the Aldrich supporters; Personal note from R. W. Wooley, Director of the Mint, on March 31, 1916; Notes from Richard E. Byrd in 1912; Note of thanks from John Skelton Williams on January 31, 1914.

C. Miscellaneous and personal letters, relating largely to political affairs: Carter Glass to William C. Bruce on September 20, 1930, promises that he would assist in the effort to have Henry B. Wilcox, a Baltimore banker, appointed to fill the existing vacancy on the Federal Reserve Board; Correspondence relating to a proposed amendment of the Settlement of War Claims Act.

D. Correspondence with Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, largely concerning allocation of scarce resources during World War II: Evidence of a conflict of opinion between Harold L. Ickes and Carter Glass, concerning racial segregation; Letter, May 6, 1936, from Harold L. Ickes, recommending that Carter Glass cast a favorable vote on the question of changing the name of the Interior Department to the Department of Conservation. Harold L. Ickes explains that this move has nothing to do with the proposal, made by Senator Harry F. Byrd, to reorganize the executive branch of the government.

E. Correspondence with Dr. Hugh G. Young, of Johns Hopkins University, relating largely to legislative matters of a medical nature: Commenting upon an editorial from a Baltimore newspaper on January 17, 1930, listing questions which should be objectively considered by the Carter Glass committee, studying the financial structure of the United States, Dr. Young states that Carter Glass will conduct a thorough investigation in a conservative manner.

Miscellaneous correspondence
Box: 12

A. Correspondence with Fred Harper, Lynchburg, Virginia, lawyer.

B. Correspondence with Samuel M. Kaplan, 1933-1945: Letters, mostly of a personal nature, some dealing with various types of political matters; Correspondence, involving Samuel M. Kaplan, concerning wartime regulation of the prices of woolen goods by the Office of Price Administration; Correspondence relating to legislation affecting the textile industry; Suggestion from Carter Glass that the extension of a loan by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation to a business firm, owned by Samuel M. Kaplan, would be worthy of consideration, honored on November 23, 1936, by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation; March 25, 1933, Carter Glass states that he looked with favor upon suggestion of Samuel M. Kaplan that a National Wool Acceptance Bank be established; Correspondence from Al Kaplan, relating to the economic situation confronting the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration just prior to its accession to control over the federal government. Kaplan was boosting his book, The Solution of the Depression; Copy of the preface of this book is included among the letters sent to Carter Glass; Letter, January 30, 1933, Al Kaplan requests that Carter Glass consider a monetary plan, which he offers as a solution to the economic problems of the depression period; Data regarding Joseph P. Carney, whom Samuel M. Kaplan boosts for a position on the Federal Reserve Board; Letter from Samuel M. Kaplan on March 26, 1934, suggesting that a bill, introduced by Carter Glass, permitting Federal Reserve banks to make capital loans directly to industry, be amended so as to permit Federal Reserve banks to subscribe to stock in any industrial acceptance banks, which might be organized; Criticism by Samuel M. Kaplan of suggested amendments to the Agricultural Adjustment Act, considered valid by Carter Glass; Letter from F. G. Awalt, Acting Comptroller of the Currency, on February 25, 1933, setting forth some of the points upon which further legislation would be necessary with respect to the national banks, if the idea of a National Wool Acceptance Bank were to be put into effect.

C. Correspondence from Representative Schuyler O. Bland, concerning mostly minor political and legislative matters: Copy of a letter from Schuyler O. Bland to J. T. Garrett, of the Richmond Federal Reserve Bank, asking that the Parksley National Bank, Parksley, Virginia, be permitted to reopen, is sent to Carter Glass with the request that he make a similar appeal on behalf of the community involved; Note from Carter Glass to Schuyler O. Bland on April 18, 1923, accompanying a small copy of an engraving made of Carter Glass while he was Secretary of the Treasury.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1902-1942
Box: 13

A. General correspondence, not arranged in any particular alphabetical or chronological order: Correspondence from bankers concerning their views on the Federal Reserve Act and their reactions to speeches on this subject by Carter Glass; Clippings of a speech made by Carter Glass at the Constitutional Convention in Norfolk, Virginia; Reproduction of an editorial concerning Louis T. McFadden's views on Investment Trusts, undated; Copy of a speech made by James Connor, Jr., November 23, 1928, regarding Prohibition and failure to support A. Smith; Editorials concerning passage of Federal Reserve Act; Alfred R. Kimball to Secretary William G. McAdoo concerning impression made by Carter Glass at Economics Club dinner and attitude of bankers toward Federal Reserve Act. November 13, 1913; Correspondence between Carter Glass and William G. McAdoo relative to Federal Reserve Act and monetary policies; Letter from Sir George Paish to William G. McAdoo bearing on the gold reserve against Federal Reserve notes; Memorandum from E.R. Black, member of Federal Reserve Board, relative to a study of the commercial and industrial situation in the United States, provisions of legislation enabling the Reserve Banks to make industrial loans, and emphasizing need of small businesses for working capital, undated; Several letters to E. M. Baty and Otis Wingo relative to the Cook County Bankers Association and the "Committee of One Hundred." Letter to Hon. Walter E. Edge regarding possible investigation of lobbying in connection with McFadden Bill; 25 letters betweeen Glass and Dave E. Satterfield; Miscellaneous correspondence with the Hon. P.H. Drewry; Correspondence with Ray Stannard Baker relative to the chapters in his biography of Woodrow Wilson that dealt with the Federal Reserve Act; Telegram from Huey Long setting forth his ideas on "scarcity of production" as a solution to the South's economic problems; Portion of letter to Senator Copper regarding monetization of debt in World War I; Copy of a report of Frederick A. Delano on the subject of clearing, 1915; Correspondence with President Woodrow Wilson, 1919; Letter to President Harding from Comptroller of the Currency, 1920, recommending a certain amendment to the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis, 1912, regarding Samuel Untermeyer and Pujo, second page missing.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1912-1913
Box: 14

A. General correspondence, apparently not filed in any systematic fashion, pertaining primarily to political appointments and elections in Virginia : Requests for bulletins, seeds, etc.; Bills; Receipts; Personal letters.

B. Of special interest are the following: Letter from George Roberts to Carter Glass, 1913, expressing his views on the problem of gold reserves for the Reserve Banks; Letter from Laurence A. Murray, Comptroller, advising certain administrative reforms in National Bank Act, 1913; Editorials on monetary and currency problems; Letter from G. J. Frame relative to his opinions on the proposed currency legislation. February 10, 1913.

Correspondence 1912-1916
Box: 15

A. Miscellaneous correspondence, not filed in any systematic order, covering mainly requests for favors, the election of 1912, and appointments in Virginia.

B. Of interest are the following: Copies of several House bills referred to Carter Glass' subcommittee for consideration in 1912; Several addresses on the subject of banking; 3 typed sheets analyzing present banking situation and suggesting reform, undated and unsigned; Explanatory statement regarding "The Currency Reform Bill" by Harlow H. Chamberlain, and copy of bill; Letter from Carter Glass to Alexander Moyer of the New York Evening Postconcerning origin of Federal Reserve Act; Letter to John Gavit, "Evening Post," regarding origin of Federal Reserve Act; Reprints from various Chambers of Commerce endorsing the Morris plan.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913
Box: 16

A. Advance copy of the speech by Carter Glass to the House of Representatives in 1913, reporting the Currency Bill out of committee; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to President Wilson, mentioning Andrew; Notes from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, one of which concerns a redraft of a proposed amendment and a handwritten suggestion that Carter Glass consult Hayes, before taking any action; Letter from Woodrow Wilson on August 6, 1912, concerning campaign plans; Copy of the bill introduced in the House of Representatives in 1913 by Carter Glass and referred to the Banking and Currency Committee, attached is a list of nine reasons for considering the bill at the extra session of Congress; List of proposed amendments and the reason for the changes suggested; Lengthy statement from Frank Vanderlip of National City Bank on July 24, 1913, concerning the banking system and proposed reforms; Letter of July 7, 1913, from George N. Reynolds, of the Chicago Continental and Commercial National Bank, concerning reserve requirements and the creation of an Advisory Board; Handwritten copy of a speech Carter Glass had prepared for delivery before the House of Representatives, concerning the credit for the authorship of the Federal Reserve Act, particularly refuting the claim that the work of Senator Nelson W. Aldrich was largely responsible for the content of the Federal Reserve Act; Letter, April 13, 1917, by Paul M. Warburg, as a member of the Federal Reserve Board, requesting that state banks be permitted to hold reserve balances at the Federal Reserve Banks; Report from the Governor of the Federal Reserve Board addressed to Senator Robert L. Owen, defending the system of check clearing against elimination; Copy of a resolution, passed by the Governors of the Federal Reserve banks, opposing the Kitchen bill, which would permit the collection of exchange charges by national banks; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President, regarding examinations for entrance into the Naval Academy; Letter presents a question concerning the definition of "gold or lawful money" in the Currency Bill; Letter, August 5, 1913, approving a provision for the distribution of 40% of the surplus earnings among the banks according to their reserve balances; Letter of August 6, 1913, from a branch of the American Bankers Association, urging recognition of savings departments in National Banks; Letter, August 4, 1913, from a bank in Flint, Michigan, suggesting certain changes in the proposed currency legislation; Statement of opposition to the Glass-Owen bill under consideration by Congress during the summer of 1913; Letter, July 31, 1913, from the Solicitor of the Treasury, suggesting a few changes in the Currency Bill, having been requested to comment upon the measure; Telegram from Sol Wexler, August 6, 1913, requesting a draft of the bill as approved by the committee; Telegram, August 6, 1913, inquiring as to the possibility of making further changes in phraseology before the caucus meeting. William W. Flannagan sent the telegram; Letters touching upon the bill being prepared by Carter Glass; Copies of the amended banking and currency measure are requested; Letters from Robert D. Kent, President of the Merchants Bank of Passaic, New Jersey, suggesting changes in the tax on currency issue and questioning the possibility of acquiring emergency currency under the Aldrich-Vreeland Act; Letter from the president of the Craddock-Terry shoe concern in Lynchburg, Virginia, suggesting the amendment of the Aldrich-Vreeland Act, reducing the rate of interest; Letter, August 6, 1913, from H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, stating that minor changes in wording were all that remained to accomplish in creating satisfactory legislation; Voting on the bill is noted, H. Parker Willis expresses displeasure with certain amendments, which he understands to have been made, he feels that it is very important to finish a report, upon which he is working, and a gives a progress report to Carter Glass; Confidential correspondence, May 27, 1913, from Senator Robert L. Owen to Carter Glass, enclosing a copy of a bill for currency reform suggested by Robert L. Owen, mentions having discussed his bill with H. Parker Willis and having criticized the Willis draft. Robert L. Owen lists the general changes, which he feels must be made to get the Willis plan into acceptable form; Letter from the president of the Northern Trust Company of Chicago, expressing favor for the proposed measure and stating that changes he would suggest would be very minor; Boston Evening Transcript, Saturday April 19, 1913, lauding the provision of the Carter Glass bill making it possible for national banks to establish foreign branches; Newspaper article on the day of the Federal Reserve Act, recalling the earliest meeting of Carter Glass and Wilson regarding currency reform; Letter, July 17, 1913, to Carter Glass from Charles S. Hamlin, which states that a memorandum suggesting changes in the Currency Bill is enclosed; Letter, January 23, 1914, from a depositor of a failed bank, protesting the practice of permitting persons responsible for the failure to engage in the task of putting the bank back on its feet; Letter from the president of the Merchants Loan and Trust Company in Chicago, requesting that the state banks be put on approximately the same footing as national banks under the new legislation; Copies of an amendment proposed by Hammer.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913
Box: 17

A. Copy of a reprint from the Journal of the American Bankers Association, July, 1913, concerning the work of the Currency Commission of the American Bankers Association, including a picture of the members ( Sol Wexler, Reynolds, Forgan, A. Barton Hepburn, and Festus Wade, among others); Copy of a memorandum concerning South American banks, from Paul M. Warburg, May 8, 1916, in the accompanying letter Paul M. Warburg expresses desire to see Carter Glass before appearing at a session of a committee headed by Senator Robert L. Owen to discuss the ownership by national banks of stock in banks handling foreign accounts; Copy of the speeches by Senator Gilbert M. Hitchcock, concerning the banking and currency legislation; Letter from John V. Farwell, previously connected with the National Citizens League, December 2, 1913, relating to a graduated scale of interest rates and opposing any provisions concerning the guarantee of deposits; Copy of the Congressional Record, November 10, 1913; Newspaper article from the Pittsburgh Post, November 16, 1913, summarizing a discussion of the Currency Bill by Congressman Robert J. Bulkley; Statement from the Deutsche Bank, October 28, 1913, to Paul M. Warburg, criticizing the regional concept, the composition of the Federal Reserve Board, and the note issue and note redemption provisions of the Robert L. Owen - Carter Glass bill. Samuel Untermeyer had exerted influence over Hefferich, who wrote the paper; Copy of a bill introduced by Senator Gilbert M. Hitchcock, April 8, 1913, setting up twenty national reserve associations; Copies of the Congressional Record, November 29, 1913, containing a speech on the Currency Bill by Senator John F. Shaforth of Colorado; Article in the St. Louis Republican, November 20, 1913, quoting Festus J. Wade and several other St. Louis bankers as stating that the pending banking legislation was the best which had ever been developed in the United States; Copies of the speeches of Carter Glass on banking reform on September 10 and 13, 1913; Copy of the bill under consideration in April, 1913, discouraging the use of injunctions in certain employer-employee relationships; Copy of the Washington Herald, December 11, 1913, containing one article in a series on "The Currency Problem." This article is entitled, "How the New System Would Work;" Speech in the House of Representatives by Edward W. Saunders on September 13, 1913, concerning the Banking and Currency Bill.

B. Envelope marked "Federal Reserve" containing letters dated for the most part between the years 1912-1914 between Carter Glass and such people as Woodrow Wilson, Paul M. Warburg, Samuel Untermeyer, Laughlin, Willie, W.T. Thompson, W.J. Bryan, William G. McAdoo, etc. The following letters are herein contained: Letter from Carter Glass to governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, September 17, 1920 explaining the course of events immediately preceding final enactment of the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin, March 31, 1926 regarding a statement from Col. House's book; Letter of thanks to William Jennings Bryan for his support and help, September 25, 1913; Letter from H. Parker Willis, November 14, 1912 discussing strategy for the committee in meeting possible criticisms of Untermeyer; Letter of congratulations from Paul M. Warburg; Letters to H. Parker Willis reporting results of conferences between Carter Glass and Robert L. Owen, June 9, 1913; Letter to H. Parker Willis mentioning a fifteen or twenty district reserve plan, April 11, 1913; Letter to Woodrow Wilson informing him that one of his suggestions had been embodied in the bill, May 15, 1913.

C. Letter from Paul M. Warburg suggesting changes in the Carter Glass bill; Letters of persons seeking to locate a Federal Reserve Bank at Richmond, Virginia; Speech of J. C. Rutherford, 9 February 1916, regarding banking policy in Virginia; Report of the Committee on Banks of the House of Delegates by Rutherford of Goochland; Letter, A. Mitchell Palmer to Carter Glass relative to several sections of the Federal Reserve Act; Letter, Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass relative to rediscounts, etc. in section 14; Letter, S. H. Green regarding guarantee of deposits; Letter to William G. McAdoo; Letter, Jefferson M. Levy to William G. McAdoo recommending William W. Flannagan for a position; Hatton M. Summers to Carter Glass regarding commodity paper as collateral of Federal Reserve notes; Letters regarding jobs and distribution of patronage.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913
Box: 19

A. Letter, August 3, 1916, to Carter Glass from Paul M. Warburg of the Federal Reserve Board, Paul M. Warburg had talked with Mann about branch banking, he had discussed the governorship of the Federal Reserve Board with William G. McAdoo, includes statement to McAdoo is with the letter; Note, May 4, 1916, Charles S. Hamlin, of the Federal Reserve Board, to Carter Glass, enclosing a lengthy statement of this thinking on proposed amendments to the note issue section of the Federal Reserve Act, listing and discussing five objects of the amendments; Several letters regarding statements of Representative Kitchen; Article, June 5, 1916, discussing the clearance of checks; Letter, August 31, 1916, from Carter Glass concerning check clearance; Letters concerning state banks and the McFadden Act; Letters concerning check clearance and the Kitchen bill; Letter concerning the possibility of repealing the National Bank Act at the point requiring that banks extend no loans in excess of 30% of their capital, the question of surplus accounts is involved; Lengthy statement of Senator James A. Reed, urging that the Senate give full and adequate attention to the Currency Bill, because of its importance, discusses changes already made and other changes are suggested; Letter from the Deputy Comptroller of the City of New York, concerning the rediscounting transactions between reserve banks; Note, October 3, 1913, from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, concerning the maturity of paper held by the banks; Clipping from the September 8, 1913, New York Americanstating that the Carter Glass bill was ready to go before the House. Sol Wexler of the American Bankers Association questioned the constitutionality of the measure. Connection of the currency bill and the tariff legislation, sponsored by Oscar W. Underwood, noted; Article in a French paper, concerning the passing of the Carter Glass bill by the House; Copy of the Treasury Daily Statement, October 1, 1913; Editorial from the Roanoke World News, comparing Carter Glass favorably to Claude A. Swanson, who had previously defeated him in a senatorial election; Handwritten letter stating that other changes in the Carter Glass bill are needed, rather than those coming from the Senate, September 12, 1913, on stationary of the Down Town Club; Letter, October 25, 1913, condemning Frank Vanderlip for his change in attitude on questions relating to the Currency Bill; Pages 13-20 of proposed changes in the Currency Bill and explanations for the changes; Letter from H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, December 4, 1913, stating that there are many changes which should be made in the Robert L. Owen bill. H. Parker Willis proposes to meet with Carter Glass to go over the errors contained in the measure; Statement agreeing that the provisions of the Currency Bill are satisfactory, if no changes are possible, but suggesting numerous improvements; Letter from J. C. McReynolds, the Attorney General, February 7, 1914, offering a favorable report on bills to confine the use of "national" to qualified banks; Copy of an article by Louis Nash, "The Functions of Money;" Letter, August 2, 1913, from a bank in Weatherford, Texas, giving the views of a country bank on the Currency Bill; Letter enclosing an article by Paul M. Warburg and stating agreement with Paul M. Warburg that the number of Federal Reserve banks should be reduced; Letter from the president of the Greenwich Bank in New York, August 7, 1913, advocating that national banks be permitted to have branches; Copy of a bill presented to the House Committee on Banking and Currency by R. M. Widney of Los Angeles, California, intended to permit national banks to place their reserves on deposit with the Treasury Department or the Sub-Treasuries; Requests for copies of the Currency Bill at its various stages; List of questions on the minds of the leaders of a group of small country bankers; Letters, August 20, 1913, from the National Association of Credit Men, supporting the Currency Bill as prepared for the caucus with no change warranted in the rediscount provisions; Letter, August 20, 1913, from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, suggesting that national bank notes be better regulated and that no refunding proposition be considered; Note, August 21, 1913, from Charles S. Hamlin, then Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, congratulating Carter Glass on a speech he had recently made; Letters concerning the opening of savings departments at national banks, August 19, 1913, by Charles Miller; Copy of an article by Murray Corrington, entitled, "The Clearing House as a Basis for Currency Issues. The Owen-Glass Bill," reprinted in the August 1913 Banking Law Journal; Letter from a hardware store in Duluth, Minnesota, expressing opposition to the Currency Act; Telegram offering support if the National Association of Credit Men for the new bill; Letter, September 3, 1913, from F. S. Heath, stating that he has found "amazing errors" in the Glass bill; Letter, September 5, 1913, stating that not all bankers around New York are opposed to the Glass bill; Letter from William W. Clay, September 9, 1913, concerning government notes as bank reserves; Note from the Secretary of the Treasury, enclosing an article by President Hadley of Yale, which he wishes to talk over with Carter Glass and H. Parker Willis. The article contains criticisms of section 17 of bill H.R. 6254; Letter, September 11, 1913, from F. S. Heath, expressing the hope that the Carter Glass bill will be defeated since combining banks into a corporation has proven undesirable in the past; Letter, September 12, 1913, from Edmund Fisher, Deputy Comptroller of New York City, making suggestions for further changes which might be advocated by Carter Glass as the Senate considered the Currency Bill; Letter from L. C. Sorrell, September 5, 1913, asking that several corrections be made in the Currency Bill; Note from Secretary of the Treasury, William G. McAdoo, calling attention to an enclosed report from Charles S. Hamlin, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, suggesting several changes in addition to the redemption of Federal Reserve notes in gold, if this latter revision is made; Letters expressing opposition to the Currency Bill, Miscellaneous letters concerning the Currency Bill, Note from Treasury Secretary, William G. McAdoo, August 28, 1913, concerning the savings bank department provisions of the Currency Bill; Two minor suggestions made by the Solicitor of the Treasury in connection with the Currency Bill, August 29, 1913; Lengthy comment upon some of the more important features of the proposed currency legislation, e.g., the Federal Reserve Board, reserves, and bank examinations; Suggestions from the Produce Exchange Annex of New York as to how to create a better bill than the Glass measure and one less like the previous Aldrich proposals; Newspaper articles, September, 1913, relating to the Currency Bill. Reversal of opinion concerning the Glass bill by the Virginia Bankers Association, conflict noted between redemption of the Federal Reserve notes and the gold standard; statement of Senator Robert L. Owen criticizing the bankers for their attitudes toward the Currency Bill; article from the Baltimore Sunof September 1, 1913, praising Carter Glass for his work in steering the Currency Bill and in the caucus; Letter, September 15, 1913, to Carter Glass from Edwin R. Seligman, criticizing the regional organization and the issue of notes by the government. Edwin R. Seligman suggests that the ideas of Paul M. Warburg be given greater weight in determining the content of the Currency Bill; Letter from the American Bankers Association, August 15, 1913, suggesting that organization could be facilitated by the numbering of the Federal Reserve Districts so as to conform to the numbering system for reserve cities; Note from John Skelton Williams, August 21, 1913, congratulating Carter Glass on his speech before the caucus; Letter from the president of an Alabama Bank, expressing opposition to the abolishment of exchange charges; List of quotations about the Currency Bill, submitted by a Detroit lawyer; Congratulatory messages of August, 1913, concerning the Carter Glass speech before the caucus; Telegram, August 22, 1913, to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis, stating that he will be in Washington soon and have the report on the savings section, although belatedly; Letter, August 25, 1913, from William W. Flannagan to Carter Glass mentioning his discussion of the banking measure with H. Parker Willis, then dealing with the advisability of clearing checks at par; Letter, August 25, 1913, from H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, concerning his work for the Carter Glass Subcommittee and criticizing the bankers for their attitudes. H. Parker Willis was opposed to letting the bankers have their way with respect to check clearance and the number of reserve banks; Letter opposing the issue of currency by banks; Suggestion of a California banker, regarding the savings bank section of the Currency Bill; Letter from a Massachusetts publishing company, making three suggestions for improving the Currency Bill; Letter, August 27, 1913, from the president of the national bank at Sheffield, Pennsylvania, listing seven reasons for the banks to oppose the Glass bill; Letter from J. W. Powers of Gainesville, Texas, stating that even the best bankers are biased in their work on banking legislation; Letter from William M. Clay, enclosing an editorial praising the stand taken by the American Bankers Association with respect to currency reform, and expressing willingness to debate anyone on the most vital subject of currency reform, i.e., the tendency to increase or decrease the national debt; Report by the president of the Citizens League of Minnesota, concerning changes that should be made in the Carter Glass - Robert L. Owen bill; Proposal to strengthen the national banking system by having currency issued directly to the banks by the government, according to the dictates of a commodity price index; June, 1913, New York Heraldarticle, concerning the banking legislation soon to be introduced in the House. The anticipated content of the measure is presented; Editorial listing the needs of banking which have been generally accepted as part of a reform of the banking system, and the things which legislation must provide against; Pamphlet by Walter F. McCaleb, "guarantee or Insurance of Bank Deposits;" Resolutions adopted during April, 1913, by various branches of the National Citizens League, urging that immediate attention be given to banking legislation; Letter questioning the provisions of the Currency Bill regarding bank examinations; Paper concerning the protection of the gold supply; Memorandum offering a plan for Central Bank of the United States; Note from the editor of the Bankers Magazine, stating that a central bank would be undesirable, enclosing pamphlet, criticizing the proposed legislation; Letter raising questions, concerning clearing houses and the definition of "savings deposits"; List of errors in the Currency Bill; Suggestion that all banks be compelled to become members of the new system, including an editorial; Report by J. Herbert Anderson, "Memorandum Regarding Currency Reform."

Miscellaneous correspondence 1913
Box: 20

A. Letter of certain citizens of Birmingham in support of that city as a site of a Federal Reserve Ban; Diagram of the effect of a loan by a Federal Reserve Bank to a member bank; Statement of operations of Federal Reserve Banks; Allen's political essays as a section on central banks; Study of the Carter Glass bill by A. B. Stickney; Bache review of August 23, 1913, contains a section on the Currency (Glass) bill; Shible essay on currency legislation; Bulletin of Nelson, Cook and Company on the general banking situation; Chicago letter, 17 September 1913, enclosing a clipping regarding H. Parker Willis, clipping is missing; Letter of 22 August 1913 regarding Robert L. Owen's impositions regarding the Glass bill; Letters from A. B. Williams, 29 August 1913, regarding authorship of the Glass bill; Letter of H. F. Michie regarding Carter Glass' "cousin of Dukie bulletin" [or "cousin Dickie Bird"] relative to his being kept out of the professorship of law; Letter of R. L. Jordan of East Radford relative to Robert L. Owen; Letter of J. C. Stewart regarding invitation of United Commercial Travellers to Senator Robert L. Owen, and letter to Carter Glass asking him to see Robert L. Owen; Letter of J. B. Lagess regarding liquidation of banks; Letter of E. D. Kent regarding discount market; Nelson, Cook and Company of Baltimore wrote regarding paper eligible for rediscount; Representative Henry wrote regarding agricultural paper.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913-1917

A. Report in a Philadelphia paper of a decline in circulation; Copy of a lengthy letter to George Roberts from A. W. Gree, concerning the actual existence of the money trust which George Roberts felt did not exist; Accompaning letter to Carter Glass, giving a specific example of the money trust; Newspaper article of July 24, 1913, entitled, "Currency Bill in Chaos," relating to trouble with Henry of Texas, over government control banking; Letter of October 31, from H. Parker Willis, suggesting that Carter Glass would not be wise to let important papers, concerning banking reform, out of his possession. H. Parker Willis expresses willingness to discuss the matter with Carter Glass at a convenient time; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President, July 25, 1913, concerning an appointment to the Naval Academy; Telegrams, July and August, 1913, opposing the Neeley amendment; Authorizations from Thomas G. Patten and Charles A. Korbly that Carter Glass vote for them against the Ragsdale amendment; Letter and part of a proposed bill relating to the section of the Currency Bill dealing with Federal Reserve notes; Letter from Forgan, president of the National City Bank of Chicago, to William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, concerning the frequency of bank examinations and the examiners is referred to Carter Glass for the consideration and subsequent discussion; Letters concerning jobs as postmasters; Miscellaneous correspondence; Letter from the president of the Florsheim Shoe Company, dealing with open market operations; Telegram from George Reynolds noting a correction to a telegram previously sent to Carter Glass; Letter urging Carter Glass to maintain his position against interference from the bankers of the country or the Wall Street interests; Copy of a pamphlet, "A Sensible Solution to Our Financial Problem," by John W. Gomes; Copy of a pamphlet, " The Currency Question As Viewed by a Foreign Banker;" Letter from a California bank president, urging Carter Glass to disregard the resolutions of the American Bankers Association; Proposed change in the section of the Currency Bill, concerning the division of earnings; Letter from Rudolph Spreckels to President Woodrow Wilson, July 26, 1913, suggesting that the President go slow in accepting the banking legislation then in preparation. The high subscription requirements for stack in the new banks and the accounting of funds held at reserve city banks as reserves are the special points picked out for criticism. The President referred the letter to Carter Glass; Letter from the Solicitor of the Treasury, renewing the suggestion that the government be given a prior lien on the assets of the Federal Reserve banks; Letter from the president of a New Jersey bank concerning safeguards on the Savings Banks section of the Currency Bill; Letter from the president of a bank in Norwich, New York, giving his suggestions for improvement upon the pending legislation. Several other similar letters; Speech by Carter Glass, April 3, 1916, concerning banking reform, crediting the Wilson administration with correcting the two fundamental defects of the banking system; Telegrams, January, 1914, concerning the desirability of placing a Federal Reserve bank in Richmond, Virginia; Letter, August 11, 1913, to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis, concerning a meeting with Phelan and the preparation of the report for introduction of the bill into the House; Copy of a letter, August 22, 1913, by William Jennings Bryan at the State Department to Carter Glass, listing the three things he felt to be most important in connection with currency legislation and leaving further details up to the President and others. This seems to be the letter which silenced Henry at the Democratic caucus; Copy of a bill introduced by Hitchcock on April 8, 1913, to establish twenty national reserve associations; Answers to thirty-three questions submitted to Edmund D. Fisher by members of the Senate Banking and Currency Committee; Editorial, written a week after the Carter Glass bill was presented to the House, discussing the bill and the changes proposed; Very important letter, H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, November 8, 1913, acknowledging receipt of a letter from Charles Hammer, clerk of the House Banking and Currency Committee, accompanied by a copy of a statement by Carter Glass about Senator Reed. H. Parker Willis writes of his own unwillingness to discuss the facts about the early history of the Carter Glass Bill before the Senate Banking Committee; Letter from a Virginia banker questioning the wisdom of the segregation of the savings department; Copy of the National City Bank Letter, August, 1915, containing tables, definitions, and statements relating to Federal Reserve activities; Letter from a New Jersey banker, giving seven reasons for par collection of checks; Note from Paul M. Warburg of the Federal Reserve Board, September 14, 1914, asking that Carter Glass read an enclosure before a discussion on the subject; Copy of a discussion of the fundamental points of the Banking and Currency Bill, prepared under the direction of Festus J. Wade; Letter, January 16, 1914, Carter Glass to Representative Oscar W. Underwood, requesting the true story of the attempt of Henry to get Carter Glass to agree to amend the Currency bill with respect to agricultural credits in return for the end of Henry's opposition to the bill. Reply from Oscar W. Underwood; Two-page list of points at which the House conferees forced changes into the Senate Currency Bill; Copy of an act permitting national banks established close to the borders between states to select only a majority of their directors from the state in which they operate; Statement about the Federal Farm Loan Act; Letter from Representative Jouett Shouse, July 11, 1916, asking for the opinion of Carter Glass on the Pomerene-McFadden Bill and enclosing a letter from a banker at Lexington, Kentucky, favoring the bill because of seasonal needs for credit; Letters from bankers favoring the McFadden Bill and discussing exchange charges and branch banking; Paper by William G. McAdoo on prosperity; Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass, June 6, 1916, enclosing an advance copy of a speech he is to deliver; Letter from a Richmond banker, urging more leeway in extending loans for banks with small capital but large surplus; Note from Charles S. Hamlin, of the Board of Governors, enclosing a report to the House Judicial Committee, encouraging the study of the problems involved when one man holds more than one position within the banking system; Statement by James K. Lynch, president of the American Bankers Association, December 3, 1916, dealing with "Inter-Bank Deposits;" Letter from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, enclosing a letter concerning the payment of interest on deposits and stating that the payment of interest on deposits could be abolished if state banks could be regulated in this respect; Letter from Williams, March 6, 1916, enclosing a letter from the Richmond Federal Reserve Bank, written on November 12, 1915, questioning the desirability of limiting national bank deposits to a stated multiple of their capital ans surplus; Letter, July 6, 1916, Charles S. Hamlin, of the Federal Reserve Board, to Carter Glass, suggesting the elimination of a clause from the Federal Reserve Act; Copy of a letter, November 23, 1914, from Benjamin Strong to Paul M. Warburg, expressing similar feelings in enclosed; Copy of the Book of the Industrial Republic, edited by John B. Alden; Letter from the president of an Alabama bank in the March 4, 1916, Chronicle, opposing the collection of checks at par; Letter from John Skelton Williams, the Comptroller of the Currency, March 2, 1916, with an enclosure, requesting action on a bill enabling his office to crack down on usurers; Letter from a Richmond, Virginia, bank president to John Skelton Williams with a copy going to Carter Glass, concerning discrimination in check clearance; Copy of a report, November 13, 1915, by Frederick A. Delano, Paul M. Warburg, and W. P. G. Harding on the Federal Reserve Board, concerning organizational activity and particularly a lessening number of districts; Statement by the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, claiming a wide divergence between the Federal Reserve Act and Aldrich bill; Article by Frank W. Hackett, "Double Taxation of National Banks;" Editorial in the September 21, 1916, Evening Postconcerning the failure of the Democrats to make a campaign issue of the Federal Reserve Act, (see envelope); Article from Leslie's Weekly, October 9, 1916, concerning the life of Paul M. Warburg, giving particular attention to his connection with the Federal Reserve System, (see envelope); Letter of October 20, 1916, from H. Parker Willis, Secretary of the Federal Reserve Board, (see envelope); Letter from F. H. Stoltze, October 7, 1916, asking for further information concerning par clearance of checks, (see envelope); Copy of the National City Bank Letter, October, 1916, containing a section on the Federal Reserve System, the amendments to the act and suggesting that Federal Reserve notes could be used as bank reserves, (see envelope); Letter, October 12, 1916, from W. P. G. Harding on the Federal Reserve Board, discussing a convention of the American Bankers Association, (see envelope); Letter from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, concerning the part played by Republicans in the adoption of the Federal Reserve Act and expressing regret at the expression of a fallacious opinion by the President.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913-1917
Box: 22

A. Letter from William G. McAdoo, enclosing a statement prepared on September 4, 1913, by William W. Flannagan, concerning stock subscriptions and reserves; Index to the Currency Bill and abstract of the Federal Reserve Act; List of changes in the Currency Bill, proposed by the Solicitor of the Treasury; Letter, October 7, 1913, from William W. Flannagan concerning the discount process; Editorial from the New York "Morning" Telegram, August 1913, concerning the likelihood of the schemes of Robert L. Henry wrecking the attempted currency reform; Newspaper article concerning the possibility of litigation, if national banks are faced with the alternative of entering the new system or losing their charters; Editorial pointing out how different things might have been with respect to currency legislation, had Senator Aldrich remained quiet on matters relating to tariffs, calls Carter Glass' statement that the work of the Monetary Commission had proven of little use a "bluff," points out close similarity of the Aldrich and Carter Glass measures; Copy of a speech on tariff legislation by Senator Morris Sheppard, placed in the Congressional Record, September 4, 1913; Brief statement concerning the discount process; Statement of San Francisco News Letter, September 27, 1913, saying that the bankers and the Wall Street interests would have to accept any legislation backed by President Wilson; Brief statement describing the Currency Bill, July 11, 1913, by the vice-president of a Richmond, Virginia, bank; Letter, July 9, 1913, from C. F. Childs and Company, dealing with government bonds; Pamphlet on anti-trust legislation in connection with interstate trade, including a discussion of the Clayton Bill; Paper concerning loans to directors of national banks; Suggestion for an amendment of the discount section of the Federal Reserve Act; Paper comparing a money system to a lake; Statement of causes for a failure of dry goods jobbing concern in 1914; Statement of the opinion of the National Citizens' League of the Glass-Owen bill; Copy of a letter, July 16, 1913, written to President Woodrow Wilson by E. H. Gillette, making two points about the proposed currency legislation; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President, concerning the possibility of war with Mexico in 1914; Letter, April 18, 1914, from the Richmond Business Men's Club, requesting copies of the speech in which Carter Glass advocated the designation of Richmond, Virginia, as a suitable location for a Federal Reserve Bank; Letter, January 5, 1914, praising Carter Glass for his work on the Currency Bill, criticizing the bankers and other Congress men; Congratulatory letter from the president of a Richmond, Virginia bank, upon the passing of the Currency Bill; Speech of Carter Glass to the House, December 22, 1913, presenting report of the Conference Committee on the Glass-Owen bill; Copy of the Federal Reserve Act as finally accepted by both Houses of Congress; Petitions urging prohibition legislation; Copy of a bill introduced in the Senate by John Sharp Williams, December 23, 1913, providing for the insurance of deposits at National banks, along with a letter from Williams explaining why he introduced the measure; Letter, July 2, 1914, from the Confidential Secretary at the Department of State, stating that a Carter Glass recommendation for the appointment would be transmitted to Secretary William Jennings Bryan; Letter, June 20, 1914, from F. W. Mondell, enclosing a copy of a bill to repeal that part of the Federal Reserve Act preventing the deposit of postal savings funds at any non-member bank; National Association of Credit Men to Carter Glass, June 29, 1914, thanking him for his speech to their convention on the Federal Reserve System; Senator Claude Swanson to Carter Glass, suggesting that he permit his name to be put on the list to receive certain publications on agriculture.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1914-1915
Box: 23

A. Copy of a bill introduced in the House o n August 14, 1914, providing for the issuance of Federal Reserve notes to producers of cotton; Article from the New York Outlook, May 16, 1914, listing the initial appointee of President Wilson to the Federal Reserve Board; Copy of the Outlookarticle in Hamilton Herald, accompanied by a criticism of Representative Robert L. Henry for attempting to gain the spotlight in connection with the current legislation; Letter, July 3, 1914, from the National Association of Credit Men, attempting to correct a false impression that the organization had endorsed the Federal Reserve Act; Requests for copies if the Carter Glass speech, "The Federal Reserve Act;" Notes on the Federal Trade Commission Bill; A copy of the Carter Glass speech, "The Federal Reserve Act;" Letters to Carter Glass, answered by Charles D. Hamner, his secretary; Pamphlets and correspondence relating to an attempt by Edward S. Brown to recover certain bonds and mortgages which had been confiscated by the government; Request for a copy of Carter Glass' speech to the Economic Club of New York from F. L. Darrow, December 20, 1913; Letter, August 28, 1913, listing the names of the nine Representatives who had voted against the Currency bill; Literature relating to primary elections; Copy of a resolution, passed on February 4, 1916, by the Virginia House of Delegates, supporting President Wilson's policy of preparedness; Letter from Frederick A. Delano of the Federal Reserve Board, November 17, 1915, minimizing the differences between Carter Glass and himself; Letter from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, November 24, 1915, concerning organizational problems in connection with the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve districts; Article by an Oklahoma judge, "The Crimes of the Usurer in Oklahoma "; List of interest rates charged by a bank to a woman borrower; Copy of an act, March 11, 1916, allowing national banks to utilize state laws guaranteeing deposits; Copy of a bill introduced by Carter Glass on December 6, 1916, concerning demand deposits and reserves; Data and discussion on the Federal Reserve System and its functions, along with a comparison of conditions before and after the passing of the Federal Reserve Act, prepared on October 6, 1914, by A. B. Leach and Co.; Memorandum prepared on May 29, 1916, by the Treasury Department for the Comptroller of the Currency, concerning amendments to the revenue section of the United States Revised Statutes; Samuel Untermeyer to Carter Glass, June 21, 1913, listing three parts of the proposed legislation to which he especially objected, stating that there was much more that might be said, expressing the opinion that banks will enter the system and remain in it, if they are informed of the benefits likely to accrue; Letters concerning appointment to West Point; Copy of the Montgomery Messengerof Christiansburg, Virginia, June 6, 1902, favoring the election of Carter Glass to the House of Representatives; Letter, February 19, 1914, requesting Representative Charles B. Smith to get information on the origin of the Currency Bill, referred to Carter Glass; Letter suggesting a situation for attention by the Pujo Committee.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913-1936
Box: 24

A. Material on origin and early history of Federal Reserve System, including Carter Glass' correspondence with Robert L. Owen and Paul M. Warburg; Bankers to Carter Glass expressing their views on Federal Reserve System; Pamphlet "The Owen- Carter Glass bill, Some Criticisms and Suggestions," by Paul M. Warburg; Pamphlet by Samuel Untermeyer, "Who is Entitled to the Credit for the Federal Reserve Act," Mimeographed statement of Congressman Eagle opposing Federal Reserve Act; Mimeographed statement of Carter Glass concerning attacks by Robert L. Owen and Samuel Untermeyer; Folder primarily containing newspaper clippings on international finance, also several clippings concerning Carter Glass' criticisms of Mitchell's policy decisions in 1929 and on "The Reserve Board's Position"; Letter to the New York Timesfrom Edwin R. Seligman; Folder of correspondence on "The Tale of Two Heifers." Also included is a folder of letters relative to farm relief legislation in 1914-16; Folder of correspondence with or concerning Randolph Leigh and the 1936 campaign for the Senate; Folder of correspondence with Norman Hamilton.

