A Guide to the Frederic G. Melcher-Robert Frost Collection, Melcher-Frost Collection 13024

A Guide to the Frederic G. Melcher-Robert Frost Collection,

A Collection in
Special Collections
The University of Virginia Library
Accession Number 13024


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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession Number
13024
Title
Frederic G. Melcher-Robert Frost Collection
Physical Characteristics
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Robert Frost Collection, Accession #13024, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

The papers consisting of Robert Frost items were purchased by the University of Virginia Library from Sue A.W. Melcher, Appleton, Wisconsin, on March 31, 2004. The additional related Melcher material was given to the University of Virginia Library by Sue A.W. Melcher, Appleton, Wisconsin, on May 28, 2004.


Biographical/Historical Information

Frederic Gershom Melcher (1879-1963) was born in Malden, Massachusetts, and died on March 9, 1963, only a short while after his friend, Robert Frost. Melcher's influence in the world of books was notable, having worked as a publisher and editor for more than a half century; a bookseller at Charles E. Lauriat Company of Boston and W.K. Stewart Company, Indianapolis, Indiana (1913-1918), for almost a quarter of a century; becoming co-editor of The Publishers' Weekly in 1918, and chairman of R.R. Bowker & Company in 1958.

Melcher contributed to the promotion of good literature for children by helping develop Children's Book Week (1919), establishing the John Newbery Medal (1921) for the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children, and establishing the Caldecott Medal, for the best American picture book for children (1937).

Scope and Content

This collection consists of the personal and professional papers of Frederic G. Melcher, editor of The Publishers' Weekly, particularly those dealing with his collection of materials concerning Robert Frost, but also his relationships to other writers, publishers, and others of the book world. Frederic G. Melcher maintained a warm friendship with Robert Frost throughout his life and this relationship is reflected in the correspondence between the two men.

These papers, 1865-1963, include correspondence, printed ephemera, news clippings, photographs, manuscripts, etc., ca. 1,375 items (6 Hollinger boxes, 2.5 linear feet).

Most of the correspondence in series five is addressed to Melcher; when it is not addressed to Melcher either personally or as editor of The Publishers' Weekly, the recipient is noted in the guide. Many of the letters in this section were generated by responses to the invitation to a dinner celebrating Robert Frost's 50th birthday; by Melcher's invitation to various authors or other individuals to come and speak at Montclair, New Jersey; or to answer Melcher's 1934 question for The Publishers' Weekly concerning recommendations for essential reading in the coming year.

Arrangement

The papers are arranged in five series: Series I: Robert Frost Manuscripts (Box 1) Series II: Correspondence of Robert Frost, members of the Frost Family and Frederic G. Melcher (Boxes 1-2) Series III: Miscellaneous Papers concerning Robert Frost (Boxes 2-3) Series IV: Miscellaneous Papers concerning Frederic G. Melcher and Other Authors (Boxes 3-4) Series V: Correspondence of Frederic G. Melcher and Various Authors and Publishers, arranged alphabetically by Name of Correspondent (Boxes 4-6)

All manuscripts and work by Robert Frost, hand-written, typed, or printed are found in the first series and are arranged alphabetically by title. The correspondence between Robert Frost, members of the Frost family, and Frederic G. Melcher is found in the second series and is arranged chronologically. The third series containing miscellaneous items concerning Robert Frost is arranged alphabetically by the type of material; for example advertising items; articles about Frost; a drawing; ephemera; guest lists, invitations, and programs for events involving Frost; news clippings; and photographs of Frost or Frost portraits.

The fourth series contains any non-correspondence material concerning Melcher or other authors, excluding Robert Frost, and is arranged alphabetically by type of material. The final series comprises the correspondence of Frederic G. Melcher and various authors and publishers, arranged alphabetically by the name of the correspondent and including any carbons of Melcher's letters to that person.

Contents List

Series I: Robert Frost Manuscripts
  • Box-folder 1:1
    "Acceptance" by Robert Frost, [1928]
    TMs, 1 p.

    South Shaftsbury, Vermont with penciled notation "Original ms typed by Mr. Frost about 1928.

  • Box-folder 1:2
    Address by Robert Frost at the Massachusetts State College Convocation, 1934 Oct 18
    TMs, carbon copy, 3 pp.

    With a printed program for the event.

  • Box-folder 1:3
    "Baseball: Perfect Day- A Day of Prowess" by Robert Frost, 1956 Jul 23
    In Sports Illustrated, printed.
  • Box-folder 1:4
    "Carpe Diem" by Robert Frost, n.d.
    AMsS, 1 p.

    Inscribed "For Frederic Melcher".

  • Box-folder 1:5
    Collected Poems of Robert Frost, [1930]
    Page Proofs

    Henry Holt and Company, New York (1of 2 folders)

  • Box-folder 1:6
    Collected Poems of Robert Frost, [1930]
    Page Proofs

    Henry Holt and Company, New York (2 of 2 folders)

  • Box-folder 1:7
    "The Cow's in the Corn" by Robert Frost, [1928]
    TMs, 1 p.

    outh Shaftsbury, Vermont with penciled notation "Original ms typed by Mr. Frost about 1928.

  • Box-folder 1:8
    "Departmental" by Robert Frost, n.d.
    AMsS, 3 pp. on 3 l.
  • Box-folder 1:9
    "The Freedom of the Moon" by Robert Frost, [1928]
    TMs, 1 p., with some autograph corrections

    South Shaftsbury, Vermont with penciled notation "Original ms typed by Mr. Frost about 1928."

  • Box-folder 1:10
    "From Snow to Snow" by Robert Frost, 1936
    printed

    Henry Holt & Company, New York.

  • Box-folder 1:11
    "The Gift Outright" by Robert Frost, 1961 Mar 21
    printed

    Reprinted as a presentation piece by Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. following the Kennedy inauguration.

  • Box-folder 1:12
    "A Group of Poems" by Robert Frost, n.d.
    printed

    Including "Fragmentary Blue" and "Place for a Third."

  • Box-folder 1:13
    "In the Big Rain" by Robert Frost, n.d.
    AMsS, 1 p.

    Inscribed " R.F. to F.M."

  • Box-folder 1:14
    "In Time of Cloud-Burst" by Robert Frost, n.d.
    AMsS, 2 pp. on 2 l.
  • Box-folder 1:15
    "The Investment" by Robert Frost, [1928]
    TMs, 1 p.

    South Shaftsbury, Vermont with penciled notation "Original ms typed by Mr. Frost about 1928," and "In West Running Brook."

  • Box-folder 1:16
    The Last Will and Testament of William P. Frost of Lawrence, 1901 Jan 15
    TMs, 5 pp.

    Essex County, Massachusetts, grandfather of Robert Frost.

  • Box-folder 1:17
    "A Line-Storm Song" by Robert Frost, 1907 Oct
    printed

    In New England Magazine.

  • Box-folder 1:18
    "A Monument to After Thought Unveiled" Robert Frost's Valedictory Address, June 1892
    TMs, 2 pp.

    Lawrence High School, 1892, published in the Lawrence High School Bulletin.

  • Box-folder 1:19
    "Neither Out Far Nor In Deep " by Robert Frost in The Yale Review, 1934 Spring
    printed

    Issue also includes "Robert Frost and the Dark Woods" by J. McBride Dabbs.

  • Box-folder 1:20
    "A New Group of Poems" by Robert Frost in Harper's Magazine, [post 1914] July
    printed
  • Box-folder 1:21
    "On a Bird Singing in its Sleep" by Robert Frost in Scribner's Magazine, 1934 December
    printed
  • Box-folder 1:22
    "On Making Sure Anything Has Happened" by Robert Frost, 1945
    AMsS, 1 p.

    Inscribed "Dear Fred: This is a preview of our group Christmas poem for 1945. R.F."

  • Box-folder 1:23
    "Part-active Shoes" by Robert Frost, 1933 April 1
    AMsS, 2 pp. on 2 l.

    Inscribed "For Fred Melcher Montclair April 1 1933."

  • Box-folder 1:24
    "The Same Leaves" by Robert Frost, [1928]
    TMs, 1 p.

    South Shaftsbury, Vermont with penciled notation, "Original ms typed by Mr. Frost about 1928."

  • Box-folder 1:25
    "Several Short Poems" by Robert Frost with J.J. Lankes Woodcut illustration, [1924]
    printed
  • Box-folder 1:26
    "Three Poems" by Robert Frost in The Yale Review 1934 Autumn
    printed

    Includes "Moon Compasses,""A Missive Missile," and "After-Flakes."

  • Box-folder 1:27
    "The Times Table" by Robert Frost, [1928]
    TMs, 1 p.

    South Shaftsbury, Vermont with penciled notation "Original ms typed by Mr. Frost about 1928."

  • Box-folder 1:28
    "To Our Ancient" by Robert Frost, n.d.
    AMsS, 1 p., with corrections by the author

    Inscribed to "F[red] M[elcher]- an old one."

  • Box-folder 1:29
    Untitled Poem beginning "In winter in the woods alone against the trees I go," by Robert Frost, n.d.
    AMsS, 1 p.

    With typescript copy.

  • Box-folder 1:30
    "War Thoughts at Home" by Robert Frost, 1918 January
    TMs, 1 p.
Series II: Correspondence of Robert Frost, members of the Frost Family, and Frederic G. Melcher,
  • Box-folder 1:31
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1919 Sep 22
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    Apologizes for not answering his letters promptly and arranges to come to his home in New Jersey early in December and read to his audience, talking about "Vocal Reality." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:32
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1919 Sep 29
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Suggests the date of December 3 for his visit and reading. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:33
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, [1919] Oct 9
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Explains that he has made a mistake in looking at his calendar and that December 4 would be a much better date for his lecture in New Jersey, since Wednesday is his busiest day in Amherst. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:34
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1919 Nov 18
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Promises to make the college accommodate itself to their plans and not to worry. Frost also supposes that Carl Sandburg has sung "the Livery Stable Blues" to Melcher, furnishing an example that he had heard. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:35
    Robert Frost to Frederic G. Melcher, on Henry Holt and Company stationery, [1919?]
    TLS, 1 p.

    Frost comments about Robert Chapin's illustrations for North of Boston, "His part of the book in a word, is cosmopolite. And they don't just see instantly how it goes with the work of a person who is known to hold that nine-tenths of personality is locality." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:36
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, [1919 ?]
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Postpones doing a reading for Melcher as he is too tired and beset by his responsibilities to his book, college duties, family, and farming. He also suggests that Melcher let one of his friends "do a real deliberate article about my literature- a whole page or two of reconsideration." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:37
    Robert Frost, Ann Arbor, Michigan, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1922 Dec 5
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Answers both Melcher's letters to himself and to Lesley at the same time, saying "You have the dates and publishers of my first editions exactly right. The Holt edition of A Boy's Will and North of Boston have no additional material and no changes in the text that I am aware of. I hope to see you when I am in N.Y. just after Christmas if you are visible." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:38
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1923 Nov 24
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    Arranges his "speaker's fee," "Whatever I come to Montclair to do it will be in exchange for your coming here once to talk to my class. That is to say you will speak for the same price I speak for. As long as no money will change hands we may as well be exorbitant and establish high records for ourselves. Suppose we make it [G.K.] Chesterton and [Sir Rabindranath] Tagore's figure- one thousand dollars." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:39
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1923 Nov 27
    TL, 1 p., carbon copy.

    Agrees to swap speaking dates with Frost, hoping for January 11th for Frost's visit. He also asks if he could visit Frost in February as he has to speak at Simmons College on February 6th. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:40
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1924 Dec 10
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    With a check for $ 75.00 drawn on the First National Bank, Amherst, Massachusetts, and signed by Frost, wherein he addresses creativity, "The Harvard psychologists have been asking us writers if in our experience the act of creation doesn't just naturally articulate into a state followed by an idea followed by some work. Old Christopher Smart said that what God created had to be determined dared and done. As long as we keep to triplets I don't much care"; his debt to Melcher, sending him his eternal gratitude and the enclosed check; and their friendship, "I'd rather see you once than write you a thousand letters." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:41
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1925 Jan 26
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Agrees to allow Melcher to give him a "triumphal dinner" in honor of his fiftieth birthday as long as he doesn't have to look or act the age. Frost also asks him to make sure to invite the Untermeyers who had also suggested a celebration for him. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:42
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1925 Jan 29
    TL, 1 p., carbon copy,

    Promises that the birthday celebration will be one that both he and Mrs. Frost will enjoy, plans to host it at the Hotel Brevoort, and asks for any friends he wishes to include in the guest list. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:43
    Elinor Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1925 Feb 27
    ALS, 4 pp. on 2 l.

    Contributes her suggestions for Robert Frost's 50th birthday party and sends her regrets that they will not be home when he is in their area. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:44
    Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1927 Sep 29
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l., with envelope,

    Wants to meet with Melcher during his trip to Springfield and discuss "that Scribners business we got started and never finished." Mentions that he has learned to drive and that he could pick him up if he came by train. Also mentions his daughter, Margery, and her poor health. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:45
    Robert Frost telegram, Bennington, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1928 Jul 12

    Says that the title of his next book will be West-running Brook, includes a carbon transcript of the telegram.

  • Box-folder 1:46
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1929 Feb 9
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Expresses his happiness that [Nicholas] Vachel [Lindsay?] is out of debt, Melcher is doing a bibliography of his work for Colophon and that he is coming to see their new farm. Frost also refers to Rudyard Kipling's monkey symbolism. Margery has taken up nursing. Possibly mentions his earliest work, Twilight, "I have a small edition of one copy of an early book of mine that nobody but Elinor and I and the printer ever saw. You'll have to say if it counts in my bibliography." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:47
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1929 Feb 13
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Has lost his letter so does not know the name of the man that he needs to inscribe on the two firsts sent to him to sign and has just returned from Middletown, Connecticut, where his book has gained him popularity. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:48
    Elinor Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1929 Jul 5
    ALS, 4 pp. on 1 l.

    Hopes that Mrs. Melcher can visit also, says they are still living in the shingled cottage while repairs are being made to the farmhouse, Marjorie is in her sixth month at the hospital and is doing good work, and Lesley's baby girl is "a perfect darling." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:49
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1930 Jan 7
    ALS, 3 pp. on 3 l.

    Discusses various editions of his books, saying "I have no first edition of the American North of Boston in blue myself." He also mentions A Boy's Will and articles about himself that might be useful in Melcher's bibliography. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:50
    Frederic G. Melcher, to Robert Frost, Amherst College, 1930 Jan 10
    Thanks Frost for his help on the bibliography he is writing and asks more questions about the first book he issued, presumably Twilight. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.
  • Box-folder 1:51
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1930 Jan 30
    ANS, 1 p.

    Asks to borrow his copy of "The Lovely Shall Be Choosers." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:52
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, 1930 May 28
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Returns "the precious first American edition of North of Boston," lent for use in his bibliography, and mentions the use of Zadig's portrait of Frost from The Herald Tribune for his article. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:53
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, 1930 Aug 6
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Plans to mail Frost a copy of his article about Frost in The Colophon which has more orders than they can fill. He also believes that the bookseller prices for Frost material are on their way up. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:54
    Robert Frost, Franconia, New Hampshire, to Frederic G. Melcher, [1930] Sep 1
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Thanks Melcher for The Colophon and its impressive treatment of himself, and asks for some advice about whether he should do a series of lectures on poetry during the winter at the New School of Social Research, not being afraid of associating with either radicals or Jews. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:55
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Franconia, New Hampshire, 1930 Sep 4
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Urges Frost to do the lecture series for the New School of Social Research because he has always wanted to hear what Frost has to say about the subject of poetry itself, the poet's relationship to nature, the world, and his work. He also believes that he informal nature of his lectures at the New School would be more stimulating than those given in the campus mold. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:56
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, 1930 Oct 21
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Compares his copy of the new edition of the Collected Poems printed by Random House with the trade edition from Holt, which he much prefers due to the weight of the volume, the size of the page, and the binding. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:57
    Robert Frost to Frederic G. Melcher, [1930]
    ALS, 1 p.

    Refers to Melcher's article in The Colophon, "Elinor and I think this is one of the best things ever written about me and my books. I have made a few corrections and one or two suggestions."

  • Box-folder 1:58
    Robert Frost Telegram to Frederic G. Melcher, 1931 Dec 4

    Sends his desperate plea, "For the love of literature plead with [Alfred?] Dashiell and [Henry Seidel] Canby not to blame me too much if I find myself unequal to presiding over dinners. I should have known that was what I was letting myself in for. Must be got out of office without making a noise." Melcher has written his a copy of his reply on the telegram itself, promising to intercede on his behalf with the P.E.N. officers who should be content with using his name in their masthead.

  • Box-folder 1:59
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, 1931 Dec 5
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Urges Frost not to be concerned about the P.E.N. dinner, although his friends would welcome his presence, he has telephoned Dashiell and all is well.

  • Box-folder 1:60
    Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1932 Jan 18
    ALS, 3 pp. on 2 l.

    Expresses his appreciation for the poem on Melcher's Christmas card, voices his concerns about the family of Nicholas Vachel Lindsay and asks if money is being raised for his widow. Frost feels that they should help her find a job so she can keep the children with her. He also shares his feelings of shame at his cowardly behavior over the P.E.N. dinner during his brief term in office.

  • Box-folder 1:61
    Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1933 Aug 4
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Asks Melcher to give some practical advice to William, the son of Professor Otto Manthey-Zorn, Frost's "chief intimate" at Amherst, who is interested in eventually setting up a bookseller's business. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:62
    Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1933 Nov 1
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Encloses the poem he particularly liked (not present) which probably should have been entitled Without "Prejudice to Anything," to prevent people from thinking he is disparaging machinery. He promises to copy out "In Time of Cloud-Burst" for Melcher but cannot answer any questions about misprints in "Mountain Interval" at this time. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:63
    Robert Frost, Key West, Florida, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1934 Dec 30
    ALS, 6 pp. on 3 l.

    Discusses the cover of A Boy's Will, and Key West, Florida, as he sees it on his winter vacation, "It is a very very dead place because it has died several times. It died as a resort of pirates, than as a house of smugglers and wreckers, then as a cigar manufactury (the Cubans moved over here to get inside the tariff wall) then as a winter resort boomtown. Franklin D. himself has taken it personally in hand to give it one more life to loose." He once again mentions his Presidency of P.E.N. and claims that Dashiel has been taking his revenge on his failure by not featuring his poetry. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:64
    Elinor Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Marguerite Melcher, [1935?] Mar 30
    ALS, 4 pp. on 2 l.

    Sends a copy of her daughter Marjorie's little book of poetry. She states that thinking about the book helped her make it through the last year, although "now that it is done, I seem to feel an utter depression that is almost worse than severe physical pain." Robert is at an interval in his lectures at Harvard due to their vacation time but has been busy with other engagements. Elinor also thanks her for the winter of theatre going together.

  • Box-folder 1:65
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1935 May 7
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Sends Frost the names of two book collectors who would be thrilled to receive a copy of the Dartmouth brochure.

  • Box-folder 1:66
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1935 Jun 19
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Discusses the Amherst College Library, its neglect, lack of use by the boys, and the need for its promotion. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:67
    Robert Frost to Frederic G. Melcher, [1935 Sep?]
    ALS, 3 pp. on 2 l.

    Explains his "tangle" with Macmillan, over King Jasper, A Poem by Edwin Arlington Robinson, with an introduction by Robert Frost, "because it wasn't an appraisal, didn't mention King Jasper and didn't bring in enough Robinson," and their advertisement which says he will autograph their $7.50 edition for no additional payment. He also mentions that he is going to New York in October to make some records for Professor Hibbet at Columbia. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:68
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, 1935 Sep 20
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Advises Frost to not autograph the Macmillan books unless they pay him another two hundred dollars. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:69
    Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1935 Nov 11
    ALS, 1 p.

    Plans to use his poem "Departmental," which will appear in The Yale Review, for a Christmas greeting. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 1:70
    Lesley Frost, Rockford College, Rockford, Illinois, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1936 Mar 13
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Asks for the article and pictures back, hopes to see him in April when she is going to Cambridge for her spring vacation with her mother and father.

  • Box-folder 1:71
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1936 Mar 18
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Hopes he is comfortable in his new surroundings, finds it exciting that over 50,000 copies of Frost's new volume are going out for sale all at once, tells of hearing from Lesley, and mentions a visit with Carl Sandburg last week.

  • Box-folder 1:72
    Frederic G. Melcher to Lesley Frost, Rockford, Illinois, 1936 Mar 19
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Apologizes for keeping her photographs so long and asks if he can have one made of her father and mother for his personal collection. Also mentions that the Book-of-the-Month Club has taken Far Range for distribution which should certainly help the sales of Collected Poems.

  • Box-folder 1:73
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1936 Mar 25
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Wishes Frost a happy 61st birthday, congratulates him on being the guest of honor on the 300th anniversary of Harvard University, discusses the new edition of Untermeyer, which contains over 30 of Frost's poems, and [Charles R.] Green's bibliography.

  • Box-folder 1:74
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1937 Apr 15
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Refers to Frost's time in Texas, and the pleasure of his friend, Rosengren, of San Antonio, at the pleasure of meeting Frost, and his plans on having David Randall of Scribner's to review Green's bibliography.

  • Box-folder 1:75
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1937 May 4
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Congratulates Frost on winning the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for A Further Range.

  • Box-folder 1:76
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, 1937 Sep 27
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Expresses his pleasure that Thornton is using his Colophon article in the volume they are publishing, mentions an Horatio Alger title that his book scout has found, "Out for Business, or Robert Frost's Strange Career." Also mentions a new article by [Robert S.] Newdick and an early Frost family photograph.

  • Box-folder 1:77
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Amherst, Massachusetts, 1937 Nov 5
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Notices from the Book Fair program that Frost will be in town soon and hope he will have time to visit Melcher at this home.

  • Box-folder 2:1
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Gainesville, Florida, 1938 Jan 6
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Hopes that the Frosts are basking in the sunlight and that Elinor is better, mentions seeing Frost's photograph and an article by Bernard De Voto used in the current Holt advertisement, and briefly discusses a book about Edward Thomas by R.P. Eckert.

  • Box-folder 2:2
    Robert Frost, Gainesville, Florida, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1938 Apr 14
    ANS, 1 p.

    "I shall be along by next Tuesday. I shall want to thank you a lot when I see you," with a printed card announcing funeral services for Elinor Frost to be held at Johnson Chapel, Amherst College, at 3 o'clock on Friday, April 22, 1938. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:3
    Frederic G. Melcher to Lesley Frost, Gainesville, Florida, 1938 Apr 28
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Offers suggestions about future employment, specifically with the Providence Booke Shop belonging to Mrs. Benjamin C. Clough, and the Kirkus Review service owned by Virginia Kirkus.

  • Box-folder 2:4
    Lesley Frost, Gainesville, Florida, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1938 Apr 28
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Thanks him for his prompt reply and his suggestions about future employment. She also shares some of her interests, especially about the Providence Booke Shop.

  • Box-folder 2:5
    Frederic G. Melcher to Lesley Frost, Gainesville, Florida, 1938 May 3
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Informs her that he has asked Virginia Kirkus to write with more details about her service.

  • Box-folder 2:6
    Frederic G. Melcher to Lesley Frost, Gainesville, Florida, 1938 May 26
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Asks is she is interested in selling the Pittsfield business.

  • Box-folder 2:7
    Lesley Frost, Gainesville, Florida, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1938 Jun 2
    ALS, 2 pp. on 2 l.

    Plans on arriving in New York next week and wants to meet with John Joseph Hagedorn and his wife over selling her business and also with Mrs. Kirkus.

  • Box-folder 2:8
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, 1938 Jul 5
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Mails a Pickering volume, thanks Frost for a poem and offers his home as a sort of between stop if he needs one.

  • Box-folder 2:9
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, 1938 Aug 9
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Refers to a full month vacation at Cape Cod and a visit from Lesley, who has decided to take a position in Washington, D.C., another offer of his home as a place of refuge to write, and asks if he would consider giving a talk for the Unity Institute Course in Montclair.

  • Box-folder 2:10
    Robert Frost, South Shaftsbury, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1938 Aug 12
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Frost finds Melcher's offer of a place to work at his home attractive but feels his restless mood would prevent him from accepting, wants to do the talk for Melcher in Montclair if they can find a good time, and gives his current engagements. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:11
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Concord Corners, Vermont, 1938 Aug 22
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Suggests March 31st as a good date for his visit to Montclair to speak and mentions obtaining a colored photograph of Frost by Blackstone. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:12
    Robert Frost, St. Botolph Club, Boston, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, [1938 Oct?]
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Agrees to speak on March 24th, mentions his desperate restlessness, and addresses at which he may be reached, "But Amherst no more!" Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:13
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1938 Oct 14
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Melcher is pleased he will see Frost at the Columbia Library School and is glad Frost is living on Mt. Vernon Street, familiar to him from his days at Lauriat's. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:14
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1938 Dec 22
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Reports about William Sloane, formerly of Farrar and Rinehart, and his plans for Holt & Company and the advertising for Frost's books.

  • Box-folder 2:15
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1939 Mar 2
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Writes that he is very excited about Frost's introduction to the Holt Collected Poems, but was bothered that Holt used a different font of type to set the new section "using Linotype because it is less expensive than Monotype."

  • Box-folder 2:16
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1939 Apr 11
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Discusses an interview that Frost gave at the Maplewood school and a poem that a student, Barbara Norton, had written.

  • Box-folder 2:17
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1939 May 12
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Refers to the Ralph Waldo Emerson Fellow in Poetry awarded to Frost by Harvard University.

  • Box-folder 2:18
    Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, [1939 Nov 27]
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l., with envelope,

    Expresses his shock and dismay that Melcher has been seriously ill, mentions writing a poem for a Christmas card for Joe Blumenthal, but adds, "Don't let this encourage you to think I am writing any more. I haven't got over hating paper pen and ink yet." Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:19
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1940 Mar 15
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Refers to his visit with Frost and his concern that he take regular meals.

  • Box-folder 2:20
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Boston, Massachusetts, 1940 Apr 2
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Enjoys Louis Untermeyer's book and the Scholastic Magazine Poetry Corner featuring Frost, with its good photograph of Frost.

  • Box-folder 2:21
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1941 Nov 14
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Sends Frost a copy of Emerson's Poems, London, 1847, for his enjoyment.

  • Box-folder 2:22
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, 1944 Mar 7
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Checks on several questions about autographed poems in Frost editions sold by questionable booksellers, especially two dedicated to E. Ording and H. Conti. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:23
    Robert Frost, Cambridge Massachusetts, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1944 Mar 22
    TLS, 2 pp. on 2 l.

    Replies that he has done things for E. Ording on request and wonders if H. Conti is not H. Knauti, who had aroused their suspicion. Shares his plans to lecture at Chicago University on the subject "Where is the Place of Ideals and Who is Their Keeper?" and mentions several other speaking engagements. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:24
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1944 Mar 23
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Thanks him for his comments about E. Ording and H. Knauti, which he will pass on to his friend Captain [Louis Henry] Cohn, who specializes in Frost material.

  • Box-folder 2:25
    Robert Frost, Key West, Florida, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1945 [Feb 22?]
    ALS, 3 pp. on 3 l., with envelope,

    Agrees to a birthday party at the P.E.N. club if he only has to read a poems or two to pay his way, and if Melcher can work it out with Henry Holt and Company. Frost tells about the other commitments he has in New York at the same time period. Talks about being with Prescott and Lillian on a small five acre farm in Florida where Prescott is attending the University of Miami.

  • Box-folder 2:26
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1945 Jul 13
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Discusses his speaking tour of England which was arranged by The National Book League. He also tells of his presentation of their joint Christmas card of "Two Tramps" to John Masefield and his suggestion that the National Book League should elect Robert Frost as the first honorary life member, which they did on the spot. Also mentions the new edition of Come In which he gave as gifts while on his trip.

  • Box-folder 2:27
    Robert Frost, Ripton, Vermont, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1945 Jul 20
    TLS, 1 p.

    Discusses Melcher's report of his trip to England and his pleasure at John Masefield's interest in his poetry. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:28
    Robert Frost, Hanover, New Hampshire, to Frederic G. Melcher, 1945 Nov 23
    ALS, 1 p.

    Tells Melcher not to worry about his idea about staying at his house for awhile since he is not sure he could be lured so close to New York and says he is glad that Melcher likes the new president. Also present is an empty envelope addressed to Melcher in Frost's hand, postmarked November 20, 1945.

  • Box-folder 2:29
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1946 Oct 21
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Thinks Frost must be pleased with the Pocket Book of Poems, which uses the Untermeyer selection and introduction and the Cosgrave pictures. He also enjoyed the article by Frost about writing poetry in the October Atlantic.

  • Box-folder 2:30
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Ripton, Vermont, 1947 Jun 2
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Identifies H. Kauti as Van Nosdall, a famous faker in the book business.

  • Box-folder 2:31
    Robert Frost Note to Frederic G. Melcher, 1949 Nov 16

    Written on Melcher's Place Card at a dinner given to Frost by Henry Holt & Company at the University Club

  • Box-folder 2:32
    Robert Frost Telegram, Cambridge, Massachusetts, to Frederic Melcher, 1951 Mar 16
    Asks to be excused from the Book Sellers Convention.
  • Box-folder 2:33
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1951 Mar 19
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Understands why Frost cannot make it to the Book Sellers Convention in May.