Official Correspondence 1912-1913
Box: 25

A. Letters between Carter Glass and H. Parker Willis, concerning the content of drafts of the Carter Glass bill and plans for holding hearings: Carter Glass requests explanation of the process by which commercial paper can be substituted for government bonds as backing for the note issue; Letters concerning the attempt of Samuel Untermeyer to take over responsibility for banking legislation; Letters concerning J. Lawrence Laughlin; Letter from H. Parker Willis, January 2, 1913, listing the major points of the bill, on which H. Parker Willis was working; Letters relating to the meeting of Carter Glass and H. Parker Willis with President Wilson on December 26, 1912; Letters telling briefly of discussion of currency matters with certain interested persons, like Paul M. Warburg and A. Barton Hepburn.

B. Letters involving the following: Samuel Untermeyer, Wall Street Lawyer; R. C. Miliken; Ludwig Bendix, American Bankers Association; Oscar W. Underwood, House of Representatives; Robert J. Bulkley, House of Representatives; James F. Byrnes, House of Representatives; J. H. Tregoe, National Association of Credit Men; Willard Ragsdale, House of Representatives; Frank Morrison, American Federation of Labor; Charles A. Lindbergh, House of Representatives; Robert L. Henry, House of Representatives; J. Lawrence Laughlin, University of Chicago; Festus J. Wade, American Bankers Association; Robert L. Owen, Senate; William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury; Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President; L. E. Travis, National Citizens League; O. M. W. Sprague, Harvard University; Frank Vanderlip, National City Bank; Otis T. Wingo, House of Representatives; Sol Wexler, American Bankers Association; Festus J. Wade, American Bankers Association; W. P. G. Harding, President of an Alabama bank; Sir Edmund Walker, Canadian banker; Hubert D. Stephens, House of Representatives; Thomas S. Martin, Senate; Paul M. Warburg, New York banker; E. D. Hulbert, Chicago banker.

C. List of witnesses for House hearings on the Currency Bill with dates.

Correspondence concerning the Federal Reserve Bank
Box: 26

A. Letter to Carter Glass regarding number of Reserve banks; Letter to Carter Glass regarding number of bankers on the Board of each Reserve Bank; Letter of A. Barton Hepburn regarding the wording of section 24; Request of A. Barton Hepburn for a copy of the Currency bill; Requests for copies of address by Senator Carter Glass; Letter of J. W. Jemks to William G. McAdoo regarding rediscount by one Federal Reserve Bank of paper submitted by another.

B. The letters in this box bear on many aspects of the Federal Reserve Bank and full reaction to its main provisions. Bankers generally did not understand the Act of certain of its provisions, but generally these were not the major items of the act.

Correspondence on banking and currency legislation 1913, February to April
Box: 27

A. Letters requesting action on banking and currency legislation: Letter, February 21, 1913, from Royal Meeker at Princeton University, stating that he believes an "important reformation" is about to take place in banking laws; Letter from A. D. Welton of the National Citizens' League; Letters from J. Lawrence Laughlin; Letter to A. Piatt Andrew; Letters making suggestions for changing the existing banking organization; Expressions of desire for change; Carter Glass to W. C. Cromwell, April 1, 1913, specifying the broad general lines along which banking reform might be effected; Charles H. Treat, former Treasurer of the United States, to Alfred H. Curtis, president of the National Bank of North America; Correspondence concerning a plan for currency reform to be submitted to the Banking and Currency Committee by Alfred O. Crozier; Letter from a California publisher, discussing the bank policy of extending call loans; Letter from Joseph French Johnson; Letter from Charles A. Morse of the National Citizens League to J. Lawrence Laughlin, discussing the way to effect the change in reserve requirements; William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, thanking Carter Glass for sending him copies of the hearings, held by the Banking and Currency Subcommittee, and those of the Pujo group investigating the "money trust;" Carter Glass to Royal Meeker, requesting some data which had been promised him; Requests for copies of the Carter Glass Subcommittee hearings from William A. Scott and Edwin W. Kemmerer honored; Carter Glass to Royal Meeker thanking him for his favor of the regional idea and the central control board; Letter from R. W. Maltison suggesting the use of cumulative voting for Board of Directors; Letter from a Kentucky lawyer, suggesting that bank directors be made personally liable for depositors money; Letter from the Deputy Comptroller of the Currency requesting the return of certain data, loaned to H. Parker Willis for use by the committee; Letter, February 12, 1913, from Festus J. Wade, urging speed in reforming the banking system; Copy of a pamphlet by George A. Bassett, "A Plan for the Issuing of Redeemable Currency by the National Government;" Letter and bill, proposing a more adequate gold reserve; Copy of a letter from Rudolph Spreckels, a San Francisco banker, to Woodrow Wilson; Letter, February 25, 1913, Royal Meeker, of Princeton University, to Carter Glass reporting that a survey of a number of prominent and especially qualified economists had discussed what was known about the pending currency legislation, considering regional system acceptable, emphasizing coordinating organization, and mentioning Joseph French Johnson, O. W. M. Sprague, Willard Fisher, and Edwin W. Kemmerer; Letter, March 14, 1913, to Carter Glass from J. Lawrence Laughlin, complaining of the slowness of the House committee in getting action on its currency bill and expressing the opinion that his own work should be placed in the hands of the Senators as a guide to their work; First page of a letter to Sol Wexler, apparently from Carter Glass, in which Glass expresses surprise at Wexler's attitude toward a draft of the Currency Bill modified in accordance with his own ideas. Three changes proposed by Wexler are listed.

Correspondence on the Currency Bill and the Federal Reserve 1912-1913
Box: 28

A. Correspondence with Samuel Untermeyer, November and December, 1922, concerning Samuel Untermeyer's proposal to merge the two subcommittees of the Banking and Currency Committee, proposal was rejected; Copy of a speech by Carter Glass, December 22, 1913, reporting to the House the results of the consideration of the currency bill by the conference committee; Letter from Charles S. Calwell, president of the Corn Exchange National Bank, June 25, 1913, concerning the location of reserves; Letter, July 28, 1913, from George M. Reynolds; Carter Glass to Thomas G. Patten; Letter, July 25, 1913, in which Edwin R. Seligman requests copies of the hearings on the Currency Bill; Letter from Carter Glass to E. B. Spencer, July 16, 1913, in which Carter Glass states that the original Currency Bill placed three bankers on the Federal Reserve Board, Carter Glass says that he will not oppose the entire measure just because he does not agree with a portion of the bill; Letter, November 12, 1913, from Claude Smallwod, setting forth certain provisions to which officials of his bank in California object; Similar letter from A. J. Waters, president of a bank in Los Angeles, California; Letter, July 17, 1913, from Carter Glass to Representative Francis B. Harrison, expressing the opinion that the underwriting of securities was an undesirable practice, but not within the province of the pending legislation, and remarking on the closeness of many important votes by the committee; Carter Glass to Representative W. S. Hammond, August 4, 1913, stating that long-term loans to farmers by the Federal Reserve banks were not desirable, because of their liquidity; Letter from bankers concerning the content of the proposed currency legislation; Telegram from Carter Glass, July 17, 1913, to H. Parker Willis, informing Willis that the committee refused to take action on several phases of the bill being prepared, unless be were present; H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass July 9, 1913, stating that work on a circular and on certain amendments was progressing, mentioning Congressman Ragsdale and A. Platt Andrew; Letter to Festus J. Wade from Carter Glass, July 1, 1913, expressing the thought that A. Platt Andrew and the New York Timeswere hostile to the Currency Bill, and stating that the bill as it stood was satisfactory to him; Congratulatory letter from Edwin W. Kemmerer to Carter Glass, December 24, 1913, upon his work in getting the Federal Reserve Act passed; Letter from A. Barton Hepburn to Carter Glass, June 3, 1913, urging him to carry on the fight for currency reform; Letter from A. D. Noyes to Carter Glass, December 23, 1913, congratulating him on the success of the Currency legislation and describing certain other of the hardships involved; Congratulatory letters; Copies of two bills introduced in the House by Alfred G. Allen with explanatory notes, providing for national banks to loan money on the security of real estate, and dealing with the salary and work load of a bank examiner; Answers to four questions, concerning the provisions of the Currency Bill, posed by the California Bankers Association, sent to Carter Glass on November 11, 1913, by a California banker; Note, July 15, 1913, from Ludwig Bendix, enclosing a draft of a plan for an Advisory Board. Carter Glass responds; Telegrams between Carter Glass and John V. Farwell, holding open the hearings for several days, until Farwell could present further information; Suggestions by Bruce J. Macdonald, a Michigan banker, with respect to the Currency law; Correspondence relating to Bishop James Cannon; Copy of a speech made by Carter Glass before the Senate, April 15, 1924, concerning Senatorial investigations; Copies of the speech to the Senate by Carter Glass, January, 1922, entitled, "Truth About the Federal Reserve System; " New Year wishes from Paul M. Warburg, December 31, 1913; Letter from William A. Glasgow, Jr., March 18, 1912, arranging a time to appear before the Carter Glass subcommittee; Note from George E. Roberts, Director of the Mint, May 28, 1913, stating that enclosures contain criticisms of the Currency Bill; Letter, Carter Glass to George W. Taylor, November 8, 1912, stating his awareness of the attempt by Samuel Untermeyer to take over the work of the Carter Glass subcommittee; Letter from Samuel Untermeyer to Carter Glass, February 27, 1912, modestly stating that Samuel Untermeyer has no ulterior motives in connection with the work of the Glass Subcommittee, declining any further opportunity to appear before the Committee; Carter Glass to A. Barton Hepburn, May 30, 1912, stating that work on the currency measure has come to a standstill on account of a proposal to permit the government to carry on banking functions and issue notes, requesting the opinions of Reynolds, Forgan, and Festus J. Wade, in addition to A. Barton Hepburn; Carter Glass answers a letter, June 30, 1913, from Edward W. Sibley saying that the dire predictions of Charles W. Fowler are not founded upon facts. Gold will not be drive out of the country, says Carter Glass; Definition of a term suggested by Ludwig Bendix in a letter, July 7, 1913; Telegram from Samuel Untermeyer, who expresses alarm over newspaper articles unfavorable to him and proposes a meeting between himself, Pujo, and Carter Glass to straighten things out; Telegram from Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass, dated August 21, expressing the hope that their friendship would not be lost, despite the lapsing of the official connection of Paul M. Warburg with the Currency legislation; Two copies of the speech to the House by Carter Glass, presenting the report of the Conference Committee.

Correspondence from Bedford County 1911, June-1912 September
Box: 29

A. Letters from residents of Bedford county to Carter Glass and vice versa: Requests for seeds, changes in rural mail routes, and organization of the precincts of the county for Carter Glass' 1912 primary election.

Correspondence from Lynchburg and Campbell County 1911 December-1912 February
Box: 30

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents in the Lynchburg area, mainly discussing proposed change in the counties which would be included in the 6th district.

Correspondence from Roanoke City and County 1912 January-July
Box: 31

A. This box contains correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents in the Roanoke area concerning the democratic primary of 1912 and discussing other matters.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County 1912
Box: 32

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents who live in Lynchburg and Campbell County, 1912, requesting seeds and literature: Correspondence regarding Carter Glass' solicitation of the vote of people in the area in the 1912 democratic primary: Letters discussing other matters of a personal nature.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Roanoke, Montgomery and Floyd counties
Box: 33

A. Discussing personal matters, solicitation of votes by Carter Glass for the 1912 primary, requesting garden seeds, bulletins, etc.

Correspondence 1912
Box: 34

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents who live in Roanoke City and county dealing with Carter Glass' solicitation of votes in the 1912 democratic primary and requesting seeds and bulletin.

Correspondence 1912-1913
Box: 35

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents who reside in Roanoke City and county, discussing recommendations of various people to Carter Glass for postmasters of local areas.

Correspondence 1912-1913
Box: 36

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents who live in Bedford County, dealing with local problems such as appointment of postmasters, changing rural routes, government purchase of land, etc.; numerous requests for bulletins, seeds and other items distributed by Congressmen.

Correspondence on banking and currency 1913 June-November
Box: 37

A. Miscellaneous correspondence relating to the currency legislation the in preparation: Numerous requests for copies of the Currency Bill; Letters from Carter Glass, announcing meetings of the House Banking and Currency Committee, the Carter Glass Subcommittee, or the Democratic members of the Committee; Correspondence with William W. Flannagan, particularly concerning changes in the Currency Bill suggested by Flannagan, picturing H. Parker Willis as favoring the changes and Carter Glass as having no objections, but the members of his Committee objecting; Letter, June 25, 1913, from William W. Flannagan, stating that as far as he knows the bill under preparation is a good one and mentioning the government issue vs. bank issue question; Limitation of a bank profit examined critically by William W. Flannagan in a letter, July 10, 1913; Telegram from H. L. Godwin, inquiring as to when a caucus meeting on the Currency Bill is to be held. Carter Glass gives and approximate date, but is not certain that a caucus will be held at all; A. Barton Hepburn requesting a copy of the Currency Bill on several occasions; Suggestion by Francis Burton Harrison of the House Ways and Means Committee that the problem of the underwriting of securities by banks be investigated; Complimentary letter, July 13, 1913, Carter Glass to E. D. Hulbert, citing particularly the reaction to his criticisms; Letter, June 26, 1913, Robert Henry, Chairman of the House Rules Committee, requesting a copy of a 1908 Carter Glass speech, attacking the major features of the Aldrich-Vreeland Bill; Suggestion from D. C. Imboden that the practice by national banks of making loans on the basis of stock held in other banks be prohibited; Telegram, August 4, 1913, Carter Glass to Charles A. Korbly, urgently requesting that Korbly be present for the final vote at which Glass fears he will be unable to cast Korbly's vote for him; Corrections of wording suggested by David J. Lewis, chairman of the House Committee on Labor; Carter Glass replies that the errors pointed out by Lewis had already been caught; Complimentary letter, July 28, 1913, Carter Glass to Charles A. Korbly, stating that Carter Glass expects support in the coming committee meeting, even though Korbly may not agree with everything in the bill; Letter giving reasons for decision to exclude state and municipal bonds from eligible paper category in answer to a letter from F. J. Lisman; Sarcastic letter from Carter Glass to George H. Locey, North Carolina lawyer, who felt that his suggestions for currency reform should have been given greater consideration; Edwin W. Kemmerer was sent a copy of the Currency Bill upon request, July 8, 1913; Letter Carter Glass to Charles E. Meek, August 12, 1913, thanking Meek for his analysis of the pending currency bill and noting that certain of the changes suggested were made in the caucus meeting; Letter, Charles E. Meek to Carter Glass, August 6, 1913, stating that Meek's bank plans to publish a comparison of the original draft of the Currency Bill to that accepted by the Committee, if no further changes were expected by Carter Glass as a result of the caucus; Carter Glass replies that he had better wait until after the caucus; Letter, Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, asking that he read and prepare a reply to a suggestion submitted by Everis Hayes to the committee; Carter Glass sent William G. McAdoo a copy of the Currency Bill, July 22, 1913; Letter referred by William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass, referring to the possibility of double liability in the case of a stock subscription by a national bank in the reserve bank of its district, if the reserve bank were to fail. Carter Glass promises to clear up the confusion existing on this point; Letter to Representative A. J. Montague, July 17, 1913, stating that the framers of the Currency Bill had in mind very limited application of the provision permitting the making of loans on real estate. These are matters for separate legislation, felt Carter Glass; Letter, Caldwell Hardy to William G. McAdoo, concerning the retirement of government bonds securing the note issue. Carter Glass answers; Letter, Carter Glass to Charles E. Meek, praising the pamphlet prepared by Meek, containing the Carter Glass Bill; Note, William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass, July 1, 1913, asking that an enclosure from Festus J. Wade be given careful consideration; Letter from a banker, concerning the retirement of the government 2 dollar bills; Letter from John M. Nelson, concerning the possibility of appointing member of the Federal Reserve Board for life, so as to avoid political maneuvering; Letter from Edmund Platt, July 9, 1913, urging that bank funds invested in the Federal Reserve System be exempt from taxation, because of the pressure otherwise exerted on country bank earnings; Telegram, July 31, 1913, Carter Glass to Representative Thomas G. Patten, asking whether he could vote for Patten against an amendment proposed by Neeley. Later objection to the casting of Thomas G. Patten's vote noted; Letter, July 4, 1913, to Carter Glass from Edmund Platt, mentioning that the House hearings were encouraged by J. Lawrence Laughlin; Letter, Robert D. Kent, president of a New Jersey bank, to Carter Glass, July 8, 1913, suggesting that the reserve bank issuing a note be identified and required to redeem the note. Carter Glass expressed agreement with this idea, but feels that the chances of effecting a change of this nature are slim. Robert D. Kent also expresses the opinion that the proposed system is unwise in that it throws the new banks into competition with the former organization, which Kent considered admirably suited to its task; Proposal by Senator Pointdexter, looking toward correcting discriminatorial action in the case of land holders; Letter, Carter Glass to Charles S. Caldwell, July 1, 1913, concerning required reserve percentages in response to a telegram asking that loans not be restricted; Paper by E. A. Paffraff, praising President Woodrow Wilson for his stand on banking legislation and making certain suggestions for reform; Carter Glass requested a clipping bureau on August 7, 1913, to send him only "favorable" newspaper articles about the Currency Bill; Arthur Reynolds requested and received copies of the Carter Glass Bill; Copy of a list of questions to be sent to businessmen by the Chicago bank, of which George M. Reynolds was president; Letter, Carter Glass to V. Sydney Rothschild, July 1, 1913, stating that originally no provision for an advisory group to the Federal Reserve Board was included, but that the way was left open for the Committee to institute such a board; Letter, June 30, 1913, from the Secretary of Commerce, concerning the outlawing of the payment of interest on deposits; Thinking of several bankers on four questions, relating to the proposed Currency Bill, for instance, government issue or bank issue; removal of reserves from their location at the moment; Letter, Carter Glass to O. M. W. Sprague, July 17, 1913, thanking him for his suggestions; Eight points, by which a satisfactory reform measure could be presented, listed by a Florida realtor; Statement of the president of a Trenton, New Jersey, bank, as to what he believed should go into a bill on banking reform; In answer to a letter, Carter Glass states, August 15, 1913, that he made a speech on the Currency Bill before the Democratic caucus, which was never published in any form; Carter Glass to J. H. Tregoe, August 12, 1913, that he expected the Currency Bill to survive the caucus meeting without any major change, which would be tantamount to acceptance by the House; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President, to Carter Glass, June 25, 1913, enclosing a memorandum from the American Bankers Association at the request of Senator Robert L. Owen; Editorial concerning a critique of the Currency Bill from the Indianapolis Star, July 24, 1913; Telegram, August 7, 1913, H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, stating that he would bring the draft of a report immediately; Letter, August 4, 1913, from Carter Glass to Andrew J. Frame, promising to give consideration to Frame's proposal concerning reserves, although he feared it was too late to make any changes at that point, because of the previous action on the question of the division of earnings. Carter Glass states that reserve requirements may yet be reduced; Letter, August 4, 1913, Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis, enclosing the latest draft of the Currency Bill and suggesting that H. Parker Willis wire any further ideas, in order to beat the holding of the Democratic caucus; Telegrams between Carter Glass and H. Parker Willis, regarding meeting to get a report ready for presentation; Letter, July 3, 1913, to Carter Glass from Festus J. Wade, stating that he returns a copy of the bill, having made only minor changes, but that he would like at a later date to discuss more important changes with Carter Glass; Letter from Carter Glass to John Skelton Williams, thanking him for a favor; Letter from H. Parker Willis, July 8, 1913, to William G. McAdoo, who referred the letter to Carter Glass. H. Parker Willis mentions seeing Fisk, a New York banker and having promised to write out a statement of his views for Fisk.

Speeches
Box: 38

A. Speech, 27 April 1933, by Carter Glass in opposition to abandonment of the gold standard; Reference to a bound volume, which has not been located, of 500 letters and telegrams commending his speech; Speech by Carter Glass on farm subsidy, June 14, 1929; Speech by Carter Glass at Jefferson Day Celebration, 13 April 1916, contrasting old and new systems of banking.

Reports concerning banking and politics
Box: 39

A. Twenty-three copies of the booklet, "A Tale of Two Heifers," explaining the case Carter Glass presents against state cattle inspectors, regarding unfair practices in the detection of disease.

B. Statistical study of banking by H. N. Stronk for the Comptroller of the Currency: Trend of development of national and state banking systems; Bank suspensions; Earnings position of banks; Movement of group banking.

C. Booklet containing speeches and letters presented on June 18, 1929, at a convention in Roanoke, Virginia, of those opposed to Alfred E. Smith as a candidate for President of the United States.

D. Copy of the Monthly Reportof the Bureau of War Risk Insurance for June, 1919.

E. Folder of letters mostly from bankers to John K. McKee of the Federal Reserve Board, thanking him for sending copies of the Carter Glass biography by Rixey Smith and Norman Beasley.

F. Lengthy report on the United Corporation, a group holding minority interest in numerous companies, mostly utilities, prepared for the Senate by W. B. Horne of the Economic Division of the Federal Trade Commission; J. P. Morgan and Company were major stockholders in the Corporation.

Speech on the Federal Reserve Act
Box: 40

A. Advance copies of the speech by Carter Glass in the House, reporting the Currency Bill out of Committee.

B. One advance print of the report of the House Banking and Currency Committee, sending the Currency Bill back to the floor without amendment.

C. Copies of a memorandum, concerning the Currency Bill introduced by Carter Glass.

Correspondence and papers, regarding banking 1914
Box: 41

A. List of banks for which the Federal Reserve System will clear; time schedules for completion of the clearing process.

B. Batch of telegrams of December 13-18, 1913, in response to a question by Carter Glass as to whether bankers preferred the Kitchcook plan for government management of reserve banks to the House provisions for banker management. Replies are varied, but the consensus of opinion seems to be that, if the banks own the stock, they should also be in control, and if they do not own the stock, government control is satisfactory. Original plan also backed.

C. List of members of the House of Representatives for the first session of the sixty-fifth Congress, including proposed committee assignments for minority members.

D. Explanation of political parties and politics, with particular reference to the 1912 campaign.

E. Pamphlets concerning war risks and insurance, particularly in regard to shipping.

F. Suggestion from an editorial in a Petersburg, Virginia, newspaper that Carter Glass leave the House for a position on the Federal Reserve Board, if President Wilson requested the move.

G. Letters of December 12, 1913, to Carter Glass from John V. Farwell stating that the Hitchcock Bill would not inspire confidence among businessmen.

H. Letter of December 13, 1913, from George M. Reynolds, backs the administration bill for banker control of the Federal Reserve banks against the Hitchcock Bill. Reynolds feel, among other things, that four reserve banks as a start would be best.

I. Memorandum from William W. Flannagan concerning discount operation; Copy of the Moss Bill, introduced on January 4, 1916, relating to farm credit, U. S. bonds, government depositaries, etc.

J. Brief statements covering a variety of subjects concerning the establishment of the Federal Reserve System, including suggestions for the location of the new banks, statistical data and newspaper articles.

K. Newspaper article reporting the parallel, drawn by House speaker Champ Clark, between Carter Glass and John Randolph.

Correspondence on banking and currency 1913 September-1914 February
Box: 42

A. Miscellaneous correspondence relating to bank reform: List of suggestions, concerning the proposed Currency Bill, presented by the National Association of Credit Men; Correspondence relating to the possibility of choosing Richmond, Virginia, as a cite for one of the Federal Reserve banks; Requests for copies of certain of the items published in connection with the work on the Currency Bill in the House; Letter of October 15, 1913, from James F. Burke, concerning committee appointments; Question of January 27, 1914, regarding the classification of banks within a district. Carter Glass answers that the classification of banks was designed to prevent large banks from controlling the system; Letters making plans for Charles A. Korbly to make a speech in the event that Carter Glass is unable to do so, on the subject of banking reform; Letters from Carter Glass, defending Representative Wilson, who is said to have worked hard in behalf of the administration proposals; Correspondence relating to rural credits; Copy of Wharton Barker's plan for currency reform, accompanying a letter from Barker, stating that he does not consider the House measure satisfactory; Statement by Carter Glass approving of a change in wording in the Currency Bill, suggested by Ludwig Bendix, concerning redemption in gold or lawful money of the notes issued; Letter of October 20, 1913, addressed to Robert L. Owen, with a copy sent to Carter Glass from George R. DeSaussure, upholding a regional system (a larger number of reserve banks than were proposed) with control by the Federal Reserve Board, as opposed to a central bank with a Board of Directors; Analysis of the Federal Reserve Act by William W. Flannagan; Telegram of October 22, 1913, asking that Carter Glass make a speech before the Economic Club of New York; Letter from E. D. Hulbert to Carter Glass on February 2, 1914; Letter touching upon the value of money and banker representation on the Federal Reserve Board, among other things; Letter of October 4, 1913, to Robert N. Harper from Carter Glass, praising William Jennings Bryan for his work on the Currency legislation; In answer to another request for a copy of his speech before the Democratic caucus, Carter Glass states that the speech was extemporaneous and expresses regret that he did not have it put down in writing, because of the fact that some people claimed his speech "settled the fate of the currency bill;" Letter on January 21, 1914, asking Carter Glass to procure recommendation from the Treasury Department for a bill insuring deposits in national banks; Letter from Carter Glass, stating that the Federal Reserve Act has no affect upon loans of savings banks chartered by states; Letter from Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, thanking him for an index and abstract of the Federal Reserve Act. McAdoo's note; In answer to a letter, concerning the organization of national banks, Carter Glass states in a hurriedly written letter that he feels the act "requires national banks to practically recharter;" Request from E. M. Patterson of the University of Pennsylvania for copies of the hearings held prior to the framing of the bill; Telegram, December 18, 1913, from George M. Reynolds stating that he had encouraged certain bankers to send message to Carter Glass favoring the administration bill over the Hitchcock bill; Carter Glass to Bradford Rhodes, January 30, 1914, praising the Federal Reserve System and expressing the opinion that the law assures prosperity; Telegram from John Harsen Rhoades on October 24, 1913, urging that the administration accept Frank Vanderlip's proposal for a central bank, despite the Democratic platform; In response to a letter from Jefferson D. Stephens, Carter Glass explains why no deposits guarantee or rural credit provisions were incorporated into the Currency Bill; Several additions to the Currency Bill of a legal nature, proposed by W. E. Stowe, October 14, 1913; Letter of September 7, 1913, from Dr. O. B. Mayes, making suggestions as to the election of directors for national banks; Notes of January, 1914, from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President, concerning a speaking invitation; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty on October 7, 1913, thanking Carter Glass for sending an editorial for President Woodrow Wilson; Note of October 30, 1913, from Joseph P. Tumulty, enclosing a letter from Howard Elting, which President Wilson wanted Carter Glass to see; Copy of a letter, written in October, 1913, by Lyon G. Tyler, deriding a statement made by Nelson W. Aldrich in reference to the Federal Reserve Act; Handwritten letter of December 25, 1913, to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis, urging Carter Glass to oppose certain men for positions on the Federal Reserve Board, who would force the system along central banking lines. H. Parker Willis suggests that men like Paul M. Warburg and Charles A. Conant be kept off the Board. He thinks it would be good, if Carter Glass would accept a position on the Board, as suggested by Secretary William G. McAdoo. H. Parker Willis felt that certain individuals had changed their minds since the passing of the act and that they would have to be dealt with carefully. Wall Street interests were still to be feared, said H. Parker Willis, who was also of the opinion that amendments to the law could be made as organizational work continued, if necessary; Letter, January 31, 1914, from Carter Glass to President Wilson, favoring an amendment suggested by E. D. Hulbert, if it were not expected to lead to a whole series of further amendments; Letter of January 5, 1914, from A. E. Walker, asking whether State banks, which do not become members of the Federal Reserve System, can receive accommodation from national banks; Lengthy discussion of the Currency Bill by Adam D. Warner on September 18, 1913, requesting that municipal securities be made acceptable collateral; Letter, September 23, 1913, from W. D. Wood, touching upon several subjects related to banking and currency reform; C. D. Hamner, secretary to Carter Glass, sent H. Parker Willis an advance copy of Carter Glass' reply to Senator Reed for criticism; Letter, October 24, 1913, requesting the retention of the segregation of savings deposits; Resolution prepared by the Board of Directors of the Richmond Chamber of Commerce, concerning currency legislation; Letter, October 22, 1913, asking that Carter Glass speak before the Economic Club of New York; In a letter to J. H. Johnson on October 28, 1913, Carter Glass states that, although everything is perfect in connection with the savings bank provisions of the Currency Bill, he feels that no change is necessary; Magazine cites Robert W. Babson and A. Piatt Andrew as considering the Owen-Glass bill to be inflationary and requests comment from Carter Glass; Three changes in the Owen-Glass bill are suggested by the Utica, New York, Association of Credit Men : redemption of notes only in gold, reduction of the number of Federal Reserve banks, and representation of the number of Federal Reserve banks on the Federal Reserve Board or an increase in the powers of the Advisory Board; Suggestions of other changes which might be made in the Currency Bill by several other Associations of Credit Men; Letters favoring an Owen-Carter bill exactly like that passed by the House; Letter from Howard W. Lewis, December 16, 1913, stating that favor or disapproval of the Hitchcock bill rests on the ownership of the stock of the regional reserve banks; Letter, November 3, 1913, from the secretary of the Economic Club of New York, stating that not everyone in the group favors the Vanderlip proposal for a central bank, so that his audience will not be hostile to the Currency Bill; In writing to J. F. Fulton, November 24, 1913, Carter Glass states that the favor of the business interests for the Currency Bill is appreciated, especially in view of the opposition of the bankers to the measure; Telegram from E. D. Hulbert, December 18, 1913, stating that bankers favor publicizing the results of bank examinations; Telegrams, December 12, 1913, Carter Glass to A. Barton Hepburn and George M. Reynolds, requesting a sample of banker opinion on the choice between government or bank management of the reserve banks; List of suggestions for the Senate Banking and Currency Committee, October 27, 1913, from the Indiana Bankers Association and individual banks at the instance of other associations; Letters from bankers between October and December, 1913, making certain suggestions or recommendations, for instance, supporting the segregation of deposits or taking a stand on the issue of notes by the government or by the banks; Letter, November 11, 1913, Victor Morawetz to Carter Glass, containing suggested amendments relating to the regional aspect of the new system, punishment for allowing reserves to fall below a certain minimum, and the extent to which the government should control the system; Letter, November 26, 1913, from Representative Howard Sutherland, asking whether some remedy can be found for the criticisms from country bankers that their primary source of earnings would be lost under the proposed banking laws; Telegram, November 13, 1913, Lou V. Stephens to Senator James A. Reed, stating that the bankers favor the passing of the administration currency bill, although they do not agree with everything in the bill; Letter from Carter Glass explaining the method by which the stock of reserve banks will be subscribed and comparing this way to that proposed by Senator Hitchcock; Letter, Carter Glass to J. H. Tregoe, December 16, 1913, stating that he had received many telegrams from bankers supporting the administration bill against the Hitchcock bill and would like to learn the sentiments of credit men also; Telegrams, Carter Glass to Sol Wexler and Harry A. Wheeler, asking for opinions on the question of control of the Regional Reserve Banks; Letter, December 4, 1913, from Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis, mentioning the ease with which Carter Glass had found he could defend the Currency Bill and stating that he wants H. Parker Willis to go over the Senate bill with himself and Korbly within the near future; Notebook containing the notes taken by Carter Glass at the meetings of the Banking and Currency Committee during July and August, 1913, including copies of proposed amendments, both those which passed and those which were defeated by the committee and listing the names of members present at each of the meetings.

Correspondence
Box: 43

A. Letter of Harvey A. Wheeler, 8 August 1913, containing valuable material relative to Carter Glass bill and attitude of banks to its requirements; Letter, Carter Glass to O. M. W. Sprague; Letter, Fiske to Carter Glass relative to Colonel House; Letter of Carter Glass to Senator Simmons regarding liberty bonds; Letter, Laughlin to Carter Glass regarding reserves of Reserve Banks; Letter of J. H. Tregoe, secretary- treasurer of the National Association of Credit Men, mentions an analysis of the Federal Reserve Act to be published in the Association magazine; Portion of the minutes of the Democratic house caucus relates to changes in the Act; Letter, Morawitz to Carter Glass; Letter, O. M. W. Sprague to Carter Glass, 10 June 1913; Letter from Reynolds regarding balances in other banks as reserves; Letter from Speyer and Company; Clipping from St. Louis Republic regarding Carter Glass' answer to Senator Reed; Editorial, Ocala, Florida, 23 December 1913; Report on action of the Conference Committee on the Federal Reserve bill; Letter, William A. Scott to Carter Glass regarding draft of bill for a central bank; Letter of George P. McLellan to Carter Glass regarding speech at Bremerton; Letter, W. A. Scott to Carter Glass on weaknesses in the banking system; Letter, Benjamin Strong to Carter Glass; Speech by Carter Glass "a Republican invention exposed," 7 September 1916, with annotations by Carter Glass; Letter, W. W. Hoxton to Carter Glass, 17 January 19127; Letter, H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, 14 December 1918, regarding treasury.