  • Box-folder 2:34
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Ripton, Vermont, 1952 Sep 26
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Provides the results of his investigation of Mr. Kerti, who requested a signed portrait.

  • Box-folder 2:35
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1953 Mar 3
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Mentions seeing Frost in the Times that morning and that P.E.N. wants to honor Frost at their cocktail party.

  • Box-folder 2:36
    Frederic G. Melcher to Robert Frost, Ripton, Vermont, 1956 Jun 27
    TL, carbon, 1 p.

    Thanks Frost for his contribution to the auction held by the American Library Association to raise money for a children's librarian scholarship in Melcher's name.

  • Box-folder 2:37
    Lesley Frost to Marguerite Melcher, 1963 Christmas
    ANS

    On a black and white postcard of Robert Frost's cabin in Ripton, Vermont, "All best wishes to you and yours, Marguerite. We both know what it means to lose great men."

  • Box-folder 2:38
    Robert Frost to Frederic G. Melcher, n.d.
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    Reports that he has received a "flood of Americana" from Goodspeeds, a good book from Dal Hitchcock, and the "Pueblo Potter" from Melcher. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:39
    Elinor Frost, New Haven, Connecticut, to Frederic G. Melcher, n.y. Apr 4
    ALS, 2 pp. on 1 l.

    Writes that they did not leave Key West as soon as expected, she is visiting Irma while Robert is staying around Washington, D.C., and she is still very weak.

  • Box-folder 2:40
    Elinor Frost, Ann Arbor, Michigan, to Marguerite Melcher, n.y. Jun 4
    ALS, 8 pp. on 2 l.

    Updates her about Marjorie's bouts of ill health, thanks her for writing to Marjorie, and tells her that they have decided to give up the fellowship at Michigan and move closer to the children, especially Carol. Robert has to lecture at Amherst for six or eight weeks next year, as well as other New England colleges.

  • Box-folder 2:41
    Elinor Frost, Ann Arbor, Michigan, to Frederic G. Melcher, n.y. Oct 26
    ALS, 3 pp. on 1 l.

    They will leave for Amherst after an absence of four months, and will remain there until April 1st . They had a very good visit with Lillian during their summer in California. Includes a carbon transcript of the letter.

  • Box-folder 2:42
    Frost Family Christmas Card to the Melchers, Christmas
    in a postcard format
Series III: Miscellaneous Papers concerning Robert Frost
  • Box-folder 2:43
    Advertisement and Order Form Postcard- A Witness Tree New Poems by Robert Frost, [1942]
    printed
  • Box-folder 2:44
    Advertisement for Phonograph Recordings of Robert Frost reading twelve of his favorite poems and other recordings, 1935, n.d.
    printed and typescript

    Available from Erpi Picture Consultants, Inc.

  • Box-folder 2:45
    Advertisement for A Way Out A One Act Play by Robert Frost 1929
    printed

    Published by The Harbor Press.

  • Box-folder 2:46
    Advertising Booklet- "Robert Frost The Man and His Work" from Henry Holt & Company, [1923]
    printed
  • Article - "Robert Frost and His Books" by Frederic G. Melcher, 1930 May
    Galley proof, 8 sheets, formerly laid in Part 2 of The Colophon in which it was published (oversize)
  • Box-folder 2:47
    Article- "Robert Frost for Collectors" by Frederic G. Melcher, [ca. 1930]
    TMsS, 12 pp.

    Annotated by the author, later printed in Colophon, May 1930

  • Box-folder 2:48
    Article- "Robert Frost and His Printers" by Ray Nash, 1946 Jan
    printed

    In The Book Collector's Packet, Volume 4 Number 5, pages 10-12, signed by Robert Frost and inscribed to Fred Melcher,

  • Box-folder 2:49
    Article-"Robert Frost's Hilltop" by Dorothy Canfield Fisher with Woodcuts by J.J. Lankes, n.d.
    printed
  • Box-folder 2:50
    Articles of Tribute to Robert Frost in Saturday Review1963 Feb 23
  • Box-folder 2:51
    Articles concerning Robert Frost, printed and electrostatic copies 1923-1950
  • Box-folder 2:52
    Articles concerning Robert Frost, printed and electrostatic copies 1951-1962, n.d.
  • Box-folder 2:53
    Articles concerning Robert Frost by Robert S. Newdick, 1935-1937
    printed
  • Box-folder 2:54
    Bibliographical Information concerning Robert Frost, A Boy's Will and North of Boston, 1930
    typescript

    Collected by J. Brussels in London and given to Frederic Melcher for use in the Amherst Library bibliography.

  • Box-folder 2:55
    Booklet of Robert Frost Poems printed for a dinner held in New York in honor of his 85th Birthday, 1959 Mar 26
    TLS, printed.

    With a letter from Edgar T. Rigg, President, Henry Holt and Company, Inc., to Frederic Melcher, March 6, 1959, about the celebration, and a copy of the menu.

  • Box-folder 2:56
    Bookplate belonging to Robert Frost, n.d.

    Inscribed "Robert Frost to Fred Melcher".

  • Box-folder 2:57
    Bookplate designed by J.J. Lankes for Robert Frost n.d.

    Showing the first house belonging to Frost in South Shaftsbury, Vermont.

  • Box-folder 2:58
    Chronology for Robert Frost 1935, 1945
  • Box-folder 2:59
    Compositions concerning Robert Frost 1913-1961, n.d.
  • Box-folder 2:60
    Description of poet Thomas Ferril by Robert Frost 1934 Oct 13

    Quoted in "Literary Notes" Yale University Press.

  • Box-folder 2:61
    Drawing of Robert Frost by Helen Wilson 1928

    Published as a supplement to The Bookman.

  • Box-folder 2:62
    Ephemera concerning The Jones Library, Amherst, Massachusetts, the Robert Frost Collection and the Committee for the Robert Frost Fund ca. 1935-1959, n.d.
  • Box-folder 2:63
    Exhibition Announcements from the Grolier Club and Duke University Library 1939, 1950
  • Box-folder 2:64
    Exhibition Catalogs concerning Robert Frost at Baker Library, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire and Reis Library, Alleghany College, Meadville, Pennsylvania 1938, 1944
  • Box-folder 2:65
    Guest List and Seating Arrangements for Robert Frost's 70th Birthday at the P.E.N. Club Dinner 1945 Mar 26
  • Box-folder 2:66
    Guest List and Seating Arrangements for Robert Frost's 80th Birthday Banquet 195[4?] Mar 26
  • Box-folder 2:67
    Honorary Degrees of Robert Frost Listed 1947-1961
  • Box-folder 2:68
    Inscription by Robert Frost in the unique copy of his first book, Twilight, printed in Antiquarian Bookman1952 Jan
  • Box-folder 2:69
    Invitations and Programs for Robert Frost's 50th Birthday Dinner, one signed by Willa Cather 1925 Mar 26
  • Box-folder 2:70
    Invitation, Seating Arrangement and Guest List for a Dinner for Robert Frost at The New School For Social Research 1937 Nov 30
  • Box-folder 2:71
    Invitation to the Wedding of Phyllis Marie Gordon and William Prescott Frost 1947 Jun 12
  • Box-folder 3:1
    Invitation, Program and Speeches for the Dedication of the Robert Frost Room in the Jones Library, Amherst, Massachusetts 1958, 1959 Oct 21
  • Box-folder 3:2
    Invitation to the Memorial Service for Robert Frost at Johnson Chapel, Amherst College 1963 Feb 17
  • Box-folder 3:3
    Invitations and Tickets to Lectures and Other Events featuring Robert Frost 1939-1958
  • Box-folder 3:4
    News clippings concerning Robert Frost 1916-1963, n.d.
  • Box-folder 3:5
    Note by Helen Melvin Moody concerning Robert Frost and his poem "The Later Minstrel" and its use at chapel at the Pinkerton Academy, [post 1907]
    photostatic copy
  • Box-folder 3:6
    Notice of "Robert Frost in A Tribute to Tagore" in celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the birth of Rabindranath Tagore 1961 April 19
  • Box-folder 3:7
    Photograph of Robert Frost 1916
  • Box-folder 3:8
    Photograph of an Oil Portrait of Robert Frost by James Chapin (1887-1975) 1930

    With an exhibition card listing the painting, January 20, 1930- February 8, 1930.

  • Box-folder 3:9
    Photograph of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Frost in the Old Book Room, Maddox House, Rockford, Illinois 1935 Dec 7
  • Box-folder 3:10
    Photograph of Robert Frost, Harvey Allen and Du Bose Heywood 1936 Jan
    "Three Literary Lights" meet in Miami, Florida, at the International Airport.
  • Box-folder 3:11
    Photograph of the Amherst Home of Robert Frost and a group shot of Robert Frost with Joseph Auslander, Audrey Wardemann, David Morton, and Robert Francis by Lincoln W. Barnes 1936
  • Box-folder 3:12
    Photographs of Robert Frost supplied by Henry Holt and Company, New York 1937 Mar
  • Box-folder 3:13
    Photograph of a Portrait of Robert Frost by Ercole Cartotto (1889-1946), an Italian artist who lives in Darien, Connecticut with an office in New York City 1938
  • Box-folder 3:14
    Photograph of an Oil Painting of Robert Frost by A. Allyn Bishop purchased by the Jones Library of Amherst in 1942 [1942]
  • Box-folder 3:15
    Photograph of Robert Frost in his study in the Baker Library, Dartmouth College with his students 1943 Oct 2
  • Box-folder 3:16
    Photograph of Robert Frost at the Agnes Scott College Library 1945 Jan 26
  • Box-folder 3:17
    Photograph of Robert Frost receiving the "Author Meets the Critics" Literary Award, by Bertis Greene 1949
  • Box-folder 3:18
    Photograph of Robert Frost with Raymond Holden, Newport, New Hampshire, First Annual Literary Festival Used Book Sale 1956 Oct 11
  • Box-folder 3:19
    Photograph of Robert Frost used on the book jacket of You Come Too[1959]
  • Box-folder 3:20
    Photographs of Robert Frost and Frederic G. Melcher at Syracuse University receiving their Honorary Degrees from Chancellor William P. Tolley, 1959

    With two copies of the program.

  • Box-folder 3:21
    Photograph of Robert Frost, seated with hands clasped n.d.
  • Box-folder 3:22
    Photograph of a Portrait of Robert Frost painted by Allen F. Rader for Howard G. Schmitt n.d.
  • Box-folder 3:23
    Pictures of Robert Frost from published print sources 1946-1962, n.d.
  • Box-folder 3:24
    Press Releases and Book Notes from Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. and Henry Holt and Company concerning Robert Frost 1936, 1962
  • Box-folder 3:25
    Press Releases from the Library of Congress concerning Robert Frost 1955-1962
  • Box-folder 3:26
    Press Release from the Poetry Society of America concerning the $1000 Robert Frost Annual Poetry Award 1961 May 15
  • Box-folder 3:27
    Press Release Typescripts concerning Robert Frost 1938, 1953
  • Box-folder 3:28
    Program and Menu for "A Vermont Breakfast Party Commemorating the Fifth Award of the Limited Editions Club's Gold Medal," with a copy of a note from Robert Frost 1949 Nov 16
  • Box-folder 3:29
    Program and Guest List for "The Poet and Reality A Conference in Honor of Robert Frost" 1950 Oct 6-8
  • Box-folder 3:30
    Program, Guest List and Seating Arrangement for the Robert Frost Dinner, 1954 Mar 26

    The Lord Jeffery Inn, Amherst, Massachusetts.

  • Box-folder 3:31
    Program for a Poetry Reading by Robert Frost at New York University 1956 Mar 23
  • Box-folder 3:32
    Quotations by Robert Frost, 1916-1954
    Typescript and Print
  • Box-folder 3:33
    Woodcut of Robert Frost by Bertrand Zadig [early 1920's]
Series IV: Miscellaneous Papers concerning Frederic G. Melcher and other Authors
  • Box-folder 3:34
    The American Institute of Graphic Arts Membership Certificate issued to Frederic G. Melcher and other materials concerning the Institute and Melcher 1924, 1926, 1940
  • Box-folder 3:35
    Article- "Some Musical Analogies in Modern Poetry" by Amy Lowell in The Musical Quarterly, n.d.
  • Box-folder 3:36
    Article- "The Poetry Revival of 1914" by Edgar Lee Masters in The American Mercury, 1932 July
    printed
  • Box-folder 3:37
    Article- "The Fifty Books Idea" by Frederic G. Melcher, 1936
    offprint
  • Box-folder 3:38
    Article- "Youth and Wings Edna St. Vincent Millay: Singer" by Carl Van Doren, ca. 1924
    reprint
  • Box-folder 3:39
    Article- "Flame and Slag Carl Sandburg: Poet with Both Fists" by Carl Van Doren in The Century Magazine, n.d.
    print
  • Box-folder 3:40
    Article- "Shades and Shadows" by Eleanor F. Wells in The English Journal, 1924 April
    reprint
  • Box-folder 3:41
    Article- "John Melcher"[1850 Jun 15]

    Typescript copy of an article from The Portsmouth Journal.

  • Box-folder 3:42
    Articles by Frederic G. Melcher 1944-1958
  • Brochure concerning Camp Merryweather, Belgrade Great Pond, Maine, compliments of Laurie Richards 1905
  • Box-folder 3:44
    Cartoon drawing of a cold day in London, 1923 May 31
  • Box-folder 3:45
    Condolence letters concerning the death of Frederic G. Melcher 1963
  • Box-folder 3:46
    Diary and Memoranda Book belonging to Frederic G. Melcher, 1896

    With an account dated March 31, 1918.

  • Box-folder 3:47
    Drawings by Ernest Thompson Seton n.d.

    "Life Studies of Wild Squirrels" inscribed by Seton to Frederic G. Melcher.

  • Box-folder 3:48
    Driver's License belonging to Frederic G. Melcher from Great Britain 1936
  • Box-folder 4:1
    Editorials by Frederic G. Melcher in The Publishers' Weekly, ca. 1937-1947
    printed
  • Box-folder 4:2
    Essay- "On Becoming Acquainted with Books" by Frederic G. Melcher, 1962
    printed
  • Box-folder 4:3
    Farewell Dinner for Frederic G. Melcher 1913

    Menu and Related Materials, leaving the employment of Charles E. Lauriat Company of Boston.

  • Box-folder 4:4
    "A Greeting from B.L. Warde An American in England to Her Friends and Colleagues of the Printing Trade in America" addressed to Frederic G. Melcher, 1940 June
    printed
  • Box-folder 4:5
    Invitation and Lists of Guests for a Dinner in Honor of James Whitcomb Riley, 1915 Oct 7
  • Box-folder 4:6
    Invitation to meet the Queen of Romania from the North American Newspaper Alliance addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Frederic G. Melcher [1926] Oct 24
  • Box-folder 4:7
    Miscellaneous Correspondence, ca. 1926-1962

    Chiefly appointments to positions on boards.

  • Box-folder 4:8
    Miscellaneous Notes n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:9
    Miscellaneous Printed Ephemera 1923-1959, n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:10
    News clippings concerning Frederic G. Melcher and Daniel Melcher, etc. 1913-1963, n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:11
    Photograph of Daniel Melcher n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:12
    Photograph of Edna St. Vincent Millay n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:13
    Photographs and Postcards concerning the Melchers ca. 1913-1959
  • Box-folder 4:14
    Place cards from a lunch at the White House on the occasion of the presentation of books to the White House Library 1933
  • Box-folder 4:15
    Poem- "Broadway's Canyon" by John Gould Fletcher, n.d.
    printed
  • Box-folder 4:16
    Poem- "Winter's Turning" by Amy Lowell, n.d.
    printed
  • Box-folder 4:17
    Poem- "Cool Tombs" by Carl Sandburg, n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:18
    Poem- "The Laughters" by Louis Untermeyer, n.d.
    printed
  • Box-folder 4:19
    Press Release concerning annual meeting of the American Country Life Association 1939
  • Box-folder 4:20
    Programs and Invitations ca. 1930-1940
Series V: Correspondence of Frederic G. Melcher with Various Authors and Publishers
  • Box-folder 4:21
    Miscellaneous Cut Autographs, including Irving Bacheller, W.H. Crane, Harry Davenport, Louis Charles Elson, William Mahone, Thomas Nelson Page, James Whitcomb Riley, and Daniel Webster 1865, 1894-1899, n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:22
    George Ade explains that he does all of his writing in pencil and not on a typewriter 1932 May 31
  • Box-folder 4:23
    Elmer Adler asks Melcher to visit him in Princeton and thanks him for becoming a member of Amigos de Calle del Cristo in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and helping the collection grow. 1940, 1959
  • Box-folder 4:24
    American Antiquarian Society, Director Clarence S. Bingham, asks Melcher to speak 1956 Jan 18, 19
  • Box-folder 4:25
    American Institute of Graphic Arts notifies Melcher that he is the recipient of the Institute Medal 1945 Apr 14, 17
  • Box-folder 4:26
    American Library Association, President Charles H. Compton, 1935, 1960
    Answers Melcher's required reading for the New Year question (1935) and thanks him for his contribution to the building fund (1960).
  • Box-folder 4:27
    Joe Anthony, Newark Evening News, 1919 Apr 17

    Mentions the League of Nations stories and an editorial about them that he was asked to write.

  • Box-folder 4:28
    Sir Edwin Arnold (1832-1904) [1901] Dec 5

    Says he cannot identify the poem they are seeking but thinks their client may be interested in one of his two books, Indian Idylls and Lotus and Jewel.

  • Box-folder 4:29
    Joseph Auslander, 1942 May
    Asks Melcher to consider the Library of Congress as a repository for his collection of Fine Printing and Bibliography.
  • Box-folder 4:30
    Mary Austen discusses her article for Publishers' Weekly, 1920-1921
  • Box-folder 4:31
    Edgar J. Banks sends Melcher a genuine ancient Babylonian tablet from Drehem, a suburb of Nippur, with a detailed description of its inscription. 1923 Apr 2
  • Box-folder 4:32
    James Barnes refers to his visit to the Nassau Club to speak on copyright and censorship. 1930 Apr 12
  • Box-folder 4:33
    Bernard M. Baruch answers Melcher's question concerning required reading for the New Year 1935 Jan 7
  • Box-folder 4:34
    [Edwin De Turck Bechtel] describes a recent talk by Robert Frost interspersed with his poems, n.y. Nov 16

    During the talk Frost spoke of his dear friends who have meant so much to him in the writing and publishing of his poems, mentioning Melcher prominently as one who was "a perfect guide and intermediary between himself and publishers, printers, bibliophiles and such."

  • Box-folder 4:35
    William Rose Benet mentions the book on General Booth, 1920, 1929
    William Rose Benet mentions the book on General Booth that he has to review for The New York Evening Post (1920) and a notice he wants placed in Publishers' Weekly warning people about a "certain abominable hack writer whose acquaintance with my wife was very slight" who has claimed he was commissioned to prepare her biography (1929).
  • Box-folder 4:36
    Ralph Bergengren thanks Melcher for his mention of Jane, Joseph, and John in Herald Tribune Books1936 Nov 15
  • Box-folder 4:37
    Albert J. Beveridge congratulates Melcher on becoming the editor at Publisher's Weekly and writes that he will be greatly missed by himself, the store, and the community of Indianapolis. 1918 May 10
  • Box-folder 4:38
    Joseph Blumenthal invites the Melchers to visit, n.d.
    Joseph Blumenthal invites the Melchers to visit just following the talk of Robert Frost at the New School on April 7th.
  • Box-folder 4:39
    Eugene Boissevain arranges a date and fee for his wife, Edna St. Vincent Millay, to speak at Montclair, New Jersey. 1924 Dec-1925
  • Box-folder 4:40
    Boy Scouts of America invites Melcher to a luncheon, 1924, 1943

    Boy Scouts of America invites Melcher to a luncheon with Douglas Fairbanks (1924) and sends to Melcher a Boy Scout lapel button and certificate (not present) as member of the National Council (1943)

  • Box-folder 4:41
    James Boyd recommends Melcher get Herschel Brickell in New York to do the job he has in mind because his own familiarity with Southern Literature is very uneven and has many gaps. 1935 Mar 23
  • Box-folder 4:42
    William Stanley Braithwaite sends Melcher a set of advance sheets, 1912-1913, 1962

    William Stanley Braithwaite sends Melcher a set of advance sheets for his anthology of magazine verse for 1913. Also present is a note from Melcher to Braithwaite about his account (1912), an obituary and notice of his funeral services (1962).

  • Box-folder 4:43
    Anna Hempstead Branch accepts the invitation to Robert Frost's birthday party and sends her three dollars. 1925 Mar 9
  • Box-folder 4:44
    John Buchan (Lord Tweedsmuir) gives Melcher permission to quote from his letter, 1928 Apr 10, n.y. Jan 11

    John Buchan (Lord Tweedsmuir) gives Melcher permission to quote from his letter about Mr. Paine's Booklovers Map of the British Isles (1928) and thanks him for his kindness and introduction at the gathering, which he enjoyed very much (Jan 11).

  • Box-folder 4:45
    Pearl S. Buck discusses his invitation (1935), 1935-1951

    Pearl S. Buck discusses his invitation (1935); her desire for Melcher to serve on the board of judges who select the monthly book used in the forums for librarians for The East and West Association (1943); his willingness to serve on the Board of Directors of The East and West Association (1948); the suspension of the publication of the magazine People (1949); and the announcement that she is suspending the activities of The East and West Association (1951) due to financial considerations.

  • Box-folder 4:46
    Gelett Burgess thanks Melcher for his talk, 1921, 1926

    Gelett Burgess thanks Melcher for his talk and asks if he knows any really good traveling salesmen who know how books are sold on the road (1921); and asks for three copies of The Publisher's Weekly for Nov 6th or 7th, which contains a bibliography of his works (1926).

  • Box-folder 4:47
    Ellis Parker Butler recommends Irving Stone's novel, n.d.

    Ellis Parker Butler recommends Irving Stone's novel about Vincent Van Gogh, Lust For Life, deeming it "the most intensely interesting book I have read in year..." and "inevitably destined to become a classic of fictional biography."

  • Box-folder 4:48
    Witter Bynner regrets that he is unable to attend Robert Frost's dinner (1925), 1925-1926, n.d.

    Witter Bynner regrets that he is unable to attend Robert Frost's dinner (1925); sends corrections for the page of his first editions as it appears in Publisher's Weekly before it appears in book form (1926); and a short humorous verse (n.d.) concerning Robert Frost: "I have a Boy's Will North of Bosting A New Hampshire Cake With Robert Frosting"

  • Box-folder 4:49
    James Branch Cabell thanks Mr. Nicholson for his gracious appreciation of his book and for recommending it to a bookseller, 1917, 1934

    He reveals that "America has simply not produced an adequate literature anywhere." (1917); finds that he is unable to write an article on Guy Holt for Melcher, as he is still deeply affected by his death (1934).

  • Box-folder 4:50
    Marion G. Canby thanks Melcher for his sincere and comforting letter of sympathy following the death of her husband, Henry Seidel Canby (1878-1961), 1961 May 24
  • Box-folder 4:51
    Carl Carmer, President of The P.E.N., A World Association of Writers, expressing his delight that Melcher has become a Vice-President of the P.E.N, 1943 May 6
  • Box-folder 4:52
    Willa Cather is grateful that Melcher likes her book, [One of Ours?] (1922), 1922, 1926, n.d.

    Regrets that she does not have time to do a talk for him (1926); says of Jurgen, "I've had the greatest fun with Jurgen! If the indecent parts of the book were cut out, there is [?] nothing interesting left, but that's a real merit. In most American books the indecency is so unessential, even when its put there with a swagger." She also assures him that "you are the only man connected with the selling end of the book trade whom it doesn't make me vastly blue to talk with." (n.d.); Also present are two undated calling cards from Cather telling when she will be at home at Five Bank Street.

  • Box-folder 4:53
    Mary Ellen Chase thanks Melcher for the August article about her in Publisher's Weekly, [1934?] Sep, n.d.

    Mary Ellen Chase thanks Melcher for the August article about her in Publisher's Weekly and informs him that she will be sailing for England on the 8th or 9th of September when her book, Mary Peters, is released. She also thanks him for his kind letter about the book that she read on the train to New York.

  • Box-folder 4:54
    Thomas Maitland Cleland, American book and type designer, expresses his gratitude for Melcher's assessment of his career and his show at the Century. 1959 Aug 12
  • Box-folder 4:55
    Elizabeth Coatsworth expresses her thanks for a radio gift in a flippant rhyme complete with oblique references to her book, The Cat Who Went to Heaven, 1931 July 4
  • Box-folder 4:56
    Melcher writes to bookseller Louis Henry Cohn, 1944 Mar 23

    Melcher writes to bookseller Louis Henry Cohn, relaying what Robert Frost had to say about autographed poems in Frost editions which he had done for E. Ording on request and his suspicion that Conti was H. Knauti. (See also Frost letters, 1944).

  • Box-folder 4:57
    Timothy Cole writes that he will be present at the Art Center to receive the great honor bestowed by the directors of the Graphic Arts, 1927 Oct 15
  • Box-folder 4:58
    Padraic Colum is unable to attend the banquet in honor of Robert Frost due to a prior engagement. n.d.
  • Box-folder 4:59
    Dr. James B. Conant, Harvard University, asks Melcher to serve on a special committee, 1945 Nov 6, 9

    Dr. James B. Conant, Harvard University, asks Melcher to serve on a special committee to hire a successor for the Director of the Harvard University Press, Mr. Scaife, and Melcher accepts.

  • Box-folder 4:60
    Grace Hazard Conkling, Hampshire Bookshop, Inc. accepts his invitation to the Robert Frost dinner (1925), 1925-1926

    Grace Hazard Conkling, Hampshire Bookshop, Inc. accepts his invitation to the Robert Frost dinner (1925); and agrees to speak at Montclair, New Jersey, with Melcher's reply (1926).

  • Box-folder 4:61
    Malcolm Cowley asks Melcher to write a short review about the White Oak Library and thanks him for doing so. 1934 Mar 22, Apr 5

    Malcolm Cowley asks Melcher to write a short review about the White Oak Library and thanks him for doing so.

  • Box-folder 4:62
    Wilbur L. Cross, Editor of The Yale Review, accepts his invitation to the Robert Frost dinner, 1925 Feb 28
  • Box-folder 4:63
    Countee Cullen regrets that his teaching duties prevents him from attending Melcher's convention at Lake Mohonk on September 28th. 1934 Sep 4
  • Box-folder 4:64
    James Henry Daugherty mentions Daniel Boone and the last Horn Book, 1940 Jul 22

    James Henry Daugherty mentions Daniel Boone and the last Horn Book as examples of his good work and proclaims, "I do so now [acknowledge Melcher] happy to know that all good books as well as children's books have so active a champion and so articulate and creative an imagination to speak and strike in their cause."

  • Box-folder 4:65
    Elmer Davis thanks Melcher for the book containing his remarks and Melcher's introduction (1946), 1946, 1954

    Discusses the testimony of Mr. Gaines and danger of censorship and his gratitude for listing him first in non-fiction in the Publisher's Weekly (1954).

  • Box-folder 4:66
    John Doan supplies his suggestion for "required reading" requested by Melcher, as Walter Pach's Ananias or the False Artist. 1934 Dec 29
  • Box-folder 4:67
    Edward H. Dodd, Jr. sends an advance copy of Winston Churchill's Birth of Britain to Melcher, 1956 Mar 1, 9

    Edward H. Dodd, Jr. sends an advance copy of Winston Churchill's Birth of Britain to Melcher, and calls bringing it into print an exhilarating and inspiring experience. Also mentions that Churchill had finished Volume II and was working on Volume III.

  • Box-folder 4:68
    Marion Dodd, The Hamphire Bookshop, Inc., mentions that she has recently purchased from Robert Frost a number of his poems, 1930 Feb 1, 3

    Marion Dodd, The Hamphire Bookshop, Inc., mentions that she has recently purchased from Robert Frost a number of his poems, two original drafts, and a copybook containing the poem "New Hampshire." She asks Melcher what she should pay for them, but Melcher declines to value the manuscripts and suggests she check American Book Prices Current.

  • Box-folder 4:69
    George H. Doran thanks Melcher for how he used his article on Hester Hunter, 1935 Oct 22

    George H. Doran thanks Melcher for how he used his article on Hester Hunter and hopes it encourages "talented and energetic women to open bookshops in their homes." He also asks to borrow the two half-tones used in the article.

  • Box-folder 4:70
    John Dos Passos writes that he enjoyed their lunch, 1949 Aug 9

    John Dos Passos writes that he enjoyed their lunch and that there appeared to be a small break on passage costs for P.E.N. members. He also asks if John Marquand was going [on the voyage] ?