Correspondence on banking and currency
Box: 44

A. Telegram from George M. Reynolds on September 21, 1914, opposing the attempt to incorporate a provision against interlocking bank directorates in the Clayton bill, Carter Glass responds that he will oppose the move; Booklet prepared on April 2, 1914, containing the plan decided upon by the organizational committee for the division of the country into twelve districts and the location of the Federal Reserve banks; Letter from a Texas banker on August 27, 1914, complaining of the provision requiring a bank to hold a certain percentage of its capital stock and surplus in order to become a member of the Federal Reserve System; Letter from William L. Boss on September 20, 1914, expressing concern over the failure of the Federal Reserve Board to act favorably upon his proposals for organization; Telegrams to Representative R. L. Henry during September, 1914, concerning emergency currency issues for agricultural purposes; Telegram of August 19, 1914, requesting that state banks be admitted to membership in the National Currency Association. Carter Glass notes that such a proposal has already been made; Letters from Charles A. Conant during August, 1914, concerning reserves, note issue, and gold certificates, expressing the desire to protect the gold reserve. Carter Glass answers that questions of tax rates on notes are difficult to handle. Charles A. Conant does not want the use of gold certificates encouraged in lieu of notes by a high tax rate on note issue; Carter Glass answers a question raised by a banker, concerning the reasoning behind a limit on the loans which could be made by a bank, according to its capital and surplus; Copy of a speech by Senator Cummings, September 29, 1914, expressing dissatisfaction with the manner in which the popular interests have been ignored by the members of the Federal Reserve Board. Carter Glass finds no specific criticism to which he could reply; Letter from W. B. Doak, September 9, 1921, complaining that the American farmer is still at a competitive disadvantage with foreign interests, despite the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from Carter Glass, September 25, 1914, to Fredrick E. Farnsworth, tentatively accepting a speaking engagement and stating that he feels that great care must be exercised to prevent the alteration of the Federal Reserve Act in an unfavorable manner; Note from Charles S. Hamlin of the Federal Reserve Board, August 29, 1914, enclosing several proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, and including a paper questioning the wisdom of opening the new banks immediately; Letter from William W. Flannagan, August 15, 1914, expressing the opinion that it would be a mistake to permit Federal Reserve notes to count as a part of the legal Reserve; Letter Carter Glass to Congressman Scott Ferris, July 8, 1914, regarding the holding of postal deposits by non-member state banks and relating to the Mondell bill; Amendment to the section of the Federal Reserve Act, setting forth the requirements for trust operations by national banks, suggested on August 31, 1914, by George C. Gregory; Reply, May 19, 1914, by Carter Glass to a letter from M. Brayton Graff, refusing a request to consider a bill not officially introduced in the House, unless Henry would agree to allow the Banking and Currency Committee to consider three bills favorably and report them to the House floor; Telegram, September 21, 1914, from E. D. Hulbert requesting assurance that Carter Glass opposes the prohibition against interlocking bank directorates. Carter Glass responds affirmatively; Letter to A. Barton Hepburn, September 14, 1914, explaining the attitudes of several groups toward the inclusion of Federal Reserve notes among reserves and promising that his committee would defeat any such proposal; Carter Glass to E. D. Hulbert, September 9, 1914, expressing full agreement with E. D. Hulbert on the question of reserves; Telegram, Carter Glass to A. Barton Hepburn, asking the position of the bankers on the question of counting Federal Reserve notes as reserve, answer by A. Barton Hepburn that most bankers in New York so desire. Subsequent letter from Carter Glass stating his view of the problem in terms of "dilution of bank reserves and resultant inflation." Glass does not support the thinking of Paul M. Warburg on the subject, although he thus comes into conflict with the Federal Reserve Board; Telegram, August 13, 1914, from A. Barton Hepburn, giving an analysis of the problem allowing bank notes to be used as reserves by national banks, a practice which Hepburn opposes; Answering telegram from Carter Glass expressing agreement with A. Barton Hepburn; Telegram from E. D. Hulbert, August 5, 1914, requesting that a proposed amendment to section 19 of the Federal Reserve Act be given consideration as soon as possible; In response to a question concerning the possibility of farmers borrowing money at a lower rate of interest, Carter Glass states that legislation along this line is pending, but that he doubts the value of the proposals; Copy of a plan for the establishment of a national Land Mortgage Bank, sent to Carter Glass on May 7, 1914, by John V. Hogan; Letter, April 16, 1914, Carter Glass stating that he has been experiencing difficulty keeping up with his correspondence, because of the necessity for explaining the provisions of the Federal Reserve Act to the business men of the country; Letter, March 24, 1914, from E. D. Hulbert, asking about the status of an amendment, upon the preparation of which he and Carter Glass had agreed; Letter from Richard W. Knott, editor of the Evening Postin Louisville, Kentucky, September 30, 1914, relating to the problem of changing the location of bank reserves, stating that the vaults of the individual bank are the proper place for reserves to be held, oppossing Paul M. Warburg's opinion that the Federal Reserve bank of the district should have control over the reserve fund, and mentioning Stanley Matthews, John Sherman, and Schiff; Answer from Carter Glass agreeing in part with Knott, but considers the proposed changes as less serious than does Knott; Several other letters from Richard W. Knott deal with this subject; In answer to a question as to how much capital stock a state bank must have before qualifying for membership in the Federal Reserve System, Carter Glass states that the requirements are the same as for national banks; Amendment suggested by Representative A. W. Lafferty, with the aim of making membership requirements somewhat less severe for state banks; Letter, Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, secretary of the Treasury, October 6, 1914, discussing the plan by which Representative Henry would have the Federal Reserve System extend loans to cotton producers; Letter opposing the issue of emergency currency by state banks; Letter, Carter Glass to Richard W. Knott, September 25, 1914, concerning the advisability of amending the Federal Reserve Act to enable member banks to deposit any part of their reserve fund at the reserve banks. Carter Glass felt that, in view of the war in Europe, such action would be acceptable; Letter, August 22, 1914, from William G. McAdoo, suggesting that a higher percent of commercial paper be permitted to be held as security for circulating notes, with a corresponding lowering of the requirements for bonds or other securities. Easier financing of farm crops was expected to be the result; Letter, Carter Glass to G. W. Musser on July 9, 1914, praising H. H. Seldomridge, a member of the Banking and Currency Committee; Amendments suggested on May 14, 1914, by Herbert Myrick to the Federal Farm Finance Act. Carter Glass responds; Note from William G. McAdoo, April 24, 1914, accompanying a memorandum on the proposed Farm Loan Associations; Several other notes from W. G. McAdoo, written during April, 1914; Letter from William G. McAdoo, March 16,1914, enclosing two proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, dealing with the discounting of acceptances growing out of foreign trade and the amount of reserves held by national banks and state banks; Letter from the American Bankers Association, September 28, 1914, concerning interlocking directorates, the continuance of which the bankers favored; Letter from Representative Edmund Platt on September 23, 1914, expressing regret at being unable to attend a meeting of the Banking and Currency Committee; Letter, July 9, 1914, to D. C. Pryor, regarding the disapproval of President Wilson for the Bulkley rural credits bill and answering inquiries concerning Congressmen Thompson and Weaver. Pryor's letter posed three questions; Statement, prepared by E. A. Paffrath on May 22, 1914, containing several points relating to loans to farmers; Copy of a letter from E. F. Rines to Senator Robert L. Owen on August 28, 1914, suggesting an amendment to the section of the Aldrich-Vreeland Act dealing with security for circulation notes; Letter from Channning Rudd, June 11, 1914, quoting O. M. W. Sprague as saying that legislation, relating to the unification of circulating currency, is pending, is answered negatively by Carter Glass; Letter of June 10, 1914, from A. F. Robson, asking that banks be permitted to continue holding postal savings funds; Letter from Channing Rudd on June 13, 1914, asking what the intent of the Federal Reserve Act was with respect to the retirement of national bank notes. Carter Glass answers that banks can increase their notes in circulation as long as they can find government 2's to secure the notes; Petition, June 16, 1914, favoring the proposed rural credit law transmitted to Carter Glass by Representative Stout; Correspondence, largely with George J. Seay and Oliver J. Sands, relating to the acceptance of Richmond, Virginia, as the cite for a Federal Reserve Bank; Letter from C. W. York, June 17, 1914, announcing a plan for a National Land Bank and Insurance Company; J. H. Tregoe of the National Association of Credit Men on September 18, 1914, requested the opinion of Carter Glass on certain amendments to the Federal Reserve Act; Other correspondence with Tregoe; Letter from Representative Oscar W. Underwood on September 23, 1914, in behalf of a bank which was said to have too little surplus, along with a copy of the letter cited by Underwood; Letter from S. W. Welch, to Oscar W. Underwood, concerning loans on cotton crops; Memorandum prepared on August 13, 1954, for the Secretary of the Treasury, by >M. C. Elliot, concerning what might be acceptable as security for circulating notes under the provisions of the Aldrich-Vreeland Act; Telegram from Representative Oscar W. Underwood, August 19, 1914, concerning membership for state banks and the more liberal use of commercial paper as backing for emergency currency; Carter Glass to Joseph P. Tumulty, May 14, 1914, discussing the attitudes of the President, Bulkley, and a three-member committee; Paper containing the recommendation of the National Association of Credit Men, concerning rediscounting; Telegrams, April 9, 1914, from John Skelton Williams as comptroller of the Currency; Telegram, July 29, 1914, from Paul M. Warburg; Letter to H. Parker Willis from Carter Glass, July 9, 1914, requesting further information on activities of the Monetary Commission; Letter, Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis, July 9, 1914, stating in confidence that William G. McAdoo is considering H. Parker Willis for the position of secretary to the Federal Reserve Board. H. Parker Willis is assured of a good job somewhere in the system, possibly at New York; Letter, June 20, 1914 , to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis asking that Carter Glass give certain information to H. Parker Willis, on the basis of which he can take action; Notes from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, in May and June, 1914; Statement by John Skelton Williams, May 29, 1914, stating that the office of the comptroller of the Currency has not discriminated against Baltimore, Maryland, in the matter of locating a reserve bank; Question concerning the liability of stockholders of state banks, which became members of the Federal Reserve System.

Correspondence and Photographss of Woodrow Wilson and William G. McAdoo 1913
Box: 45

A. Woodrow Wilson to Carter Glass, expressing appreciation for his work on the Federal Reserve Act.

B. Letter from William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass, giving Glass credit for the pushing through of the Federal Reserve Act.

Correspondence
Box: 46A

A. Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding collaboration by H. Parker Willis; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding the shares of a Federal Reserve to be held by a bank that is no longer a member bank; Letter, Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding the address to the Reserve City Bankers Association; Letter, Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding earnings of Federal Reserve Banks; Letter from Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding interest on savings accounts; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding the making of National Banks receivers in the case of bankruptcy of other banks; Carter Glass to Tom McAdams regarding earnings and dividends of Reserve Banks; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding earnings and dividends of Reserve Banks, January, 1929; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding state legislation antagonistic to National Banks; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding the authorization of state banks and trust companies to act as depositories for Federal Reserve banks; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding the weak position of National Banks; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding the taxation of Banks; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass and vice versa on the McFadden Act; Carter Glass to Tom McAdams regarding the position of Federal Reserve agent; Carter Glass to Tom McAdams regarding attitude of President Warren G. Harding toward Federal Reserve System; Carter Glass to Tom McAdams regarding the appointment of chairman of the Board; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding members of the Board of Governors, 1 January 1923; Letter from Preshaker to Senator Lenroot regarding appointments to the Board of Governors; Tom McAdams to Governor W. P. G. Harding regarding par collection, etc.; Letter from Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding the three basic complaints against reserve banks; Carter Glass to Tom McAdams, reference to Senator Reed's campaign and the injection of the Federal Reserve System into the election campaign; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding plans to resist the tax on Federal Reserve System; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass regarding perpetual charters for National Banks; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass, 20 December 1921, regarding reappointment of Harding; McAdams to Carter Glass, 7 December 1920, regarding discount rate charged by Atlanta; Tom McAdams to Carter Glass, 9 August 1920, regarding regulation of interest rates charged by banks.

Correspondence
Box: 46B

A. Eugene Meyer to Carter Glass, 7 May 1932, regarding changes in Glass bill; Samuel Untermeyer to Carter Glass, 31 May 1932, regarding affiliates of banks; Letter from Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 18 March 1938, regarding funds for H. Parker Willis memorial; Letter from Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 25 January 1938, regarding the holding companies; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 4 February 1937, regarding administration policy on gold and the Federal Reserve; Memorandum by Edmund Platt on the conflict of laws regarding holding companies; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding new members on the Board of Governors, 29 January 1936; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding the article in the Herald Tribune, 26 December 1935; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 2 January 1936; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 3 February 1935, regarding open market; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding H. Parker Willis and others, 26 July 1934; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 16 April 1935, regarding gold standard, etc.; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass relative to Herald Tribunearticle, 16 April 1935, relative to gold standard; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass relative to Echols, 22 March 1935; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass relative to interest on time deposits, 3 January 1935; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 7 June 1934, relative to clipping on the Warren study of closed banks; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding industrial loans by Reserve banks, 4 May 1934; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding Platt letter in Herald Tribune, 30 April 1934, on creating credit; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding industrial loans, 30 March 1934; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding confiscation of gold, 18 January 1934; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding terms of board members; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding branch banking; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding branch banking, 3 January 1933; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 4 November 1932, regarding branch banking; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 13 July 1932, regarding branch banking; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 18 February 1933, regarding branch banking; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 24 January 1933, regarding branch banking; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding trust companies, February, 1933; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, Journal of Commerce, 23 January 1933; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 26 May 1932; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 9 April 1932; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 20 February 1932, regarding emergency banking act.

Correspondence
Box: 46C

A. Letter of Samuel Untermeyer to Carter Glass regarding bank affiliates under the Glass bill; Letter to Eugene Myer regarding changes in Carter Glass bill; Letter from Edmund Platt to Carter Glass regarding memorial for H. Parker Willis, 18 March 1938, also regarding holding companies; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 8 October 1938; Platt to Glass, 25 January 1938; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 4 February 1937; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 21 December 1936, regarding branch banking; Manuscript by Edmund Platt on holding companies and the Glass bill; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 17 April 1938, regarding branch banking; Platt to Glass, 29 January 1936, regarding new members of the board; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 2 January 1936, on several matters; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 3 July 1935, regarding the open market; Platt to Glass, 22 March 1935, approval of Echols; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 16 April 1935, regarding the Act of 1935; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 17 February 1935, on same subject; Platt to Glass, 8 January 1935, regarding interest on savings deposits; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 9 June 1934, regarding Warren's study of liquidity of banks; Platt to Glass, 19 March 1934, regarding credit; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 13 January 1934, on abandonment of gold; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 18 January 1934; Platt to Glass, 20 September 1930, regarding terms of members of the board; 14 March 1933, final form of Glass bill; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 3 January 1933, regarding branch banking; Platt to Glass, 4 November 1932, regarding branch banking; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 13 July 1932, regarding the University of Virginia and Institute of Public Affairs; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 18 February 1933, regarding branch banking and the Carter Glass bill; Platt to Glass, 14 May 1932, regarding series in Commercial and Financial Chronicle, 4 November 1921; Edmund Platt to Carter Glass, 9 April 1932, regarding branch banking.

Correspondence
Box: 46D

A.Comments by Samuel Untermeyer on the Currency Bill; Speech by Carter Glass, September 1920, on currency reform and the Federal Reserve act; Letter from President Woodrow Wilson regarding personnel of the Committee on banking and currency; William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass, Paul M. Warburg to William G. McAdoo, 2 August 1916; Letter of Coolidge to Carter Glass, 30 July 1935; Letter of T. J. Coolidge to Carter Glass regarding direct loans to the treasury; Letter of Joseph Kennedy regarding "job" as Federal Reserve agent, February 1936.

Correspondence
Box: 46E

A. Letter to Carter Glass from John Randolph Bolling relative to "story" by Carter Glass, 31 July 1926; Ray Stannard Baker to Carter Glass, 28 July 1926, regarding manuscript sent to Baker by Carter Glass and Baker's comments; Edwin R. Seligman to Carter Glass regarding Paul M. Warburg; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, 31 August 1926, regarding Glass articles; Letter from Oliver J. Sands to Carter Glass regarding eligible paper, 18 May 1932; Letter from Oliver J. Sands to Carter Glass, 12 February 1932, regarding accounts payable by banks; Letter to Carter Glass from Phillips urging appointment of Oliver J. Sands to the Federal Reserve; Oliver J. Sands to Carter Glass regarding foreign bonds in the assets of banks, 15 December 1931; Oliver J. Sands to Carter Glass, 13 February 1932, regarding reserve bank loans to commercial banks; Atlee Bomersee to Carter Glass, 29 February 1932, regarding Federal Reserve credit and available eligible paper; Letter of Carter Glass to Burleson regarding appointment to Paul M. Warburg to Board of Governors, 16 April 1914; Letter of Daiger to Rixey Smith regarding Samuel Untermeyer; Editorial in Lynchburg Advance, regarding interference with foreign credits by Federal Reserve System; Memo regarding Cuban bonds and a Committee relative thereto; Letter, 20 August 1934, H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass regarding Paul M. Warburg and Federal Reserve act, and work to be done by Bogen and Beckhart for Carter Glass; Robert Sterling Clark to Grayson; Review of Carter Glass' book by Warren G. Harding; A. D. Smith's four articles in New York Timeson the founders of the Federal Reserve System; W. P. G. Harding review of Carter Glass' History of the Federal Reserve in New York Evening Post, 19 March 1929.

Miscellaneous Papers and Correspondenc 1898-1918 (1909-1913)
Box: 47

A. Lists of thousands of names of people from various counties in Virginia, presumably names of eligible voters or registered democrats in a certain district of the state.

B. Item dealing with banking legislation, including drafts of proposed laws and a list of questions for witnesses appearing before the Committee on Banking and Currency as well as other such material.

C. Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1898-1918: Letter from M. L. Muhleman of New York enclosing unpublished tables which show the "unequal distribution of banking facilities;" Copy of an outline and list of standard questions for witnesses testifying before the Banking and Currency Committee in the 1912-1913 session. Questions attempt to get the witnesses' idea on current and proposed legislation; Booklet entitled "Guarantee on Insurance of Bank Deposits," by Walter F. McCalab; Correspondence indicating a controversy between Carter Glass and the Treasury Department over proposed improvement to a post office building in Lynchburg, Virginia, ca. 1908-1911; Correspondence, 1909, from Richard B. Davis, Petersburg, lawyer evidently answering an inquiry as to the salary Bishop James Cannon got as President of the Blackstone Institute; Ca. 10 talks evidently made by Carter Glass before various religious and church groups; Letters between Carter Glass and various labor leaders in which Carter Glass emphasizes the fact that he has never voted against a bill to help organized labor, 1912 and 1902; An undated, unsigned document in handwriting (possibly that of Carter Glass ) entitled, "An Act to Create a Bank to be Known as -'The Bank of the United States of America. '" A possible date for this document might be obtained by its reference to 7,163 national banks in the United States; Ca. 10 letters regarding certain Federal public buildings to be constructed at Norton and Westpoint, Virginia, 1903; Petition from Radford, Virginia citizens asking passage of a bill to improve New River waterpower; Correspondence from a Frank A. Brest of Lancaster, Virginia, 1909, showing an attempt to expose corruption in the Virginia State Board of Education; Twelve folders in which are found provisions of a proposed law entitles, "An Act to Introduce into the banking and currency system of the United States elasticity of credit and circulation through the establishment of a Treasury Board and District Associations"; Lists of peoples' names, evidently the eligible voters or registered democrats in various district or counties of Virginia.

Correspondence 1916 Septembe-November
Box: 48

A. Miscellaneous correspondence: Letter from Andrew J. Frame, November 20, 1916, concerning rediscounts and reserve requirements; Copy of the Constitution of the United States; Copy of the Journal of the American Bankers Association, October, 1916, including an article on a speech by Paul M. Warburg on the Federal Reserve System; Pamphlet, "Two Years of War," by Sir Gilbert Parker; Pamphlet, "To Belgium; " Letter from William W. Flannagan of the Federal Farm Loan Bureau; Letter from F. H. Stoltze, asking several questions concerning exchange charges; Copy of, "The Farmers' Open Forum" for September, 1916; Letter to Carter Glass from the Charlottesville, Virginia, Chamber of Commerce, October 4, 1916, containing a resolution pertaining to the purchase of Monticello, Thomas Jefferson's home, by the Federal Government; Booklet, "Preparedness Plus, Military and Naval Preparedness Plus Self-Defense by Pan America and a World-Wide League to Prevent Aggression;" Article, September 25, 1916, from the New York City Times, reporting a reply prepared by Carter Glass to critics of the Federal Reserve Act, discussing Republicans, the Aldrich bill, the cost of the system, and the payment of dividends; Copy of a pamphlet, "What Public Man Say About the League to Enforce Peace," including statement by Woodrow Wilson, Elihu Root, Samuel Gompers, and John Bates Clark, among others; Correspondence relating to the Federal Farm Loan Act; Copy of a letter from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, to William G. McAdoo, September 14, 1916, giving figures to prove that, since the establishment of the Federal Reserve System, bank failures decreased, rather than increased, as was claimed by Congressman Sloan; Letter from A. W. Dobie at the University of Virginia, regarding plans for a speech on October 3, 1916, when Carter Glass was to speak about the Federal Reserve Act; List of twenty-five points by Charles N. Fowler in criticism of the Federal Reserve System, published on September 16, 1916. Charles N. Fowler challenges either William G. McAdoo, Charles S. Hamlin, or Carter Glass to a public debate on these points.

Correspondence on banking and currency 1916 January-May

A. Miscellaneous correspondence: Correspondence with Carter Glass, concerning his bill relating to branch banking; Correspondence relating to rural credit legislation; Letter to Carter Glass from J. T. Bowman, opposing that portion of a bill, sponsored by Carter Glass, which would place a fine on loans made at greater that a certain rate of interest, and stating that loans for small amounts would become almost non- existent; Note, April 12, 1916, from John Skelton Williams, concerning the condition of national banks; Letters to Carter Glass, concerning interlocking directorates; Copy of a Commercial and Financial Chroniclearticle, opposing proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, particularly provisions relating to the issue of Federal Reserve notes. The article was sent to Carter Glass on March 29, 1916, by the editor; Letter, February 18, 1916, from Frederick A. Delano of the Federal Reserve Board, suggesting a revision and recodification of the National Bank Act; Letter, January 22, 1916, Carter Glass to Representative C. C. Dickinson, defending the delegation of Federal Reserve banks as fiscal agents for the government and the adoption of restrictive legislation against those who charge excessive rates of interest for loans. Dickinson's letter is included; Letter from Carter Glass, February 29, 1916, to W. H. Freed, stating his position in opposition to the use of long-term real estate security as collateral for bank loans. Letter from Freed, favoring the change; Letter Carter Glass to John T. Garrett, May 16, 1916, concerning the granting of legal tender qualities to gold certificates; Copy of a bill, introduced by Warren Gard and sent to Carter Glass by Representative Gard, slightly altering the laws relating to monopolies; Article concerning the Postal Saving Bank; Suggestion from George S. Gardiner, as to paper eligible for rediscount; Telegrams relating to the Land Mortgage Bank bill; Letter, May 8, 1913, from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding, concerning a plan of the Federal Reserve Board on check clearance; Telegram from Representative R. L. Henry, requesting a copy of the rural credits bill; Other correspondence between Henry and Carter Glass; Letter R. R. Revill to Representative A. B. Rouse, February 16, 1916, opposing permitting the establishment of branch banks in certain cities, because of the disadvantage to state banks. Carter Glass wrote to Charles S. Hamlin; Letter Carter Glass to Representative Houston, February 5, 1916, stating that the Federal Reserve System should not be an emergency organization and that the number of Federal Reserve banks should not be decreased; Note from Walker Hill, February 1, 1916, suggesting an amendment to the Clayton Act, relating to interlocking directorates; Letter, April 22, 1916, to Carter Glass from Representative C. A. Lindberg, accompanying a minority report on the rural credit bill; Correspondence concerning credit unions and the Land Mortgage bill; Letter, March 8, 1916, to Representative William Kent, opposing the granting of the privilege of member banks to obtain loans directly at Federal Reserve banks. William Kent forwarded a resolution he had received to this effect; Note from the Secretary of the Interior, February 4, 1916, requesting consideration for farmers, working on reclamation projects, under the pending rural credits bill; Reprint of a May 13, 1915, article from the Passaic Daily Herald, giving Robert D. Kent credit for the content of the Aldrich-Vreeland bill; Copy of a paper by Robert D. Kent, president of the Merchants Bank of Passaic, New Jersey, setting forth "A Plan of a Cooperative System of Rural Credits;" Literature and correspondence, regarding rural credits and the Federal Farm Loan Act; Letter, March 7, 1916, to Carter Glass from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, enclosing a memorandum from H. Parker Willis, Secretary of the Federal Reserve Board, by Paul M. Warburg, concerning extension of American banking facilities in foreign countries; Suggestion that the limitation of loans by banks to any individual borrower to a certain percentage of its capital be changed to a lower percentage of capital and surplus, in view of the large surplus funds accumulated by many banks; Note, March 7, 1916, from the Director of the Mint, enclosing a copy of a bill and a letter from William G. McAdoo, regarding the holding of more gold bullion, in preference to gold coin, as reserve against gold certificates; Letter, Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, enclosing the latest draft of the Rural Credits bill from the conference committee; Letter from Representative D. T. Morgan, making plans to introduce a land credit bill; Letter, May 1, 1916, from the president of a Norfolk, Virginia, bank, concerning the guarantee of bank deposits under state laws; Carter Glass to Robert L. Owen, May 4, 1916, concerning two bills, recommended by the Secretary of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board and passed by the House, which Carter Glass felt should be acceptable to the Senate; Letter, Carter Glass to Jacob Siebert, Jr., March 30, 1916, concerning amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, with particular reference to the question of Federal Reserve notes as reserves; Letters regarding investments by national banks in the stock of banks engaging in foreign trade; Letter, Carter Glass to Thomas Conway, University of Pennsylvania, stating inability to supply a requested document; Correspondence by telegram between Carter Glass and several committee members, concerning consideration of the Rural Credits bill; Letters relating to bank clearance and the desirability of membership in the Federal Reserve System; Letter to Representative Jewett Shouse from Carter Glass on February 5, 1916, concerning the position of Paul M. Warburg on acceptance. Clipping enclosed; Letters from J. H. Tregoe of the National Association of Credit Men, and others, concerning the possible repeal of the National Bankruptcy Law; Further correspondence on rural credits; Suggested amendment to the Federal Reserve Act from Andrew J. Frame, relating to state banks becoming members of the Federal Reserve System; Note, March 12, 1916, from Festus J. Wade; List of important points about banking practice and policy, which Festus J. Wade wanted Charles S. Hamlin, of the Federal Reserve Board to keep in mind; Note from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, to Carter Glass, proposing that no banks, other that Federal Reserve Banks, be permitted to have the word "Federal" as part of their titles; Requests for certain documents from H. Parker Willis for the Federal Reserve Board; Copy of a brief talk by Carter Glass, showing the effect on the banking system of loans to farmers in relation to commercial loans; Batch of telegrams, relating largely to amendments to the Clayton Act, particularly in regard to interlocking directorates.

Correspondence
Box: 50A

A. Typed copy of article in the Chicago Tribune, 4 June 1915, regarding influence of James B. Forgan and George M. Reynolds on the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago; Anonymous; Letter of John Skelton Williams regarding emergency currency, 20 December 1914; 8 September 1914, letter to President Wilson by Paul M. Warburg, ideas regarding reserve of banks, fictitious reserves; Federal Reserve notes as legal reserves of member banks; Carter Glass to B. C. Forbes, 5 December 1914, regarding acceptance powers for banks in general; Letter of D. W. Adams to Carter Glass, 6 December 1914, regarding credit extended by Federal Reserve banks; B. C. Forbes to Carter Glass regarding commercial paper, 1 December 1914; Rural credits bill, beginning of agitation for a system of rural credit; John S. Brittan to Carter Glass regarding collection charges on checks, 5/5/15; George Bayley to Carter Glass regarding farm credits for dairying, 25 January 1915; C. H. Bosworth to Carter Glass regarding par collection, 30 June 1915; Carter Glass to Grinels, 7 January 18, regarding function of Reserve Banks; A. W. Green to Carter Glass regarding Ogden Armour and the Continental and Commercial National Bank, 6 January 1915; Letter to Carter Glass from Chicago regarding Forgan and the Reserve banks; Carter Glass to Hulbert, 27 December 1915, regarding Federal Reserve notes as bank reserves; Letters in this box regarding the Federal Farm Loan System.

Correspondence
Box: 50B

A. J. S. Jones to Carter Glass, November, 1915, a good letter regarding state guarantee of bank deposits and the need for Federal law; Jackson Johnson of St. Louis, May 1, 1916, regarding exchange charges on the customer check; S. R. Heller to Carter Glass regarding the loan value of warehouse certificates; Letter, Carter Glass to Henry P. Jay, January, 1915, a reprimand; Henry B. Jay to Frederick A. Delano, 7 January, 1915, regarding alleged interview of Carter Glass and others in Chicago Tribune; William Ingle, 6 January 1915, to Carter Glass regarding rural credit legislation; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, 23 December 1914, regarding Federal Reserve notes as legal tender; Henry B. Jay regarding James B. Forgan and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, Forgan's election was illegal according to Jay and board members; A. Barton Hepburn to Carter Glass, 15 September 1914; L. E. Lyford articles in New York Times, 2 January 1916, regarding the slowness of state banks to join the Federal Reserve System; Carter Glass to L. E. Lyford regarding membership of state banks in the system; L. E. Lyford to Carter Glass, 1 January 1916, regarding Federal Reserve act and state banks; Carter Glass to L. E. Lyford, 23 December 1915, regarding excessive reports; L. E. Lyford to Carter Glass, 14 December 1915, regarding modification of the Federal Reserve act in certain respects if the system is to succeed; South Carolina banks petition a rural credit system; James G. McConkey, economist, St. Louis Reserve Bank, regarding par collections; John Marshall, 11 February 1915, regarding cheaper credit for farmers; Use of trade acceptances to be authorized, 21 December 1915; Letter from Benjamin Strong to Carter Glass, 30 September 1915, regarding regional meeting of officers of Reserve banks to iron out operating problems.

Correspondence
Box: 50C

A. Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass, 22 June 1915; H. Parker Willis to Carter Glass, 28 June 1915; W. W. Wheeler to Carter Glass and a response of Carter Glass regarding the exchange charges on collection of checks, 16 May 1915; W. W. Wheeler to Carter Glass, 14 June 1915; Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass, 8 October 1914, regarding St. Louis, Kansas City, Richmond and Atlanta Reserve Banks.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County 1912-1913
Box: 51

>A. Matters covered in the correspondence are chiefly local and personal affairs or are requests for seeds and bulletins.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Bedford County
Box: 52

A. For the most part the material is taken up with controversies over the appointment of local postmasters and changing of rural routes.

Correspondence regarding appointments and requests for advice and assistance
Box: 53

A. Ca. 500 letters from constituents asking Carter Glass' support in obtaining patronage positions, support for various legislation in which they are interested, and requests for government publications.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Montgomery
Box: 54

A. Including disccussion of postmasterships, requests for seeds and farm bulletins.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County 1913
Box: 55

A. 6th Congressional District.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Floyd County 1913-1915
Box: 56

A. The correspondence deals either with personal affairs of problems of a local nature. Most of the material deals with discussion and controversy over appointment of postmasters or changing of rural routes. There are also many requests for seeds, government bulletins, etc.

Correspondence from constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County 1913
Box: 57

A. The matters discussed are mostly either of a personal nature or dealing with local problems. Such things as filling local postmasterships, changing rural routes, requests for government bulletins, seeds and jobs are taken up. Also correspondence with the business manager of the Lynchburg News regarding the erection of a new building.

Correspondence from constituents in Bedford County 1913
Box: 58

>A. The correspondence deals almost entirely with appointments to government jobs, especially postmasterships. Other problems of a local and personal nature are taken up.

Correspondence from constituents in Roanoke City and County 1913-1914
Box: 59

A. The material deals mostly with local and personal problems, especially with requests for seeds and literature and controversies over postmasterships.

Correspondence from constituents in Montgomery County 1913-1914
Box: 60

A. The material deals mostly with postmasterships and rural routes, requests for government bulletins, seeds, jobs, pensions, etc. or take up some other matter of a local or personal nature.

Correspondence from constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County
Box: 61

A. For the most part the subjects dealt with are either personal or of a local nature. Letters from Carter Glass' sons, the business manager of his paper, and others concerning the affairs of the newspaper are included; Requests for government publications, jobs, seeds, etc. are also included, 1913.

Correspondence from constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County
Box: 62

A. In which they seek government jobs, literature, etc. or take up the matters of a personal or local nature; Letters from Carter Glass' sons and his newspaper business manager are also included.

Correspondence
Box: 63A

A. J. W. Alexander, 13 June 1916, regarding branch banking in North Carolina; Letters from various persons regarding branch banking; First National Bank of Brooklyn to Carter Glass regarding amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, 19 July 1916; Continental Insurance Company objections to bank's writing of fire insurance, 20 July 1916; Commercial National Bank of Beeville, Texas, on par collections; Carter Glass to Bayley regarding McFadden Act -not likely to pass since it strikes at a fundamental provision of the Federal Reserve Act, 28 June 1916; Monmouth Company Bankers Association, New Jersey, against branch banking, 13 June 1916; Old Town National Bank of Baltimore regarding bankers, 19 June 1916; Westport Avenue Bank of Borland regarding branch banking; First National Bank of Bedford, 7 June 16, to Carter Glass regarding location of reserve balances; First National Bank of Bound Brook, New Jersey, to Carter Glass regarding location of reserve balances; Carter Glass to Seibert of C. and F. C. regarding difference with Paul M. Warburg, 2 August 1916; John Cudahy to Carter Glass regarding rural credits, 20 July 1916; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass for amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, 18 July 1916; William T. Creasy to Carter Glass urging employment of C. B. Kegly to the Board of the Federal Farm Loan System; Fifth and third National Bank of Cincinnati; Carter Glass to Allen Cucullu regarding McFadden Bill, 27 June 1916; Camden Deposit and Trust Company to Carter Glass regarding branch banking; Allen Cucullu on McFadden Bill; Hinsch, Fifth and Third National Bank of Cincinnati, relative to balance due from other banks as reserve; West Englewood Ashland State Bank of Chicago regarding branch banking; Letters of many Chicago banks to Carter Glass regarding McFadden Bill; J. R. Noel to Carter Glass regarding branch banking, 17 April 1916. A good statement of Chicago conditions; Cook County bankers to Carter Glass regarding branch banking; Frederick A. Delano to Carter Glass regarding the counting of Federal Reserve notes as reserve of member banks; A. L. Mills to Carter Glass regarding Federal Reserve notes as part of required reserves; West side State Bank of Denver to Carter Glass regarding branches; Frederick A. Delano to Carter Glass regarding amendment of the Federal Reserve Act; Carter Glass to Elston, 26 June 1916, regarding concentration of reserves of national Banks in Federal Reserve banks; Elston to Carter Glass regarding branches for National banks; Old National Bank of Grand Rapids, 23 May 1916, and other banks to Carter Glass regarding permission to keep part of their reserves with correspondent banks; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass regarding par clearance, 3 August 1916; Hulbert letter to Frederick A. Delano on Federal Reserve notes as reserves of banks; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass regarding amendment to Federal Reserve act, 29 June 1916; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, 29 June 1916, regarding Federal Reserve notes as reserves; Carter Glass to Charles S. Hamlin, 8 July 1916, regarding Robert L. Owen and amendments desired by the board; A. Barton Hepburn to Carter Glass regarding directors of the New York Reserve Bank who live in New Jersey; William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass regarding par clearance. 14 July 1916; Carter Glass to Miller regarding tax on Federal Reserve notes; Carter Glass to Royal J. Miller, and Miller to Carter Glass, regarding interest on Federal Reserve notes, 23 May 1916; North Carolina Bankers Association resolution regarding par clearance; Carter Glass to Senator Smoot regarding amendments to Federal Reserve Act; Michigan State Library to Carter Glass about materials; Irving Sherman to Carter Glass regarding branches abroad; Oliver J. Sands and memo of George Bryan on taxation of bank shares; Carter Glass to Oliver J. Sands regarding McFadden Bill, 30 May 1916; George Bryan to Oliver J. Sands on taxation of bank shares; Carter Glass to Smoot regarding amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, 25 July 1916; Verdery, M. J. regarding Carter Glass' speech on McLemore resolution; Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass regarding Farm Loan System bonds, 10 May 1916; Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass regarding Federal Reserve notes as bank reserves; Paul M. Warburg to Carter Glass regarding amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, 8 July 1916; Comptroller to Carter Glass regarding National Banking Act and system, and amendments, 15 July 1916; Comptroller to Carter Glass regarding National Banks, 8 June 1916; Opinion of the Comptroller to Carter Glass regarding proposed amendments, 13 June 1916; Reynolds to H. Parker Willis regarding changes in Federal Reserve Act, 3 February 1916; Robert Bridges, Commissioner of port of Seattle, regarding rates on wheat loans, 16 February 1916.

Correspondence on banking and currency
Box: 64

A. Branch banking: Letters from bankers during 1937 opposing the establishment of branch banks, particularly across state lines, considering question of possession of bank stocks by holing companies, and considering branch banking problems; Copy of a bill concerning payment of interest on demand deposits by member banks, accompanied by a report stating the disfavor of the Federal Deposit Insurance Company with the bill; Report of June 11, 1937, from the Treasury Department, relating to receiverships among banking organizations; Copies of several bills designating legal tender; Copy of a report from the American Bankers Association, regarding banks, bank surplus and reserves, holding companies, etc.

B. Samuel Untermeyer : Letter, February 13, 1912, Carter Glass to Samuel Untermeyer, clarifying statements made by him about Samuel Untermeyer; Correspondence with A. P. Pujo, chairman of the House Banking and Currency Committee, concerning the activities of Samuel Untermeyer; copies of a letter from Colonel E. M. House to President Woodrow Wilson, attempting to arrange a secret meeting between the President and Samuel Untermeyer; Letter from Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis, November 8, 1913, relating to the testimony given by H. Parker Willis before the Senate Banking and Currency Committee and enclosing part of a reply by Carter Glass to Senator Reed which had yet to be published; Copy of a report showing the connection of Samuel Untermeyer with a Supreme Court case in which he appeared as plaintiff; Copies of newspaper articles, 1913 and 1914, reflecting unfavorably upon Samuel Untermeyer; Correspondence and newspaper article relating to the defense made by Samuel Untermeyer against attacks made upon him by Carter Glass in a series of magazine articles; Letters from A. Barton Hepburn and George M. Reynolds, June, 1913, criticizing an alternative plan to that proposed by the House Subcommittee on Banking and Currency; Copy of a letter from Carter Glass to Woodrow Wilson, June 17, 1913, enclosing statements by A. Barton Hepburn and E. C. Hulbert; Letters, March, 1912, between Carter Glass and William A. Glasgow, in which Glasgow declines an offer to become counsel for the Money Trust investigation; Letter, June 7, 1913, from Carter Glass to A. Barton Hepburn, stating that, "the chief point on danger now seems to be the apparent intractability of our friend Senator Owen;" Copy of a letter, June 24, 1924, Carter Glass to Arthur W. Page, concerning statements made by Samuel Untermeyer and Robert L. Owen about their connection with the Federal Reserve Act; Correspondence with C. R. Berrien, 1927, about the testimony of Samuel Untermeyer before the Senate Banking and Currency Committee; Letter from Alvin Untermeyer, relaying a message from Samuel Untermeyer in connection with unfavorable comments by Carter Glass, and defending Samuel against his critics; Newspaper article, January 29, 1927, reprinting the replies of Samuel Untermeyer and Carter Glass to statements about each other.

C. Charles S. Hamlin : Confidential letter, May 30, 1926, Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, asking that Carter Glass do what he could to prevent his replacement on the Board of Governors by a Republican, since no Democrats would then be on the board; Letter, July 3, 1926, Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, giving personal data about himself and his connection with John Skelton Williams for use in a possible Senate debate, if necessary; Abstract of one of the chapters of Paul M. Warburg's book sent to Carter Glass by Charles S. Hamlin; Letter, April 19, 1930, Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, returning a draft of a bill to amend the National Bank Act with favorable comment; Correspondence, June, 1932, concerning reduction in wages for Federal Reserve Board members and employees; Article by Charles S. Hamlin, September 28, 1928, refuting the charge that several policies adopted by the Federal Reserve System cheapened credit, thus encouraging speculation and tracing the cause of the difficulties to other sources; Discussion by Charles S. Hamlin, February 10, 1932, of events during the depression period, including recommendations for increasing the powers of the Federal Reserve Board over unwise banking practices; Abstract prepared by Charles S. Hamlin in 1930, citing references to Carter Glass and to H. Parker Willis, made by Paul M. Warburg in his book; Statements by Charles S. Hamlin in favor of the reappointment to the Federal Reserve Board of Wayland W. Magee; Copies of several bills introduced in the Senate on January 10, 1933, intended to meet an emergency situation in agriculture; Note from Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, January 24, 1933, suggesting that any inflationary measures accepted by Congress could be combated by granting the power to increase reserve requirements to the Federal Reserve Board; Note, May 24, 1932, from Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass accompanying an index of the Carter Glass bill, prepared by Charles S. Hamlin; Congratulatory note from Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, concerning the work done by Carter Glass in getting the McFadden Bill accepted; Memorandum prepared for Charles S. Hamlin and submitted to Carter Glass, showing the effect of reserve requirements on national banks at the time of the transfer of reserve funds to the new banks in 1914; Explanation by Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, August 20, 1924, as to why the discount rates were raised in 1920; Personal letter, Carter Glass to Charles S. Hamlin, September 20, 1926, concerning the book which Carter Glass was preparing and citing the sole point at which it was considered that Paul M. Warburg had made a contribution to the Federal Reserve Act; Index-digest, prepared by Charles S. Hamlin on February 1, 1930, of the report on the Federal Reserve System, prepared by the Banking and Currency Committee of the United States Chamber of Commerce; Copy of a pamphlet, "Stock Trading," sent to Carter Glass by Charles S. Hamlin; Personal letter, Carter Glass to Charles S. Hamlin, September 7, 1928, in which Carter Glass agrees to discuss proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act with Charles S. Hamlin and Governor Young; Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass, praising O. M. W. Sprague; Letter of April 1, 1927, to Carter Glass from Charles S. Hamlin, drawing a connecting link between the admission of state banks to the Federal Reserve System and the McFadden Bill; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin on July 29, 1927, informing Carter Glass as to the progress made on the drafting of new regulations on such subjects as membership conditions for state banks; Letter of January 23, 1926, from Carter Glass to Charles S. Hamlin, telling of his part in the appointments of Mohlenpah and Edmund Platt to the Federal Reserve Board; Statement by Charles S. Hamlin on April 23, 1926, relating to the McFadden Bill.

D. The Federal Reserve Board : Copy of a report to Congress, January 1, 1941, from the Federal Reserve System, giving suggestions aimed at solving the problems presented by an abundance of excess reserves; Copy of a bill, introduced in the Senate on February 25, 1941, which would have made reserve requirements more sever; Letter of September 12, 1940, from Carter Glass to a publishing company, thanking them for sending him a copy of Arthur D. Howden Smith's book, House of Texas, and offering a critical analysis of that part of the work dealing with the Federal Reserve Act; Statement by the Board of Governors on April 8, 1939, setting forth various proposals for the attainment of economic stability and requesting that Congress clarify the part to be played by monetary and credit policy in the attainment of the desired goals; Letter from the president of a Missouri bank, concerning interest expense and the establishment of a true system of par clearance; Lists of suggestions to the President for appointment to fill a vacancy on the Federal Reserve Board; Copy of a letter from J. M. Nichols, president of the First National Bank of Englewood, written to Marriner S. Eccles on July 15, 1936 expressing strong opposition to the political implications of an increase in reserve requirements; Statement by the Board of Governors, March 17, 1936, upholding the prohibition against interlocking directorates, despite complaint of unfairness by an Ohio banker; Correspondence regarding the possibility of an appointment to the Federal Reserve Board for General J. C. Persons; Statement, January 30, 1936, by the Federal Reserve Board to the effect that business concerns may not place savings on deposit with member banks; Statements from the New York Credit Men's Association late in 1935, in behalf of William H. Pouch as a member of the Federal Reserve Board; Correspondence, December, 1935, concerning the use of influence by Marriner Eccles in behalf of several Philadelphia bankers, including a list of statements made at various times by J. David Stren, newly appointed class C director of the Philadelphia Federal Reserve Bank; Letters exchanged between Carter Glass and Charles S. Hamlin, in which opposite views are expressed on the advisability of giving a responsible position in the Federal Reserve System to J. David Stren; Letters suggesting Hollins N. Randolph for a position on the Federal Reserve Board; Recommendation by the Board of Governors, July 6, 1935, with the aim of making the prohibition against interlocking directorates more effective; Letter of December 16, 1935, from Carter Glass to Chester Morrill, of the Federal Reserve Board, concerning interest on time and savings deposits; Letter, October 24, 1935, to Representative Sam Rayburn, regarding appointments to official positions in the Federal Reserve System; Copy of a speech by Ogden L. Mills, May 28, 1935, supporting Carter Glass in his criticisms of the Eccles bill and entering a plea to keep politics and banking separated; Copy of a bill to permit the further use of governments obligations as collateral for Federal Reserve notes, along with a favorable statement on the topic by Chester Morrill, of the Federal Reserve Board; Report by E. R. Black on the need for working capital by small business interests; Several proposed amendments to section 12B of the Federal Reserve Act.

Correspondence and manuscripts
Box: 65

A. Carter Glass' answer to Seymour regarding Colonel House and Federal Reserve legislation; manuscript for Adventure in Constructive Finance, by Carter Glass.

B. Copy of portions of the book An Adventure in Constructive Finance, partially typed and partially handwritten.

Correspondence
Box: 66

A. Memo by "A Democrat" regarding McVeagh and Bailey; Memo to Laughlin regarding asset currency; Memo on Owen Bill by Carter Glass (?); Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass on H. Parker Willis ' book on Federal Reserve System and history; Memo regarding Lynchburg Bank reserve requirements; Muchincloes to Carter Glass; W. H. Allen to Carter Glass regarding flow of funds; Champ Clark to Bricker, and Bricker to Rouse, 11 February 1913; Central Warehouse Lumber Company regarding trade discounts; Charles McCulloch regarding plan to expand money supply; Connant to Carter Glass regarding Connant's book, 6 March 1913; J. M. McCarthy to Carter Glass with good recommendations for changes in National Banking Act, 8 March 1913; Suggestions from George M. Coffin for amendments, 1 February 1913; Allen Cuculli to Carter Glass regarding amendments; J. D. Forgan to Carter Glass regarding hearings; Fisher to Carter Glass regarding Crawford-Fulzer Bill; D. R. Francis of St. Louis regarding Carter Glass' speech; Fowler to Carter Glass (interesting contents); Fowler to Carter Glass regarding insurance of deposits; John B. Farwell regarding hearings, 5 December 1912; Fowler regarding hearings; J. R. Greenlees regarding currency and banking situation; Carter Glass to Holdsworth, 27 January 1913, with reference to paper of Holdsworth; Edwin W. Kemmerer to Carter Glass regarding replies to questions 21 December 1912; Kirby to Carter Glass on report of the National Association of Manufacturers on Carter Glass questions, 27 December 1912; Edwin W. Kemmerer to Carter Glass and answers to questions; Royal Meeker to Carter Glass regarding hearings, 8 January 1913; L. M. Shaw to Carter Glass, 4 December 1912; Carter Glass to Sprague, 27 June 1913; McVeagh to Carter Glass, 7 February 1913; Carter Glass to Wilson, 31 January 1913; Carter Glass to Paul M. Warburg, invitation to appear before committee, 30 December 1912; Laughlin to Carter Glass regarding hearings of committee, 5 January 1912.

Correspondence on banking and currency 1913 December 25-1914 March
Box: 67

A. Miscellaneous correspondence on matters relating to banking and currency: Letter from the editor of a Nebraska newspaper on January 11, 1914, urging the passing of a bill to guarantee bank deposits; Correspondence relating to rural credits legislation; Letters asking Carter Glass to aid in bringing a Federal Reserve banks to Richmond, Virginia; Letters requesting copies of bills, speeches, etc. especially copies of the currency bill in its final form; Letter from the president of a Minneapolis bank on December 18, 1913, suggesting several changes which should be made prior to final acceptance of the measure; Letter from the president of a Philadelphia bank on January 27, 1914, expressing opposition to any prohibition against interlocking directorates; Letter of January 2, 1914, from Carter Glass to Andrew J. Frame, expressing satisfaction at the entry of the bank, of which Frame was president, into the Federal Reserve System; Letter from Carter Glass to William W. Flannagan on January 2, 1914, thanking Flannagan for his help during the struggle to get the currency measure accepted and offering to explain at some later date to Flannagan the way in which he and Representative Korbly had triumphed over the Senate during the meeting of the Conference Committee; Note of December 29, 1913, to Carter Glass from Andrew J. Frame, stating his satisfaction with the currency bill, particularly the section containing a suggestion of his own; Letter suggesting that cumulative voting procedures be adopted in the election of bank directors; Letter posing questions as to the difference between the Federal Reserve System and a third bank if the United States; Note of December 19, 1913, from E. D. Hulbert, official of a Chicago bank, requesting that Carter Glass oppose any attempt, backed by Paul M. Warburg or William G. McAdoo, to allow Federal Reserve notes to be counted as reserves by member banks; Article from the January, 1912, Journal of Political Economy, written by E. D. Hulbert, entitled, "Some Points in Opposition to the Aldrich Plan;" Letter from E. D. Hulbert on December 17, 1913, expressing disfavor with the nature of the criticisms of the currency bill presented by Senator Elihu Root and urging Carter Glass to oppose the inclusion of Federal Reserve notes in bank reserves; Letter of inquiry from E. D. Hulbert in February, 1914, asking about the result of a meeting between Carter Glass and several Senators; Reply from Carter Glass stating that the meeting would be held as soon as Senator Robert L. Owen could be present; Letter of January 21, 1914, Carter Glass to Senator Gilbert M. Hitchcock, referring him to Representative Charles A. Korbly on the subject of the guarantee of bank deposits; Telegram from E. D. Hulbert on December 20, 1913, stating agreement with George M. Reynolds on the question of the advisability of making reserve requirements higher for reserve city banks than they are for other banks; Letter of thanks from Carter Glass on January 5, 1914, to Edward L. Howe at Princeton, New Jersey, in appreciation of a congratulatory letter following legislation; Letter of indebtedness on the part of Carter Glass on January 5, 1914, followed by a congratulatory letter from A. Barton Hepburn; Congratulatory note of January 12, 1914, from Carter Glass to Charles A. Korbly on his re-nomination to Congress; Letter of acknowledgment from Carter Glass to Edwin W. Kemmerer on January 5, 1914; Quotation from a speech by Samuel Untermeyer on January 5, 1914, advocating the use of cumulative voting methods in selecting directors for national banks, recommended for the consideration of Carter Glass by Richard V. Mattison of the Keasbey and Mattison Company, Ambler, Pennsylvania; Note from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, on January 4, 1914, suggesting that it might be wise for Carter Glass to accept a speaking engagement in Peoria, Illinois; Request from E. M. Patterson, of the University of Pennsylvania, for copies of hearings held in connection with rural credits legislation; Request from A. P. Pujo on December 29, 1913, for a copy of the currency law; List of questions, posed on January 28, 1914, by Jefferson D. Stephens, in connection with the currency legislation; Letter of January 9, 1914, from Carter Glass to Oliver J. Sands, suggesting that H. Parker Willis could have helped the people of Richmond, Virginia, had he been available; Letter, January 16, 1914, Carter Glass to Representative Oscar W. Underwood about the events which transpired with respect to Representative Henry during the caucus on the currency bill; Similar letter to Representative A. M. Palmer; Affirmative reply to questions by Carter Glass from Oscar W. Underwood; Letter of January 12, 1914, from Samuel Untermeyer, stating that a speech of his is being sent to Carter Glass; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty on December 26, 1913, asking that a telegram from a group of Lynchburg businessmen, asking President Wilson to stop for a short time in the city to pay tribute to Carter Glass for his part in the currency legislation be destroyed; Copies of a letter written on August 22, 1913, by William Jennings Bryan to Carter Glass, supporting the proposed currency bill, given three provisions which William Jennings Bryan considered vitally important; Acknowledgment from Joseph P. Tumulty of receipt from Carter Glass of a pamphlet, prepared by Paul M. Warburg; Letter from H. Parker Willis, February 25, 1914, stating that, as a result of a talk with Representative Bulkley, he was sending a personal letter to Carter Glass, concerning the rural credits bill; Congratulatory note, Carter Glass to John Skelton Williams, January 20, 1914, upon the selection of Williams as Comptroller of the Currency; Letter, January 19, 1914, to Paul M. Warburg from Carter Glass, concerning working conditions for women and children, in answer to a letter from Paul M. Warburg; Handwritten letter from Carter Glass to President Wilson, apologizing for a request, made to the President by certain Lynchburg businessmen, that his vacation be interrupted to stop in the city to help pay tribute to Carter Glass; Note, April 3, 1916, from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, expressing agreement with those opposing the state law in Nebraska, concerning the guarantee of deposits; Copy of State Taxation of National Banks, presenting an opinion by George Bryan, attorney for the Virginia Bankers Association, May 23, 1916; Report by M. C. Elliot, counsel for the Federal Reserve Board, concerning the guarantee of deposits by surety companies; Letter from the American Bankers Association to the governor of the Federal Reserve Board on June 1, 1916, in favor of the McFadden Bill; Editorial of January 30, 1914, attacking Samuel Untermeyer for desiring to have banks operate under Post Office regulations; Copy of a speech by James R. Young, entitled, "Land and Loan Associations."

Correspondence from constituents in Floyd and Montgomery counties 1912-1913
Box: 68

A. Correspondence regarding Carter Glass' chances in the 1912 Democratic primary and solicitation by Carter Glass of votes; requests for seeds, government bulletins and yearbooks; Correspondence regarding appointment of postmasters and changing of rural routes.

Correspondence regarding government jobs 1914
Box: 69

A. Requests or recommendations for governments jobs, mainly concerning postmaster positions around the Roanoke, Virginia, area.

Correspondence from constituents in Campbell County and Lynchburg 1914
Box: 70

A. Correspondence regarding postmaster appointments, requests for government jobs, seeds, publications, etc. or some other local or personal question; Letters to Carter Glass' son and newspaper executives regarding the running of the paper.

Correspondence from constituents in Roanoke City and County 1914
Box: 71

A. Requests for copies of the Federal Reserve Act and other government publications; Requests for government jobs; seeds, etc; Requests for information regarding the effects of the new Federal Reserve Act on State banks; Recommendations for postmasterships; and other matters of a personal or local nature.

Correspondence from residents of Roanoke City and County 1914
Box: 72

A. Regarding subjects of a local or personal nature; Requests for Carter Glass' consideration on various bills; Recommendations of people for postmasterships, etc.

Correspondence between Glass and constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County 1914
Box: 73

A. Material dealing with local or personal affairs.

Correspondence from constituents in Bedford County 1914
Box: 74

A. Recommendations for postmasterships; Requests for seeds; Correspondence regarding other local and personal matters.

Correspondence from constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell Counties 1914
Box: 75

A. Correspondence regarding matters of a local nature; Correspondence regarding personal and financial matters with the business manager of Carter Glass' newspaper.

Correspondence with constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell Counties 1914
Box: 76

A. Material dealing with matters of local interest or with personal affairs of Carter Glass, his newspaper and friends.

Correspondence from residents of Lynchburg and Campbell Counties 1914-1915
Box: 77

A. Material dealing with topics of a local or personal interest; Letters from creditors regarding small accounts owed by Carter Glass and other financial matters.

Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents in Roanoke City and County 1914-1915
Box: 78

A. Material dealing with a controversy over the appointment of Postmaster of Roanoke; Correspondence regarding other local or personal matters, July 16, 1997

Correspondence from constituents of Roanoke City and County 1915
Box: 79

A. Material dealing with appointment of postmasters and requests for seeds and government bulletins.

Correspondence from constituents in Bedford County 1915
Box: 80

A. Material dealing with appointment of postmasters and requests for seeds and government bulletins.

Letters from constituents in Lynchburg and Campbell County 1915
Box: 81

A. Correspondence concerning postmasterships, government jobs, changing rural routes, requests for seeds and bulletins and other personal and local matters.

Correspondence: Roanoke City and County 1915, March-August
Box: 82

A. Ca. 400 letters concerning state and local political matters-appointments, elections, etc.; Requests for assistance; Applications for employment in the government; Personal letters; Correspondence with the Treasury Department regarding certified checks.

Correspondence: Lynchburg and Campbell County 1917
Box: 83

A. Alphabetically arranged miscellaneous correspondence, dealing generally with local politics in Virginia.

Correspondence from residents of Bedford County
Box: 84

A. Correspondence dealing with controversial issues of local interest; Questions, arguments, and petitions from citizens regarding the appointment of postmasters and changing rural routes, particularly in the communities of Huddleston and Abent; Replies to most of the letters; Requests for copies of certain bills, literature from the Agriculture Department, maps and other items.

Correspondence: Lynchburg and Campbell County 1916, March-May
Box: 85

A. Ca. 500 letters concerning state and local politics and appointments, requests for seeds and bulletins, newspaper business, legislation and personal matters.

Correspondence 1915-1916
Box: 86

A. Letters from constituents concerning government jobs, requests for publications and seeds, financial reports and activities regarding his newspaper, etc.; Personal letters from Carter Glass' friends and children; Letter to E. F. Sheffey from Carter Glass in which Carter Glass gives his views of the way Bishop James Cannon handles is financial affairs.

Correspondence, Roanoke City and County 1915 August-1916 February
Box: 87

A. 500 letters concerning state and local politics, particularly appointment of postmaster, requests for seeds, bulletins, etc. and expressions of opinions on various legislation under consideration.

Correspondence, including requests for Document 85 on liberalism testing 1928-1929
Box: 88

A. Letters requesting copies of Senate Document No. 85 or acknowledging receipt of the literature, concerning inspection procedures for determining whether cattle had contracted tuberculosis: Responses from Senators upon receipt of copies of Senate Document No. 85; Letters requesting copies of Senate Document No. 85, or entering similar complaints in connection with cattle inspectors.

B. Copy of a bill introduced by Carter Glass on May 3, 1928, to allow cattle owners to be repaid for any losses suffered, as a result of the declaration of animals as tubercular.

Correspondence from Roanoke City and County 1916
Box: 89

A. Letters concerning government jobs and appointments,; Requests for copies of bills and other literature; Requests for seeds; Queries regarding the effect of certain legislation on particular interests, etc.

Correspondence from Montgomery County 1914 July-1916 January
Box: 90

A. Miscellaneous correspondence with constituents in Montgomery County, Virginia : Suggestion from the postmaster at Radford, Virginia, that a campaign be organized to give Carter Glass a large vote in a forthcoming election, even though he would be unopposed; Request from an employee of a bank at Christiansburg, Virginia, that Carter Glass help him get a job at one of the Federal Reserve banks. Carter Glass answers that he does not make recommendations of this nature because of his intimate connection with the Federal Reserve System.

Correspondence, Lynchburg and Campbell County 1916 May-August
Box: 91

A. Letters regarding state and local political matters, including appointments, endorsements, etc.; Requests for seeds, bulletins and compensation; Letters to Walter Addison and M. Duerson concerning the News and Advanceand other personal or business matters.

Correspondence from residents of Floyd County
Box: 92

A. Letters concerning postmastership, rural route changes and requests for seeds and government bulletins.

Correspondence 1916-1917
Box: 93

A. About 600 letters concerning the local political situation, appointments, endorsements, requests for seeds, bulletins, etc. claims for compensation and various personal and business matters.

Correspondence with constituents in Roanoke City and County 1916 May-November
Box: 94

A. Miscellaneous correspondence with constituents during 1916: Editorial from the New York Sun, June 26, 1916, sent by a Roanoke, Virginia, insurance firm, backing the stand taken by Carter Glass in favor of branch banking; Several letters from real estate firms, opposing an amendment to the National Bank Act that would enable national banks to carry out certain insurance functions; Letter, September 8, 1916, from a Roanoke, Virginia, lawyer, congratulating Carter Glass on a speech distinguishing the Federal Reserve Act and the Aldrich bill; Letter from J. B. String fellow, a national bank examiner, thanking Carter Glass for aiding in the unsuccessful attempt to procure for him the job as Federal reserve agent at Richmond, Virginia.

Correspondence with constituents in Floyd County 1916 December-1917 April
Box: 95

A. Miscellaneous correspondence with constituents in Floyd County.

Correspondence with constituents in Bedford County 1916 December-1917 April
Box: 96

A. Miscellaneous correspondence with constituents from Bedford County.

Speeches 1916-1928
Box: 97

A. Jefferson Day Dinner: Copies of speeches by Alfred E. Smith and Harry F. Byrd, among others, referring particularly to the proper relation of the government to the economy.

B. Copy of a speech, "A Menacing Group Alliance," made in the Senate on March 23, 1922, by Carter Glass, refuting the statement that Woodrow Wilson agreed to the entry into World War I by the United States, because of the existence of certain secret treaties which were endangering the loans made by Morgan financial interests.

D. Copy of a brief Armistice Day speech made by Carter Glass on November 11, 1923.

E. Copies of a speech by Carter Glass in the Senate on June 14, 1929, relating the problems created by high protective tariffs to the agricultural interests.

F. Copy of "The Truth about the War Department," a speech made by Carter Glass on February 7, 1918.

G. Copies of a Jefferson Day speech by Carter Glass on April 13, 1916, explaining the need for banking reform and describing the remedies which has been prescribed for the financial difficulties.

H. Copies of a speech, "Lest We Forget," by Carter Glass on February 16, 1923, concerning the advisability of accepting a proposal for lowering the debt of the British to the United States.

I. Envelope supposed to contain a speech made by Carter Glass on June 14, 1917, in regard to an amendment to the Federal Reserve Act. The copy of the speech, however, is missing.

J. Copy of a speech by Carter Glass on April 27, 1933, entitled "Shall We Go Over the Precipice?", opposing an amendment to the bill by which the country was to go off the old standard and also stating opposition to the bill. Carter Glass expresses the opinion that the bill would make the Federal Reserve System subservient to the Treasury Department.

K. Copy of a speech made by Carter Glass at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on February 9, 1919, contrasting the banking system before the passing of the Federal Reserve Act, under which the failure of two New York banks caused a panic, with the banking community which survived a world war almost unscathed.

L. Complimentary letters during the summer of 1936, on the speech by Carter Glass at a Democratic Convention, at which time he expressed dissatisfaction with the trend in national government.

M. copy of a speech by Carter Glass in Chicago, Illinois, on March 21, 1919, in which he discusses liberty loans and the historical development of the Federal Reserve System.

N. Statements, concerning Admiral Cary T. Grayson, which Carter Glass had printed in the Congressional Record.

O. Statement placed in the Congressional Recordon August 16, 1937, by Carter Glass, giving information about the activities of the Federal Deposit Insurance Company.

P. Copies of a statement by Carter Glass, in connection with the victory liberty loan, entitled, "Business Need Not Fear Future."

Q. Copies of a speech by Carter Glass in the House of Representatives on September 7, 1916, and a speech made during 1916 to the American Bankers' Association, dealing with the Federal Reserve Act, the reasons for its enactment, the process by which it became law, and the performance of the system.

R. Copies of, "A Dangerous Nostrum," a speech by Carter Glass on June 22, 1926, opposing a bill designed to aid agricultural interests, because it was not in accordance with the fundamental principles of government.

Speeches 1916-1928
Box: 98

A. Copies of a speech by Carter Glass on April 8, 1914, concerning the location of regional reserve banks with particular reference to placing a bank in Richmond, Virginia, rather than Baltimore, Maryland, Washington, D. C., or another city.

B. Copy of speeches by Carter Glass on September 10 and 13, 1913, when he was trying to assure the passage by the House of Representatives of the bill, creating the Federal Reserve System.

C. Copy of an address by Carter Glass during 1919 to the North Carolina Bankers Association, touching upon a wide range of subjects.

D. Copy of a speech delivered on January 26, 1932, by Carter Glass, entitles, "Responsibility for Foreign Loans," and called by Carter Glass the "Turnip-head speech,"

E. Copy of a speech by Carter Glass on June 9, 1925, before a meeting of the Robert Morris Associates.

F. Copies of a speech made on March 20 in Minneapolis and March 21, 1919, in Chicago by Carter Glass, discussing the Federal Reserve System, the war, and the liberty loan campaign.

G. Copies of booklet, "A Tale of Two Heifers," containing the statement of Carter Glass, opposing certain cattle inspection procedure being followed by employees of the State of Virginia.

H. Copies of "Government by Investigation as. Government by Suppression," a speech made on April 15, 1924, by Carter Glass, suggesting that the Secretary of the Treasury permit an investigation of one of the Treasury agencies by a Senate Committee.

I. Copy of a speech by Carter Glass on October 23, 1928, criticizing the actions of Herbert Hoover, when he served as Food Administrator in the World War I period, and refuting those who defended President Hoover.

J. Copies of a speech, "The Facts About the Fiscal Policy of our Government During the Past Few Years," made by Carter Glass on November 1, 1932.

Correspondence protesting Kitchen amendment to HR17606 1917
Box: 99

A. Copies of amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, submitted on April 27, 1917, by the Banking and Currency Committee, of which Carter Glass was chairman, for consideration on the House floor; Copy of a letter of May 16, 1917, from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, to President Wilson, giving his views on the situation with respect to several amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, then ready for resolution in conference committee. William G. McAdoo mentions bringing Carter Glass around to accepting the issuance of Federal Reserve notes against gold and expresses opposition to granting permission for certain banks to make exchange charges; Letter of October 2, 1916, from Paul M. Warburg of the Federal Reserve Board, covering a variety of points, considered of importance at the time, such as stressing the adequacy of gold balances held by member banks; Letter, Carter Glass to James B. Forgan, January 15, 1917, in which Carter Glass inquires about the justification for the position, taken by bankers who had previously considered the Federal Reserve Act an inflationary measure, that Federal Reserve notes should be used as reserves; Telegram, November 11, 1916, from Bernard M. Baruch; Letter from W. P. G. Harding, governor of the Federal Reserve Board, January 22, 1917, announcing withdrawal of a recommendation that Federal Reserve notes be issued against gold certificates; Letter from Paul M. Warburg, of the Board of Governors, January 30, 1917, asking that Carter Glass try to get Congress to reconsider the section of the Federal Reserve Act, relating bank loans to directors; Letters to and from Carter Glass concerning private bankers as directors of national banks, the performance of insurance services by small national banks, and the check collection amendment offered in 1917 by Representative Kitchen and by Senator Hardwick; Letter from Carter Glass to W. P. G. Harding at the Federal Reserve Board, stating that a return to the former system of check collection would be undesirable; Several letters from bakers favoring the Kitchen bill; Correspondence with John V. Farwell about the Kitchen bill; Letter from Representative Edmund Platt, favoring the exacting of exchange charges; Reply of Carter Glass to the letter from Edmund Platt; Numerous letters from merchants, both retail and wholesale, throughout the country, protesting the charging of exchange during the check clearance process. For example, there are letters from grocers, drygoods concerns, and hardware stores; Letter from W. P. G. Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board, accompanying a statement of the effect of a proposed amendment to the reserve requirements; Letter, April 30, 1917, from Paul M. Warburg, of the Federal Reserve Board, noting an enclosure felt to be of interest to Carter Glass; Letters sent to the Board of Governors, opposing the Kitchen amendment concerning exchange charges, and transmitted by Warren G. Harding to Carter Glass; Correspondence of the Comptroller of the Currency, relating to exchange charges on checks, including letters from John Skelton Williams to Carter Glass.

Correspondence with the Army Department 1917
Box: 100

A. Correspondence in connection with military service problems brought to the attention of Carter Glass by constituents.

Correspondence
Box: 101

A. Carter Glass to Penrose regarding Hudson matter, 9 October 1919, an extension of interest payments on loans to European borrowers; Russell C. Leffingwell to Carter Glass, 30 January 1936, regarding subrogation of collateral for war loan; Russell C. Leffingwell to Carter Glass, 5 January 1936; Mellon to Carter Glass regarding cables sent by Carter Glass; Houston to Carter Glass regarding cables; Leffingwell to Carter Glass, 19 December 1922. Memo regarding the legality of foreign loans, 17 December 1922; Memo of Treasury, 3 March 1921, regarding foreign loans; Memo, 2 August 1921, to Carter Glass regarding refunding of foreign obligations; Memo for secretary, 25 October 1919, regarding money market; Memo to Carter Glass from (?) Kelley regarding foreign loans, 3 March 1921; Russell C. Leffingwell to Carter Glass, 15 December 1920, regarding reversal of War Finance Corporation; Russell C. Leffingwell to Kellogg regarding the reserve (A good memo); Leffingwell to (?) versus soldier's bonus; Leffingwell address before the Academy, 12 May 1922; Leffingwell's address before Political Science Association, 30 April 1922; Carter Glass to Norman H. Davis regarding French finance; Carter Glass to the President, 28 May 1918 [1919], regarding the removal of embargoes on coin, bullion and currency by Presidential proclamation; President from Carter Glass, 2 June 1911, regarding forging of notes; Carter Glass to President regarding appointment of John Skelton Williams, 24 January 1919.

Correspondence protesting the Hardwick amendment to H. R. 3613 1917
Box: 102

A. Numerous letters opposing the Hardwick amendment which would renew the right of the banks to levy exchange charges on checks.

B. Pamphlets explaining the Hardwick amendment and discussing the collection policies of the Federal Reserve System.

C. Notes from several Senators, stating opposition to the Hardwick amendment and expressing the hope that the Conference Committee would refuse to accept this portion of the bill.

D. Letter from an organ of the American Bankers Association in favor of the Hardwick amendment.

E. Copy of a telegram from Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, concerning possibility of urging the President to veto the bill, if the Hardwick amendment is accepted by the Conference Committee.

F. Letter from Paul M. Warburg on April 28, 1917, sending a statement to Carter Glass, intended to keep him informed about the attitude of influential persons toward exchange charges.

G. Note from W. P. G. Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board, on December 4, 1916, enclosing a substitute amendment to that part of the Federal Reserve Act dealing with membership requirements, suggested by H. Parker Willis.

H. Letter from W. P. G. Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board, sending correspondence about the Kitchen bill to Carter Glass.

I. Letter, Carter Glass to Representative C. A. Brand, expressing the hope that the President would veto the bill containing the Hardwick amendment.

J. Letter from the president of the Girard National Bank favoring the charging of exchange by banks.

K. Telegram, Benjamin Strong to Carter Glass, of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, opposing the plan to permit the charging of exchange.

L. Letter from John Perrin, of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, concerning the responsibilities of the Federal Reserve Agent.

M. Copy of the Federal Reserve Act as amended to September 7, 1916, and a copy of the Kitchen bill.

N. Copies of a report by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on the check collection system, prepared by Pierre Jay.

O. Copies of the pamphlet, entitled, "The Collection System of the Federal Reserve Banks."

P. Copies of a ten-page paper on "A Dispassionate Analysis of the Subject of 'Exchange' on Checks, Being a Collection Fee Assessed by City Banks when Paying checks Drawn Against Banks in Other Cities, or in Towns and Villages."

Correspondence protesting Hardwick amendment on H. R. 3673
Box: 103

A. Telegram from Carter Glass, May 16, 1917, to, George A. Knapp, J. H. McLaurin, and several retailers and wholesalers, suggesting that provisions with regard to check collections, contained in a bill before a Conference Committee, be opposed by business interests.

B. Letters and telegrams opposing the Hardwick amendment, permitting banks to make exchange charges for handling checks: Telegram from William G. McAdoo; Letter from J. H. Tregoe, Secretary of the National Association of Credit Men, showing how the group was cooperating in opposing the Hardwick amendment; Correspondence with Thomas A. Fernley, Secretary of the National Wholesale Dry Goods Association, who did much of the work involved in flooding Congress men with messages opposing a return to former exchange charge practices; Letters from numerous Congress men, promising to give thorough consideration to the problem of exchange charges; Correspondence from Frederick A. Delano, of the Federal Reserve Board, concerning the check clearance provisions of the Federal Reserve Act; Memorandum from the Federal Reserve Board, concerning statements made by J. F. Thralls; Letters from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, opposing the Hardwick amendment.

C. Letters from banks supporting the return of the privilege of making exchange charges.

D. Letter from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, accompanying a report on usury charges.

E. Paper on, "Domestic Exchange," by Robert D. Kent, president of a bank in Passaic, New Jersey.

F. Letter from W. P. G. Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board, stating that the acceptance of the bill containing the Hardwick amendment would cost the government large sums of money in connection with Liberty Loan subscriptions.

G. Telegram from William G. McAdoo, secretary of the Treasury, expressing the hope that action on amendments to the Federal Reserve Act would result favorably for purposes of governmental borrowing.

H. Copy of the Journal of the American Bankers Association, May, 1917, containing a review of the proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act.

I. Copy of the Federal Reserve Bulletin, February, 1917, containing explanations of the proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act.

J. Copy of a proposed amendment to several sections of the Federal Reserve Act, introduced in the Senate on May 9, 1917.

K. Copy of the Federal Reserve Act as amended up to September 7, 1916.

L. Letter from Paul M. Warburg, of the Federal Reserve Board, discussing the anticipated effects of impending payments for Liberty Loans bonds upon the Federal Reserve banks and stressing the need for increasing reserve requirements, as would result from the proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act.

M. Balance sheet, prepared by the Comptroller of the Currency, showing the condition of the national banks.

N. Statistics showing the number of various types of business concerns in the United States.

O. Letters purporting in many cases to be describing the poor operation of the existing system of check collection, including letters from bankers transmitted by the Federal Reserve Board and letters from business concerns sent by the Comptroller of the Currency.

P. Statements of Federal Reserve officials and the Comptroller of the Currency, concerning the effect of exchange charges on the banks and the attitude of bankers in 1916 toward the check collection system.

Correspondence
Box: 104

A. Several letters of protest against the Hardwick amendment; Several letters in favor of reinstatement of the Hardwick amendment; Letter to Carter Glass if favor of establishment of a foreign exchange bureau in the Federal Reserve System; Carter Glass to McLane Tilton regarding Kitchen amendments; Fitz Henry to Carter Glass regarding insurance of deposits for non-member banks, 23 March 1918; Carter Glass to Scheffy regarding Hardwick amendment; Carter Glass to George Moore regarding Hardwick amendment; Sabath to Carter Glass regarding Hardwick amendment; Carter Glass to Tregoe regarding Hardwick amendment; Carter Glass to Campbell regarding Hardwick amendment; Carter Glass also opposed Kitchen amendment in the House version of the Hardwick amendment in the Senate; George Seay to Carter Glass regarding Kitchen amendment; Pierre Jay to Carter Glass regarding the advertising of the Federal Reserve System; Letter from various sources protesting the high cost of living and demands for relief pouring in first half of 1917; Analysis of a bill to coordinate, unify and consolidate the financial system of the United States, 6 January 1917; Carter Glass to Joseph P. Tumulty regarding the help of the National Association of Credit Men, 20 June 1917; Carter Glass to Fernley, 20 January 1917, regarding Hardwick amendment; Carter Glass to Aiken of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston on amendment to the Federal Reserve Act; Pierre Jay to Carter Glass regarding par collection fight; Peron to Carter Glass regarding par collection fight; Orr of National Association of Credit Men to pressure senators on Hardwick Bill; Carter Glass to C. L. Cobb; Carter Glass to Burton, 27 September 1917, regarding collateral for Federal Reserve notes; E. P. Miller of Lynchburg, to Carter Glass regarding the need for $1.00 bills; Carter Glass to Congressman Cornhill regarding the keeping of government securities at par.

Correspondence on personal and legislative matters 1925-1930
Box: 105

A. Walter Wyatt, General Counsel for the Federal Reserve Board : Letters and data concerning the legal aspects of the par clearance of checks.

B. Governor John Garland Pollard : Correspondence with John Garland Pollard while he was a dean at William and Mary College, concerning the possibility of obtaining a position with the Federal Trade Commission; Correspondence during the gubernatorial campaign of 1925, relating to certain charges that Carter Glass had fallen under the influence of the political machine in Virginia; Correspondence with John Garland Pollard during the period in 1929, of his candidacy for the governorship of Virginia; Copy of a letter from Carter Glass to the President on December 10, 1929, suggesting that John Garland Pollard be appointed to the Federal Trade Commission. The Secretary to the President informs Carter Glass that the President will write him personally.

C. Yorketown Mine Depot Explosives: Copy of a bill introduced in the Senate on January 27, 1928, by Carter Glass, delaying action on the movement, by the Navy of certain explosives from their storage place near Baltimore, Maryland, to Yorketown, Virginia; Correspondence concerning objections to the movement of explosives into the Norfolk - Portsmouth area; Copy of a case heard before the United States Circuit Court of Appeals involving property owners in Yorketown and the officials of the Naval establishment there.

D. Correspondence concerning the book, Adventure in Constructive Financeby Carter Glass : Copy of a letter from Carter Glass to Harry Price, reporter for a Washington, D. C. newspaper, inquiring as to his knowledge of the connection of Colonel E. M. House with the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from David Lawrence, reporter for another Washington newspaper, to Carter Glass, giving him recollection of the events of 1913, involving Colonel House with Currency legislation; Typewritten copy of a part of the manuscript prepared by Carter Glass while he was working on his book, Adventure in Constructive Finance; Copies of two letters, handwritten, one of which is from Colonel House to President Woodrow Wilson and the other of which seems of the same nature, although it is unsigned and no salutation is given, dealing with currency matters and one states that, during a talk, Carter Glass admitted to a complete lack of knowledge about currency matters; Correspondence with several men, including Ray Stannard Baker, Charles S. Hamlin, and Arthur W. Page, who had read portions of the manuscript for the book by Carter Glass; Letter, Royal Meeker to President Woodrow Wilson, October 14, 1912, concerning the ideas put forth by Irving Fisher about the gold content of the dollar; Letter from Mrs. Woodrow Wilson on April 15, 1926, accompanying four letters from President Wilson to Colonel House.

E. List of delegates to a conference in May, 1930, at Dallas, Texas.

F. Correspondence relating to a job for Mrs. Saide L. Hamner.

G. Correspondence with Winder R. Harris, managing editor of the Virginian-Pilot, concerning articles which it was desired that Carter Glass write.

H. Considerable correspondence between Carter Glass and Doubleday, Page, and Company publishers about the preparation, distribution, etc. of, Adventure in Constructive Finance: Letters regarding criticism of Carter Glass' book by Samuel Untermeyer and the claims of Samuel Untermeyer and Senator Robert L. Owen to credit for formulating the Federal Reserve Act. It was decided not to dignify Samuel Untermeyer with a refutation of his claims. Robert L. Owen's work in connection with the law was considered negligible, but nothing was to be printed against him; Several letters mention the defense of Colonel E. M. House by Arthur D. Howden Smith.

I. Correspondence relating to the reappointment of John J. Esch to the Interstate Commerce Commission. The reversal of a decision by the Interstate Commerce Commission in the Lake Cargi Coal case is one of the main points discussed in connection with Senate confirmation of Esch.

Correspondence 1917-1918
Box: 106

A. Personal correspondence, dealing generally with financial matters, the Lynchburg News and Advance, requests for favors, and invitation; includes letters to and from Professor Stockton Arson, Walter E. Addison, Bernard M. Baruch, John A. Choloner, M. K. Duerson and Carter Glass, Jr. Letter to Ann Carter Glass regarding his appointment as Secretary of the Treasury; Letter to E. D. Hulbert denying that Carter Glass opposed the Federal Reserve Act.