  • Box-folder 4:71
    Frank Nelson Doubleday (1862-1934) offers to arrange a tour for him at their Kingswood plant while he is in London attending book meetings. 1931 May 1
  • Box-folder 4:72
    Lloyd C. Douglas accepts an invitation to dinner at Melcher's home, 1943-1944

    Lloyd C. Douglas accepts an invitation to dinner at Melcher's home which he thoroughly enjoyed (1943) and sends an article for the forthcoming religious number of Publisher's Weekly requested by Melcher (1944).

  • Box-folder 4:73
    Theodore Dreiser discusses in detail the facts that he feels that each publisher should take into account with their affidavits concerning his arbitration case with the Liveright Publishing Corporation over the cost of the plates of his work and the price per copy of his bound books (April 30, 1934), 1934-1935

    Theodore Dreiser discusses in detail the facts that he feels that each publisher should take into account with their affidavits concerning his arbitration case with the Liveright Publishing Corporation over the cost of the plates of his work and the price per copy of his bound books (April 30, 1934). He also thanks Melcher very much for his assistance in submitting an affidavit to the arbitration on his behalf (May 10, 1934). In answer to Melcher's request for his suggestion for "required reading," Dreiser declines as there are too many from which to choose.

  • Box-folder 4:74
    Will Durant, takes a moment from his own work The Story of Civilization to give his recommendations for required reading, 1934 Dec 29

    Will Durant, takes a moment from his own work The Story of Civilization to give his recommendations for required reading, "I should recommend to the reader who wishes to be profoundly instructed and moved, Dostoievski's novel The Brothers Karamazov; and to the reader who is tough-minded enough to care for instruction without amusement, Spengler's Decline of the West. I think the novels of Pearl Buck show a fine understanding of human life. William Henry Chamberlain's Russia's Iron Age seems to be the best recent survey of the Communist experiment in Russia. Or let the reader digest the book of Ecclesiastes, and tell me how God ever let that dour tract into the Bible."

  • Box-folder 4:75
    W.A. Dwiggins asks for a copy of the article in Publisher's Weekly about his work (1928), 1928, 1939

    W.A. Dwiggins asks for a copy of the article in Publisher's Weekly about his work (1928); and shares his thoughts about a "Twenty Years After" article for the Publisher's Weekly (1939).

  • Box-folder 5:1
    Walter Prichard Eaton discusses his article on fine printing for The Bookman (1921), 1921-1935

    Suggests that the topic of his lecture at Montclair, New Jersey, will be a talk on the amateur revival in our theater and its meaning for American life (December 28, 1924 & January 2, 1925); accepts invitation to the Frost dinner and asks about a manuscript for twenty-five one-act plays (March 3, 1925); arranges to stay with Melcher during a lecture at Monclair, New Jersey, but says that his wife never attends his lectures, "She stays home and reads Edgar Wallace" (1932); discusses the play Uncle Tom and its possibilities (June 3, 1933); sends a brief review of February Hill by Victoria Lincoln, "Drama, humor and beauty in a sordid shack & sordid lives in -of all places!- Fall River" (January 5, 1935); and writes briefly about his motor trip in Great Britain (September 2, 1935).

  • Box-folder 5:2
    Walter D. Edmonds graciously refuses an invitation to speak before the Library Association's Convention, 1936 Jul 28
  • Box-folder 5:3
    T.S. Eliot agrees to attend a reception given by the English Speaking Union and the East West Association on December 4th for him while he is in New York on other business. 1950 Oct 12, 16
  • Box-folder 5:4
    John Erskine thanks Melcher for his kind introduction during his address in Montclair, New Jersey (1922); and accepts an invitation to the Robert Frost dinner (1925). 1922, 1925
  • Box-folder 5:5
    Luther H. Evans, Librarian of Congress, regrets that Melcher was unable to attend the Dec 12th event, 1951 Jan 10
  • Box-folder 5:6
    Geoffrey Faber sends a letter in lieu of a Christmas card which are practically taboo in Great Britain during the war. 1943 Dec 7
  • Box-folder 5:7
    Rachel Field shares her excitement and pleasure at winning the Newbery Medal, for Hitty: Her First Hundred Years 1930-1931, 1936

    Rachel Field shares her excitement and pleasure at winning the Newbery Medal, for Hitty: Her First Hundred Years and her presence at the California American Library Association meeting and thanks Melcher for all the good publicity she received from Publisher's Weekly (July 19, 1930); thanks him for sending Esther Burr (1931) and responding quickly about Wilson Follett (1936).

  • Box-folder 5:8
    [Edward A. Filene], Wm. Filene's Sons Company, recommends The Autobiography of Lincoln Steffens saying that "Steffens is the wisest man I know in his judgment of men and events in this country." 1935 Jan 2
  • Box-folder 5:9
    Dr. Morris Fishbein, editor of The Journal of the American Medical Association, recommends The Forty Days of Musa Dagh by Franz Werfel because of its emphasis on the rights of minorities. 1935 Jan 7
  • Box-folder 5:10
    Dorothy Canfield Fisher regrets that she is unable to accept speaking engagements while her children are still young , 1924-1956, n.d.

    Dorothy Canfield Fisher regrets that she is unable to accept speaking engagements while her children are still young and Melcher agrees that for writers to speak is a great imposition on their time although he has seen the benefits of public exposure for the author. He also enjoyed her story "Hats" and found its conclusions applicable to publishing (1924); accepts invitation to the Robert Frost dinner, and says, "I'd have been outrageously disappointed to have missed it" (Mar 3, [1925]); shares that she did not enjoy writing Her Son's Wife [1926?]; thanks Melcher for his thoughtful and reassuring words about her last book [Why Stop Learning?] and expresses her concern over the health of Marjorie Frost (Jan 6, 11, 1928); recommends that Americans make much greater use of the Encyclopedia in their everyday questions and disputes (Dec 31, 1934); asks for extra copies of Publisher's Weekly with its excellent photographs of the Skinner Award dinner so she can send them to her friends overseas (1951); thanks Melcher for promising to send her Volume III of the Bowker lectures and mentions that the University of Vermont has been collecting her papers for the last ten years. She also tells of selecting some of her short stories from the last fifty years for publication by Harcourt, Brace and Company (March 4, 1956); and Melcher replies about the importance of collecting the papers of writers, mentioning some of hers in his collection, as well as two favorite photographs of Fisher which are present in this folder (March 8, 1956). In her undated correspondence, she mentions the death of her father-in-law just prior to her speaking engagement at Montclair and the need to borrow a copy of her book Hillsboro People for her reading; and mentions the illness of Marjorie Frost.

  • Box-folder 5:11
    Esther Forbes expresses her delight that Melcher liked Paradise [1937]; and Rainbow (1954). [1937], 1954
  • Box-folder 5:12
    Waldo Frank accepts invitation to the Robert Frost dinner. 1925 Mar 10
  • Box-folder 5:13
    Justice Felix Frankfurter thanks Melcher for the gift of a book, 1949 Feb 10

    Justice Felix Frankfurter thanks Melcher for the gift of a book and says, "Particularly as to things of the mind and spirit, which includes manifestations of beauty, I do not want this country to lag behind any other."

  • Box-folder 5:14
    Frances Frost regrets that she is unable to be a speaker at the New York Library Association convention due to prior commitments. 1934 Jun 14
  • Box-folder 5:15
    Ruth G. Gagliardo discusses the upcoming auction, 1956 Jan 17, 25

    Ruth G. Gagliardo discusses the upcoming auction and her success in getting Robert Frost to write out his poem, "Pasture" and sign it for the auction. She also shares his note praising his great friend, Fred Melcher.

  • Box-folder 5:16
    Richard Le Gallienne to Charles E. Lauriat, n.d.

    Richard Le Gallienne to Charles E. Lauriat, expects to be able to send a large paper copy of his [Odes from the Divan of Hafiz?] within a fortnight.

  • Box-folder 5:17
    John Galsworthy is pleased with the printing of the article in Publisher's Weekly. 1925 Jun 23
  • Box-folder 5:18
    Lewis Gannett, New York Herald Tribune, 1956 Oct 2

    Says that the book business would not be such pleasant company without Melcher and that he hopes that he himself has at least twenty more years to do the things that can't be done in the confines of a daily newspaper column.

  • Box-folder 5:19
    Hamlin Garland hopes that Melcher will join The Town Hall Club, New York. 1925 Mar 21
  • Box-folder 5:20
    Porter Garnett thanks Melcher for his kind words last Wednesday night. 1932 Feb 3
  • Box-folder 5:21
    Lillian M. Gilbreth recommends Mary Peters by Mary Ellen Chase as a worthy book to read. 1935 Jan 3
  • Box-folder 5:22
    Eric Gill complains that the edition of Troilus and Cressida produced by Random House was not produced in consultation with Gill, 1933 Mar 17 & 30, Apr 7

    Eric Gill complains that the edition of Troilus and Cressida produced by Random House was not produced in consultation with Gill and not in accordance with the conditions stipulated by Mr. Gibbings of the Golden Cockerel Press. He was also upset that the decorations were not printed from his wood engravings but from photographic reproductions on a smaller scale and without monetary recompense.

  • Box-folder 5:23
    Edna M. Glau[?] writes a personal letter to Mrs. Melcher mentioning Daniel Melcher, 1919 Dec 27
  • Box-folder 5:24
    Frederic W. Goudy sends Melcher a drawing via his wife, 1919, 1929

    Frederic W. Goudy sends Melcher a drawing via his wife as he is laid up with acute indigestion (1919) and he agrees to serve on the Fifty Books Committee to select fifty books for the yearly show of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (1929).

  • Box-folder 5:25
    Edward Grabhorn appreciates Melcher's praise about the Walt Whitman book. 1930 Sep 3, 30
  • Box-folder 5:26
    Charles R. Green, Librarian, The Jones Library, Amherst, Massachusetts, chiefly corresponds with Melcher , 1933-1962

    Charles R. Green, Librarian, The Jones Library, Amherst, Massachusetts, chiefly corresponds with Melcher about various aspects of the Robert Frost collection the library is trying to build, including the pursuit of various Frost related items that they lack, a Frost bibliography, Frost chronology and notification of new Frost publications. Occasionally, Green offers Melcher the opportunity to purchase duplicate Frost related items, such as photographs, made available to the library. He also discusses a planned exhibit on the work of Helen Gentry (1939); the purchase of the Robert Frost portrait for the special collection of Robert Frost material in the library (Mar 19, 1942); invitation for Robert Frost's 70th Birthday at the P.E.N. Club Dinner (Mar 13, 1945); request for Melcher to donate some of his material to the library (Jan 17, 21, 1947); honorary degrees given to Frost (May 14, 1947, see list in Box 2); the difference in cost between the American and English Masque of Reason (Dec 24, 1948); request for help in revising their published edition of the Robert Frost Bibliography (Aug 31, 1950; Mar 2, 1955); the Kenyon College Robert Frost celebration (Sep 8, 1950); dedication of the Robert Frost Room (Oct 20, 1958; Oct 27, 1959).

  • Box-folder 5:27
    Ralph Green discusses Melcher's comments in Notes on Printing and Graphic Arts, 1953 Mar 18, 19

    Ralph Green discusses Melcher's comments in Notes on Printing and Graphic Arts concerning Daniel Fowle's press, and lists the possible wooden presses made before 1787, the date of Fowle's death, that may have been exhibited as the Fowle press in the 19th century.

  • Box-folder 5:28
    Berta and Elmer S. Hader thank Melcher for his nice letter about their book, n.d.
  • Box-folder 5:29
    Edward E. Hale autograph with the words, "Do the best you can." 1899 Dec 25
  • Box-folder 5:30
    Alfred Harcourt, Henry Holt and Company, tells Melcher, currently working for W.K. Stewart Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, about the visit of Robert Frost, 1916, 1953

    Alfred Harcourt, Henry Holt and Company, tells Melcher, currently working for W.K. Stewart Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, about the visit of Robert Frost who was very pleased with what he had to say about North of Boston and A Boy's Will in The Publisher's Weekly, with a typescript copy of the column (1916); and appreciates his editorial about Harcourt and Carl Sandburg (1953).

  • Box-folder 5:31
    Joel Chandler Harris writes a brief note, n.d.

    "My vote is always for boys and girls."

  • Box-folder 5:32
    Albert L. Hartman, Watchung School, 1933 Sep 12

    Thanks Melcher for his letter of commendation for the school.

  • Box-folder 5:33
    Dr. Victor G. Heiser thanks Mrs. Melcher for her hospitality during his visit. 1938 Oct 21
  • Box-folder 5:34
    Alice Corbin Henderson writes concerning the growth of Santa Fe, New Mexico and Spanish folk-songs (Oct 7, 1926), 1926-1930

    Discusses the publication of her New Mexico poetry anthology, The Turquoise Trail, and her column "Santa Fe Bookshelf" which appeared in Publisher's Weekly of June 11, 1927 (Jan 2 and Feb 6, 1928); Melcher gives her permission to reprint her column "Santa Fe Bookshelf" (Feb 14, 1928); and notes that both publishers and authors are becoming much more Southwest conscious, citing examples (May 12, 1930).

  • Box-folder 5:35
    Thomas Wentworth Higginson offers to sell his eight volume set of Winsor's History of America to Messrs. Lauriat & Company. 1907 Feb 16
  • Box-folder 5:36
    John Haynes Holmes recommends John Stuart Mill's Liberty to the new post-war generation to learn the lessons of liberty anew. 1935 Jan 2
  • Box-folder 5:37
    Henry Holt and Company, Mr. Holt is unable to attend Frost's birthday dinner (1925) 1925-1954

    Plans for their book on Frost to contain mainly critical studies or reviews of particular books (Aug 11, 1937); sends holiday greeting cards containing printed poems of Robert Frost, "Carpe Diem," and "The Gift Outright" and invites Melcher to both the 70th and 80th birthday celebrations.

  • Box-folder 5:38
    Herbert Hoover accepts the suggestion made by Mr. Howell to the American Booksellers Association (1929), 1929-1930

    Invites Melcher to be a delegate to the White house Conference on Child Health and Protection (1930)

  • Box-folder 5:39
    George Wren Howard, Jonathan Cape Limited, London, describes the visit of Robert Frost to their offices and a subsequent party given for him. 1957 Jun 13, 17
  • Box-folder 5:40
    Henry Hoyns, Harper and Brothers, 1944 Dec 18
    Believes no one has "earned more from the publishing business than you [Melcher] have."
  • Box-folder 5:41
    Dard Hunter asks Melcher's opinion about the feasibility of Hunter revising William Edwin Rudge's Papermaking through Eighteen Centuries and selling it at a price that students could afford. 1941 Apr 11, 14
  • Box-folder 5:42
    Fannie Hurst tells Melcher to contact her manager about a possible speaking engagement in Montclair, New Jersey. 1924 Oct 23, 25
  • Box-folder 5:43
    Indianapolis Literary Club notifies Melcher of his election to the club. 1917 Nov 30
  • Box-folder 5:44
    Inez Haynes Irwin has forwarded the dollar he sent on to Mrs. Basnett of the Bundle Shop, although tempted in this present financial crisis to keep it herself. 1933 Mar 13
  • Box-folder 5:45
    Mitsuru and Michi Ishii, 1947-1948

    A Japanese couple that Melcher met on a trip to Japan about publishing, with the husband being the president of the Japan Publishers Association and his wife the principal of a private school. They write about how his remarks were well received by Japanese educators, publishers, and book dealers and his pursuit of Whitman material. Also present is a letter from the Japanese translator, Tetsuko K. Suzuki, also the sister-in-law of Mr. Ishii.