Correspondence on legislation, (Q-Z) 1917
Box: 107

A. Miscellaneous correspondence: Carter Glass cites the probable unconstitutionality of omitting a clause from that section of the Federal Reserve Act enabling national banks to carry out fiduciary functions; Carter Glass answers a query by stating that liberty bonds in the possession of a bank cannot be considered a credit against capital and surplus for tax purposes; Several letters expressing desire to have the law amended, so that national banks would not have to pay taxes on Liberty Bonds; Pamphlet by the United Real Estate Owners Association, opposing a proposed revenue bill; Letter from a fertilizer manufacturer, stating that a stamp tax on checks would be undesirable; Correspondence between Carter Glass, William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, and Oliver J. Sands, Chairman of the Virginia Bankers Association, concerning certain proposals for legislation made by Sands; Letter from Representative John H. Small, favoring the discontinuance of the necessity for member banks of the Federal Reserve System to pay a stamp tax on obligations secured by Liberty Bonds. Carter Glass concurs; Letter from a Roanoke, Virginia, banker, April 15, 1918, requesting to be informed when Congress accepts a pending measure allowing the Treasury Department to place receipts from income and excess profits taxes with government depositaries; Letter to the editor of the Boston Transcript, showing the unconstitutionality of the Pittman Bill, relating to the coinage of silver, sent to Carter Glass by the writer, James C. Hallock, 1918 April 20; In response to a letter from Oliver J. Sands, concerning a bill to prevent national banks from charging a bill to prevent national banks from charging usurious rates of interest, Carter Glass states that he would like to see national banks charge interest rates that would correspond in direction of movement to the rediscount rate set by the Federal Reserve System; Letter, September 1, 1917, from John V. Farwell, asking that the proposed excess profits tax be made effective only after eight percent had been earned on invested capital; Letter from a hotel operator in Georgia, proposing that the government issue treasury notes in greater volume and that these notes be made legal tender for all debts; Answers by Carter Glass to questions concerning issuance of greenbacks in 1917, the difficulty of obtaining loans through the Farm Loan System, and the prevalence of bias in banking laws; Letter from a Lynchburg, Virginia, banker, February 23, 1918, describing certain transactions between his bank and the Federal Reserve Bank at Richmond, which he did not feel should be subject to taxation; Letter, April 18, 1918, from R. L. Van Zandt, governor of the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, suggesting changes in the proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act. Carter Glass accepts the suggestions, but fears that it is too late to have them included in the pending measure; Letters from special interest groups, opposing the exaction of taxes on excess profits, draw an unencouraging answer from Carter Glass; Carter Glass expresses approval of the ideas, presented by John V. Farwell in an attempt to analyze the effects of the proposed excess profits tax; Copy of a pamphlet concerning the proper role of the government in dealing with suppliers of war materials; Letters relating to the plans for acquiring revenue for the government, including ideas on the taxation of excess profits. Much of the correspondence is with those who have special interests which they desire to protect. The anticipated result of the imposition of the proposed taxes is the failure of many concerns; Correspondence concerning extending the right to vote to women; Letter from the Corn Exchange National Bank, favoring the granting of permission to the national banks to establish branches; Copy of the Congressional Record, July 21, 1917; Letter from a New York lawyer, concerning trustee functions of national banks; Petitions urging Carter Glass to vote in favor of extending the right to vote to women.

Correspondence on legislation, (G-Q) 1917
Box: 108

A. Correspondence relating to matters of legislative concern during 1917 and 1918: Correspondence regarding a bill to require new corporations and corporations being refinanced to secure a license from a government agency; Note from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, accompanying a War Finance Bill backed by McAdoo; Letter, February 27, 1918, from Thomas B. McAdams, suggesting that a proposal to limit bank deposits to ten times the capital and surplus accounts of the bank would be unwise and giving several reasons for doubting the wisdom of the measure; Correspondence from an Arkansas banker, who favored the guarantee of bank deposits and defended John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, who had proposed the plan; Letter from Thomas B. McAdams, March 2, 1918, expressing fear that certain proposed changes would cause some national banks to live up their charters; Telegram from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, to Carter Glass, April 17, 1918, recommending that the Pitman bill be passed and suggesting that Carter Glass get the thinking of Treasury officials from Assistant Secretary Russell C. Leffingwell; Letter, December 14, 1917, in which Carter Glass states that he opposes expanding the list of paper eligible for rediscount purposes to include such things as railroad bonds and that he does not believe that Congress will do anything to "impair the commercial character of the Federal Reserve System; " Letter from an Alabama banker, February 4, 1918, suggesting an addition to a proposed amendment to that part of the Federal Reserve Act relating to the capital required for a bank to become a member of the Federal Reserve System; Letter, April 15, 1918, from a Lynchburg, Virginia, banker, asking that the Sub-Treasury system be discontinued; Letter, March 12, 1918, expressing favor with the McFadden Bill, which would enable business concerned to pay taxes over a period of time, instead of all at once; Letter from an insurance company, August 26, 1918, opposing the entry into the insurance field by the government; Carter Glass responds to a letter from Representative Albert Johnson, April 27, 1918, to say that he does not feel that any controversial issues relating to banking should be considered during a war period; Correspondence during March, 1918, with E. D. Hulbert, who opposed the granting of permission for banks to establish branches; Correspondence with A. Barton Hepburn during February, 1918, about a bill having to do with eligible paper; Note from the Assistant Treasury Secretary, relating to a letter to Carter Glass from A. Barton Hepburn, August 16, 1917, suggesting that taxes be made payable before the month in which they fell due; Carter Glass responds negatively to a question from Representative F. E. Guernsey, a member of the Banking and Currency Committee, as to whether mutual savings banks could become members of the Federal Reserve System; Carter Glass rejects a scheme for the issue of currency presented by A. A. Graham, a Kansas lawyer; Letter complaining of the inequity of the proposed provision of an excess profits tax bill, whereby taxes would be levied on the basis of pre-war earnings; Correspondence with John M. Miller, president of a Richmond, Virginia, bank, concerning the possibility of a last-minute attempt to raise the discount rate for taxes paid prematurely from three to four percent; Letter from a Richmond bank, suggesting that the terms of the next issue of Treasury certificates be published as early as possible, so that the banks can make plans on the basis of their present holdings; Statement of approval from the Merchants Association of New York for bills relating to branch banking, the exercise of trust functions by national banks, and the issues of Federal Reserve notes in given denominations; Letter stating that the import duties to be exacted under the proposed War Revenue bill would be quite unfair in some cases; Letter from a Connecticut contractor, favoring the amendment to the Federal Reserve Act, proposed by Senator Calder, and expressing the hope that somehow state banks might be attracted into the Federal Reserve System in greater numbers; Letter from Senator Robert L. Owen, February 19, 1918, asking that Carter Glass study critically a bill to establish a Federal Reserve bank in a foreign country; Correspondence with Edmund Platt, a member of the House Banking and Currency Committee, concerning a proposed tax on bank checks; Letter from an official of the American Bankers Association, expressing a desire that the shortage of supply of bills in small denominations be remedied by appropriate legislation; Letter from Carter Glass supporting the move to repeal the stamp tax on short term notes given in payment of liberty bonds; Correspondence concerning what to do with the idle supply of silver in the hands of he government.

Miscellaneous Correspondence 1913-1917
Box: 109

A. Letters from bankers, businessmen and others giving their views on certain proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act which the Committee on Banking and Currency in the House was studying in 1917; Letters from various people asking Carter Glass to use his influence in getting certain positions or appointments to jobs for specific individuals; Letters of a personal nature; Letter from William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass accompanied by a copy of William G. McAdoo's statement before Senate Committee in which he asks for an assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury, February 12, 1917; Letter from an officer of the Seattle National Bank to John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, 1917 in which the writer explains in some detail the practical shortcomings of the Federal Reserve System in his district because of great distance from the San Francisco Reserve bank and lack of a branch in the Seattle area; Letter from G. J. Seay of the Richmond Federal Reserve Bank in which he presents arguments to Carter Glass favoring a proposed amendment to the Federal Reserve Act which "would permit the issue of Federal Reserve notes against paper and gold, the minimum proportion of gold being 40 percent, and this reserve when on deposit with the Agent to be counted as a part of the reserve of the bank," 1917; Many letters asking personal favors of Carter Glass such as requests for his help in getting certain positions or jobs for various people; Letters asking his opinion on certain subjects and letters of a very personal nature from friends; Canceled checks, bank statement, receipts and bill from various concerns; Correspondence to Carter Glass from the manager of the United Loan and Trust Co. of Lynchburg, for example, one letter notifying him of his election to the Board of Directors, 1917; Copy of a letter sent by Carter Glass to an executive of the National Shoe Wholesalers Association, 1917, suggesting that the Association appeal to its members to send protests to their Congress men so that the proposed "Kitchin bill" would be defeated, statin that the bill would restore the "old system of charges" on collecting checks, and noting that country bankers are flooding Congress men with letters in favor of the bill and some counteracting letters are needed; Reply to the Carter Glass letter and copies of protests are attached; Copy of a letter from a banker in which he goes against the majority of his profession and protests, instead of encouraging the proposed "Kitchin bill." (See #7 above), 1917; Copy of a letter from a national bank protesting the Kitchen bill and also strongly advocating the compulsory inclusion of all banks into the Federal Reserve System, 1917; Letter, W. P. G. Harding to Carter Glass in which Harding expresses in detail his thoughts regarding the issue and keeping in circulation of large amounts of Federal Reserve notes and the proper type of security which should be held by the Reserve Banks. Some members of the House Banking Committee were evidently dissatisfied with certain practices of the Federal Reserve Banks and Harding is explaining his position, 1917; Letter from a Chicago banker giving his ideas regarding certain sections of H. R. 20045, 1917, letter is addressed to Carter Glass; Several letters to Carter Glass asking his influence in getting certain men appointed to a new board which was to be created under the Smith-Hughes bill for Vocational Education, 1917. The appointments were to be made by the President; Letter to Carter Glass, 1917, advocating support of a Senate Bill providing for compulsory military training; Letters expressing sympathy in the death of Carter Glass' sister, 1915; Copy of Chicago Commerce, weekly publication, November 28, 1913, in which appears a speech by Carter Glass defending the proposed Federal Reserve Act; Letter from Robert L. Owen to W. P. G. Harding, Governor of Federal Reserve Board, in which Robert L. Owen submits an amendment to "the pending bill ( Senate Bill no. 8)," 1917; Occasional correspondence between the Chairman of the Democratic National Committee and Carter Glass, mostly 1916 and 1917; Letter from G. J. Seay, Governor of Richmond Federal Reserve Bank, to Carter Glass in which he expresses his opinion on certain problems concerning a projected loan by the government of about five billion dollars, 1917; Speech by Carter Glass in the House of Representatives entitled, "American Rights on the Seas," March 8, 1916; Speech of Paul M. Warburg, at the dinner of the Economic Club of New York, May 22, 1916; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin, Governor of Federal Reserve Board, to Carter Glass enclosing copies of proposed amendments to sections 13 and 16 of the Federal Reserve Act, 1916; Some correspondence over a proposed amendment to Section 5197 of the Revised Statutes of the United States regulating the rate of interest which may be charged by national banking associations and to raise revenue; Letter from President of the National City Bank of New York expressing his opinion on proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, 1917; Similar letters from the presidents of Chase National Bank and Continental and Commercial National Bank of Chicago. Evidently Carter Glass had written and requested their opinions.

Miscellaneous correspondence
Box: 110

A. Letters on miscellaneous matters including enlistments, the obtaining of commissions, and relative matters from friends and neighbors of Carter Glass.

Correspondence with the War Department 1917
Box: 111

A. Miscellaneous correspondence on behalf of constituents, concerning the performance of military duties.

B. Correspondence concerning war risk insurance; Copy of the War Risk Insurance Act.

Correspondence with the War Department, (W-Z) 1917
Box: 112

A. Miscellaneous correspondence and data relating to various types of military service, particularly referring to methods of becoming a commissioned officer.

Departmental correspondence 1917
Box: 113

A. Miscellaneous correspondence: Letter from a Detroit banker, forwarded to Carter Glass by Representative Frank E. Doremus, in which the suggestion is made that the Federal reserve Act might be amended so as to permit state banks, which carry on savings operations, as well as commercial business, to enter the Federal Reserve System; Letters concerning application for and payment of pensions; Numerous requests for seeds.

Correspondence
Box: 114

A. Letters relating to seeds and miscellaneous matters.

Correspondence concerning positions 1917
Box: 115

A. Correspondence regarding jobs for certain constituents: Refusals on the part of Carter Glass to suggest the employment of anyone by the Federal Reserve System; Correspondence with John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, concerning a dissatisfied employee.

Correspondence
Box: 116

A. Correspondence regarding appointments for government jobs, promotions, transfers and recommendations.

Correspondence
Box: 117

A. Correspondence relating to applicants for government jobs or for promotions, transfers, and recommendations, etc.

Correspondence concerning the Post Office Department 1917
Box: 118

A. Miscellaneous correspondence relating to the postal service.

Correspondence 1919-1921
Box: 119

A. Letter from Carter Glass to Warren G. Harding, governor of the Federal Reserve System, November 5, 1919, suggesting that sole reliance not be placed in changing the discount rate in the regulation of stock speculation.

B. Numerous requests for Carter Glass to place the name of a correspondent on his list to receive the Congressional Record, after Carter Glass replaced Senator Martin.

C. Correspondence regarding the entry of the United States into the League of Nations.

E. Letters requesting that Carter Glass support a bill whereby the government would increase its aid to home economics students.

Correspondence 1918
Box: 120

A. Letter from Carter Glass to McAdams regarding work on amendments to Federal Reserve Act, 11 September 1918; Personal papers such as bills, receipts, etc.

Correspondence with the Army Department 1917
Box: 121

A. Letters relating to military matters, especially the attempts to assure certain constituents of positions considered desirable.

Correspondence 1918
Box: 122

A. Carter Glass to Bowers regarding interest rates on Treasury bonds, 6 March 1918; Carter Glass to Brand regarding the views of Williams on paper eligible for rediscount; Letter to Carter Glass regarding the legalizing of trade acceptances, 15 July 1918; W. S. Battle to Carter Glass regarding disposition of the sub-treasuries, 16 April 1918.

B. Letters regarding: food administration; claims for relief; requests for assistance of many kinds; requests for literature; requests for help in getting Federal positions; request for support of legislation, such as woman suffrage; letters of complaint against Secretary Baker; requests for transfers from Army to navy; letters regarding transportation problems.

General Correspondence, (D-G) 1917
Box: 123

A. Miscellaneous correspondence dealing with problems pertinent at the time: Agreement by Carter Glass to participate in activities to be held in honor of Samuel Gompers.

B. Data on the proposed American-Hellenic Commercial Corporation, a joint stock company.

C. Letter from John V. Farwell to Carter Glass on July 24, 1918, enclosing a copy of an article by Farwell in the Chicago Daily Tribune, requesting that Carter Glass oppose a pending revenue bill, if he agrees with the criticisms expressed.

D. Letter, Carter Glass to Representative W. J. Fields, March 21, 1918,, expressing the opinion that Congress will not accept a bill insuring bank deposits.

E. Letter from the New York Clearing House on February 21, 1918, asking that Section 13 of the Federal Reserve Act be amended, so that member banks would not have to pay a tax on advances made by the Federal Reserve System on the basis of promissory notes.

F. Letter of June 21, 1917, from Carter Glass to a Lynchburg, Virginia, lawyer, discussing governmental regulation of price fixing in the coal industry.

G. Letter from H. B. Powell, stating that an attempt was being made by the New York Federal Reserve Bank to gain control of the import and export of gold, thereby nullifying the Federal Reserve Act.

Correspondence
Box: 124

A. Letters from various persons relative to appointments to many types of positions; Many requests for speeches, copies of hearings and the like; Letter from Carter Glass to Williams and one to Cucullu regarding bank loans to its own directors; Letter, David Lubin to Carter Glass regarding farm credit legislation, 27 November 1917; Letter from Carter Glass to David J. Lewis regarding Irving Fisher and the gold standard; Carter Glass to Morris Cohen regarding speech by senator Edward Holden on the Federal Reserve System; Princeton Bank and Trust Company to Carter Glass regarding section 22 of the Federal Reserve Act and loans to bank officers; Memorandum of R. L. Henry, chairman of the House Committee on Rules regarding security affiliates of the First National Bank and the National City Bank of New York City.

B. Letters regarding new jobs and transfers from old jobs; problems of pensioners; requests for seeds and government documents; Invitations to make addresses; Requests for the views of Senator Carter Glass on pending legislation; Political appointments; Pleas for assistance from persons seeking promotions to better salary positions; Letters regarding the filling of vacancies with the right people; Claims with persons against various departments.

General Correspondence, (Mc-G) 1917
Box: 125

A. Miscellaneous correspondence concerning problems pertinent at the time: Letter, Carter Glass to William G. McAdoo, asking that he not interfere in the dismissal of a member of the Land Bank Board; Letters between Carter Glass and Thomas B. McAdams, regarding amendments to the section of the Federal Reserve Act limiting bank loans to a percentage of capital and surplus, and suggesting that member bank interest rates be made to correspond more closely to the Federal Reserve discount rate; Note from William G. McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, March 28, 1918, asking Carter Glass to aid in the passing of a bill, relating to the War Emergency Fund; Letter from William G. McAdoo, suggesting that the National Bank Act be amended so as to lower taxes in connection with liberty bonds and Treasury certificates; Copies of letters from William G. McAdoo and Carter Glass aiding the campaign of Ralph W. Moss, a member of the Banking and Currency Committee, for re-election to the House; Suggested amendment by Louis T. McFadden, a member of the House Banking and Currency Committee, March 12, 1918, permitting member banks, situated close to reserve cities or central reserve cities, to chose between several levels of reserves to be maintained at the Federal Reserve banks; Letter, Carter Glass to W. M. McCormick, president of the Baltimore Commercial Bank, stating that work on changing the requirements for entrance by state banks into the Federal Reserve System continued; Letter from A. C. Miller, of the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, D. C., congratulating Carter Glass on the passing of the War Finance Corporation bill; Copy of the National City Bank Letter, February, 1918; Letter from Victor Morawetz on July 5, 1918, accompanying several of his articles, particularly concerning labor problems and the form in which taxes should be extracted; Correspondence preparatory to the election of 1918; Letter, October 2, 1917, from a representative of the American Bankers Association, stating that banks would have to bear the costs involved in issuing national bank notes of smaller denominations than those already circulating at the time. Senator Robert L. Owen answers that the bill, which is being criticized, has already been passed, and Carter Glass responds similarly; Correspondence, July, 1918, between Carter Glass and Robert L. Owen, regrading earlier attempts to contact each other; Letter from W. M .McCormick, president of the Baltimore Commercial Bank, October 19, 1917, stating that it is likely that three of the largest Maryland banks will soon ask for admission to the Federal Reserve System; Correspondence with John Perrin, Federal Reserve Agent of the San Francisco bank, during July, 1917, concerning the failure to amend the Federal Reserve Act, so as to enable branch banks to maintain a supply of unissued Federal Reserve notes; Carter Glass, in responding to a request to speak in behalf of liberty loans, states on June 20, 1917, that he has been too busy working on Federal Reserve legislation to accept such engagements; Letter, March 13, 1918, from Herbert Quick, a member of the Farm Loan Board, denying statements by a Haslam, concerning the part played by Professor Scott, of the University of Wisconsin, in the drafting of the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from an official of the Riverside National Bank, October 10, 1917, to the editor of the Commercial and Financial Chronicle, discussing the problems posed by the action of the securities market; Correspondence with Representative Michael P. Phelan during July, 1918, concerning attempts to get the Phelan bill, which dealt with denominations of Federal Reserve notes, through the Senate; Correspondence between the Richmond Federal Reserve Bank and a Lynchburg, Virginia, bank concerning the failure of the authorities to permit surplus funds for rediscounting purposes; Letter, Carter Glass to Michael F. Phelan, September 29, 1918, regarding an amendment to the National Bank Act, which would enable banks to use their funds for certain educational purposes.

Correspondence 1917
Box: 126

A. Letter from Sydney Rothschild to Carter Glass, 12 December 1918, regarding the effectiveness of the Federal Advisory Council, discussing a plan for a remedy; Carter Glass to Sheffey, 19 July 1917, regarding interest rates on call money and the Federal Reserve.

B. Letters regarding situations and problems of constituents, and some personal problems of Carter Glass.

General correspondence, (T-Z) 1917
Box: 127

A. Miscellaneous correspondence: Correspondence with the National Association of Credit Men congratulating them upon working for the defeat of the Hardwick amendment, which would have enabled banks to charge for clearing checks; Letter, May 31, 1917, from R. H. Tremain, Deputy Governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, accompanying a copy of a speech by L. H. Hendricks, considered relevant to the problem created by the Hardwick amendment; Letter from the Farm Mortgage Association of America, March 5, 1918, dealing largely with agricultural financing and suggesting that paper arising from other than commercial transactions should not be made eligible for rediscount. Carter Glass answers that investment securities should not be included among eligible paper; Letter from J. H. Tregoe, secretary of the National Association of Credit Men, April 5, 1918, accompanying a copy of a statement to the Secretary of the Treasury, suggesting that some way be found to lighten the tax burden on manufacturers. Carter Glass responds that he has asked the Treasury Department to permit the payment of taxes over a period of time, rather than all at once; Letter from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary to the President, January 24, 1918, asking that Carter Glass accept an invitation to make a speech which Woodrow Wilson would be unable to make; Note from Joseph P. Tumulty, June 28, 1918, stating that a letter from Carter Glass, apparently dealing with H. Parker Willis, had been presented to the President; Copy of resolutions adopted by the National Association of Credit Men, concerning the usefulness of the trade acceptance, the outstanding charter of Federal Reserve officials, particularly Paul M. Warburg, and the number of state banks which had become members of the Federal Reserve System; Correspondence with a Roanoke, Virginia, banker, regarding failure to get checks cleared properly; Letter, February 25, 1918, from the governor of the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank to Carter Glass, telling of the adverse effect, upon the program to convince state banks to come into the Federal Reserve System, of a statement by Carter Glass that certain Federal Reserve officials were grafters; Note from John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, October 12, 1917, suggesting that something be done to bring to a halt the unnecessary decline of prices on the stock market, thereby protecting debtors, and mentioning prevention of the short selling of securities; Correspondence with the Comptroller of the Currency, regarding loans to bank directors; Letter, March 1, 1918, to Paul M. Warburg, concerning the problems of permitting notes of the War Finance Corporation to be bought and sold by the Federal Reserve Banks on the open market; Letter to the editor of the New York World, February 8, 1918, refuting the claim by Senator Gilbert M. Hitchcock that the Federal Reserve Act was largely the result of his own labors and differed considerably from the bill supported by Carter Glass; Letter from William C. Ward, October 5, 1917, stating that several of the reasons for the Guarantee Trust Company joining the Federal Reserve System were to take advantage of the opportunity to rediscount paper and to better their position in international finance; Letter from H. Parker Willis, secretary of the Federal Reserve Board, to Carter Glass, enclosing copies of amendments to the Federal Reserve Act to be proof read by Carter Glass and also including several committee reports; Correspondence during 1918, regarding the possible effects of the government taking over the railroads; Lengthy, handwritten letter to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis, July 28, 1918, apprising Carter Glass of the status of the various members of the Federal Reserve Board, as to availability to carry on their functions and setting forth his own plans for terminating his work as secretary of the Board. A majority of the Board members were either out of town, too busy with other duties, or leaving their positions entirely. No work was being accomplished and few plans could be made until Congress, then in session but not willing to consider any important legislative matters, made appointments which would fill the vacancies on the Board. H. Parker Willis sees the period as the end of the initial stage of the history of the Federal Reserve System. He plans to continue his association with the System, but in an advisory capacity from New York; Personal letter to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis, June 25, 1918, noting the resignation of Frederick A. Delano and asking that Carter Glass suggest to the President that H. Parker Willis be appointed to the vacant position on the Federal Reserve Board, if this action were considered desirable by Carter Glass. H. Parker Willis states that his reason for making such a suggestion is to insure that a person who understands the problems of the Board is appointed to the position. He says that he will take no other action on this proposition; Copy of a letter written by Carter Glass on June 27, 1918, to Woodrow Wilson, recommending that H. Parker Willis be appointed to the Federal Reserve Board in the place of Frederick A. Delano, and giving his qualifications for the job; Letter to Carter Glass from H. Parker Willis, August 21, 1918, expressing interest in a letter sent to him by Carter Glass and stating that he hoped to learn that a favorable decision had been made in the matter; Correspondence and pamphlets, 1918, regarding priority in production of goods; Telegram from F. K. Wyncott, of Portsmouth, Virginia, stating simply that McAdoo should succeed Wilson; Telegram from Carter Glass to Paul M. Warburg, undated, saying in part, "Am deeply disappointed at turn of events, which is to be deplored. Will write when I get your address."

Correspondence 1917, 1937-1938
Box: 128

A. Letter, 18 February 1918, from Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass regarding Carter Glass' reply to Senator Chamberlain; Folder of letters relating to the controversy with Harold L. Ickes, including many letters of gratitude to Carter Glass for his address in which he responded to Harold L. Ickes ' insults to him; Many letters to Carter Glass from people across the land for his castigation of Senator Chamberlain of Oregon for his attack on the administration's conduct of the war, 1918; Letters of congratulations to Carter Glass on his speech of 7 February 1918; Communication from Dr. John De LaMeter of the Federal Reserve Bulletin; Letter of 25 February 1918; Memo, 6 February 1918, from the War Department regarding machine guns; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin of the Board congratulating Carter Glass on his address; Letter of Elizabeth Baker (Mrs. Newton D. Baker ) to Carter Glass regarding his defense of the War Department; Letter from Secretary Lansing to Carter Glass congratulating him on his speech in defense of the War Department; Copy of a message from Secretary Carter Glass, 19 December 1918, to American Embassy, Paris, for the President; Memo, 27 August 1938, of Carter Glass regarding Harold L. Ickes; Letter from Carter Glass to Mrs. Banister, 6 September 1938, regarding Harold L. Ickes and others; Clipping from Hugh Johnson's column, August 30, 1938, regarding Harold L. Ickes; Carter Glass to Harold L. Ickes, 9 September 1937, Frank A. Dougherty to Carter Glass; Paper, no address, from Rochester, 3 August 1938, to Carter Glass from unknown; Letter of Carter Glass, 7 September 1938, to Hugh Johnson.

B. Letters, mostly congratulating to Carter Glass for his attack on Senator Chamberlain.

Answers to congratulatory messages on becoming Secretary of the Treasury 1918-1919
Box: 129

A. Notes from Carter Glass, answering congratulatory messages from many persons upon his appointment as Secretary of the Treasury, including notes to Pierre Jay, George J. Seay, Dr. Edwin R. Seligman, Sol Wexler, John Sharpe Williams, Coldwell Hardy, John V. Farwell, Bernard M. Baruch, Henry Morgenthau, who was later to become Secretary of the Treasury, Joseph P. Tumulty, William W. Flannagan, W. P. G. Harding, Festus G. Wade, George M. Reynolds, Theodore E. Burton, Paul M. Warburg, E. D. Hulbert, William M. Martin, A. D. Noyes, John Skelton Williams, A. C. Miller, A. Barton Hepburn, Russell C. Leffingwell, Charles S. Hamlin, Oliver J. Sands, Benjamin Strong, Jouett Shouse, Robert L. Owen, J. H. Tregoe, Charles W. Fowler, Thomas B. McAdams, A. D. Welton and Royal Meeker.

Correspondence, (A-B) 1919
Box: 130

A. Miscellaneous correspondence some of which involves matters of concern to the Treasury Department : Letter, November 1, 1919, to K. C. Adams, expressing the opinion that Congress would not pass legislation leading to the maintenance of an international commodity index at a constant level; In answer to a letter of April 1, 1919, Carter Glass states that more Treasury certificates will be issued and probably exchanged for government bonds, but that he can make no estimate as to the rate of taxation within the immediate future; Letter from Alfred G. Allen, a Cincinnati lawyer, January 11, 1919, refusing the opportunity to become Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, and suggesting that Robert B. Bulkley of Walter W. Warwick, Comptroller of the Treasury, would be capable of handling the job; Copy of a pamphlet on financial matters, "The Busy B's -Bankruptcy and Banking"; Telegram from a representative of the American Acceptance Council, asking Carter Glass to write a statement in favor of the use of trade and bank acceptance; Correspondence with the American Bankers Association during 1919, in which Carter Glass refuses an invitation to speak to a convention of the group; Letter, December 10, 1918, from Irving Fisher, asking that Carter Glass preside at a meeting of the American Economic Association is answered negatively by Carter Glass. Dr. Fisher suggests that Carter Glass address himself to the problems of "reconstructing monetary standards;" Numerous offers for speaking engagements, most of which are declined by Carter Glass; Correspondence between the American National Bank of Saint Paul, Minnesota, and Russell C. Leffingwell, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, concerning the deposit of government funds; Invitation from General Douglas McArthur, superintendent of the United States Military Academy, to attend the 1919 Army-Navy football game; Printed pamphlet by the Associated Advertising Clubs of the World, January 7, 1919, denouncing fraud in the Pan Motor Company of New Mexico; In a letter to Robert Carter Glass, Carter Glass states that, "for personal reasons I would not be willing to ask any favor of Strong" ( Benjamin Strong, Governor of the New York Federal Reserve Bank ); Plans by Federal Reserve officials for a visit by Secretary Carter Glass to Atlanta, Georgia; Correspondence concerning Mrs. Emma Ayres Skinner, who wanted a job either at the Federal Reserve Board of with the Treasury Department; Letter to Carter Glass regarding American Jewish Congress held in December, 1918, and the Bill of Rights adopted there in favor of religious liberty.

B. Correspondence between the Treasury Department and the American Mission at Paris : Agreement by the American Mission with the Treasury Department that the United States should not borrow in foreign countries for the purpose of stabilizing the dollar or raising that value of the dollar in foreign countries and giving several reasons for the opinion; Article on "The Financial Situation in Germany, " with similar analysis for Spain and England; Rejection by the Treasury Department of a plan proposed by Britain's Lloyd George for financial aid to Europe; Suggestion by the American Mission that appeal should be made to the Federal Reserve Board to cooperate with Belgium in supplying gold or securities to aid German recovery; Reports dealing with financial problems brought about by the conclusion of the war.

C. Correspondence with American Legion organizations, regarding the punishment of enemies of the United States, who reside within the country.

D. Miscellaneous correspondence: Letter attacking Frank A. Vanderlip, whom it is feared may be appointed to take the place of Frederick A. Delano on the Federal Reserve Board.

E. Ca. 75 miscellaneous letters, mainly regarding patronage and speaking invitations, 1918-1920.

Correspondence, (BA-BR) 1919
Box: 131

A. Correspondence from Roger Babson, Director of the Information and Education Services of the Labor Department, and criticisms sent to Carter Glass about Babson's statistical data.

B. Correspondence with Newton D. Baker, Secretary of War.

C. Correspondence relating to invitations to speak in Baltimore.

D. Letter from Frank P. Bennett, stating that the country would gain by having Carter Glass accept an appointment to the Federal Reserve Board, which it was rumored that the President had offered.

E. Miscellaneous correspondence, requests for jobs and preferment, military matters, liberty loan drive.

F. Miscellaneous correspondence, requests for jobs and early discharge from military service, for speeches (usually declined), and liberty loan drives.

G. Miscellaneous correspondence: Correspondence relating to several speaking engagements which Carter Glass might accept, including letters to several Congress men; Letter to Calvin Coolidge, Governor of Massachusetts, concerning a proposed speaking engagement in Boston; Several pictures of Carter Glass during ceremonies at the laying of a cornerstone; Copy of a booklet published in memory of a former Congressman, Stanley E. Bowdle; Correspondence regarding victory loan campaigns.

H. Miscellaneous correspondence: Letter, April 14, 1919, from Dwight Braman, claiming that his work prior to 1913 had been to some degree responsible for the existence of the Federal Reserve System and recalling that he had appeared before the House Banking and Currency Committee when Charles N. Fowler was chairman; Correspondence regarding the condition of Senator Thomas Staples Martin and the possibility that Harry St. George Tucker might be appointed to succeed him; Copy of revisions in income tax forms were sent to the Treasury Department for an opinion on their legality; Correspondence with John Kerr Branch concerning activities connected with liberty bonds, increases in taxes, and bonds of foreign governments endorsed by the United States Government; Correspondence concerning liberty loan campaigns; Carter Glass responds to a letter complaining about the high cost of living by asking what control the government might exert; Memorandum from W. S. Broughton at the Treasury Department, concerning the part played by the Federal Reserve System in liberty bond subscriptions; Letter to Carter Glass from General John J. Pershing, Commander-in-Chief of American Expeditionary Forces, May 17, 1919, reporting favorable action on requests for release of the Army officers stationed in France; Expression of appreciation by Carter Glass for the offer by a St. Louis publisher to give extra publicity to Treasury policies, whenever such an effort was needed; Handwritten note to Secretary Carter Glass from William Jennings Bryan, suggesting that John Skelton Williams, whose work as Comptroller of the Currency he praises highly, would be the best possible person to become Secretary of the Treasury; Letter from William Jennings Bryan, February 15, 1919, suggesting that ex-servicemen should be god salesmen for liberty bonds, if the were encouraged by the Treasury Department to engage actively in the sales campaign.

Correspondence
Box: 132

A. Papers relating to appointments to Annapolis, transfers sought by men in the service, applications for help in securing appointments, appointments to Annapolis from and to Carter Glass.

B. Correspondence largely regarding military transfers, and appointments to the United States Naval Academy, citing test dates, entrance regulations, and appointment procedures.

Correspondence, (BR-CO) 1919
Box: 133

A. Miscellaneous correspondence (BU-BY): Proposal from the Division of Loans and Currency of the Treasury Department that the government begin preparation of a budget which would be adequate to determine appropriations; Correspondence concerning liberty loans, including a note from Joseph P. Tumulty, Secretary of the President; Letter from E. S. Burke, Jr., praising Carter Glass for his work at the Treasury Department and in connection with the establishment of the Federal Reserve System; Correspondence with John Burke, Treasurer of the United States, concerning certain undesirable activities by the International Bank of Washington, which was making use of Burke's name; Memorandum from John Burke regarding an appointment to the assistant treasurership of the United States, accompanied by a note from Russell C. Leffingwell; Copy of the First Annual Report of the War Finance Corporation, January 23, 1919, from the Federal Reserve Board; Appeals for release from military duty; Correspondence on post-war loan drives; Stock frauds offering to sell shares in return for Liberty Bonds; Correspondence regarding a dispute between A. H. Burroughs, president of a sugar company in Mexico and a friend of Carter Glass, and the War Trade Board, over export of some machinery.

B. Miscellaneous correspondence (A-CE): Correspondence concerning victory loans; Correspondence with Representative Jouett Shouse, concerning the possibility of having Treasury officials propose promotions in the case of the Coast Guard; Telegram from C. D. Carter, November 27, 1919, expressing the hope that the problem of placing a branch reserve bank at Oklahoma City would soon be settled; Copy of a letter in which Dudley Cates of the Bureau of War Risk Insurance upholds the decision to resign his position and criticizes the organization of the bureau; Patronage; Soldier's bonus; Invitations to speak or attend meetings; War Risk Insurance Bureau letters of complaint and praise for Carter Glass' clean-up efforts.

C. Memoranda and notes from George R. Cooksey of the Treasury Department, concerning war risk insurance, liberty loans, and the sale of government bonds to cover revenue inadequate, among other things Civics and Commercemagazine, September 1919, a publication of the Milwaukee Association of Commerce, with article on aviation in Milwaukee; Memoranda and correspondence on adjusting government salaries to inflation; Numerous telegrams regarding liberty loan campaigns.

D. Miscellaneous correspondence (CH-CO): Correspondence concerning liberty loans, patronage, discharges, commissions; Canceled checks from Carter Glass' account at Washington Bank; Notes involving a feud between Cooper, President of the Union Savings Bank of D. C., and John Skelton Williams, (Williams' papers, #10, 040, are available at the University of Virginia ), then being considered for comptroller of the Currency, 1918-1920.

Correspondence
Box: 134

A. Special article prepared for Carter Glass for Josephus Daniels for publication in the Raleigh News and Observer; Miscellaneous correspondence, including local Virginia politics, invitations to speak, Liberty Loans, military discharges, 1918-1920; Letter from DeSassure of the Jacksonville branch regarding Federal Trust Companies, 23 June 1919; Correspondence of Josephus Daniels and Carter Glass, including a very interesting Carter Glass letter of July 16, 1928, discussing the Democratic platform of that year, especially the question of prohibition; Other letters regarding 1928 campaign; Virginia politics, references to Bishop James Cannon (the political power); Some letters regarding banking reform during the Depression; Paper referring to Carter Glass' article in the Saturday Evening Post, 9 August 1919; Correspondence with E. A. Christian, a first cousin of Carter Glass, living in Texas, asking for a jobs or a loan, some minor political interest, 1919-1919; Norman Davis to Carter Glass regarding Strong as a member of the Reparations Committee, 27 August 1919; Correspondence with City of Charleston, South Carolina, mainly with Mayor T. T. Hyde, relative to the Liberty Loan Drive, 1919; Letter or memo from Carter Glass to Frederick A. Delano regarding a proposed action by the Federal Reserve Board concerning the number of Federal Reserve Banks, 18 November 1915. Carter Glass strongly disagrees with Frederick A. Delano and the Board as to the proposed action. Reference to the Board's action or motion is made but not attached to the memo; Invitations to speak to various groups in Chicago, 1919; Invitations to speak to various groups in Cleveland, 1919; Correspondence with Frederick A. Delano in which Carter Glass is very hostile to the idea of reducing the number of Federal Reserve Banks, typed copy, marked "strictly confidential," 1915-1917; Copy of an article, 1917, on proposed reforms to bring more state banks into the Reserve system.

Correspondence, (DE-FI) 1919
Box: 135

A. Correspondence with the Democratic National Committee : Printed copy of the Proceedings of the Democratic National Committee, February 26, 1919; Letters regarding appointment of women to National Committee; Other appointments.