  • Box-folder 5:46
    Sarah Orne Jewett to Messrs. Charles E. Lauriat Company, 1902 Jan

    Requesting they send her the six volumes of correspondence of George Sand and the Historic de la Dentelle from their last catalog of fine old French books.

  • Box-folder 5:47
    James Weldon Johnson regrets he is unable to dine with the Melchers on December 27th, 1936 Dec 18

    James Weldon Johnson regrets he is unable to dine with the Melchers on December 27th because he had already accepted another invitation from Mr. and Mrs. David H. Stevens but asks if he can drop in for a few minutes before starting back to New York.

  • Box-folder 5:48
    Robert Josephy thanks Melcher for his generous gift, 1941 Mar 16

    obert Josephy thanks Melcher for his generous gift and equally generous remarks on Wednesday evening at the Guild party and for his help in his numerous undertakings of the last twenty years.

  • Box-folder 5:49
    Helen Keller thanks Melcher for his response to her appeal on behalf of the American Foundation for the Blind, Inc. 1946 Feb 6
  • Box-folder 5:50
    Harry Kemp (1883-1960) describes his book, The Golden Word, [1930?]

    Harry Kemp (1883-1960) describes his book, The Golden Word, on sale for two dollars through his printer, N. Berstein, "There are five hundred copies and each one is personally inscribed with my autograph and with a poem of mine."

  • Box-folder 5:51
    Henry Watson Kent lists the eight hosts for a dinner as himself, Melcher, Silve, Rollins, Rogers, Ruzicka, Cleland, and Warde (1928), 1928, [1940]

    Henry Watson Kent lists the eight hosts for a dinner as himself, Melcher, Silve, Rollins, Rogers, Ruzicka, Cleland, and Warde (1928); and is pleased that Melcher had undertaken the chairmanship of the 500th Anniversary of Printing Committee [1940].

  • Box-folder 5:52
    T[homas] W. Lamont is unable at present to answer Melcher's request for his book preferences. 1934 Dec 31
  • Box-folder 5:53
    "Jerry" Land (Emory Scott Land) hopes that the debate and vindication vote in the Senate will clear the atmosphere and be advantageous to the [United States Maritime] Commission and staff (1943); and thanks Melcher for his letter about his promotion to Vice Admiral (1944). 1943-1944
  • Box-folder 5:54
    Julius J. Lankes asks which of his woodcuts appeared in Publisher's Weekly, 1925, 1930, 1932, n.d.

    Julius J. Lankes asks which of his woodcuts appeared in Publisher's Weekly and Melcher replies that it was one provided by Doubleday, Page & Company who used the cover for Barren Ground in an advertisement; he also mentions his visit with Robert Frost, who has a display of Lankes prints in his dining room (1925); thanks him for his letter which he will give to the man who issued Virginia Woodcuts; Lankes also complains about people who order books but then never pay for them (1930). Also included are examples of prints by J.J. Lankes.

  • Box-folder 5:55
    Henry Goddard Leach (1880-1970), 1935 Jan 4

    Henry Goddard Leach (1880-1970), editor of The Forum suggests that Americans should be re-reading Leaves of Grass, "Re-reading Whitman gives the public a sense of the grandeur of the national as well as the authenticity of the meticulous, and here and there a new national poet might spring into being."

  • Box-folder 5:56
    [Ann?] Leighton to Mr. and Mrs. Melcher, n.y. Jul 17

    Hopes to meet them soon while she is staying at Wellfleet.

  • Box-folder 5:57
    Josiah K. Lilly, Jr. thanks Melcher for his copies of "The Old Wives' Tale" and Robert Frost's, "Two Tramps in Mud-Time". 1948 Nov 18
  • Box-folder 5:58
    Joseph C. Lincoln suggests that his talk at Montclair, New Jersey be on "The Making of a Book" discussing how an author gets his material, prepares the story, etc., but agrees to do his Cape Cod talk again at Melcher's request. 1923 Jan-Feb
  • Box-folder 5:59
    Joseph Wharton Lippincott thanks Melcher for his complimentary editorial about the company in Publisher's Weekly. 1941 May 27
  • Box-folder 5:60
    Hugh Lofting on a postcard discusses the League of Nations in Geneva, 1923 Sep 10

    Hugh Lofting on a postcard discusses the League of Nations in Geneva, facetiously stating that he has been trying to get the Animal Kingdom admitted but everyone is too worked up over the Italian-Greek affair that they won't listen to him.

  • Box-folder 5:61
    Nicholas Longworth to Cass Canfield, Harper and Brothers, 1930 May 26

    Reports on the progress of H.R. 6990, reintroduced as H.R. 12549.

  • Box-folder 5:62
    Milton Edward Lord, Director of the Boston Public Library, 1956 Oct 5

    Found Melcher's, "A Boston Bookstore at the Turn of the Century "fascinating.

  • Box-folder 5:63
    Amy Lowell arranges a day for a talk at Montclair, New Jersey, 1919 Jul-Dec

    Amy Lowell arranges a day for a talk at Montclair, New Jersey, around the dates of her Columbia lectures in New York and the topic, preferring a reading of her poems with explanatory remarks. She later thanks Melcher for his hospitality and the clipping from Publisher's Weekly about her book [Pictures of the Floating World ?].

  • Box-folder 5:64
    Robert Luce, U.S. House of Representatives, Chairman of the Committee on the Library, thanks Melcher for his note and a book. 1931 Jan 26
  • Box-folder 5:65
    H. M. Lydenberg, Director of the New York Public Library, 1935 Jan 4

    Recommends, "For a stimulant, a delight, a book with constant and certain appeal, a book of lasting and perennial charm, an invitation to appreciation of idealism, a constant demonstration of the necessity of balance, a responsive mirror of human nature, give me the book from the pen of that charming, stimulating, revealing, gratitude-provoking Cid Hamlet Benengeli transcribed by Cervantes as "Don Quixote."

  • Box-folder 5:66
    Arthur Machen (1863-1947), 1923-1924

    Arthur Machen (1863-1947) gives permission to use his article "The Collector's Craft" for a fee of fifteen dollars and expresses his surprise that Hieroglyphics a Note Upon Ecstasy in Literature is doing well in the United States (1923).

  • Box-folder 5:67
    Percy MacKaye and his daughter, Arvia, will be happy to come to Robert Frost's dinner. 1925 Feb 27, Mar 4
  • Box-folder 5:68
    Archibald MacLeish states that he is unable to come to the conference although he knows how important it is (August 9, 1939), 1939-1945

    Tries to gauge the usefulness of a conference on the Copyright Act (August 21,1943); and appreciates the statement on international aspects of the use of books from Melcher for use in the United Nations conference to be called in London (May 24, 1945).

  • Box-folder 5:69
    John Macrae, Chairman of the Nominating Committee of the National Association of Book Publishers, writes concerning Melcher's nomination for the post of Secretary. 1932 Nov 28, 30
  • Box-folder 5:70
    Thomas R. Marshall, Vice-President of the United States, to W.K. Stewart Company, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1917 Dec 1

    Asks for two copies of the Lincoln Anthology and one copy of Charles W. Moore's Life of Lincoln.

  • Box-folder 5:71
    Walter S. Marvin, Secretary of the Montclair Art Museum, 1940 Mar 5

    Expressing the deep regret with which the Board received Melcher's resignation from the Board of Trustees and their deep appreciation for his many services.

  • Box-folder 5:72
    Jan Masaryk says he is unable to come to Montclair and speak at this time as he must sail on the Queen Elizabeth in two days. 1947 Jan 16, 17
  • Box-folder 5:73
    John Masefield shares the origin of his verse-speaking festivals, 1928-1931, 1957 Aug 10, 14, n.d.

    John Masefield shares the origin of his verse-speaking festivals, 1928-1931, and the founding of the Scottish Association for the Speaking of Verse around 1922. Melcher shares his memory of taking Nicholas Vachel Lindsay to hear Masefield speak before a club he belonged to in Indiana.

  • Box-folder 5:74
    William Babington Maxwell, a delegate from the Society of Authors, 1923 Jun-Oct

    Regrets having to sail for home without meeting with Melcher again.

  • Box-folder 5:75
    Frederic G. Melcher sends a form letter, 1934 Dec 28

    Frederic G. Melcher sends a form letter posing the question, "What would be your one-book prescription for country-wide 'required' reading for this coming year?" This was sent to a hundred people for their response, and several respondents' correspondence is in this series under their names.

  • Box-folder 5:76
    Frederic G. Melcher to Thomas P. Stricker, 1935 Oct 15

    Asking for his participation on the Fifty Books Committee of the American Institute of Graphic Arts.

  • Box-folder 5:77
    Frederic G. Melcher writing home from Spokane, Washington, n.d.

    Mentions Vachel Lindsay's meeting with Hoddard King, a visit to the library, an interview with the press, a visit with the Lindsays to see the baby, all on his first day's visit to Spokane.

  • Box-folder 5:78
    H.L. Mencken agrees to speak at the American Booksellers Association luncheon, 1940, 1946, n.d.

    H.L. Mencken agrees to speak at the American Booksellers Association luncheon on the topic of the future of the book and Melcher sends several suggestions for avenues to explore. Mencken's five- page typescript carbon for that talk delivered on May 13, 1940, is present with his correspondence (1940): and in two undated notes arranges for the printing of two different articles.

  • Box-folder 5:79
    Elliott Merrick ("Bud") writes concerning the harsh winter and the sale of his book, From This Hill (February 10, 1935), 1935-1942, n.d.

    Elliott Merrick ("Bud") writes concerning the harsh winter and the sale of his book, From This Hill (February 10, 1935); says some of his work will appear in Story in December and asks Melcher to write a letter recommending him for a Guggenheim Fellowship (October 28, November 1, 1935); describes writing a book, "It seems to me rather like putting on a diver's helmet and going down to the bottom of the ocean, with no respite for a year except an occasional attack of the bends by way of relaxation" (August 11, [1936]); gives his reaction to the advance copy of R.F.D. sent by Melcher (March 7, [1938?]; describes the good results from his Mohonk trip concerning Frost and Fire and his concern over Melcher's health (September 1939) which turned out to be an attack of appendicitis October 5, [1939]; his trip to Labrador during the summer, purchase of a sailboat and the progress in sales of Northern Nurse (January 4, 1942); describes their vacation stay at the Melchers' at Wellfleet, Massachusetts (August 1, 5, 19, 29, n.y.); and explains his new job as Southeastern Forest Experiment Station editor at Asheville, North Carolina (October 12, n.y.).

  • Box-folder 5:80
    Sir Francis Meynell, The Nonesuch Press Ltd., 1930 Aug 22

    Thanks Melcher for his kind words about his Keepsake.

  • Box-folder 5:81
    Carl H. Milam thanks Melcher for the gift to the American Library Association building fund in his honor. 1961 Feb 7
  • Box-folder 5:82
    Alan Alexander Milne, from Melcher, 1947, 1953

    Alan Alexander Milne, from Melcher who shares his experience in Japan with the publisher Mitsuru Ishii and his wife, who had seen their school and home destroyed by incendiaries during World War II. Mr. Ishii lost his entire collection of 10,000 books, and Mrs. Suzuki, about 1,000 children's books but she did manage to save one because it was hidden in a dugout in the school yard. It was the Methuen edition of When We Were Very Young. Milne says that he wrote to Mrs. Suzuki and discusses his work used in Japanese school books. He also talks about his son's career at Cambridge in a news clipping mentioned by Melcher. (1947). Melcher then wrote Milne in 1953, telling Milne that he related the same story at a convention of children's librarians who then asked him to read "The King's Breakfast." This became a tradition with Melcher telling the story and reading "The King's Breakfast" to the librarians every year.

  • Box-folder 5:83
    Margaret Mitchell writes about the Berne Convention treaty in the Senate, 1939, 1941

    legislation in Congress to provide real copyright protection for American authors abroad, and her problem with the Dutch courts (1939). She also thanks Melcher for sending her the Publisher's Weekly story, "Dutch Court Gives Ruling in Mitchell Case" (1941).

  • Box-folder 5:84
    Silas Weir Mitchell autograph signed at Bar Harbor, Maine n.d.
  • Box-folder 5:85
    Harriet Monroe regrets that she is unable to attend the Robert Frost birthday dinner, 1925 Mar 16

    Harriet Monroe regrets that she is unable to attend the Robert Frost birthday dinner but she wishes to be counted as present in spirit. She sends her greetings to Frost, "May he live long and prosper- and keep on good terms with his muse!"

  • Box-folder 5:86
    Helen M. Moody, a former pupil of Robert Frost's at Pinkerton Academy, to Mr. Thompson, 1940 Mar 8

    Helen M. Moody, a former pupil of Robert Frost's at Pinkerton Academy, to Mr. Thompson, writes that she is willing to be interviewed about Frost and also suggests that he talk to Miss Sylvia Clark, who was also a teacher at the Academy. See also her note about Frost in Box 3.

  • Box-folder 5:87
    Anne Carroll Moore thanks Melcher for his participation in her silver anniversary at [the New York Public Library?] (1931); and refers to his beautiful tribute at the Newbery-Caldecott dinner (1948). 1931-1948
  • Box-folder 5:88
    Marianne Moore appreciates the print of Melcher and herself provided by McDowell and Obolensky. 1958 May 4
  • Box-folder 5:89
    Stanley Morison, Sheed and Ward Publishers, provides letter of introduction for Thomas F. Burns. 1933 Jan 27
  • Box-folder 5:90
    Christopher Morley sends a copy of a speech (not present) he has written for "Roger Mifflin", 1919-1943, n.d.