B. Miscellaneous correspondence (DI-DY): Correspondence concerning victory loans; Correspondence with John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, Daniel C. Roper, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, and others, recommending John B. Doolin for the directorship of the Oklahoma City branch of the Federal Reserve Bank; Letter from John S. Drum, of the Capital Issues Committee, on January 4, 1919, discussing the problem of state banks, which perform savings functions, being admitted to membership in the Federal Reserve System; Letter of January 27, 1919, asking the opinion of Carter Glass as to what the states should do in connection with banks having capital of less than $25, 000; Correspondence on jobs, discharges, introductions, invitations to speak.

C. Correspondence with M. K. Duerson of the Lynchburg newspaper with which Carter Glass was connected: Nearly all personal business connected with Carter Glass' financial affairs, especially The Newsand The Advancenewspapers of Lynchburg.

D. Miscellaneous correspondence (E): Statement by Congressman Joe H. Eagle as to how bond sales might be increased during the 1919 victory loan campaigns; Correspondence concerning victory loans; Letter from David Elliot, December 9, 1918, asking that the time limit for converting government 4's into 4 1/2% bonds to be extended, since it was thought by some that conversion could be accomplished at will. Carter Glass responds that this recommendation was made to Congress; Copies of the monthly financial letter of the Farmers and Merchants National Bank of Los Angeles, which is severely criticized by John B. Elliott, customs collector for the Los Angeles district; Letter from Milton C. Elliott, expressing regret that he had found it necessary to resign as general counsel of the Federal Reserve Board; Letter from John Burke, Treasurer of the United States, noting with favor the selection of Elliott for the position of Register of the Treasury; Letter from Guy Emerson, vice-president of the National Bank of Commerce in New York, suggesting that the war-inspired cooperation between the Treasury Department and the bankers should be continued, possible through the Federal Reserve System; Copy of a draft of a plan for European relief, submitted to Carter Glass for consideration by an assistant secretary; Patronage appeals, invitations to speak, etc.

E. Miscellaneous correspondence (FA-FI): Correspondence relating to liberty loans; Correspondence with John V. Farwell, who refuses opportunity to have his name proposed as a replacement for Frederick A. Delano on the Federal Reserve Board; Letters from Farwell, suggesting that, in view of the large profits being made by textile manufacturers, the Tariff Commission should study the feasibility of providing less protection for the industry, in order to increase the supply of dry goods and lower the price; Suggestion from Frederick T. Fearney that the government exploit Alaskan coal resources; Copy of the form upon which Federal Reserve banks were to report earnings and dividends was sent to Carter Glass from the Federal Reserve Board; Letter from Representative Scott Ferris, expressing favor with the appointment of Jouett Shouse as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury; Newspaper article concerning the Bureau of War Risk Insurance with particular reference to its former director, Henry D. Lindsley; Correspondence with Scott Ferris, regarding his attitude concerning the establishment of a branch Federal Reserve bank at Oklahoma City; Copy of an editorial by Douglas Southall Freeman in the Richmond News Leader, backing Carter Glass for either the governorship of Virginia or a seat in the Senate, whichever he desired; Correspondence with Irving Fisher, who sent copies of the final report of the American Economic Association on the purchasing power of money to Secretary Carter Glass. Carter Glass expressing willingness to discuss at a later date the problems involved in a readjustment of monetary standards with Fisher; Reports, pamphlets, etc. regarding continuation of government insurance; Copy of an article by Carter Glass entitled,"The Financial Tasks and Duties of Today," in the May 7, 1919, issue of the Vicksburg(Miss.)Herald; Correspondence with various farmers' groups regarding War Risk Insurance, patronage, etc.

Correspondence, (FA-GL) 1919
Box: 136

A. Correspondence with A. B. Farquhar concerning matters of economic import and especially regarding war debts: Memorandum regarding government finance, prepared for Charles E. Mitchell.

B. Correspondence with the Federal Reserve Board, while Carter Glass was Secretary of the Treasury: List of Class C directors of Federal Reserve banks, appointed at a meeting of the Federal Reserve Board on December 18, 1919; Statement of the Federal Reserve Board in which the location at Oklahoma City of a branch bank of the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank is approved; Two copies of reports on general business conditions, prepared at the New York Federal Reserve Bank; Note relating to actions by the Federal Reserve Board and a list of topics to be discussed during the next meeting; Memorandum concerning the volume of government securities held in foreign countries; Memorandum concerning the practice of buying acceptance across reserve district lines.

C. Miscellaneous correspondence (FL-FY): Correspondence with William W. Flannagan; Note, William W. Flannagan, to Carter Glass, expressing the opinion that the reversal in attitude toward the Federal Reserve System on the part of New York banks was significant; Explanation of the retirement of F. W. Foote, a Mississippi banker, from a position as director of the Federal Reserve bank of his district and presenting the name of a logical successor; Correspondence relating to the Federal Farm Loan System; Correspondence concerning the selection of and appointee to the War Finance Corporation; Letter from P. M. Foshay, December 8, 1919, regarding the incidence of taxation; Copy of a program for a meeting of certain Federal Reserve officials on December 30, 1918, during which the plans of the Treasury Department for the 1919 war savings campaign were to be discussed; Correspondence with the Secretary of War, Newton D. Baker, regarding retention in army career of an emergency officer; Correspondence regarding sit of the 1920 Democratic Convention; Newspaper article criticizing the luxury of President Wilson's accommodations in Europe; Liberty Loan material, including letters from Women's Liberty Loan Committee, Antoinette Funk; Letters regarding food relief and credit for Europe, which Carter Glass was in favor of.

D. Miscellaneous correspondence (GA-GI): Copy of an address by Elbert H. Gary on June 23, 1913, on labor; Letter from Edwin F. Gay, Director of the Central Bureau of Planning and Statistics, announcing the discontinuance of his organization; Patronage Liberty Loan, invitations to speak; Correspondence with Representative John N. Garner of Texas regarding salaries of customs agents and border guards.

E. Personal correspondence Data; Newspaper clippings from 1918-1920, especially on rumors of Carter Glass for president.

Miscellaneous correspondence (GL-GO)
Box: 137

A.: Copy of Hill's Golden Rule, January, 1919; Letter from Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of Labor, accompanying a copy of, Labor and the War; Letter from John W. Gordon of Gordon and Brown, insurance agency, Richmond, Virginia, representing London concerns, giving reasons for favoring continuation of government ownership of the railroads. Gordon favors private operation of the railroads, but feels that conditions created during the period of government ownership were so bad as to render the railroads incapable of continuing to operate without government guarantee of compensation. He also felt that the laborers were tending to force the companies towards bankruptcy and indited Samuel Gompers, LaFollette, and Burger in this connection; Note from Bob Gordon, office sergeant-at-arms for the House of Representatives, December 20, 1918, expressing sorrow at the departure of Carter Glass, who had agreed to become Secretary of the Treasury; Suggestion that the 3% government bonds payable on demand be exchanged for 4 1/4% bonds; Personal correspondence with relatives; Patronage; Letter from Carter Glass to Richard Carter Glass, criticizing the latter for an intemperate editorial in The Advanceattacking railroad unions.

B. Miscellaneous correspondence (GR-GY): Letter describing favorable reaction of a group of state bankers in the Tidewater, Virginia, area after having heard Carter Glass speak about the victory loan; Accusation by A. W. Green that the banking interests, which opposed the Federal Reserve legislation, were now opposing the attempt by the Federal Trade Commission to regulate the packing industry, which seemed to have a type of monopoly; Letter, January 27, 1919, from Thomas W. Gregory, Attorney General, attempting to smooth over minor difficulties involving the Treasury Department and the Alien Property Custodian over the refusal of the Treasury and particularly Russell C. Leffingwell, to make certain payments; Copy of a booklet entitled, "Why the Government Should Own the Railroads;" Copy of a speech, "The Financial Outlook," made on December 27, 1918, by B. Howell Griswold; Correspondence relating to the War Risk Bureau; Correspondence concerning the victory loan; Copy of a House bill to provide for a library information service in the Bureau of Education; Copy of a pamphlet by Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of Labor, entitled, "Why the Peace Treaty Should be Ratified, American labor's reasons for supporting the League of Nations covenant with its labor provisions;" Letter of introduction for W. D. Guerin, a Cleveland, Ohio banker, from Senator Atlee Pomerene; Patronage; Speaking invitations.

C. Miscellaneous correspondence (HO-HY): Booklet showing the method by which the budget for the State of Virginia was being prepared; Memorandum on the economic situation in Europe, prepared on July 3, 1919, by Herbert Hoover.

Miscellaneous correspondence, (H-I) 1919-1920

A.: Patronage, Liberty Loans; printed pamphlet with plan for National Equipment Corporation to speak; Exchange of public letters between Carter Glass and Will H. Hays, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, over Hays' false charge that lists of Liberty Loan subscribers were being used as Democratic Party mailing lists; Correspondence with John M. Hart about Virginia politics and other matters; Correspondence with Edward N. Hurley regarding of the United States Shipping Board and prospects for the United States Merchant Marine; Letter, Carter Glass to Haislip, attacking Senator Henry Cabot Lodge; D. F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture, letters regarding need for public thrift and the Bureau of War Risk Insurance; Correspondence concerned with appointment of new collector on internal revenue for Utah; Letters regarding controversy between the United States Railroad Administration under Walker D. Hines, and the Industrial Board under George N. Peck, which was attempting to set prices for industrial products; Correspondence on patronage, speaking engagements, loan drives, etc.

B. Miscellaneous Financial Documents, 1916-1919: Report on banking and finances in South America, 1916; Report, 1919, denouncing the proposed International Gold Clearance Fund; Report, 1919, on the work of the International High Commission.

C. Correspondence involving E. P. Howard, Murray Hulbert, Joseph W. Haseman, George Harrison, John M. Short, H. H. Perry, Walker Hines.

Correspondence, (J-K) 1919
Box: 139

A. Miscellaneous correspondence (J): Correspondence in which Carter Glass refuses opportunity to speak at a meeting of the Florida Bankers' Association, including a letter from George R. Desaussure, manager of the Jacksonville branch of the Federal Reserve bank of Atlanta; Correspondence involving several persons, including R. L. VanZandt, governor of the Federal Reserve Bank at Dallas, Texas, concerning the propriety of transferring the account of the Leigh Valley Railroad from one bank to another by order of the Comptroller of the Currency; Correspondence with Pierre Jay, of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York during March, 1919, concerning the cessation to the deposits of the New York Central Railroad at the First Trust and Deposit Company, Syracuse, New York, as a result of the order issued by the Comptroller of the Currency prohibiting the maintaining of railroad accounts with certain trust companies; Letter from Senator Edward S. Johnson on August 6, 1919, accompanying a copy of a letter sent to President Wilson stating that the way to solve the problem of the high cost of necessities was to limit the percent of profits in the same manner that the rate of interest charged by banks was limited; Copy of a letter from Carter Glass to Arthur A. Jones written on August 11, 1919, in which the authorship of the Federal Reserve Act is discussed. Carter Glass denies the statement by Jones that Woodrow Wilson was the author of the measure, even though the backing of E. D. Hulbert had been cited as the foundation for the statement. Carter Glass sent a copy of his speeches before the House of Representatives on September 10 and 13, 1913, with the passages marked which answered the question. He also stated that it could be proven that, although attempts were made, the Senate did not succeed in forcing any major changes in the House bill; Letter and note mentioning the name of W. A. Julian. The letter is from Senator Atlee Pomerene; the note mentions the Federal Reserve Board; Patronage letters; Soldier's discharge requests; Some personal letters.

B. Correspondence during 1919 with R. G. Cholmley-Jones, director of the Bureau of War Risk Insurance : Letters of recommendation for R. G. Chomley-Jones as director of War Risk Insurance; Brief biography of R. G. Chomley-Jones.

C. Miscellaneous correspondence (KA-KI): Letter, October 28, 1919, from S. M. Kaplan, concerning the possible increase in the capital and surplus of the Fifth National Bank of New York; Correspondence involving W. A. Heath, chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, concerning passports to Europe; Robert D. Kent, president of the Merchants Bank of Passaic in New Jersey, wrote to Carter Glass on January 22, 1919, asking his opinion of statements made by Kent with regard to the office of Comptroller of the Currency during an address entitled, "The Federal Reserve System from the Viewpoint of an Ineligible Non-Member," at a convention of the American Bankers Association. Carter Glass responds that he disagrees with what Kent has to say and that he does not feel that the office of the Comptroller of the Currency should be merged with the Federal Reserve Board. A copy of the speech by Kent is enclosed; Correspondence with Representative William Kettner, concerning the attempt to appoint a chief national bank examiner at San Francisco; Correspondence with Willard M. Kiplinger, who had just resigned a position with the Associated Press to go to work for the National Bank of Commerce. Carter Glass thanks him for his cooperation in connection with the liberty loan campaigns; Correspondence regarding patronage, military discharges, educational proposals, requests to speck; Correspondence with C. G. Kizer relative to Carter Glass possibly running for Governor or Senator.

D. Miscellaneous Correspondence (KL-KY): Copy of a speech by C. E. Knoeppel concerning the cost of living and a pamphlet, "Economic Production Plus Industrial Democracy, sent to Carter Glass by Knoeppel, president of an industrial engineering concern; Correspondence regarding patronage, requests to speak; Typed resolution of the New Korea Association protesting Japanese occupation of Korea.

Miscellaneous Correspondence (LA-LI)
Box: 140

A. Patronage, especially government appointments; Requests to speak; Honorary degree to Carter Glass from Lafayette College; Military discharges; Correspondence with J. H. Lindsay, editor and owner of The Daily Progress, Charlottesville, Virginia; Statement by Carter Glass in favor of a National Budget System; Correspondence with Lithuanian National Council regarding possible United States recognition of independent Lithuania.

B. Miscellaneous Correspondence (LO-LY): Correspondence with C. L. Lobeck, Congressman from Nebraska; Loan drives; Patronage; Requests to speak; Military discharges; Letters to S. L. Lupton of the State Corporation commission, describing failure of Lynchburg Traction and Light Company as seen by Carter Glass.

C. Miscellaneous correspondence with James Hamilton Lewis, Senator from Illinois.

D. Henry D. Lindley, Director of Bureau of War Risk Insurance : Correspondence of Carter Glass, Henry D. Lindley, and others, especially regarding conflict with Carter Glass and Lindley's resignation.

Correspondence between William G. McAdoo and Carter Glass
Box: 141

A. Covers a variety of topics, especially government loan drives, questions by Carter Glass about Treasury procedures, national politics, appointments to government office, labor relations, the railroads, discussion of a successor for Carter Glass at the Treasury ( John Skelton Williams was considered), etc. regarding the appointment of a secretary of the Treasury.

B. Correspondence with R. C. McGhee, an employee of Glass: Correspondence regarding business in Lynchburg.

C. Miscellaneous correspondence, (MAC-MAY): Patronage, loan drives, military discharges.

D. Miscellaneous correspondence, (Mc): Patronage, promotions, military discharges, etc.

Miscellaneous correspondence 1919-1925
Box: 142

A. Correspondence, March, 1922, relating to an amendment to the Federal Reserve Act, suggested by Senator McKellar, whereby the paper of cotton factors would be eligible for rediscount. Carter Glass responds that he voted for this amendment, since the restrictions set forth by the Federal Reserve Board seemed to justify an affirmative vote, but that the measure had been defeated; Correspondence regarding a Federal charter for Rotary Clubs; Note from Theodore Wold, governor of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, regarding a vacant position as postmaster in St. Cloud, Minnesota; Memoranda regarding finances of the Farm Loan organization; Memoranda and booklet relating to collection of customs duties in free ports in the United States; Memorandum from A. Mitchell Palmer, Attorney General, to Carter Glass on March 20, 1919, stating that John Skelton Williams might still be considered a member of the Federal Reserve Board and, as such, be entitled to receive compensation, despite the fact that the appointment of Williams to succeed himself had not been confirmed by the Senate prior to its adjournment; Editorial in the Bristol Herald Courierof February 2, 1920, noting that Carter Glass was to leave the Treasury Department, after serving for a little more than a year, to take over the seat of Senator Martin upon the appointment of Governor Davis of Virginia. Later editorial concerns his successor; Copy of the preliminary financial statement of the United States government for April 6, 1917, to May 31, 1919; Memoranda concerning the Pittman Act of 1918, which dealt with the coinage of silver, mimeos of letters, 1922-1923; Statistics on time deposits held by national banks; Copy of the Clayton Antitrust Act; Miscellaneous patronage and other letters; Business cards; Photograph of Spanish American War Veterans.

B. Miss Maloney, 1920-1922: Correspondence dealing with employment problems of a constituent.

C. Rotary Club, 1920: Correspondence relating to a proposal for a federal charter for the International Association of Rotary Clubs.

D. Miscellaneous correspondence, 1919: Patronage; Discharges; Numerous complaints from grocers against the large packers; Material on the federal regulation of packing industry.

Correspondence and announcements regarding the Civil Service Commission and the Peace Treaty 1919-1921
Box: 143

A. Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1919-1920: Some civil service material; The remainder nearly all concerned with ratification of Treaty of Versailles.

B. Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1920-1921: Additional civil service material and requests from constituents for job assistance; Treaty of Versailles material, including printed speech by Senator Henry Cabot Lodge and printed copy of various reservations introduced by Lodge.

C. League of Nations and Peace Treaty: Telegram from Frederick A. Delano, congratulating Carter Glass on his article on the peace treaty which had appeared in the New York Times; Booklet, "The Meaning of War and the Basis for Permanent Peace," by James W. Johnson; copy of a letter from Carter Glass to Theodore Warburg on March 17, 1920, in which he indicates a knowledge of the attitude of President Wilson on certain amendments to the peace treaty;"Comparison of the Plan for the League of Nations, " 1919, 4 copies; "Treaty of Peace with Germany, " 1919, 2 copies; "Hearing Before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Part 17," 1919, one copy.

Correspondence concerning legislative and Treasury matters 1919-1922
Box: 144

A. Correspondence with Joseph P. Tumulty, secretary to the President: Note, January 14, 1920, stating that the President had not yet decided upon a successor for Carter Glass as Treasury Secretary and requesting that Carter Glass remain at the job for awhile longer; Tumulty sent an editorial taken from the Newark Evening News, January 27, 1920, in which the criticisms of Charles N. Fowler, concerning the Federal Reserve System, are discussed; Tumulty sent a copy of a letter from Senator Robert L. Owen to President Wilson on November 6, 1919, concerning the desirability of correcting an adverse balance of trade; Newspaper article in which Representative Edmund Platt proposed removing from the Federal Reserve Act those elements which William Jennings Bryan had suggested; Other correspondence from J. P. Tumulty at the White House.

B. Several notes from Robert Lansing, Secretary of State.

C. Correspondence with Daniel C. Roper, Commissioner of Internal Revenue: Letter from Roper to William G. McAdoo on August 12, 1919, reporting on events since McAdoo had left the Treasury Department; Copy of a confidential report from Daniel C. Roper on February 1, 1919, concerning the method of meeting government obligations, incurred in anticipation of revenue from quarterly payments of income and excess profits taxes, which had since been canceled.

D. Correspondence with William G. Redfield, Secretary of Commerce: Correspondence concerning the proper performance of Treasury functions in connection with foreign exchange; Correspondence relating to the terminations of price controls.

E. Correspondence with Charles S. Hamlin, member of the Federal Reserve Board : Correspondence regarding the question of the power of the Federal Reserve Board to change discount rates; Letter from Governor Harding, December 29, 1919, stating that acceptances are not being used extensively for rediscount purposes; Note from Charles S. Hamlin on December 20, 1919, pointing out an error in the proposed bill abolishing the sub-treasuries; Correspondence relating to the possible abolition of the Capital Issues Committee. Although he was chairman of the Committee, Charles S. Hamlin favored its abolition; Report from Benjamin Strong, governor of the New York Federal Reserve Bank, concerning replacement of United States notes (greenbacks) by Federal Reserve notes and the abolition of the sub-treasury system, sent by Charles S. Hamlin to Carter Glass for an expression of opinion from the Treasury Department. Carter Glass does not think highly of the proposal to retire greenbacks; Correspondence concerning a proposed Federal Stock Publicity bill to regulate stock promotions; Correspondence with John Skelton Williams, Comptroller of the Currency, concerning the wisdom of granting permission for the National City Bank to establish foreign branches; Note from Charles S. Hamlin stating that any refunding of debts by foreign countries should be handled by Federal Reserve banks, rather than by private bankers; Copy of a draft, prepared on February 7, 1919, of an act to "provide for furnishing information with respect to shares of stock offered to the public;" Statement of Carter Glass that he is happy to know that Charles S. Hamlin is satisfied with the appointment of Shouse as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.

F. Correspondence with W. P. G. Harding, Governor of the Federal Reserve Board : Copy of an address to be delivered by Harding to a Pan-American Financial Conference; Statement by Harding in which he refutes a claim by J. A. Pondrom that small banks are being discriminated against by the requirement that checks be cleared at par; Letter from W. P. G. Harding on November 12, 1919, suggesting that Carter Glass introduce legislation designed to stop the circulation of checks bearing a statement that the check would be paid at the current exchange rate; Memorandum from Harding to Carter Glass, citing a problem in which the cities of Lynchburg and Roanoke, Virginia, were involved, concerning immediate payment of checks at Federal Reserve banks, if excess reserves sufficient to cover this service were maintained; A report to the President by Senator Robert L. Owen on February 27, 1919, suggesting that the dollar be put at par with the money of other countries by the issue of government securities payable in foreign currency, is referred to Carter Glass through a personal note from Woodrow Wilson. The opinion of W. P. G. Harding on the question is presented in a letter to Carter Glass, then Secretary of the Treasury; A copy of a statement, encouraging use of credit by the construction industry, which Warren G. Harding sent to Leffingwell with the suggestion that a similar report be issued by the Treasury Department; Notes by which Carter Glass agrees that Harding is too busy to continue the work involved in his connection with the War Finance Corporation and promises to have him relieved of these duties; Report prepared by Leffingwell, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, for Carter Glass on January 3, 1919, recommending that the Federal Reserve Act be amended so that more revenue can be derived from the earnings of the Federal Reserve banks. A corresponding memorandum to Harding from M. C. Elliott, general counsel, refutes a portion of the Leffingwell memorandum; Several other notes from Harding.

G. Correspondence with Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior.

H. Correspondence concerning appointments to the Federal Reserve Board : List of persons and groups recommending several men for appointment to the Federal Reserve Board. Paul M. Warburg has the best recommendations; Article in the Daily Bulletinissued by the weekly newspaper Manufacturers Record, entitled, "Why Paul M. Warburg Should Not Be Reappointed on the Federal Reserve Board "; Telegram from Pierre Jay, presenting the names of many men who might possibly be appointed to the Federal Reserve Board, but questioning the availability of most of the better men on the list; Explanation of the provisions of the Federal Reserve Act with respect to qualifications for membership on the Federal Reserve Board, sent to Carter Glass by W. P. G. Harding; Correspondence running over a period of time between the Treasury Department and Evans Woollen, concerning the opportunity to fill a vacancy on the Federal Reserve Board. Woollen failed to arrive at the decision to accept the appointment, if tendered, in time to have his name presented; Refusal of W. A. Julian to accept recommendation as a member of the Federal Reserve Board; Telegram from William G. McAdoo to Carter Glass, then Secretary of the Treasury, approving the suggestion of Charles G. Dawes for nomination to a position on the Federal Reserve Board. Dawes declined; Wallace D. Simmons, St. Louis, Missouri, hardware executive, declines to have his name suggested by Carter Glass for a position on the Federal Reserve Board; John V. Farwell recommended Frederick A. Delano for reappointment to the Federal Reserve Board, but Carter Glass felt that circumstance prevented his making this recommendation to the President; Telegram from E. D. Hulbert also recommending Frederick A. Delano; F. H. Rawson refused a nomination for a place on the board; Letter of December 2, 1918, from Pierre Jay to Russell C. Leffingwell, passing on a recommendation of F. P. Hixon, with whose nomination it was said Benjamin Strong would concur. William G. McAdoo responds to an inquiry from Carter Glass by stating that he does not know Hixon; Note from Vice-President Thomas R. Marshall on January 18, 1919, stating that, if Evans Woollen or E. H. Wolcott are not available, he would suggest Leroy A. Goddard, whose appointment would be satisfactory with James B. Forgan and Reynolds. Carter Glass, however, was not inclined to propose the name of Goddard, because he was not widely known among western bankers; Exchange of telegrams with William G. McAdoo, agreeing to postpone action on appointments to the Federal Reserve Board; Albert Strauss at the Federal Reserve Board recommended J. H. Puelicher for nomination to the Board.

I. Response to requests for copies of the Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, including requests from several Senators. The Secretary of War, William G. McAdoo, Frederick A. Delano, Louis D. Brandeis, Robert W. Woolley, and John Wanamaker are among those who write to thank Carter Glass for sending them copies of the report.

J. Correspondence involving Russell C. Leffingwell and reports prepared by Leffingwell as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury: Letter of high commendation written by Carter Glass on February 2, 1920, to Russell C. Leffingwell for his service during the term of Carter Glass as Secretary of the Treasury, paying compliments to Leffingwell in correspondence received by Carter Glass; Memoranda relating to foreign loans; Statement and newspaper articles regarding the ship building industry; Memoranda regarding the cost of living; Summary of newspaper reports about the effect of a program, introduced by Carter Glass, whereby Treasury notes would continue un use to finance government operations; Note from Russell C. Leffingwell discouraging any policy permitting public officials to get information about national bank loans from bank examiners; Memoranda concerning price levels and determination of wheat prices by the government; Copies of several summaries pertaining to Treasury activities and expected Treasury policies; Statement by Leffingwell that banks should not buy tax certificates, in anticipation of the time when income and profits taxes fall due, but rediscount the certificates before the taxes must be paid; Memoranda relating to liberty loans; Copy of a bill "to provide a national budget system and an independent audit of Government accounts," accompanied by a Leffingwell memorandum on the bill, which expresses some disfavor; Memoranda regarding the desirability of retaining certain men on jobs indirectly involving the Treasury Department and of bringing several good new men into the department; Memorandum, addressed to Russell C. Leffingwell by Fred J. Kent, Director of the Division of Foreign exchange of the Federal Reserve Board, favoring the raising of the gold embargo; Memorandum in which Leffingwell opposes tax exemptions for bonds issued by the Federal Home Loan Bank and gives his personal reasons for taking this position; Memorandum from Leffingwell to Carter Glass on May 14, 1919, opposing a plan offered by Governor Harding, whereby the Federal Reserve Board would set up an organization of its own to handle foreign exchange matters, suggesting that these things not be taken out of the hands of New York financiers, stating that the board would not be able to conduct such business satisfactorily and that this plan is similar to an earlier plan, presented by Senator Robert L. Owen, with which Harding did not agree; Memorandum opposing the establishment of an International Gold Clearance Fund and showing the effect on the Federal Reserve System; Newspaper article reporting the likelihood of a new Treasury issue similar to previous victory loans, but with no sales campaign involved. Statement by Carter Glass, concerning the method and terms of issue is included; Russell C. Leffingwell states that he hopes acceptance of the Railroad Administration will not be allowed into Reserve bank portfolios; Leffingwell expressing alarm over a statement by Governor Miller of the Federal Reserve Bank at Kansas City, criticizing governmental expenditures and fearing that the success of the Victory Liberty Loan might be jeopardized; Memoranda and printed statements concerning liberty loans; Copy of an act of January 13, 1919, in the Senate, providing for relief in cases where formal contracts had not been made according to law; Copy of an article of January 18, 1919, entitled, "Financial Experts to Advise Wilson." The problems were those occasioned by the armistice with Germany; Memorandum from the Federal Reserve Board on January 18, 1919, concerning wheat prices.

Miscellaneous Personal Correspondence 1919-1925
Box: 145

A. Correspondence with Rixey Smith, secretary to Carter Glass : Handwritten letter from Carter Glass to Rixey Smith, asking him to locate certain statistics concerning loans by the Richmond Federal Reserve Bank to South Carolina banks, among certain papers retained for confronting Tom Heflin; Copy of a magazine article, listing Carter Glass as a possible Democratic candidate for the presidency in 1924 and devoting a lengthy paragraph to the reasons for considering him as an acceptable candidate; Rixey Smith wrote Carter Glass on July 6, 1923, to say that the things in his office had been properly stored away and that particular care had been taken of a package of papers concerning the Federal Reserve, about which Carter Glass had spoken; Letter from Rixey Smith, October 5, 1922, stating that President Harding would make no appointments to the Federal Reserve Board while Congress was not in session, but that he seemed to favor W. P. G. Harding, if Congressional approval were insured. Newspaper report of a speech by Reginald McKenna, former chancellor of the British Exchequer, concerning the methods by which England, France, Italy, and Germany could pay their debts, is enclosed by Smith.

B. Correspondence with Henry C. Stuart, former governor of Virginia : Letter of July 9, 1923, from Carter Glass, stating that the circumstances under which he feels that he might be nominated for the presidency; Carter Glass to Henry C. Stuart, July 22, 1924, describing how narrowly he had missed the Presidential nomination; Exchange of letters between Carter Glass and Henry C. Stuart, September-October, 1924, regarding attempt by former Governor Westmoreland Davis to create a division between them, as a means of breaking back into politics.

C. Letter to the editor of the Richmond Times-Dispatch, correcting an impression that, in a speech to the Richmond Chapter of the American Institute of Banking, Carter Glass had severely criticized the War Finance Corporation.

D. Correspondence with William V. Wilson, Lynchburg, Virginia, lawyer: Letter from Carter Glass to William V. Wilson on March 12, 1920, stating that he discussed the question of increasing government deposits at the Lynchburg National Bank with Assistant Secretary Leffingwell, but received little satisfaction.

E. Two copies of a speech of February 13, 1924, by Senator Samuel M. Ralston, on the Mellon tax plan.

F. Congratulatory note from Carter Glass to Samuel M. Ralston on November 13, 1922, concerning his election to the Senate.

G. Correspondence involving Jouett Shouse, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury: Copy of a letter to Jouett Shouse on June 4, 1920, from the Oklahoma branch of the Robert L. Owen for President organization, in which the claim to authorship of the Federal Reserve Act is repeated in behalf of Senator Robert L. Owen; Patronage and personal letters.

H. Correspondence with Josephus Daniels, most of which took place while he was Secretary of the Navy : Copy of a speech by Josephus Daniels on January 8, 1920, before a Jackson Day banquet audience; Correspondence relating to the book, "Our Navy at War," by Daniels, a copy of which was sent to Carter Glass on June 27, 1922; Miscellaneous correspondence with Daniels, especially requests for military discharges.

I. Correspondence between Carter Glass and Walter Lipmann, requesting information or making complimentary remarks.

J. Correspondence with Christopher B. Garnett, a Washington, D. C. lawyer: Letter from Carter Glass on November 16, 1925, discrediting the members of the Supreme Court, who participated in certain decisions involving interstate commerce; Letter of introduction for Garnett to Edmund Platt, former Congressman then serving as Deputy Governor of the Federal Reserve Board; Correspondence relating to the Norfolk and Mobjack Bay Steamboat Co., run by Garnett.

K. Correspondence with James P. Woods, a Roanoke, Virginia, lawyer, most of which concerns the possibility of a nomination for Carter Glass to candidacy for the presidency; Some local patronage and politics.

L. Correspondence of Carter Glass in which he recommends that John W. Davis be appointed to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court.

M. Correspondence, February, 1924, at the time of the death of Woodrow Wilson : Copy of an editorial of February 2, 1924, when Wilson was near death, entitled, " Woodrow Wilson in History"; Carbon copies of a letter from President Wilson to Carter Glass, May 28, 1920, thanking him for sending a copy of the platform adopted by Virginia Democrats; Excerpts from a book by Woodrow Wilson, A History of the American People; Carbon copy of a note from President Woodrow Wilson to Russell C. Leffingwell, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, on February 4, 1920, thanking him for deciding to continue his association with the Treasury Department under Secretary Houston.

N. Correspondence with E. Lee Trinkle, Governor of Virginia : Some correspondence bearing on Virginia politics and election of Governor Trinkle, patronage, etc.

Invitations 1919-1920
Box: 146

A. Invitations to attend various public functions, including several meeting of bankers organizations.

Correspondence 1930-1937
Box: 147

A. Harry F. Byrd: Numerous letters, including local politics, tariffs, appointments, depression relief measures, the apple industry, prohibition; Letters and papers document the beginning of a split between Harry F. Byrd and Carter Glass and the liberal Democrats of the Franklin D. Roosevelt camp; Correspondence discussing Virginia's road situation, state political affairs, drought relief and appointment of people to various jobs in the state are treated; Correspondence involving H. G. Shirley, Highway Commissioner in Virginia, and Colgate W. Darden.

B. Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior: Miscellaneous correspondence, including controversy over bridge at Yorketown.

C. General Hugh S. Johnson : Mainly concerned with price fixing activities of the National Recovery Administration; Letter from the Southern Wholesale Lumbermen's Association, March 13, 1934, protesting against minimum prices for lumber.

D. Russell C. Leffingwell of J. P. Morgan & Co. : Letters from the 1930's, commenting on the economic crisis and New Deal measures. Correspondence from Leffingwell concerning banking legislation; Thirty- page letter expressing his criticisms of proposed amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, 1932; Letter hinting at some verbal attacks on Russell C. Leffingwell by Hearst, Samuel Untermeyer and Aldrich.

E. W. D. Mitchell, Attorney General: Correspondence regarding the Harry Goldhurst fraud case.

Invitations and Correspondence 1920
Box: 148

A. Invitations extended to Carter Glass during the year 1920 to attend and address various conferences, meetings, etc.; Invitations to luncheon by public figures such as W. P. G. Harding and an invitation to speak on "Causes and Remedies of Inflation" by the Academy of Political Science; Copies of Carter Glass' answers.

Personal Correspondence 1918-1920
Box: 149

A. Ca. 20 letters, 1920, congratulating Carter Glass on his appointment to succeed Martin in the Senate; Letters regarding the possibility of Carter Glass as presidential nominee at Democratic convention, 1920, mostly of a personal nature, urging him, etc.; Letter from Carter Glass to Edmund Platt, member of Federal Board, acknowledging receipt of the chair used by Carter Glass while Chairman of the subcommittee on banking in which he did a large share of his work on the Federal Reserve legislation. The chair was sent to Carter Glass' home, 1920; Letters of a personal nature; References to Virginia politics.

Correspondence, (A) 1920-1922
Box: 150

A. Ca. 150 or more letters and replies, 1920-1921, requesting that Carter Glass give his attention to various special interests when the Committee on appropriations considers the amounts to be appropriated to these different interests in the budget; About 6 letters indicating a controversy over a prayer made before the Disarmament Conference by Rev. Abernathy, 1922 in which the latter failed to mention Christ, discussing strong contention over whether the failure was purposely or accidental; Letters concerning the claims of war veterans to some form of compensation; Correspondence regarding a bill "to regulate the operation of and foster the development of ratio communications in the United States, " S.4038, 1920; Copy of a decision of the Federal District Court of the Northern District of Georgia involving the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. Non member banks charged the Federal Reserve Bank of trying to put the former out of business because of their no agreeing to remit at par the payment of checks; Ca. 25 letters from the American Legion asking Carter Glass' aid on various bills, especially the soldiers bonus bill, 1919-1921; Letters from people seeking employment with the government.

Correspondence, (A) 1920-1922
Box: 151

A. Continuous file from Box 150. The headings include both people and topics. In folders, alphabetical order. The major things included follow: Upwards of 200 letter dated 1920-22 concerning the status and plight of the Armenian people and the invasion of their lands by the Turks; Ca. 10 letters, 1922 between Carter Glass and George W. Armstrong of Texas, who was in the process of writing a book, The Crime of '20, regarding authorship of the Federal Reserve Act, mentioning Paul M. Warburg, Samuel Untermeyer, A. Barton Hepburn, Reynolds, James B. Forgan, Festus J. Wade, John Perrin, Laughlin, Congress men Henry, etc. in the heated debate; See folder entitled, "Armstrong George. W.;" About 35 letters dating back to 1917, asking for position in Carter Glass' office; Ca. 200 letters from people and organizations expressing their views on the question of disarmament, 1920-1922; Miscellaneous requests for assistance from constituents and friends; military discharges; veterans affairs; jobs, etc.; The replies are for the most part attached to the letters. All the material in this box is segregated by use of manila folders and arranged alphabetically.

Correspondence, (A-B) 1920-1922
Box: 152

A. The material in this box is arranged alphabetically in separate folders and is composed largely of personal requests. The following items are contained herein: Statement entitled, "Agricultural Progress in Virginia in Brief and What the State Has Done for Agriculture"; Other correspondence on agriculture; Letters requesting various agricultural literature; Requests for Carter Glass to join the "Agricultural Bloc"; Personal requests by Carter Glass' constituents for partial or total disability compensation for veterans of various wars and also for positions and employment.

Correspondence, (B) 1920-1922
Box: 153

A. Letters written by Carter Glass in which he points out certain passages in his speeches which show how much the Senate had to do with Federal Reserve Legislation. (See "Barry, Joseph F".); Correspondence from constituents and friends of Carter Glass in which they express their opinion on current matters, solicit his support of proposed legislation, seek his assistance in getting jobs, pensions, transfers, promotions, paroles, etc. or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (B) 1920-1922
Box: 154

A. The material in this box is arranged alphabetically, each heading being in a separate folder. Requests for favors of Senator Carter Glass by his constituents; Requests for jobs and veteran's pension claims, etc.; Letter, 1922, containing a description of some incidents in the early life of the late Booker T. Washington, written by one who claims to have known Washington when he was young. (See folder entitled, "Burroughs, A. H.").

Correspondence, (B) 1920-1922
Box: 155

A. Each item dealt with is in a separate folder. Letters asking favors of Carter Glass; Correspondence between Carter Glass and a man from California in which the latter seeks to determine the position of Hiram Johnson on the Federal Reserve Act. (See folder entitled, "Barham, J. L."); Correspondence concerning the Ball Rent Bill involving a prolongation of the Rent Commission in Washington, D. C. Also, several letters relating to amendments to the bankruptcy law.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 156

A. Folders of correspondence with constituents concerning claims for pensions, requests for employment and similar mattersl; Letter from Carter Glass to H. N. Beale concerning the operations of the Federal Reserve System.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 157

A. Miscellaneous correspondence pertaining to pension claims, requests for assistance and local politics; appointments as United States Marshall; Internal revenue; Postmaster appointments, etc.

Correspondence, (B) 1920- 1922
Box: 158

A. Correspondence and literature in separate folders. Most of it is from Carter Glass' constituents; Ca. 150 letters dealing with the Bunsum bill, involving aid to disabled veterans, and other bills having to do with war veterans' bonuses, etc.; Letters are of a personal nature dealing with individual problems and asking favors of Carter Glass for jobs, pensions, etc.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 159

A. Miscellaneous correspondence concerning pension claims, request for assistance; Letters from constituents regarding pending legislation such as Washingtion, D. C. teachers salary bill , commodity trading regulation bill, etc; material on population origins from the 1920 Census; Railroad boxcar shortage after World War I.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 160

A. Personal and individual business correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents asking favors regarding jobs, veterans' benefits, etc.; Ca. 100 letters regarding the Calder Bill to investigate and regulate the coal industry. (See folder entitled, "Calder Senate Bill #S.4928, Coal Situation"); Correspondence regarding "perpetual" charters for national banks. (See folder "Calder Senate S. #3255, Perpetual Charters for National Banks."); Correspondence with R. L. Clanton of South Hill, Virginia, in which Carter Glass reveals in confidence that his attitude toward the Virginia gubernatorial and senatorial races of 1921-1922; Blunt and humorous letter by Carter Glass criticizing the United States Supreme Court (filed under "Cabell, George C.").

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 161

A. Pension claims, requests for aid and similar matters; Copy of speech by George M. Coffin on "The Federal Reserve Banking System"; Folder on the Coast Guard, with some printed material and letters regarding an attempt to merge it into the Navy.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 162

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents asking individual favors such as help in getting government jobs, veterans' disability and pension claims, etc.; Ca. 50-75 letters regarding proposed legislation to provide for tolls for check collection by banks. (See folder entitled, "Checks Collection -Toll on."); Correspondence regarding Child Labor Bill S4816, 1921; Correspondence regarding appointment of J. H. Chitwood as district attorney; Folders on several pending bills in Congress, mainly response to constituent pressure to support or oppose.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 163

A. Miscellaneous correspondence; requests for assistance, pension claims, constituents' opinions on legislative matters.

Correspondence 1920-1922
Box: 164

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their ideas and opinions on current matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his assistance in getting government jobs, transfers, promotions, pensions, compensation, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature; Large folder from E. A. Christian, Carter Glass' cousin in Texas asking for jobs and favors; Letters from G. R. Cooksey, assistant to the Secretary of the Treasury, including his resignation.

Correspondence, (D) 1920-1922
Box: 165

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents regarding personal problems of the constituents in which they usually solicit aid from him on such matters as veterans' pension and disability compensation claims, getting jobs, etc.; Large file on District of Columbia Appropriations Committee, especially teachers' salaries.

B. Folder entitled, "Democratic National Committee, 1921" in which there appears to be dissatisfaction on Carter Glass' part with activities of the Chairman: Letters from Bernard M. Baruch and other men of prominence.

C. Folder of correspondence with T. A. Darby, with suggestion for financing German reparations and creating an international currency.

Correspondence, (D) 1920-1922
Box: 167

A. Letters from Carter Glass' constituents expressing their views and asking his aid on various matters such as securing government jobs; Letter questioning actions of the Federal Reserve as reported in a speech by Senator Tom Heflin and a reply (See folder entitled, "Dunivin, J. N."); Correspondence regarding the omission of the word "Christ" in the disarmament conference. (See "Durkin, W. W."); Correspondence regarding the anti lynching bill; Correspondence regarding the duty on dyestuffs and chemicals. (See "Dyestuffs").

B. Folder of material on the United States Shipping Board, including long letter to President Wilson from " S. E. Dodge " with detailed charges of corruption; Letters commenting on politics from W. W. Durbin, democratic chairman for Ohio.

Correspondence, (D) 1920-1922
Box: 168

A. Correspondence on various subjects from Carter Glass' colleagues and constituents. The material is filed in separate folders according to subject or correspondent.

B. Folder dealing with the provisions of the Democratic platform in 1920, another on the National Democratic Committee and another on Democratic publicity, 1920, each containing ca. 20-50 letters or reports and clippings.

C. Correspondence regarding the Denison bill to regulate the sale of corporate securities; Requests for aid in getting a job.

Correspondence, (D) 1920-1922
Box: 169

A. Four folders of material, each containing correspondence to and from Carter Glass regarding various aspects of the Democratic side of the political campaigns of 1920 and 1922. At least two folders contain ca. 150 or more letters. The titles of the folders are as follows:"Democratic National Convention, June 28, 1920." Comments and correspondence on the convention, especially the boom for Carter Glass; "Democratic Campaign, 1920, Speaking, etc."

B. Correspondence from Bernard M. Baruch, J. P. Tumulty, Thomas J. Walsh, Fred W. Scott, Scott Ferris, Pat Harrison, etc.; quite a bit of material on campaign in Virginia as well as nationally; "Democratic State Campaign, Hon. Hal Flood Chairman," Correspondence from Harry F. Byrd, on local politics and financing the campaign; Other miscellaneous correspondence on the campaign, invitations to speak, etc.; "Democratic National Committee, 1922." Correspondence from Cordell Hull, especially on fund raising; several issues of a newsletter put out by the Democratic National Committee.

Correspondence, (E) 1920-1922
Box: 170

A. Letters from Carter Glass' constituents, and replies, seeking his aid in such things as veterans' compensation claims, government jobs, salary increases, transfers, etc. The items are filed separately.

Correspondence, (E-F) 1920-1922
Box: 171

A. Letters from Carter Glass' constituents asking aid on veterans' compensation, securing government jobs and other things; Carter Glass' replies; Letter from Carter Glass mentioning the origin and giving his opinion of the validity of Tom Heflin's reply to his defense of the Federal Reserve Act. (See "Foote, F. W."), 1922.

B. Letter to Carter Glass from C. A. Forbes, first Director of the Veterans Bureau, describing the early progress of the bureau; Letter to J. T. Flynn giving Carter Glass' assessment of the Disarmament Conference; Copies of the Industrial Employment Survey Bulletinfor 1921 (filed under "E").

Correspondence, (F) 1920-1922
Box: 172

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents in which the latter, for the most part, seek his aid on things such as veterans' compensation, government jobs, salary increases, transfers, proposed legislation and other matters of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (F) 1920-1922
Box: 173

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents in which the latter usually seek his aid on such things as government jobs, veterans' disability claims, personal recommendations, etc.

B. Copy of a letter from Carter Glass to Homer L. Ferguson, President of the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, giving the views and policy of the Treasury on various financial matters; Correspondence regarding confirmation of Professor Henry J. Ford as Interstate Commerce Commissioner; Copies of letters from Carter Glass to Hal D. Flood, chairman of Virginia Democratic Committee, discussing local politics, especially election of governor, and the race question in Virginia.

Correspondence, (F) 1920-1922
Box: 174

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents: Letters seeking Carter Glass' aid on such things as government jobs, veterans' pensions, and other personal problems; Correspondence in which constituents express their views on proposed legislation. For example, see Folder entitled, "Frelinghuysen Senate (Bill S #39) Permitting Branch Banking"; Letters on other matters with Senator Frelinghuysen.

Correspondence, (G) 1920-1922
Box: 175

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents: Correspondence relating to personal problems of constituents and seeking Carter Glass' aid on such things as government jobs, veterans' pension claims, proposed legislation, etc.

B. Folder of correspondence regarding a bill terminating government guarantee of wheat prices. See "Gronna Senate Bill #S3844."

C. Folder containing a letter from Carter Glass clarifying the constitutionality of a former Congressman being appointed to the Federal Reserve Board. There seems to have been some question about it. See "Grayson, Rear Admiral T. Cary."

D. Original letter to Carter Glass from H. A. Garfield, Administrator of the United States Fuel Administration, December 14, 1919, explaining his reasons for his resignation from office as Administrator.

Correspondence, (G) 1920-1922
Box: 176

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents, in which the latter usually seek his aid on personal problems such as securing government jobs, veterans' claims, etc.; Letters from various politicians and important men such as Samuel Gompers; Folder of correspondence between Carter Glass and the vice president regarding the status of Carter Glass' clerical force on the government payroll at the end of a term Carter Glass served in the Senate. See " Carter Glass, correspondence with Vice President"; Letters from Samuel Gompers relating to industrial unrest after World War I.

Correspondence, (G) 1920-1922
Box: 177

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents in which the latter for the most part seek his aid on personal problems, such as securing jobs or congratulate him for speeches. There is also correspondence from some of Carter Glass' colleagues and kinspeople. For example, from E. C. Glass, brother of the Senator.

B. Correspondence with Julian Gunn on Virginia politics; Correspondence regarding appointment of Joseph A. Glasgow as United States Attorney.

C. Folder of correspondence congratulating him on a published letter to John S. Bryan, concerning the League of Nations.

Correspondence, (G-H) 1920-1922
Box: 178

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents over matters of a personal nature such as opinions on proposed legislation, requests for government literature, requests for aid in getting jobs and disability compensation, etc.; Letters from various senators, government officials, etc.; Letter mentioning the McFadden Bill, 1921, for example, (See "Gilbert, Hon. S. T.").

Correspondence, (H) 1920-1922
Box: 179

A. Four-page letter from Carter Glass to W. E. Harris, editor of a Petersburg newspaper, explaining clearly Carter Glass' part, Wilson's part and Parker H. Parker Willis ' part in the writing of the Federal Reserve Act. See folder entitled, "Harris, Walker Edward."

B. Letters from constituents asking favors and expressing opinions.

Correspondence, (H) 1920-1922
Box: 180

A. Letters from Carter Glass indicating that his data on the Federal Reserve Act are in the hands of H. Parker Willis. He states, "All of my newspaper clippings of that date, 1913, together with all other of my data are in the possession of Dr. H. Parker Willis. . . .who is preparing to write a history of Federal Reserve Legislation." Mentions the Vanderlip plan of central banking. (See folder entitled, "Hollister, W. R.").

B. Letters from constituents asking favors and expressing opinions.

Correspondence, (H) 1920-1922
Box: 181

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents in which the latter ask personal favors, express opinions regarding proposed legislation, etc.

Correspondence, (H) 1920-1922
Box: 182

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents pertaining to various personal problems of the latter and in which they seek advice and express opinions. Such things as aid in securing jobs, veterans' pension claims, etc. are treated.

Correspondence, (H) 1920-1922
Box: 183

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents dealing with personal problems of the latter and seeking favors from Carter Glass regarding government jobs, etc.

B. Folder, ca. 50-75 letters, dealing with a bill introduced by Senator Haugen and pertaining to the size and shape of food and drug containers.

Correspondence, (H-I) 1920-1922
Box: 184

A. Folder of correspondence from constituents urging Carter Glass to take some particular standard on proposed immigration limitation legislation; Folder of correspondence regarding payment of foreign debts to this country and other international debt problems; Folder of correspondence regarding "Irish Independence."

B. Correspondence from an unnamed person indicating that a Professor W. A. Scott of the University of Wisconsin wrote the final version of the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from Carter Glass giving his opinion of this report. (See folder entitled, "Quick, Herbert").

Correspondence, (J) 1920-1922
Box: 185

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents dealing for the most part with personal problems of the latter. For example, the constituents seek such things as government jobs, pensions, etc.

Correspondence, (J) 1920-1922
Box: 186

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents in which they solicit his aid in securing jobs, getting pensions, obtaining advice and express their own opinion on certain issues.

Letter from Charles A. Korbly
Box: 187

A. Letter from Korbly, the ranking member of the House Banking Committee, in which he talks about the authorship of the Federal Reserve Act, and also a statement to the effect (Enclosed in Korbly's letter) that Robert L. Owen was responsible for the Act. This, Korbly seems to refute, mentions William G. McAdoo's connection. (See folder entitled, "Korbly, Hon. C. A.").

Correspondence, (K-L) 1920-1922
Box: 188

A. Correspondence between Carter Glass and his constituents concerning personal problems of the latter. The letters deal largely with such things as getting jobs, transfers, pensions, etc. for the constituents and nothing of general importance is dealt with extensively.

Correspondence, (L) 1920-1922
Box: 189

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents asking favors, seeking information and literature and expressing opinions on various subjects.

Correspondence, (L) 1920-1922
Box: 190

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents in which they ask favors, plead for his support on proposed legislation, solicit aid in getting jobs, etc.

Correspondence, (L) 1920-1922
Box: 191

A. Copy of a bill introduced by Senator Ladd "to establish an honest money system," 1921. See "Ladd, Sen. S#2604."

B. Correspondence from constituents about proposed legislation, aid in getting jobs and pensions, and requests for information, etc.

Correspondence, (L-M) 1920-1922
Box: 192

A. Report of the Committee on Banking of the Merchants' Association of New York in regarding changes in the "Federal Reserve Act" (See "Mead, S. C."); Correspondence from constituents in which they, for the most part, seek Carter Glass' aid on their personal problems, or express opinions on legislation.

Correspondence, (M) 1920-1922
Box: 193

A. Copy of a letter to the New York Times, August 18, 1920, written by Ex-Senator Henry C. Hansborough in which he attempts to show where credit for the Federal Reserve Act should go and substantiates evidence of a certain line of thought on authorship of the Act; Letter and mimeographed pamphlet to Carter Glass from Hollins Randolph attempting to defend the act in the face of its many critics. (This material is found in the front of a folder which is thick with miscellaneous material -no name or title on the folder).

B. Letters about court proceedings against the Virginia State Veterinarian, Ferreyhough.

C. Correspondence from constituents about personal matters such as aid in securing jobs, transactions involving Carter Glass' cows and farm, help in getting veterans' pensions, etc.

Correspondence, (M) 1920-1922
Box: 194

A. Ca. 200 letters pertaining to the government's activities at Muscle Shoals in Alabama and to certain legislation regarding the project. (See folder entitled, " Muscle Shoals Bill S-3390").

B. Correspondence from constituents and friends of Carter Glass regarding personal matters.

Correspondence, (M) 1920-1922
Box: 194

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they, for the most part, express their opinions on legislation matters, seek his aid in securing pensions and jobs, and take up other matters of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (M) 1920-1922
Box: 196

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they, for the most part, express their opinions on proposed legislation, seek his aid securing pensions and jobs, and take up other matters of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (M) 1920-1922
Box: 197

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they, for the most part, express their opinion on proposed legislation, seek his aid in securing government jobs and pensions and take up other matters of a personal nature.

Correspondence,(M) 1920-1922
Box: 198

A. Correspondence from constituents and friends of Carter Glass in which they, for the most part, express their opinions on important matters and proposed legislation, and seek his aid on such things as securing pensions, jobs, transfers, etc.; Folder, for example, on the "McFadden Bill, Relative to National Bank Texas. "

B. Correspondence dealing with problems of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (N) 1920-1922
Box: 199

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they, for the most part, express their opinions on proposed legislation or seek his assistance in getting such things as pensions, transfers, jobs and other matters of a personal nature; Folder of letters from editors of various publications asking Carter Glass to write articles on various subjects.

Correspondence, (O-P) 1920-1922
Box: 200

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they, for the most part, express opinions on proposed legislation or seek his assistance in getting jobs, transfers, and pensions and take up other matters of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (N) 1920-1922
Box: 201

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents in which they seek his aid on various personal problems; Folders regarding Negro problems, naval appropriations and proposed legislation regarding the navy, various problems concerning port of Norfolk, Virginia and containing letters and literature expressing opinions and giving data on various aspects of the problems considered.

Correspondence, (P) 1920-1922
Box: 202

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express opinions on proposed legislation, plead for his vote on certain matters, seek his aid in getting government jobs, pensions, transfers, etc. or take up some other matter of a rather personal nature.

Correspondence, (P) 1920-1922
Box: 203

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express opinions on proposed legislation or seek his aid in getting jobs and other such personal matters; Folder on certain proposed legislation to strengthen prohibition enforcement.

Correspondence, (P) 1920-1922
Box: 204

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their opinions on current affairs, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his assistance in securing jobs, transfers or pensions for them, or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (R) 1920-1922
Box: 205

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their opinions on current matters, solicit his support of certain proposed legislation, seek his aid in securing them a job, transfer, or pension, or take up some other personal matter.

Correspondence, (R) 1920-1922
Box: 206

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their opinions on current affairs, solicit his vote or support on certain legislative issues, seek his assistance in getting jobs, transfers, paroles, pensions, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (R) 1920-1922
Box: 207

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they solicit his support of certain legislation, express their opinions on current affairs, seek his assistance in getting jobs, transfers, paroles, pensions, etc. or take up some personal matter with him; Folder dealing with the merits of the United States trading with Russia. See "Russian Trade"; Folder regarding our government sending a representative to the Vatican in Rome. See "Rome, Rep. to Vatican."

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 208

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends regarding such matters as government jobs, transfers, pensions, legislation, etc.

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 209

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' friends and constituents in which they express their opinions on current matters, or solicit his support on certain proposed legislation, seek his assistance in securing pensions, jobs, transfers, promotions, paroles, etc. for them, or take up some matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 210

A. Correspondence from constituents and friends of Carter Glass in which they express their opinion on current matters, solicit his support on various proposed legislation, seek his assistance in getting jobs, transfers, promotions, pensions, paroles, etc. or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 211

A. Folder of correspondence indicating some controversy between Carter Glass and Rear Admiral Sims over a Senate investigation in which Carter Glass evidently brought out some information against Sims. Sims had evidently made some rather undiplomatic utterances for which he was being investigated. See "Sims, Rear Admiral."

B. Folders relating to the United States Shipping Board, and to the scarcity and high price of sugar.

C. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express opinions on current affairs, solicit his support of proposed legislation, seek his support of proposed legislation, seek his assistance in getting jobs, transfers, promotions, pensions, paroles, pardons, etc., or take up some other personal matter with him.

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 212

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their opinions on current affairs, solicit his support for proposed legislation, or seek his aid in getting jobs, pensions, transfers, promotions, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

B. Two folders containing a rather large number of letters concerning the Sheppard-Towner maternity bill and a proposed increase in second-class postal notes.

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 213

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their opinions on various current affairs, solicit his vote on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, pensions, transfers, promotions, compensation, paroles, army discharges, etc., or take up some matter of a personal nature with him.

Correspondence, (S) 1920-1922
Box: 214

A. Folder entitled "Strauss, Hon. Albert" in which may be found a copy of Lloyds Bank Monthly. On page 117 of the journal is an article on the Federal Reserve System and Carter Glass defending the Federal Reserve System which was being criticized at the time for its deflationary policy.

B. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express opinions on current affairs, of solicit his support on proposed legislation, or seek his assistance in getting a job, pension, promotion, transfer, parole, etc. or take up some other matter of a personal nature with him.

Correspondence, (T-U) 1920-1922
Box: 215

A. Correspondence from Carter Glass' constituents and friends in which they express their opinions on current matters, solicit his vote on vote on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting government jobs, pensions, promotions, paroles, transfers, etc., or take up some other matter with him.

B. Folder of ca. 100 letters from people expressing their thoughts on the Four-Power Treaty. See "Treaty."

Correspondence, (V) 1920-1922
Box: 216

A. Correspondence from constituents, friends and business concerns to Carter Glass in which they express their opinions on various matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, transfers, promotions, pensions, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature; Correspondence relating to proposed legislation is filed according to the name of the Congressman submitting the bill.

Correspondence, (W) 1920-1922
Box: 217

A. Folder containing letters between Carter Glass and a constituent in which they seem to disagree on the proper rate of rediscount, the proper course for the Federal Reserve to take, and other matters (1920). See "Williams, Langhorne M."

B. Folder of correspondence relating to the activities of the War Finance Corporation and concerning the proposed revival of its activities to help relieve farm distress in 1920. See " War Finance Corporation. "

C. Correspondence to Carter Glass from friends, constituents, and business organizations in which they express their thoughts on current affairs, solicit his support of certain legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, paroles, transfers, executive clemency, pensions, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

D. Correspondence relating to proposed legislation, filed under the name of the Congressman who submitted the bill.

Correspondence 1921-1922
Box: 218

A. Folder of ca. 200 letters between Carter Glass and John Skelton Williams, one-time Comptroller of the Currency: Letter from Carter Glass, January 25, 1922, in which he states that in his first draft of the Federal Reserve Act he provided that the Secretary of Agriculture should be an ex-officio member of the Federal Reserve Board and discusses the type of men who should be members; Letter, January 3, 1922, in which he expresses the belief that the Federal Reserve System has been extravagant in its building program and too liberal in the matter of officers' salaries and mentions agricultural interests and the Federal Reserve System; Letter, January 31, 1922, claiming that Carter Glass heard Senator Tom Heflin rehearsing a speech attacking the Federal Reserve System which had bee written by John Skelton Williams and answering Williams' objection to a speech by Carter Glass in defense of the Federal Reserve System; Letter, February 6, 1922 discussing disagreements with John Skelton Williams and containing a statement by Carter Glass that he was warned by Tom Heflin not to speak in defense of the Federal Reserve System in the Senate. Carter Glass was told that if he spoke in defense of the system, the paternity of the bill would be ascribed to a German economist rather than to Carter Glass; Several letters from John Skelton Williams charging extravagant and poor administration of the New York Federal Reserve Bank; Letter from Carter Glass, June 17, 1921, in which he deplores the failure of the Federal Reserve to call for Governor Strong's resignation; Letter, May 19, 1921, referring to Strong; Letters from Williams regarding the confirmation by the Senate of his appointment as Comptroller of the Currency; Letters relating to banking and financial matters are included. See "Williams, Hon. John Skelton."

B. Correspondence to Carter Glass from constituents, friends, business concerns, etc. in which they express their opinions on various matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, transfers, pensions, compensation, paroles, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (W) 1920-1922
Box: 219

A. Correspondence to and from D. B. Winfree, Carter Glass' private secretary during the years 1920-1922.

B. Correspondence to Carter Glass from constituents, friends, and business organizations, etc. in which they express their opinions on various matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, transfers, pensions, compensation, paroles, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (W) 1920-1922
Box: 220

A. Correspondence to Carter Glass from constituents, friends, business organizations, etc. in which they express their opinions on various matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, transfers, pensions, compensation, paroles, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (W) 1920-1922
Box: 221

A. Correspondence with an officer of the Anti Saloon League discussing various political matters. See "Wheeler, Wayne B."

B. Correspondence to Carter Glass from friends, constituents, and business organizations, in which they express their opinions on various matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, transfers, pensions, compensation, paroles, etc., or take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Correspondence, (W-Z) 1920-1922
Box: 222

A. Folder of correspondence to and from Miss Mary Wallace, Carter Glass' stenographer. See "Wallace. . ."; Letter to her from C. D. Hamner, who was evidently a former stenographer, describing the filing system used while he was employed; Letter, April 8, 1921, may be useful in determining how things were filed.

B. Correspondence to Carter Glass from constituents, friends, business organizations, etc. in which they express their opinions on various matters, solicit his support on proposed legislation, seek his aid in getting jobs, transfers, pensions, clemency in court martial cases, etc., take up some other matter of a personal nature.

Legislative Correspondence 1920-1921
Box: 223

A. Letters to Carter Glass requesting literature, including copies of bills, speeches, government documents, etc.; Carter Glass' acknowledgment of each letter.

Legislative Correspondence 1920-1926
Box: 224

A. Folder of correspondence with Carter Glass on the subject of taxation and the high cost of living, dated ca. 1920; Correspondence regarding the usefulness of the B. L. S. cost of living index is also included; Folder of ca. 300 letters regarding the Federal Farm Loan Act -Proposed amendments, policies of the banks, etc., dated from 1919 to 1922; Folder of ca. 100 letters regarding proposed tax revisions in 1919-1921; Folder of ca. 100 letters regarding the soldiers bonus, dated mostly 1922; Letter, dated 1926, regarding branch banking by state banks and proposed legislation relating thereto; Letter from Cordell Hull to a Tennessee publication, 1926, referring to the farm problem.

Miscellaneous Correspondence, Speeches, and Legislation 1914-1944
Box: 225

A. Correspondence on the attempted court packing by Franklin D. Roosevelt and on the plight of the cotton farmers in 1914 are also in included, dated in the middle and late 1930's.

B. Letters indicating a clash of ideas between Representative Henry of Texas and Carter Glass over the question of proper aid to cotton farmers, 1914; Ca. 10 letters regarding appointment of local postmasters; Ca. 15 letters of a personal nature and some regarding business matters on Carter Glass' farm; Copy of a speech of Representative Henry B. Steagall before meeting of supervisors of state banks, 1936, dealing with Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and branch banking, etc.; Article praising Carter Glass in his speech attacking the court packing attempt by Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1937; Letter from Leo T. Crowley, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, 1936 to which is attached copy of speech delivered before meeting of supervisors of state banks. Speech deals with sufficiency of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as insurer of bank deposits; Letters and petitions from attorneys appealing for an additional judge in the Western district of Virginia, 1937; Speech of Hon. Henry St. George Rucker of Virginia in the House of Representatives, 1926, opposing an appropriation for the "welfare and hygiene of maternity and infancy;" Letter from Cordell Hull, Secretary of State,, 1944, enclosing a copy of a paper prepared during the conversations at Dumbarton Oaks. Paper is entitled, "Proposals for the Establishment of a General International Organization"; speech by Sir Charles Addis entitled, "The New Monetary Technique," 1936.

Correspondence Personal and Legislative 1920-1925
Box: 226

A. Folders each containing correspondence to a particular person or about a particular subject. Items in the box include: Folder of letters to and from B. F. Moomaw, farmer in which Carter Glass deals mostly with the plight of the farmers, reviving the War Finance Corporation, farm prices, etc.; Folder including a letter from Carter Glass describing his scheme proposed by him as an "automatic qualification which would effectively exclude negroes from registration" for voting in Virginia, February 25, 1921. See "Harrison, Hon. T. W."; Letter to W. C. Harrison in which Carter Glass discusses the speeches made by Tom Heflin attacking a previous speech by Carter Glass regarding the Federal Reserve System, October 25, 1923; Letters, not in folders, to Hon. Everis A. Hayes, formerly of the House of Representatives, regarding the McFadden Bill which dealt with branch banking, 1925; Memorandum "as to the substitution of the 'interest charge' on the uncovered portion of Federal Reserve notes. . . . for the present payment to the United States as a franchise tax of the balance of earnings remaining after the payment of dividends on stock and appropriation to surplus." This memorandum is not in a folder and is accompanied by a letter to Hon. S. P. Gilbert, Jr.; Letter from Carter Glass to Dr. Laurence W. Abbott answering criticism of the Federal Reserve Act and administration of the system, March 8, 1923. See "Abbott . . ."; Two letters criticizing the system, one from Willoughby McCormick and another from H. H. Cable; Folder of correspondence with R. G. Edmonds, editor of the Manufacturers Record, including a rather heated controversy over the revival of the War Finance Corporation, the "deflation" policy of the Federal Reserve Board, etc. The controversy ended with a severance of correspondence between them; Folders of correspondence dealing with various public and personal matters.

Correspondence Legislative and Personal 1920-1925
Box: 227

A. Folders of correspondence with various people and about various subjects -each person or subject in a separate folder: Ca. 150 letters regarding the Johnson Immigration Bill in 1924, from Carter Glass' constituents; About 250-350 letters from constituents urging Carter Glass to let his vote on the soldiers' bonus bill be in accord with their views, 1922-1924; Other letters.

Correspondence Personal and Legislative 1920-1925
Box: 228

A. Folder of correspondence and editorials regarding the contest between Mapp and Harry F. Byrd for governor of Virginia, 1925. See "Mapp and Byrd"; Correspondence with Albert Rathbone regarding the Foreign debt owed the United States by France, Greece, etc. and other financial matters; Political correspondence with Robert Woolley; Other correspondence.

Legislative Correspondence 1920-1925
Box: 229

A. Ca. 50 letters regarding Secretary of Treasury Mellon's ideas for reduction of taxes; Ca. 100-150 letters requesting copies of a speech made by Carter Glass against the McNary-Haugen Farm Relief Bill; Letters congratulating Carter Glass on his stand; Ca. 25 letters regarding increased pay for federal judges; About 200-250 letters requesting copies of speeches, literature, etc.

Correspondence on Legislation 1920-1925
Box: 230

A. About 50 letters regarding a proposed amendment to the constitution which would permit the Federal government to enact a child labor law; Upwards of 300 letters congratulating Carter Glass on his speech regarding the funding of the British War Debt and asking for copies of the speech; About 50-100 letters regarding a revision of the prohibition laws, 1924; Ca. 100-150 letters regarding proposed legislation having to do with state taxation of national banks; Folder of ca. 75 letters regarding proposed changes in the income tax laws, especially corporate income taxes.; Folder of letters regarding a proposed emergency tariff bill.

Correspondence Regarding Legislation 1920-1927
Box: 231

A. Correspondence from constituents expressing approval of or opposition to proposed legislation. Such things as tax bills, foreign debt, treaty ratification, tariffs, post office department, etc. are referred to.

Correspondence 1920-1930
Box: 232

A. Requests for Copies of Speeches: Folder of letters congratulating Carter Glass on his re-election to the Senate in 1930; Ca. 300 or more letters praising Carter Glass on a speech made in 1924, and asking for copies of it. Speech was entitled, "Government by Investigation vs. Government by Suppression."

Correspondence 1921
Box: 233

A. Invitations: Requests for Carter Glass to speak to or attend various conferences, meetings etc.

Correspondence Regarding Legislation and Federal Reserve Banks 1920-1921
Box: 234

A. Printed copy of the views of certain members of the Senate Committee on Banking and Currency concerning the Federal Reserve Act, 1913; Mimeographed letter from W. P. G. Harding to member banks explaining why it is not desirable for the ember banks to share in the extra large earnings of the Federal Reserve Banks any more than their normal 6%, April 22, 1920; Article by H. Parker Willis called, "The Responsibility of The Federal Reserve System " in which he goes into the causes of the inflation of 1919-1920, etc.; Photostated copy of questionnaire on "the high cost of living," 1920. It seems to have been prepared by the Republican National Committee and contains questions regarding the causes, effects, remedies, etc.; Correspondence, 1922, between the Governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and two Nashville, Tennessee member banks concerning certain bonds that were rediscounted with the Federal Reserve bank, etc. and a controversy between them over repayment of the loan; Letter from Harding to the Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee in which he explains the theory of and defends the progressive rediscount rate used by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta during the early 1920's; Eight page memorandum quoting statements made against members of the Federal Reserve System by Senators Tom Heflin and Watson which are libelous in their content except for the constitutional immunity of senators, July 12, 1922, prepared by E. W. Freeman, Assistant Counsel for the Federal Reserve Board; Copy of remarks made by a Wisconsin banker against a bill seeking to provide for the payment of exchange on checks; Letters, 1922, from various bankers and others in the country, recommending the reappointment of W. P. G. Harding as governor of the Federal Reserve Board; Mimeographed letter from W. P. G. Harding to John Skelton Williams, January 31, 192, answering charges of mismanagement made by Williams against the Board; Mimeographed copy of a report of a special committee of the Federal Reserve Board answering charges made against it by John Skelton Williams and further charging Williams with a failure to carry out his duty, February 28, 1921; Letter from W. P. G. Harding to John Skelton Williams, April 4, 1921, after Williams had left the Comptroller post, in which Harding, writing for the Federal Reserve Board, answers further charges previously made by Williams; Letter from The Federal Reserve Bank of New York to W. P. G. Harding in which the bank officers must submit information and refute the charges made specifically against that bank by John Skelton Williams, March 16, 1921; Mimeographed letter from W. P. G. Harding to the Senate explaining the Board's actions in having Senator Carter Glass' speech in defense of the Board circulated; Copy of Commerce and Financefor March 15, 1922, containing an editorial, "Are the Reserve Banks Exceeding their Functions?"; Synopsis of the decision of the United States District Court in the case of Brookings State Bank vs. Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; Copy of judge's opinion; "A Reply to the Critics of the Federal Reserve System, " a typewritten statement by Hollins N. Randolph; Letter from John Skelton Williams to Carter Glass, May 28, 1921, discussing what he thinks the Federal Reserve Board should have done to avoid such a sudden drop in prices; Letters between W. P. G. Harding and the Governor of Nebraska concerning the need for credit relief by Nebraska farmers; Letter from W. P. G. Harding to Carter Glass regarding the cost of building the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and answering charges of extravagance made by John Skelton Williams; Copy of a letter from W. P. G. Harding to Senator Robert L. Owen replying to a letter of Robert L. Owen s in which he had urged that steps be taken to bring Liberty Bonds back to par; Copy of a letter from John Skelton Williams, February 26, 1921, to W. P. G. Harding in which Williams continues to charge poor administration, etc.; Pages from the Congressional Recordcontaining words of Senator Tom Heflin attacking H. Parker Willis, W. P. G. Harding, the Federal Reserve Board and others; Copy of a letter from W. P. G. Harding to Senator Irvine L. Lenroot on the subject of the Federal Reserve clearing system, April 1, 1920; Speech by W. P. G. Harding entitled, "A Brief Discussion of Present Conditions," December 7, 1920, delivered before American Farm Bureau Federation, Indianapolis; Paper on par remittance by Hollins N. Randolph; Letters from John Skelton Williams to Senator Smoot charging the Federal Reserve System with paying excessive salaries; Letters to Smoot from Edmund Platt, vice-Governor of the Federal Reserve Board answering William's charges; Other items, mostly concerned with the Federal Reserve System.

Correspondence Regarding Tariffs 1921-1922
Box: 235

A. Ca. 200 or more letters to Carter Glass from constituents, regarding proposed protective tariff bills and so-called emergency tariff bills; Carter Glass' replies, 1921; About 200 letters of the same general description, except that they refer to proposed tariff measures in the year 1922. In most cases the letters are in the interest of certain groups affected by the tariffs and deal with particular problems of the writers.

Correspondence Regarding Woodrow Wilson Foundation 1921-1923
Box: 236

A. Correspondence regarding the Woodrow Wilson Foundation Fund's drive to raise $50,000 in Virginia. Carter Glass was state Chairman of the Fund.

Correspondence 1922
Box: 237

A. About 150 or more letters praising Carter Glass on his speech "The Truth About the Federal Reserve System, " and asking for copies of it, 1922.

Correspondence 1922
Box: 238

A. Requests for copies of Carter Glass' speech, "The Truth About the Federal Reserve System."Ca. 150-200 letters, 1922.

Correspondence Regarding Democratic Campaign 1922-1924
Box: 239

A. Folder of correspondence to Carter Glass in 1924 while he was at the Democratic National Convention; Letters expressing the hope that he would be nominated; Folder of correspondence from the Democratic National Committee in 1923, outlining strategy, etc.; Folder of requests for tickets to the Democratic National Convention, 1924; Folder of correspondence regarding the democratic campaign in the state of Virginia in 1922; Letters asking Carter Glass to speak.

Correspondence 1922-1927
Box: 240

A. Folder on the McFadden Bill in 1927: Typed statement made by Carter Glass giving his ideas of the merits of the bill and the procedure necessary to get it passed and his view of the Hull amendments; Letter from Louis T. McFadden to members of the House regarding proposed changes in his bill, 1927; Letter from the Senate conferees to Louis T. McFadden; Booklet on, "Facts versus Misstatements regarding the McFadden Bill;" Letters from constituents expressing opinions on the bill.

B. Folder of letters making arrangements for Carter Glass to make a speech in Greenville, South Carolina, 1924.

C. About 400-500 letters from constituents expressing their opinions on the soldiers bonus bill, 1922.

Correspondence 1934, 1940
Box: 241

A. Folder of correspondence and editorials endorsing Carter Glass for the Democratic presidential nomination, 1934; Folder of ca. 350 letters congratulating Carter Glass on a speech made in 1940 at the Democratic National Convention in which he denounced a third term for Franklin D. Roosevelt and nominated James A. Farley.

Correspondence 1922-1924
Box: 242

A. Requests for Carter Glass to speak to various groups or to attend various performances, ceremonies, shows, etc., 1922-1924.

Correspondence 1923
Box: 243

A. Invitations for Carter Glass to attend various ceremonies and gatherings, or for him to speak to certain groups, 1923.

Correspondence Legislation 1924-1920
Box: 244

A. Folder of political correspondence with J. T. Deal of the second district of Virginia, 1923-1930; Folder of correspondence with Senator Capper dealing almost entirely with legislation regarding public utilities in the District of Columbia; Correspondence with G. O'Connor Goolrick, for the most part over a state Democratic primary in which Harry F. Byrd and Mapp were candidates; Personal and political correspondence with Vance C. McCormick regarding opinions on national political matters, monetary matters, etc.; Correspondence with Colonel James P. Woods, dealing mostly with state politics in Virginia; Folder of miscellaneous political and legislative correspondence with Congressman R. Walton Moore; Folder of correspondence with Colonel W. S. Battle of Roanoke, Virginia dealing with the Virginia political situation and to some extent with Bishop James Cannon and his controversy with Carter Glass.

Correspondence 1923-1929
Box: 245

A. Letters congratulating Carter Glass on a statement made by him rebuking seven democrats who issued some sort of point statement after their election in 1930; Letters congratulating Carter Glass on his re- election in 1924; Letters acknowledging receipt of an autographed copy of Carter Glass' book by his friends; Letters expressing opinions on his book, " An Adventure in Constructive Finance; " Requests for copies of a speech by Carter Glass attacking critics of the Federal Reserve System, 1923; Letters acknowledging a cartoon sent to his friends by Carter Glass as a Thanksgiving gift in 1929; Letters acknowledging receipt by Carter Glass' friends of a brochure written by him called "A Tale of Two Heifers"in which he evidently attacked the state legislation authorizing the testing of cows for tuberculosis; Correspondence from the Lynchburg Industrial Savings and Loan Corporation regarding a note which Carter Glass endorsed for a Mrs. Rebecca Spurlock. The bank was threatening to take action because Mrs. Spurlock was in arrears in her payments.

Correspondence 1941
Box: 246

A. Miscellaneous letters concerning legislative matters in 1941: Letters to Carter Glass expressing concern over Morgan Shaw's idea of taxing corporate earnings above a 6% return on capital 100%; Letters from Senator Harry F. Byrd suggesting certain men for appointments, etc.; Letters regarding an attempt to take part of Arlington County, Virginia into the District of Columbia, so that Arlington Cemetery, its airport, Fort Meyer, etc. would be in D. C.; Letters and literature on the results of testing for tuberculosis in cows and the worth of such testing; Bill from Carter Glass' lawyers for presenting his case against the state veterinarian, et al.; Copies of letters received during the Smith campaign, both congratulating and not.