    Christopher Morley sends a copy of a speech (not present) he has written for "Roger Mifflin" at the convention to be delivered by Cedric Crowell impersonating Mifflin (1920); returns a completed questionnaire, "Who's Who Among Living American Authors?" to Publishers Weekly (July 5, 1921); book sales concerning The Haunted Bookshop (August 5 & 8, 1921); Melcher discusses the drawbacks of a bibliography, "Booksellers' Reference Library" and mentions he is to be the director of the bookselling course at Columbia University next summer (November 27, 1926); requests Melcher to join as a member and investor in The Foundry on River Street Hoboken, hoping to create a "permanent Cheshire Cheese sort of place," with a printed prospectus (April 15 & 19, 1930); to Ted McCawley, discusses and supplies a list of additional suggestions for the White House Collection (July 12, 1934); mention of the success of Kitty Foyle and the news that Frank Henry is resigning from Lippincotts at the end of the year (December 7 & 11, 1939); congratulates Melcher on the appearance of the new Publishers' Weekly (August 14, 1942); and discusses at length his opposition to the autographing of books by the author, especially in war-time due to the cost and trouble to the author mailing the books back to the purchaser (January 7, 1943).

  • Box-folder 5:91
    Kathleen Morrison and Theodore Morrison mention an article about Robert Frost in the Scholastic Magazine, 1940-1952

    Kathleen Morrison and Theodore Morrison mention an article about Robert Frost in the Scholastic Magazine which may have a new photograph of Frost and that Frost has just left on a trip to Iowa and Utah (April 3 & 8, 1940); Melcher agrees to speak at the Breadloaf Conference and discusses the relationship of Robert Frost and his publishers (August 14 & 23, 1948); they mention that Robert Frost is concerned about the sale of one of his books with his poem, "Closed for Good" written out, presumably by a friend, as he has learned his lesson about writing out long poems for strangers (November 7, 1949); and Melcher mentions his investigation of Mr. Kauti and his background on Frost's behalf (October 1, 1952).

  • Box-folder 5:92
    Honore W. Morrow thanks Melcher for his expression of sympathy. 1931 Dec 9
  • Box-folder 5:93
    Senator Wayne Morse, Oregon, sends a form letter thanking his supporters. 1952 Dec 3
  • Box-folder 5:94
    Louise Chandler Moulton to Mr. Lauriat, thanks him for his efforts which secured her book earlier than expected. n.y. Jun 12
  • Box-folder 5:95
    Lewis Mumford agrees to serve as a judge on the Fifty Books Committee (November 9 & 21, 1935); and ultimately agrees to speak for Melcher (December 22, 1935; January 7 & 11, 1936). 1935-1936
  • Box-folder 6:1
    Ray Nash, Dartmouth College, Department of Art and Archaeology, Hanover, New Hampshire, 1950-1957

    Discusses the upcoming auction of Twilight by Robert Frost and his hopes that Dartmouth can secure the book (December 4, 1950); asks Melcher if he hasn't got some article or note on some aspect of printing or the book trade, suitable for Printing and Graphic Arts (1957).

  • Box-folder 6:2
    Robert Nathan warns that someone is impersonating him in Chicago (May [16],1933); and refers to the sales of his book, The Road of Ages, as reported in the English Publishers' Circular May 10, 1935). 1933, 1935
  • Box-folder 6:3
    Scott Nearing responds to a form letter from Melcher, [1934 Dec 28]

    Scott Nearing responds to a form letter from Melcher posing the question, "What would be your one-book prescription for country-wide 'required' reading for this coming year?" with Rajani Palme Dutt's book, Fascism and Social Revolution.

  • Box-folder 6:4
    W.A. Neilson responds to a form letter from Melcher, 1935, 1940

    W.A. Neilson responds to a form letter from Melcher posing the question, "What would be your one-book prescription for country-wide 'required' reading for this coming year?" with A Primer for Tomorrow by Dean Christian Gauss.

  • Box-folder 6:5
    Robert S. Newdick, professor at Ohio State University, reports on his wonderful four-day visit with Robert Frost and his wife, 1935-1938

    obert S. Newdick, professor at Ohio State University, reports on his wonderful four-day visit with Robert Frost and his wife, both of whom promised assistance with his full-length biography. For his bibliography of Frost, he has joined forces with Mr. Green and Mr. Clymer (September 30, 1935). Melcher helps with questions about one of Frost's poems about shoes, one smelling of Atlantic salt and the other Pacific salt and an anecdote concerning the same poem and T.S. Eliot (December 12 & 16, 1935); Melcher warns Newdick to proceed slowly because both Frosts "have a way of backing away from the responsibility of digging up material from the past" (December 26, 1935; January 3 & 9, 1936); complaints about the style, quantity, and accuracy of Clymer and Green's contributions to the Frost bibliography about which Melcher agrees that Newdick should proceed on his own (January 27, 1936; February 3 & 25, 1936; March 4, 1936); reports on Frost's appearance and reception at Ohio State University and his invitation for Newdick to visit him during the summer (May 25, 1936); Melcher asks for copies of all Newdick's articles about Frost (July 7, 1936); describes his work on articles about Frost, including one on exhibitions and bibliographies of the work of Robert Frost, mentioning Melcher's own checklist in Publishers' Weekly and the fuller descriptions in The Colophon (July 29, 1936); discusses the idea of publishing the prose work of Robert Frost (July 29, August 3 & 5, 1936); questions about whether he should do a biography of Frost for Oxford University Press (November 23, 30, 1937; March 4, 7, 9, 10, 1938); and asks for help on a possible paper about the various types of Frost inscriptions in books (September 15, 19, October 2, 21).

  • Box-folder 6:6
    A. Edward Newton discusses one second-hand bookstore owner in Indianapolis, 1922-1932

    A. Edward Newton discusses one second-hand bookstore owner in Indianapolis who does not allow anyone to browse in his store, but asks if you need a particular book which he then retrieves for the customer (Apr 20-21, 1922); and sends an advertisement request to Publishers' Weekly for a book, Thomas Hardy- Novelist or Poet? The proceeds from the sale of the book are forwarded to a committee in England in charge of erecting a monument to Thomas Hardy (August 15, 24, 1929).

  • Box-folder 6:7
    Earle W. Newton answers Melcher's questions about the publication information for The Gold Hesperidee A New Poem by Robert Frost published by The Bibliophile Press, Cortland, New York. 1935 Jul-Aug
  • Box-folder 6:8
    Meredith Nicholson asks Melcher to send Mr. Jackson copies of some of his works (May 18, 1916), 1916-1929, n.d.

    Meredith Nicholson asks Melcher to send Mr. Jackson copies of some of his works (May 18, 1916); misses Melcher since he left Indianapolis; saw Stewart, of the W.K. Stewart Company, who did not appear bitter about Melcher leaving Indianapolis; and mentions his book The Valley of Democracy and his work for Scribners (August 21, 1918); discusses his war work and Matthew's review in the newspaper about his writing (September 16, 1918); mention of his work on Indiana, his book And They Lived Happily Ever After and a prospective book on Andrew Jackson (1925 November 12, 16, 23, 27).

  • Box-folder 6:9
    Blair Niles thanks Melcher for his efforts in awarding her the Constance Lindsay Skinner medal. 1941 March 15
  • Box-folder 6:10
    Edward J. O'Brien asks Melcher's opinion about his transcript short story selection this year, 1918 Feb 12

    Edward J. O'Brien asks Melcher's opinion about his transcript short story selection this year, because he wants to "make the American public sufficiently self conscious, so that those whose stories have qualities of straightforwardness and direct plot might be encouraged to stop writing down rather than up to the level."

  • Box-folder 6:11
    Frederick O'Brien discusses the results of the recent vote at the Travel Show concerning travel books. 1922 May 3, 13
  • Box-folder 6:12
    Walter Pach recommends for reading Les maãitres d'autrefois. Belgique-Hollande by Eugene Fromentin. In English, he believes the title would be something like Old Masters of Belgium and Holland. 1935 Jan 4
  • Box-folder 6:13
    Edmund Pearson declines to speak at the library meeting at Lake Placid. 1934 May 22
  • Box-folder 6:14
    Joseph Pennell proposes "The Wonder of Work in War Time" as the subject of his talk (November 2, 1917);, 1917, 1922

    Joseph Pennell proposes "The Wonder of Work in War Time" as the subject of his talk (November 2, 1917); and in most of his correspondence, discusses the Kelmscott Chaucer and the comments of Mr. Hopkins, a New York bookseller, about it (October 6, 7, 16, 18, 20, 29; November 1, 5, 1922)

  • Box-folder 6:15
    Bliss Perry is unable to give a talk (April 25, 1924), 1924, 1934-1935

    Comments on the White House library book list and makes his own recommendations (1934 July 6; January 10, 1935).

  • Box-folder 6:16
    William Lyon Phelps cannot accept his invitation for that day (January 3, 1921), 1921, 1934

    William Lyon Phelps cannot accept his invitation for that day (January 3, 1921); and sends his eliminations and additions to the White House library book list (July 2, 1934).

  • Box-folder 6:17
    Ezra Pound refers to an article in the Publishers' Weekly on censorship, 1927

    Ezra Pound refers to an article in the Publishers' Weekly on censorship and gives his own views on the subject and characterizes the current copyright law as dishonest (May 11, September 6, 1927); responds to a printed note claiming that he acted as an agent for James Joyce with Samuel Roth and his magazine The Two Worlds Monthly (August 6, September 26, 1927); and contributes a paragraph to be published in the Publishers' Weekly protesting the support of magazine publishers for the current copyright law as opposed to the new one proposed by Mr. Vestal, which he feels would be fairer to authors (October 12, 1927).

  • Box-folder 6:18
    John Barnes Pratt thanks Melcher for his review of A.S. Barnes and Company on its 100th Anniversary, 1938 Mar 15

    ohn Barnes Pratt thanks Melcher for his review of A.S. Barnes and Company on its 100th Anniversary, his friendship, and his efforts on building up the Publishers' Weekly to a "wonderful journal of publishing."

  • Box-folder 6:19
    Keith Preston promises to write something for the Publishers' Weekly as soon as he can. n.d.
  • Box-folder 6:20
    Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, appreciates Melcher's note in the Publishers' Weekly , [1939], 1949

    Herbert Putnam, Library of Congress, appreciates Melcher's note in the Publishers' Weekly concerning himself and the need for professional standards in library work (December 3, [1939]) and his presence and remarks at the luncheon (April 12, 1949).

  • Box-folder 6:21
    William C. Redfield, Secretary of Commerce, to Congressman D.J. O'Connell, cannot accept his invitation due to the press of work. 1919 Apr 21
  • Box-folder 6:22
    William Marion Reedy tells Melcher he will publish his article on the subject of "Publishers and Profiteers" in answer to "A Book Buyer" in his magazine Reedy's Mirror (May 14, 1919) and apologizes for not being able to meet him while he was in St. Louis (March 10, 1920). 1919-1920
  • Box-folder 6:23
    Aurelia Henry Reinhardt recommends for reading Russia's Iron Age by William Henry Chamberlain. 1935 Jan 15
  • Box-folder 6:24
    Mary Roberts Rinehart discusses her boys' prospects and her appreciation for his letter and for the way that he ran her little article. n.d.
  • Box-folder 6:25
    Jessie B. Rittenhouse regrets that they will not be able to attend Robert Frost's birthday dinner. [1925] Mar 1
  • Box-folder 6:26
    Corinne Roosevelt Robinson encloses her review of Roman Bartholomew by Edwin Arlington Robinson. [1923?] Apr 4
  • Box-folder 6:27
    Edwin Arlington Robinson regrets that he is unable to attend Robert Frost's birthday dinner. 1925 Mar 5
  • Box-folder 6:28
    Bruce Rogers discusses inaccuracies in The Bookman's Glossary (May 7, 8, 1925), 1920-1957

    Bruce Rogers discusses inaccuracies in The Bookman's Glossary (May 7, 8, 1925); the use of Mrs. Florence Wyman Ivins' portrait of him for an article by Carl Rollins (October 19, November 9, 11, December 2, 1925); questions about subscriptions to the Publishers' Weekly and The Bookman's Journal (December 2, 1925); his opinion of Thomas James Cobden-Sanderson, which aside from the craftsmanship of his bindings, was not a high one, especially concerning his destruction of Sir Emery Walker's property in the Doves Press types; his preference for Jessie Willcox Smith to Arthur Rackham as a children's illustrator, "Rackham is too sentimental and is really for grown-ups- the child wants something simpler... J.W.S. supplies this (however badly, at times) while Rackham furnishes the poetry, all ready-made- he's good at that, of course, but best in his simple head- & tail-pieces- too much 'art' in the others- for children" (October 20, 1926). Bruce Rogers also asks Melcher not to discuss his proposed Prayer Book in Publishers' Weekly at this time (May 20, 1927); encloses [Will] Ransom's article on himself and expresses his appreciation of the entire series of articles done by him (May 3, 1928); mentions Carl Rollins review of The Book of Psalms and a check-list by Alice Lerch (June 18, 20, 1928); thanks Melcher for his subscription to The Odyssey, a new translation by T.E. Lawrence, published by Sir Emery Walker, Wilfred Merton, and Bruce Rogers from Monotype Centaur Type, and asks that an advertisement for the book be placed in Publishers' Weekly (October 8, November 22, 1932); encloses an interview by Bruce Rogers about his work on exhibit at the New York Public Library ([January?] 2, 1954; May 19, 1955); discusses his plans for the October House Classics, with an advance notice and description of the first book, Life of Saint George (March 27, 30, May 26, June 8, 1956); mails a notice that his grand-daughter will begin to sell books of his making (December 31, 1956; January 21, 24, 1957); and includes a brochure, A Remembrance of Bruce Rogers A Gentle Man From Indiana, prepared for friends of Philip and Fanny Duschnes (December 1957).

  • Box-folder 6:29
    Carl P. Rollins, Yale University Press, recipient of a letter from Melcher in which he asks that a further paragraph about Frost's studies at Harvard be inserted in his article about Robert Frost before its publication. 1930 Mar 4
  • Box-folder 6:30
    Eleanor Roosevelt invites Melcher to lunch to discuss the White House Library (January 6, 1941) and asks for Melcher's help in securing some books in English for Inamullah Khan, President of the All Pakistan Youth Movement (October 19, 24, 1955). 1941, 1955
  • Box-folder 6:31
    Leverett Saltonstall, Governor of Massachusetts, thanks Melcher for documents sent to his office. 1943 Nov 10
  • Box-folder 6:32
    Kate Sanborn to Mr. Lauriat, orders a set of Robert Louis Stevenson's books be sent to her brother for his birthday. [1902] Jul 23
  • Box-folder 6:33
    Carl Sandburg, Chicago Daily News stationery, sends a letter of introduction for Martha Cochran of New Rochelle (September 7, 1926) 1918-1929, n.d.