Correspondence 1925-1926
Box: 247

A. Folder of ca. 75-100 letters urging Carter Glass to vote for United States entrance into the World Court, 1925-1926; Ca. 25 letters urging Carter Glass to vote for a pension bill before Congress which would help dependents of service men (1926); Ca. 75 letters, mostly from local lodges of railway brotherhoods, requesting Carter Glass to vote for the Couzens Resolution having to do with the consolidation of railroads; Folder of newspaper clippings regarding an attack by Carter Glass on action by President Coolidge of sanctioning or vetoing private bank loans to foreign governments; Folder of letters from various interests asking for Carter Glass' influence in getting Congress to appropriate money for a cause,1929; Letters to Carter Glass regarding amendment of the Voshead Act and repeal of prohibition, 1926; Folder of newspaper clippings dealing with prohibition, Bishop James Cannon, debt of foreign governments to the United States, political articles about Carter Glass, etc.

Correspondence Legislation 1925-1930
Box: 248

A. Correspondence on proposed legislation regarding Immigration, Reorganization, the Radio bill, Big Navy Bill, McFadden Bill, including letter from Federal Reserve Agent in St. Louis, and Tax Bill, 69th Congress.

Correspondence Personal and Legislative 1926-1930
Box: 249

A. Election contest of William B. Wilson : Letters and papers.

B. File on Paul M. Warburg : Statement of American Bankers Association favoring indeterminate charters for Federal Reserve banks; two statements by Paul M. Warburg on monetary matters; letters between Carter Glass and Paul M. Warburg relating to passage of McFadden Bill.

C. File on Dallas Federal Reserve Bank Case; File on Charles Mitchell; Letters from Charles Collins, Assistant Comptroller of the Currency, including some pertaining to McFadden Bill; Folder of correspondence with A. D. Noyes of the New York Times, concerning Houden Smith articles, Paul M. Warburg's influence on Federal Reserve Act, Senator Tom Heflin, and other related matters; Folder of correspondence with Albert Shaw, including letters expressing Carter Glass' view on Federal Reserve Policy in 1928.

Correspondence Political and Legislative 1920-1930
Box: 250

A. Files of correspondence with Harry F. Byrd, concerning the political situation in Virginia in 1927-1928, and the Presidential Campaign of 1928. About 500 letters; Edwin Halsey, regarding the Democratic National Campaign of 1928; Senator Carter Glass and Rixey Smith, including an article by Carter Glass, "The Battle for the Banking Bill," 1927, and concerning primarily routine matters; Benjamin Strong, Governor of Federal Reserve Board of New York including letters on Federal Reserve policies in the 1920's, branch banking, and H. Parker Willis; Norman H. Davis, including letters relating to House and Seymour.

Hearings 1928
Box: 251

A. Senatorial Campaign Expenditures

Legislative and Personal Correspondence 1927-1936
Box: 252

A. Correspondence with George. A. Norris, Governor of the Reserve Board of Philadelphia on Senate Bill 4412 amending the Federal Reserve Act, on the relation between the Federal Reserve Board and Reserve Banks, and on uniformity in discount rates, Ca. 30 letters; Letter from Carter Glass to Robert J. Buckley denying similarity between Aldrich Bill and Federal Reserve Act. Letter from Carter Glass to Frederick A. Delano defining the importance of the position of Comptroller of the Currency; Memorandum regarding consideration of reappointment of Governor Harding; Copy of regulation of Board dealing with par collections and correspondence on this subject; Letters to Robert Carter Glass; Letter from Carter Glass to Edna E. Gaines discussing origin of Federal Reserve Act; Correspondence with Lloyd R. Freeman on call loan rates; Early draft of Federal Reserve Act, May, 1913; Letter to George Donnella, discussing Samuel Untermeyer; Correspondence with John M. Miller, Jr. concerning Glass-Steagall Act; Correspondence with John D. Mershon on origin of Federal Reserve Act; Letter from Edmund Platt and copy of minority report of Board on branch banking, 1923.

Correspondence: Political Campaign 1928
Box: 253

A. Folder of invitations to speak during Presidential Campaign; Letters touching the Presidential Campaign, the Democratic National Platform, and Prohibition.

Correspondence
Box: 254

Regarding Tubercular Infection of Animals. Requests from constituents for copies of Senate Docket No. 85.

Correspondence regarding Tariff 1929-1930
Box: 255

A. Ca. 1,500 letters from constituents in regard to their views on proposed tariff legislation.

Political Correspondence 1928-1930
Box: 256

A. Ca. 100 letters acknowledging Carter Glass' form letter of October 20, 1930, asking for support in his re-election campaign; Ca. 500 letters of commendation regarding Carter Glass' radio speech campaign of 1928.

Political Correspondence 1920-1930
Box: 257

A. Folders of correspondence regarding Spotsylvania Battlefield Park; Hon. Joseph P. Tumulty; W. E. Borali; James F. Byrnes; Rixey Smith, 1926 including letters relating to the preparation and publication of " An Adventure in Creative Finance"; Letters to Arthur W. Page concerning publication of Carter Glass' book; Louis Wiley; Col. Henry Anderson; Frank Cabb, Jr.; Walter E. Addison; St. George Tucker.

Legislative and Personal Correspondence 1929-1935
Box: 258

A. Folder of correspondence between Carter Glass and Rixey Smith; Rixey Smith's personal file; Letters, telegrams and newspaper clippings pertaining to the Morgan case, ca. 250; File of correspondence with E. C. Folkes, about 100 letters, dealing primarily with the American bank in Richmond, the use of convicts in road forces, and his desire to obtain a Federal appointment.

Telegrams regarding Carter Glass Banking Bill 1933
Box: 259

A. Ca. 1,500 telegrams from bankers and others throughout the United States endorsing the Carter Glass Banking Bill.

Correspondence regarding Cannon Case 1930-1931
Box: 260

A. Miscellaneous correspondence and documents pertaining to investigation and trial of Bishop James Cannon; 2 letters from Jouett Shouse conveying information on Cannon's activities; Ca. 8 mimeographed copies of statement by Forrest J. Prettyman on manner in which Bishop James Cannon Church trial was conducted; Folder of material concerning Cannon's stock gambling. Copy of Goldhurst's confession; File on Goldhurst parole.

Correspondence regarding Cannon Case, (S-Z) 1930-1931
Box: 261

A. Letters of Charles H. Tuttle, Frank Morgan and Robert Thomas.

B. Folder of newspaper clippings on Carter Glass' speech November 1, 1932; Statements of Senator Carter Glass on his 1935 banking legislation. Speeches by Carter Glass on various subjects, 1930-1934, including Veterans' Bonus, Farm Relief, Illegal Foreign Loans, and Kellog Peace Pact. Statement of Senator Carter Glass regarding efforts of Federal Reserve Board to curb speculation. Letters of Carter Glass to Bishop James Cannon and Cannon to Carter Glass. Correspondence between Cannon and Cable & Company.

C. Letter from Carter Glass to Byerly discussing bill for change of reserve on time deposits.

D. Correspondence with Senator Nye regarding investigation of James Cannon.

Correspondence regarding Bishop James Cannon Case, (A-D) 1930-1931
Box: 262

A. Correspondence pertaining to various aspects of the Bishop James Cannon Case: Ca.1000 pieces including: Ned Daniel, J. Lee Davis, Guston T. Fitzhugh, J. B. Woods, Collins Denny, Ernest Cherrington and others; Letters indicate the important role played by Carter Glass in uncovering evidence against Cannon.

B. Folder of about 20 letters between Carter Glass and James Cannon.

Correspondence, Cannon Case, (E-R) 1930-1931
Box: 263

A. Miscellaneous correspondence on various aspects of the investigation of James Cannon's activities; Letters verifying Carter Glass' importance as an instigator of the proceedings against Cannon; Correspondence with Daniel Roter, Judge Adolphus Nagan, James O'Brien, Dr. F. J. Prettyman, Charles B. Parkhill, William D. Mitchell, Basil Manley, Rev. J. C. Harrel, W. M. Cravatt, Clara Goldhurst, Guston Fitzhugh, Bishop William N. Ainsworth, and statements of Mrs. Helen McCallum (Cannon) and Mrs. Joan Chapman.

Correspondence, Bishop James Cannon's Case 1928-1933
Box: 264

A. Correspondence with James O'Brien and Judge Adolphus Nagan; Folder of newspaper clippings about Cannon and about Carter Glass' proposed tax on stock market transactions. Photostatic copies of correspondence of J. Edgar Hoover (regarding Goldhurst) and of other papers pertaining to Goldhurst's trial; Folder of correspondence with Harold P. Nye and G. T. Fitzhugh.

Newspaper Clippings 1930-1931
Box: 265

A. Editorials and news accounts of Cannon's stock market transactions.

Correspondence: Legislative and Political 1929-1932
Box: 266

A. Folders of correspondence pertaining to the Banking and Currency meeting, January 19, 1931. Banking Legislation memoranda; letters from bankers offering their appraisals of the existing situation and suggesting improvements; Henry P. Epes, Charles W. Collins, Claude Weaver, and Hon. J. W. Pole, including letters pertaining to the insurance of bank deposits and the branch banking bill.

Correspondence: Legislation 1930-1935
Box: 267

A. Correspondence includes: Letters relating to Stock Exchange Inquiry; Letters and telegrams pertaining to the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Also financial reports; Correspondence with the Treasury Department, primarily concerning appointments; Letter from Hon. A. H. Vandenburg suggesting an amendment to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation law; Correspondence with Jouett Shouse on party matters, views of constituents and other subjects; Correspondence between Carter Glass and C. Bascom Slemp; Correspondence with Peter Saunders.

Correspondence: Political 1930-1935
Box: 268

A. Folder of correspondence pertaining to the pamphlet, "You Can Defend America;" Congratulatory letters on 1942 election; Correspondence with Franklin D. Roosevelt, primarily concerning routine political and legislative matters. Some letters of a personal nature; Folder of miscellaneous correspondence and newspaper clippings, including Robert's nomination to Federal Judgeship. Shakespeare controversy, several clippings and an article, "Vapor vs. the Record," concerning Samuel Untermeyer's participation in Federal Reserve legislation; Copy of speech made by him at Richmond, and statements concerning the activities of Bishop James Cannon.

Correspondence: Legislation 1930-1935
Box: 269

A. Folders of letters pertaining to highway construction in Virginia; Correspondence with John J. Raskob regarding his appearance before the banking committee, 1933; Personal correspondence with Dr. L. S. Rowe; Letters relating to the Reconstruction Finance Company; Correspondence with A. L. Ailworth, mostly of a personal or local political nature, 1920-1933.

Correspondence: Legislation 1928-1933
Box: 270

A. Folder of about 600 letters from constituents expressing their views on the World Court, the Disarmament Conference, and Muscle Shoals; Folder of about 300 letters concerning the tariff bill of 1930.

Correspondence: Personal and Legislative 1930-1935
Box: 271

A. Papers pertaining to the Farm Credit Administration; Letters of J. F. T. O'Connor, Comptroller, 1933; Correspondence with George W. Norris concerning policies of the Federal Reserve System; Letters concerning the Joint Stock Land Banks; Letters congratulating Carter Glass on his opposition to the Bonus Bill, 1934; Folder of telegrams concerning banking schemes; General correspondence on appropriations, 1933; Correspondence on agricultural matters, 1933.

Political Correspondence 1932-1933
Box: 272

A. Letters, telegrams and petitions concerning the prohibition issue, ca. 500 pieces, dated 1932-1933; Correspondence with George L. Harris, Governor of Federal Reserve Bank of New York, on Federal Reserve policies and monetary and banking practices and legislation, including statement of Board of New York Bank regarding Banking Legislation, 1932.

Political Correspondence 1930-1935
Box: 273

A. Two folders of correspondence between Carter Glass and Rixey Smith on various aspects of the Cannon investigation; Folder of miscellaneous correspondence, including letters of Jesse H. Jones, Harold L. Ickes, Louis T. McFadden and William McAdoo; Folder of letters and clippings relating to the Morgan investigation; Folder of miscellaneous papers including a speech on the Federal Reserve Act, delivered in Pittsburgh, February 8, 1919; and letters between Carter Glass and Robert F. Wagner concerning proposed amendment to the Federal Reserve Act in 1938.

Political Correspondence 1930-1940
Box: 274

A. Folder of letters relating to the University of Virginia dispute; About a dozen letters from bankers on various aspects of proposed monetary and banking legislation; Correspondence between Carter Glass and Rixey Smith on Bishop James Cannon and miscellaneous matters; Folder of letters on Bacon-Shakespeare controversy, including copy of an interview with William Smedley; Speeches and memoranda relating to taxes.

Personal Correspondence 1931-1934
Box: 275

A. Miscellaneous personal correspondence: About 300 letters including those of Colgate W. Darden, Eugene Black, Bernard M. Baruch, W. P. Wood, Jouett Shouse, and Mrs. Woodrow Wilson; Letters of commendation on his 1933 speech regarding the New Deal.

Invitations 1930-1933
Box: 276

A. Invitations received from 1930-1933; Letters of acceptance or regrets.

Correspondence: Bishop James Cannon Case 1931
Box: 277

A. Several hundred photostated pages of memoranda for the Attorney General from J. Edgar Hoover on the subject of bribery in the Goldhurst case; Other photostated documents, including the statements of Joseph Radlow and Miss Failor.

Correspondence: Federal Reserve 1931
Box: 278

A. Folder of correspondence marked, "Federal Reserve Act Changes No. I" containing letters which express the writer's attitude toward broadening the definition of eligible paper, forming a National Credit Corporation, extending branch and chain banking and examining banks more carefully, including letters of: Eugene Meyer, Angus McLean, George Harrison, Charles S. Hamlin, F. W. Taussig, J. H. Case, Robert J. Bulkley, Bernard M. Baruch, and Alfred L. Aikin. ca. 400 letter; A folder containing about 450 letters primarily on the above mentioned subjects. Correspondents include: H. Parker Willis, Richard C. Whitney, Arthur H. Vandenburg, Joseph T. Robinson, Samuel D. Pettengell and Peter Norbeck.

Correspondence 1931
Box: 279

A. Ca. 300 letters of various political and legislative matters: Letter from Newton D. Baker containing suggestions for the Democratic Platform in 1932; Correspondence with S. O. Bland relating to the payment of "prevailing wages" on Federal projects in Virginia; Letter from Carter Glass to R. B. Cassel expressing his views on the poor administration of the Federal Reserve Act; Correspondence between Carter Glass and William G. McAdoo; Letter, April 3, 1931, from William G. McAdoo denying that the so-called Treasury Plan was suggested by either Samuel Untermeyer or Robert L. Owen.

Correspondence 1931-1932
Box: 280

A. Ca. 400 letters covering miscellaneous political and personal matters: Correspondence with Bernard M. Baruch regarding the political situation in 1931; Correspondence with E. C. Branson enclosing a statement from Charles S. Hamlin in the subject "The Right of Federal Reserve banks to Produce Foreign Bonds and Use Them as Security for Federal Reserve Notes;" Letters of Harry F. Byrd pertaining to political support of various leaders in Virginia; Letter from Carter Glass to Horace N. Hawkins concerning Wilson's attitude toward a third term and his actions at the 1920 convention; Correspondence with Governor John G. Pollard relating to the appointment of a United States Marshall in the eastern District of Virginia and to other political matters in Virginia.

Correspondence: Banking and Currency 1921-1933
Box: 281

A. Papers relating to the preparation of the McFadden Bill, including a long letter from H. Parker Willis to Senator King, February 5, 1927, and a memorandum prepared for Senator Carter Glass by Charles W. Collins; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin enclosing what appears to be suggested changes in Carter Glass' Chronicle; Statement "Some Notable Achievements of the Federal Reserve System, " unsigned and undated; Memorandum in Carter Glass' handwriting of conversation and communications with Charles S. Hamlin, Paul M. Warburg and W. P. G. Harding concerning the plan of the Federal Reserve Board to reduce the number of Reserve Banks; Folder marked, "Treasury -Letters of Congratulation." Ca. 200, dated, 1933; Carter Glass' handwritten opinion of par check clearance; Typewritten memoranda with marginal notations in Carter Glass' handwriting concerning the action of the Federal Reserve Board in 1920; Memorandum prepared by Walter Wyatt, "Brief Statement of Present Legal Status of Par Clearance System." November 26, 1926; Memorandum on the Carter Glass - Robert L. Owen Banking Bill; Letter from Edmund Platt, January 9, 1922, reviewing the controversy over Reserve policies in which J. S. Williams and others were then engaged; Letter from John Skelton Williams to Carter Glass, June 21, 1921, explaining his position; Correspondence pertaining to the Federal Reserve, including letters of George Seay, W. P. G. Harding and John Skelton Williams.

Correspondence: Legislation 1932
Box: 282

A. Folder of ca. 25 letters concerning the Bus Bill; Folder of Correspondence concerning the Children's Bureau; Folder of ca. 400 letters concerning Vocational Education.

Correspondence regarding Banking and Currency, Federal Reserve 1913-1932
Box: 283

A. Folder of correspondence with Russell C. Leffingwell, 1920-1932. In addition to letters of a personal nature there are many which deal with monetary and financial matters; Letters, April 25, 1932 and February 20, 1932, suggest the importance of Leffingwell's ideas in the formulation of the Carter Glass Bill. In letters dated April 29, 1932 and April 5, 1932 the Federal Reserve and Treasury policies of 1919- 1920 and the behavior of Charles Mitchell in 1929 are discussed; Number of memoranda, 1919, giving information regarding the financial situation in that year. Letter of February 25, 1924, discusses the participation of Eugene Meyer in the revival of the War Finance Corporation; Letters, February 3, 1923, and February 6, 1923, record the views of both Leffingwell and Carter Glass on the subject of the payment of foreign debts by our Allies.

B. About 10 loose papers, including a memoranda which gives the opinions of the following Senators on various provisions of the Federal Reserve Act at the time of the House- Senate Conference: Bristow, Reed, Wilson, Thomas Ashurst, Lavis Shaffroth, Weeks and Hayes; Record of voting in the House- Senate Conference.

C. Folder of ca. 400 letters with H. Parker Willis, 1913-1932; Letters, 1909-1932, dealing with the Banking and Currency Committee hearings; Memoranda prepared by H. Parker Willis suggesting amendments to the McFadden Bill; Letter, March 10, 1930, explaining some provisions of the proposed Carter Glass Bill; Letters, December 1, 1929 and December 2, 1929, in which H. Parker Willis interprets various sections of the Banking Act of 1930 and comments on the bill; Letter from W. P. G. Harding, January 3, 1925, discussing the provision of the McFadden Act that would tend to broaden the definition of eligible paper; Letter from H. Parker Willis of August 29, 1929, in which he expresses his opinion of the forthcoming book by Paul M. Warburg and of the importance of Paul M. Warburg's part in the drafting of the Federal Reserve Act; Letter, January 17, 1928, setting forth the facts as to the gold clearing fund provision in the Federal Reserve Act; Letter from H. Parker Willis dated June 8, 1927, giving the facts about the proposed book by Paul M. Warburg; Several letters of August-November, 1926, discussing Carter Glass' forthcoming book. Letter, February 10, 1926, from Carter Glass to H. Parker Willis touches on the dispute over whether state banks should be admitted to the Federal Reserve System; Ca. 30 letters between November, 1924, and January, 1926, deal with the McFadden Bill; Letter of January, 1923, discussing the establishment of a Federal Farm Discount Corporation; Letter from H. Parker Willis, May 26, 1913, in which he reports A. Barton Hepburn as "approving the reserve position" and also discusses Samuel Untermeyer; Letter and memoranda from H. Parker Willis, June 3, 1913, regarding the plan for a "National reserve"; Letter of June 6, 1913, from Carter Glass concerning, apparently, the Robert L. Owen Bill; Letters of June 5, 1913, concerning H. Parker Willis ' estimates of William G. McAdoo's plan, and of June 7, 1913, indicating that Wilson regarded McAdoo's plan sympathetically.

Correspondence: Federal Reserve and Banking, (A-J) 1932
Box: 284

A. Alphabetically arranged correspondence, mostly letters from constituents expressing their views on the proposed Carter Glass Banking Bill; Ca. 400 letters; Letter of February 13, 1932, Carter Glass to George Stewart Brown, stating the factors that motivated him to introduce his bill and blames the current critical situation upon the maladministration of the Federal Reserve banking system; Carbon copy of a draft of the Carter Glass Bill. Letters of John Janney to the Secretary to the President and Senator William E. Borah, February 6, 1932 and February 3, 1932.

Correspondence: Federal Reserve and Banking, (K-Z) 1932
Box: 285

A. Ca. 400 letters from constituents expressing their views on the proposed Carter Glass Bill. Included are letters of Edwin W. Kemmerer, Samuel B. Pettengill and of prominent bankers throughout the country; Proposals for insuring deposits and preventing bank failures.

Correspondence: Tax Legislation 1932
Box: 286

A. Folder of correspondence on the Sales Tax; Folder of correspondence concerning tax on gasoline; Folder of correspondence on Soldiers Bonus Bill; Folder on the Bituminous Coal situation; Letters from constituents expressing their views on the various tax measures.

Correspondence: Legislation 1932
Box: 287

A. Folder of correspondence marked. "miscellaneous Bills" including letters concerning the Glass-Steagall Bill, World Court, Economy Bill, Dies Bill, Muscle Shoals, Tyson-Fitzgerald Act, McNary Bill, Copper Resale Bill, appropriations and the need for various relief measures.

Telegrams: Carter Glass Banking Bill 1932
Box: 288

A. About 1500 telegrams urging speedy passage of Carter Glass Bill.

Correspondence: "Constitutional Immorality" Radio Address 1937
Box: 289

A. Letters from people throughout the nation praising Carter Glass' stand on the packing of the Supreme Court; Letters written in opposition to Carter Glass' speech.

Correspondence: Legislation 1932
Box: 290

A. Folder marked, "Tax File" containing ca. 300 letters concerning the manufacturer's tax, electricity tax, sales tax, inheritance tax, theater tax and tax on checks; Folder entitled, " Tax Letters" containing ca. 75 letters pertaining to taxes on motor vehicles and on electricity; Folder marked, "Goldsborough Bill," including letters between Carter Glass and Goldsborough.

Correspondence: Financial Matters, (J-Z) 1932
Box: 291

A. About 300 letters, alphabetically arranged, concerning bank failures, insurance of deposits, comments on the Carter Glass Banking Bill, stock market investigation and war debt adjustments.

B. Report by the Federal Advisory Council on Senate Bill #4115.

Correspondence: Legislation 1932-1933
Box: 292

A. Folder of correspondence on the Home Loan Bill; Folder of correspondence on the Economy Act of 1933; Folder of correspondence regarding Shenandoah National Park; Folder of correspondence about the 1933 Tax Bill; Folder of correspondence on Prohibition.

Correspondence: Financial and Legislation, (A-H) 1932
Box: 293

A. Folder of letters requesting copies of the Carter Glass Banking Bill; About 350 loose letters, alphabetically arranged, complimenting Carter Glass on his stand on financial matters and on his Banking Bill; Statement of the Federal Reserve Board.

Official Correspondence, Patronage 1932
Box: 294

A. Folder marked, " Lynchburg Postmaster," containing about 25 letters requesting assistance in obtaining the position of postmaster; Folder marked "Patronage" containing about 50 letters relating to requests for jobs; Folder of applications for Virginia postmaster; Miscellaneous letters, some personal others pertaining to financial and political matters.

Correspondence: Political 1930-1935
Box: 295

A. Folder of ca. 50 non-complimentary letters regarding the Morgan Investigation; Folder of correspondence pertaining to W. D. Nye's candidacy for Marshall of Eastern District of Virginia; Folder of about 300 letters concerning the Morgan Investigation; Folder marked "Miscellaneous" containing ca. 350 letters relative to the Goldhurst-Cannon cases; Folder of correspondence with T. McCall Frazier concerning State political matters; Folder of correspondence with the Hon. J. G. Pollard regarding State political affairs.

Correspondence: Banking, etc., (A-J) 1932-1933
Box: 296

A. About 400 letters from constituents, mostly bankers, expressing their views on the Carter Glass Banking Bill, the need for reform in banking practices, and the restraint of speculation. A folder of correspondence relating to Section 19 (Branch Banking) of the Carter Glass Bill.

Correspondence: Banking, etc., (K-Z) 1932-1933
Box: 297

A. About 400 letters from bankers and others relating to the Carter Glass Banking Bill, deposit insurance, stock speculation and the need for reform in banking practices.

Correspondence: Speeches 1932-1933
Box: 298

A. Folder of letters complimenting Carter Glass on his speech against the Inflation Bill. Requests for copies of speech; Folder marked "Correspondence with reference to Senator Carter Glass' speech of November 1, 1932," and requests for speech; Folder marked "inflation Speech," with request for copies; Folder of "Inflation Letters" complimenting Carter Glass on his speech.

Correspondence 1932
Box: 299

A. Miscellaneous correspondence, alphabetically arranged; About 300-350 letters, mostly of a personal or political nature; Letters from Claude Swanson, John Jacob Raskob, George H. Moses, William H. King, Jesse H. Jones, Harry Goldhurst, Arthur Copper, Harry F. Byrd, James A. Farley.

B. Letter from Charles S. Hamlin, September 14, 1932, stating what had been done by the Federal Reserve Board under the Carter Glass amendments permitting direct Federal Reserve loans to Borrowers; Other letters between Carter Glass and Charles S. Hamlin discussing this amendment.

Correspondence: "Fan Mail" 1932-1933
Box: 300

A. About 400 letters of a political and legislative nature containing suggestions for banking reforms.

Correspondence: Banking Bill and Federal Reserve, (A-J) 1931-1933
Box: 301

A. Letters congratulating Carter Glass upon the passage of his bill; Letters containing suggestions on how to curb short-selling; Letters containing suggestions for amending the Federal Reserve Act; Carbon Copy of Senator Carter Glass' remarks regarding Federal Reserve, undated.

Correspondence: Banking Bill and Federal Reserve, (K-Z) 1931-1933
Box: 302

A. Letters concerning deposit insurance, amendments to the Federal Reserve Act, and restriction on stock speculation and short selling.

Correspondence regarding Loans, etc. Statistics 1932-1937
Box: 303

A. Envelope marked, "Facts Covering War Debt, New York, 1932," containing a pamphlet of the same title prepared by Young and Ottley Inc.; Folder marked "Foreign Loans." Copies of representative editorials from newspapers throughout the nation expressing views on loans to Allies in 1917-1918; Cable from the American Mission, November 13, 1919, on relief to Austria; About 75 letters pertaining to Foreign Loans; Folder marked "Allied Loans -Reductions"; Reports on Allied deaths in battle; authorative statements on the authorization of loans to foreign countries; and statistics on the repayment of loans, 1937.

Reports, Papers and Correspondence, Banking and Currency, Carter Glass Bill 1932-1934
Box: 304

A. Folder marked "Letters and papers for the Record, May 1, 1935"; Newspaper editorials concerning the banking notions of Marriner Eccles and the new bill amending the Federal Reserve Act; Correspondence with and statements of various persons who testified before the Banking and Currency Committee in 1935, including James H. Rogers, Irving Fisher, and F. A. Vanderlip; About 100 letters from constituents opposing the Fletcher-Steagall Act; Confidential memorandum for the Secretary of the Treasury, prepared by the Federal Reserve Board of New York, April 17, 1933, concerning the international value of the dollar; Folder marked "Eccles, Marriner, 1934"; Correspondence between Marriner Eccles and Carter Glass; Letters from constituents concerning Marriner Eccles ' policies, including two from Walter E. Spahr discussing Marriner Eccles ' testimony before the House Committee on Banking and Currency; Several memoranda on Branch Banking; Mimeographed copy of an early draft of the Federal Reserve Act; Memoranda and statistics concerning bank failures, 1921-1931; Correspondence with bankers concerning the Glass-Steagall Act; Several letters from H. Parker Willis analyzing the bill.

Reports, Papers and Correspondence, Banking and Currency, Carter Glass Bill 1932-1934
Box: 305

A. Correspondence regarding Carter Glass Bill with officials of the Federal Reserve System : Letter, April 5, 1932, from Chester Morrill Secretary of the Federal Reserve Board, containing suggestions for legislation to regulate the holding company affiliates of member banks; Letter of January 30, 1932, from E. L. Smead, Chief of the Division of Bank Operations of the Federal Reserve Board, giving the amount of loans that each Federal Reserve bank could extend to member banks as of January 27, 1932; Letter of February 24, 1932, showing the amount of eligible assets held by each of the five largest member banks in San Francisco and other figures; Similar information in a letter, February 23, 1932; Letter of April 30, 1932, showing changes in member bank security loans under the various discount rates during 1920-1921; Letters of February -April, 1932, giving statistics on loans, discounts and reserve; Letter from Charles S. Hamlin, July 9, 1932, enclosing draft of an amendment to the Federal Reserve Act giving Federal Reserve Banks in emergencies the power to loan directly on eligible paper; Letter, December 19, 1931, showing vote of Governors regarding amendment to Section 13 of Federal Reserve Act.

B. Copies of reports by the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve Board on the bills which were referred to Carter Glass' subcommittee.

C. Report of the Committee on Bank Reserves of the Federal Reserve System.

D. Treasury correspondence regarding Carter Glass Bill.

E. Newspaper clippings regarding Carter Glass Bill.

F. Letters proposing amendments to the Carter Glass Bill.

G. Carbon copy of a statement, author not designated, purporting to record the controversy between the Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board in 1919 over discount rate.

H. Early drafts of the Carter Glass Bill.

I. Letters and telegrams regarding Carter Glass Bill.

Correspondence, Huey Long 1932-1935
Box: 306

A. Letters regarding Senatorial Investigation of election to Senate of J. Overton in 1932; Letters to and from the Women's Committee, Square Dealers; editorials and articles requesting Carter Glass' aid in unseating both Long and Overton; Accounts of corruption under Long's regime; Comments on Long- Carter Glass controversy over Banking Legislation; Copies of letters sent out by Huey Long, defending himself and attacking others; Newspaper articles and editorials relating to these and similar topics.

Correspondence: Congratulatory Letters, etc. 1933
Box: 307

A. About 400 letters from people throughout the nation congratulating Carter Glass on his opposition to the administration.

Correspondence regarding Economy Bill 1933
Box: 308

A. Letters praising Carter Glass' support of Economy measures; Letters criticizing the moratorium; Letters suggesting reforms in banking practices.

Correspondence 1933
Box: 309

A. Letter to James M. Beck stating his views on the Recovery Act; Letters congratulating Carter Glass on passage of Carter Glass Bill; Correspondence with Harry F. Byrd. State politics.

Correspondence regarding Banking 1933
Box: 310

A. About 400 letters from bankers, lawyers, and others offering suggestions regarding the Carter Glass Bill, expressing opinions concerning deposit insurance, and giving suggestions for other reform measures; Statement by the employees of the National City Bank concerning the activities of the bank's officials, including Charles E. Mitchell.

Correspondence regarding Banking and Currency 1919-1933
Box: 311

A. Folder marked " Banking and Currency Committee Senate " containing letters relating to banking legislation and papers relating to the business of the Committee; Treasury Department reports on various bills referred to Carter Glass' subcommittee, and miscellaneous letters concerning banking legislation; Correspondence with Henry B. Steagall regarding the Glass-Steagall Act; Folder of correspondence with N. K. Duerson regarding business and personal matters, 1919-1933.

Correspondence regarding Legislation 1933-1935
Box: 312

A. Folder of letters concerning National Recovery Administration, 1934; Correspondence with Robert F. Wagner, Millard E. Tydings, General Hugh Johnson, and many businessmen who wrote protesting against the Act; About 200 letters written in 1935-1936 concerning the abuses perpetrated by the National Recovery Administration.

Correspondence: Legislation Banking and Currency 1933-1937
Box: 313

A. Synopsis of opposition to Federal Reserve Bill, a memorandum reporting various expressions of disapproval by bankers and others in 1913; Photostatic copies of an article in The Outlookentitled, "The Bankers' Objections to the Currency Bill"; Photostatic of The Financial Ageof 1913; Folder marked "Democratic Committees" containing correspondence with the Democratic National Committee; File marked, "Banking and Currency" containing correspondence relating to bills pending before Carter Glass' sub-committee, May 1936, and copies of several bills; Folder of correspondence concerning the Copper-Kelley bill; Folder of correspondence regarding Farm Relief; Folder of correspondence on Beer Bill; Letters congratulating Carter Glass on his opposition.

Correspondence: Speeches 1933-1937
Box: 314

A. Folder containing copies of the speech "Constitutional Immorality"; Folder marked " Carter Glass candidacy for United States Senate, March 4, 1925," containing correspondence pertaining to his registration as a candidate; Correspondence relating to Carter Glass' Lynchburg speech in 1934; Folder of correspondence commenting on Carter Glass' impromptu remarks on the floor of the Senate, February 20, 1933; Letters in reply to Carter Glass' complaint regarding "and/or."

Correspondence regarding Legislation 1934-1935
Box: 315

A. Folder of correspondence on the National Recovery Administration, 1935; Letters from businessmen asking Carter Glass to oppose reenactment of the National Recovery Administration; Folder marked "Bank, 1934" containing correspondence regarding proposed changes in the Bank Act of 1933; Folder of correspondence about the Guffey Bill; Folder of correspondence on the Pure Food Act; Folder of correspondence about Old Age Pensions, 1935.

Correspondence: Legislation 1934-1936
Box: 316

A. Folder of correspondence on Stock Exchange Bill; Letters from bankers, lawyers, investment counselors and others relating to the Federal Trade Commission and other provisions of the Stock Exchange Bill; About 350 letters in a folder marked "First Gold Letters" congratulating Carter Glass on his opposition to gold devaluation; Folder entitled "Vinson Bill" containing about 75 letters congratulating Carter Glass on his opposition to the Vinson Bill.

Correspondence: Legislation 1934-1936
Box: 317

A. Folder of about 400 letters relating to the Bank Bill of 1935; Letters from bankers expressing views on the proposed Bill or enclosing amendments to the Bill; Newspaper clippings and printed statements concerning various aspects of the Bill; Letter to M. E. Bristow, February 9, 1935, Carter Glass affirms that he believes the purpose of the Bank Bill to be to destroy state banks; Letters concerning the appointment of Marriner Eccles to the Federal Reserve Board; Letters relating to deposit insurance assessments; Correspondence between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Duncan Fletcher regarding Bank Bill; Correspondence with Reed Smoot and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation concerning Marriner Eccles ' connection with banks in Utah and the condition of those banks; Folder marked "Bonus, 1936" containing ca. 75 letters mostly commending Carter Glass on his stand against the Bonus Bill; Folder of letters regarding The World Court, 1935, both for and against our entry.

Correspondence: Legislation 1934-1936
Box: 318

A. Folder of correspondence on the Wagner Bill; Letters from constituents giving their views on this Bill; Folder of correspondence on Taw Bill, 1934; Letters from constituents supporting of objecting to proposed taxes on candy, cigarettes and other items; Folder of letters pertaining to the Bonus and the Independent Offices Bill.

B. Folder of correspondence on the Wagner Bill; About 300 letters from constituents presenting their views on this Bill.

Correspondence: Legislation 1935
Box: 319

A. Folder of correspondence regarding Tax Bill, 1935; Letters from constituents protesting against or supporting various excise taxes; Folder of correspondence on the Wagner Resolution, 1935, to exclude all persona except lawyers from practice before public departments. Letters from constituents protesting this Resolution; Letters regarding the Wagner Labor Bill; Folder of letters from constituents expressing their views on the Tobacco Control Act.

Correspondence 1934
Box: 320

A. Miscellaneous correspondence, primarily personal or regarding state politics, including letters of Harry F. Byrd, William S. Battle, Bernard M. Baruch, Eugene Black, William E. Borah, T. G. Bruch, Leo Crowley, Marriner Eccles, James A. Farley, Jesse Jones and Charles S. Hamlin; Letter from Carter Glass to M. E. Bristow dated December 26, 1934, in which he states his views on actions taken by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation regarding insurance of non-member State Banks.

B. Carbon copy of a letter from W. J. Bryan, October 6, 1913, promising his support of Federal Reserve Act.

C. Carbon copy of a statement made by Carter Glass on December 27, 1934, regarding interest payments by banks on time and savings deposits. Letter to Charles S. Hamlin on same subject, December 24, 1934; Letter to Professor Raymond Moley, October 29, 1934, in which Carter Glass expresses the opinion that the Federal Reserve System has "practically been wrecked"; Letter to Senator S. W. Raymond, December 4, 1934, characterizing as a steal the transfer of Federal Reserve funds to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

Correspondence: Legislation 1935
Box: 321

A. Folder of correspondence on the Anti-Lynching Law, 1935; Letters from constituents asking for his support of the Bill; Folder of correspondence on Bonus, 1935; Letters from constituents expressing their views on the proposed bonus legislation.

Correspondence: Personal and Legislation 1935
Box: 322

A. Folders of complimentary letters to Senator Carter Glass, primarily commending his opposition to the Administration; Folder of papers concerning the Judgeship for the Eastern District of Virginia.

Correspondence regarding Veteran Cases, (C-G) 1934-1943
Box: 323

A. Correspondence between veterans and Carter Glass and between Carter Glass and the Veterans Administration relative to claims for compensation.

Correspondence: Veteran's Cases, (H-N) 1934-1943
Box: 324

A. Correspondence between veterans and Carter Glass, and between Carter Glass and the Veterans Administration concerning claims for compensation.

Correspondence: Veteran's Cases, (A-C) 1933-1943
Box: 325

A. Correspondence between veterans and Carter Glass, and between Carter Glass and the Veterans Administration relating to claims of veterans.

Correspondence: Veteran's Cases, (O-S) 1934-1943
Box: 326

A. Correspondence between veterans and Carter Glass and between Carter Glass and the Veterans Administration relative to claims for compensation.

Correspondence: Veteran's Cases, (T-Z) 1934-1943
Box: 327

A. Correspondence between veterans and Carter Glass, and between Carter Glass and the Veterans Administration concerning claims for compensation.

Correspondence: Legislation 1934-1936
Box: 328

A. Folder of letters about gold, 1934; Letters from constituents commenting on the unconstitutionality of gold devaluation; Letters on the Towsend Plan, 1936; Folder of telegrams concerning the AAA; Correspondence concerning the AAA, 1939; Folder of correspondence on requests for appropriations to Army, Navy, District of Columbia and other agencies; Folder of correspondence on the Tax Bill, 1936; Letters from constituents expressing their views on various excise taxes and on other provisions of the Bill; Folder of letters on the proposed Gold Reserve Bill, 1934; Letters complimenting Carter Glass on his stand on monetary matters.

Correspondence: Legislation 1934-1936
Box: 329