    Carl Sandburg, Chicago Daily News stationery, sends a letter of introduction for Martha Cochran of New Rochelle (September 7, 1926); and thanks for the volume of Edward Channing's History of the United States with a request for his copy of The Confusion of Tongues (May 11, 17, 1929). Also present is a lengthy typescript review about Carl Sandburg and his work by Clement K. Shorter which appeared in The Sphere, London (July 29, 1918).

  • Box-folder 6:34
    Frances Clarke Sayers discusses in detail the luncheon given to honor Melcher which was attended by his son, Daniel Melcher, in his stead and the gifts presented to Melcher in honor of his 50th Anniversary. 1945 Jun 15
  • Box-folder 6:35
    Evelyn Scott thanks Melcher for the invitation to the literary dinner of the New York Library Association at Lake Mohonk on September 28, 1934

    She would love to attend the dinner, but cannot due to the fact that her husband is now in the hospital in England and she must leave earlier than planned.

  • Charles Scribner appreciates very much Melcher's kind words about him after fifty years in the business in the last issue of the Publishers' Weekly. 1925 Jan 27
  • Box-folder 6:37
    Ellery Sedgwick, The Atlantic Monthly, asks if he knows any librarians or book critics, 1919, 1920

    Ellery Sedgwick, The Atlantic Monthly, asks if he knows any librarians or book critics, further west than Cleveland, to use as a consultant occasionally and mentions Parker material that they hope to publish (March 12, 1919) and discusses their plans for a new bookroom to retail their own publications (September 3, 1920).

  • Box-folder 6:38
    Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant informs Melcher that she is writing a biography about Robert Frost, 1956-1961

    Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant informs Melcher that she is writing a biography about Robert Frost, focusing on the poetry itself, for Henry Holt and Company. She notes that her friendship with the Frosts dates to 1924 when she first wrote about him in The New Republic and asks Melcher if she could talk with him about Robert Frost at his convenience (February 14, 15, 1956); sends a detailed list of Robert Frost material left with Sergeant by Frederic Melcher on March 10, 1956 (March 21, 1956); asks about the possible location of various files concerning Frost that were removed from the Holt records by various editors or managers before they came to the Princeton Library and the biographical material assembled by Robert S. Newdick (May 27, 31, 1956); writes about the completion and upcoming publication of Robert Frost: The Trial by Existence (September 11, 15, 1959; February 25, March 4, 8, 1960); apologizes that she has mislaid The Mountaineer, January 13, 1928, which she hopes to find (April 29, May 3, 9, 13, 1960; January 3, 6, 1961); and asks permission to send copies of Melcher's letters and Frost material with her files to the University of Virginia Barrett Library which Melcher declines (February 20, 23, 1961).

  • Box-folder 6:39
    Stuart Sherman writes that he cannot come and speak at Montclair at the present time but might be able to come next winter (May 12, September 26, 1924; February 18, 1925). 1924-1926
  • Box-folder 6:40
    Upton Sinclair informs Melcher of his compilation of a bibliography of foreign editions and translations of his books (August 26, 1930); and recommends for reading his book, I, Candidate for Governor: and How I Got Licked (January 11, 1935). 1930, 1935
  • Box-folder 6:41
    Jessie Willcox Smith appreciates Melcher's letter and the check for the poster she made for Children's Book Week. 1919 Nov 22
  • Box-folder 6:42
    Samuel Francis Smith, autograph copy of verse from "America" with signature of Smith, 1894 Sep 29
  • Box-folder 6:43
    Wilbert Snow responds that he will attend the Robert Frost birthday dinner which he later says went really well and asks for the full name of an author that he had reviewed. 1925 Mar 3, Apr 3
  • Box-folder 6:44
    Paul Standard thanks Melcher for the B.R. Selborne that he secured for him, mentions an anecdote about an autographed book of birthday greetings for W.A. Dwiggins that arrived 78 days early, and refers to his Book Clinic article for Publishers' Weekly. 1937 Jun 12
  • Box-folder 6:45
    Vilhjalmur Stefansson includes carbons of letters to publishers with his letter to Melcher, 1939 Apr 22

    All about possible books pertaining to Icelandic mythology, discovery and exploration, biographies, biology or botany, etc. that they could sell at a bookstall in the Iceland building at the World's Fair in New York.

  • Box-folder 6:46
    Lincoln Steffens recommends for common reading, Fascism and Social Revolution by R. Palme-Dutt and as a second choice, John Strachey's Coming Struggle for Power. 1935 Jan 3
  • Box-folder 6:47
    Adali E. Stevenson thanks the Melchers for their understanding message and support of a dinner at the Waldorf Astoria. 1952, 1956
  • Box-folder 6:48
    Frederick A. Stokes asks Melcher to be a member of the Frances Hodgson Burnett Memorial Committee to create a "Secret Garden" in Central Park set apart for children "as a nature-study, story-telling centre for children." 1925 Aug 1
  • Box-folder 6:49
    Philip Duffield Stong agrees to speak before the stout-hearted librarians at Lake Mohonk on the 24th, 1936 Sep 12

    "As to length I venture to suggest that my ignorance will seem just as appalling in fifteen minutes as it will in an hour." He also thanks him for his kind words about Honk the Moose.

  • Box-folder 6:50
    Mark Sullivan recommends for reading Far Away and Long Ago by W.H. Hudson. 1935 Jan 14
  • Box-folder 6:51
    Frank Swinnerton thanks Melcher for his kindness during his Montclair engagement (January 7, [1924]), [1924?]-1931

    Sends his third "Word from London" article to the Publishers' Weekly; tells an anecdote about Edgar Wallace and mentions his book, The Calendar about horse-racing (October 3, November 19, 1929); and hopes to meet him while Melcher is on his trip to England (May 7, 1931).

  • Box-folder 6:52
    Ida M. Tarbell thanks him for his suggestion about her article on the service that the library can perform for men and women at work "at the machine." 1920 Jan 21
  • Box-folder 6:53
    Sara Teasdale and her husband happily accept the invitation to the birthday dinner for Robert Frost. 1925 Mar 20
  • Box-folder 6:54
    Lawrance Thompson, recently out of the Navy, asks Melcher for his help in gathering materials for his biography of Robert Frost, 1946-1949

    Lawrance Thompson, recently out of the Navy, asks Melcher for his help in gathering materials for his biography of Robert Frost, and mentions living in one of Frost's many farmhouses in Vermont at Ripton while he spent time with Frost who described the experience as "walking around the story of my life" (October 10, 1946); Melcher mentions the collection of Charles R. Green and the records made by Columbia University of Robert Frost reading his poetry (October 14, 1946); Thompson agrees as to the importance of preserving the prose of Robert Frost because he fears that Frost will never get around to doing anything about it, particularly the Charles Eliot Norton lectures (October 17, 21, 1946); promises to bring Melcher some items for his collection and finds his information about August Gehrs' recollections on the sale of North of Boston most interesting (November 5, 7, 1946); and supplies gossip about the title of Frost's next book (November 12, 15, 1946). He especially appreciates the use of Melcher's copy of Rural America because it contains Frost's article "Poetry and the Rural Life." Thompson feels that this article "is his own careful statement that he isn't trying to get everybody back to the farm; he is merely trying to get people to realize the importance of being themselves, and cultivating an Emersonian self-reliance, and by analogy the farm offers a symbol of the kind of withdrawal-from-society in order to get time to strengthen self and create produce for the open market." He also expresses concern about the preservation of original documents, sharing how two of the persons he contacted about Frost letters had lost them to fire (December 2, 1946). Thompson thanks Melcher for letting him read the Frost-Melcher correspondence and the excerpt from Publishers' Weekly for January 22, 1916 about Frost and for all of his additional help on his biography (January 4, 194[7?]); sends a list of detailed questions generated by looking at Melcher's material on Frost which Melcher attempts to answer point by point before going on his trip to Japan in the interest of copyright treaty drafting (February 3, 4, 1947).

  • Box-folder 6:55
    Ridgely Torrence responds to the invitation to the Robert Frost dinner, 1925 Mar 13

    "I value him as a friend and I admire his poetry extremely. His light seems to me one of the most authentic among living poets. Everything he writes interests me. I admire equally too, his spiritual honesty and solid sincerity."

  • Box-folder 6:56
    Unidentified Correspondents discuss such topics as: soldiers' reading (August 5, 1918), 1902-1948, n.d.

    Ten suggestions for the White House library (June 26, 1934); the pen portrait in the January 17th issue of Publishers' Weekly about his 48 years of publishing, Ben, Houghton Mifflin Company (January 26, 1948); British publisher, [George?] Allen, expresses an appreciation for Melcher's contributions to the world of books, reflection on his own third of a century in publishing and enjoyment of the occasion honoring him (June 8, n.y.).

  • Box-folder 6:57
    Louis Untermeyer discusses the invitation to the Robert Frost birthday dinner and related details (1925); and thanks for the information that he sent him for an article in The American Spectator (October 9, 1932). 1925, 1932
  • Box-folder 6:58
    Sir Stanley Unwin (1884-1968), George Allen & Unwin Ltd. agrees to accept Melcher's son, Daniel, as a volunteer in his office, 1934-1946

    Sir Stanley Unwin (1884-1968), George Allen and Unwin Ltd. agrees to accept Melcher's son, Daniel, as a volunteer in his office with the warning that he will arrive at very busy time in their organization; mentions other European publishers where he could volunteer; and mentions the copyright bill in Congress (August 23, 1934; March 18, 1935); and he discusses his Knighthood and his work on behalf of the National Book Council (January 28, 1946).

  • Box-folder 6:59
    D.B. Updike, The Merrymount Press, regrets that he did not get a chance to say good-bye when Melcher left Lauriat's for W.K. Stewart & Co., Booksellers, Indianapolis, Indiana (March 10, 1913), 1913-1940

    Mentions examples from his press illustrating the good type of work done there (January 13, 1915); discusses Mr. Benton's paper on Baskerville, The Life of Baskerville by Strauss, and the Bibliography of Baskerville published by the Baskerville Club (January 15, 1915); appreciates the kind words about The Merrymount Press in Publishers' Weekly (September 7, 1925); Melcher expresses his pleasure at a gift of a volume from the Humanist Library (April 1, 1927); appreciates the dinner given for him at the University Club (May 8, 12, 23, 1928); feels incapable of speaking gracefully or well at a presentation of an award to Mr. Kent (December 28, 1929); agrees to sit for a photograph by Mrs. Ullman, but he doesn't like to have his photograph taken (November 18, 1930); refuses to speak before the American Institute of Graphic Arts (February 20, 1931); and thanks Melcher for his "very handsome editorial" in the Publishers' Weekly of March 23rd (March 26, 1940).

  • Box-folder 6:60
    Carl Van Doren, The Nation, agrees to speak at Montclair, New Jersey on "Today's Novelists" (July 20, 1922); and discusses his book The Ninth Wave (September 13, 1926). 1922, 1926
  • Box-folder 6:61
    Irita Van Doren writes about arranging speakers for the Robert Frost birthday dinner. 1925 Feb 19
  • Box-folder 6:62
    Mark Van Doren accepts the invitation to the Robert Frost birthday dinner. 1925 Mar 3
  • Box-folder 6:63
    John C. Van Dyke refuses an invitation to speak before the National Arts Club (November 9, 1923). 1923 Nov 9
  • Box-folder 6:64
    Hendrik Willen Van Loon sends a hand-drawn and colored post card about his book Ancient Man the Beginning of Civilizations (November 25, 1920), 1920-1940

    Discusses the suspicion of the foreigner in America (May 30, 1922); and his book written for the Book Fair ([June] 15, 1937).

  • Box-folder 6:65
    John W. Vandercook agrees to speak at Lake Mohonk and asks advice as to a topic (July 4, 1934; n.d.), 1934, n.d.
  • Box-folder 6:66
    Dorothy M. Vaughan, Librarian, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, writes concerning an oil painting of the ship Frank Jones, 1949 Dec 12

    Dorothy M. Vaughan, Librarian, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, writes concerning an oil painting of the ship Frank Jones, which she suggests that Melcher may wish to purchase for the library as a memorial to the Melcher family of Portsmouth. She also tells of finding a newspaper account of the Franklin statue dedication held in Boston in 1856 which mentions that the old Melcher press was sent up for the occasion. She believes this proves that the old John Melcher press belonged to Benjamin Franklin.

  • Box-folder 6:67
    Elizabeth Gray Vining thanks Melcher for his letter of praise as one with a sympathetic understanding of Japan. 1952 May 17
  • Box-folder 6:68
    Robert F. Wagner, Office of the Mayor of New York, thanks Melcher for attending luncheon to discuss the development of Carnegie Hall as a permanent cultural center. 1960 Oct 10
  • Box-folder 6:69
    Lillian D. Wald recommends for reading Goodbye Mr. Chips. 1935 Jan 8
  • Box-folder 6:70
    mery Walker accepts the request for him to sell the American periodical rights in his article in The Times Printing Supplement, 1929 Nov 1
  • Box-folder 6:71
    Harry [Warren ?] asks if he can't get on the free list for receipt of Publishers' Weekly. 1930 Apr 17
  • Box-folder 6:72
    Booker T. Washington, two autographs, one on a calling card 1901
  • Box-folder 6:73
    Rose Weinberg thanks Melcher for sharing his notes about the [Herbert] Putnam celebration in [1949?] n.y. Apr 19
  • Box-folder 6:74
    John Hall Wheelock is unable to accept the invitation to the Robert Frost birthday dinner. 1925 Feb 28
  • Box-folder 6:75
    W.A. White is unable to recommend a book for reading as he feels "There is no one book for every man." 1935 Jan 2
  • Box-folder 6:76
    Edgar Swan Wiers, minister of Unity Church, Montclair, New Jersey, expresses his gratitude for his work as presiding officer where he "unified everything and gave an emotional content without letting that go too far." 1931 Mar 27
  • Box-folder 6:77
    Ray Lyman Wilbur invites Melcher to become a member of the White House Conference on Child Health and Protection (July 7, 14, 1930); and recommends for reading The Challenge to Liberty by Herbert Hoover (January 2, 1935). 1930, 1935
  • Box-folder 6:78
    John Gilbert Winant (1889-1947) thanks Melcher for the memorial book on President Roosevelt, 1945 Aug 13
  • Box-folder 6:79
    Robert Winthrop (1809-1894) to the Rev. Walter S. Alexander, sends autographs of Mr. Webster and Mr. Choate. 1868 Dec 9
  • Box-folder 6:80
    Humbert Wolfe asks Melcher to visit him sometime in London. n.d.
  • Box-folder 6:81
    Alexander Woollcott discusses an invitation to speak at the annual luncheon of the National Association of Book Publishers. 1932 Jan 8, 12
  • Box-folder 6:82
    Elinor Wylie sends payment for the Robert Frost birthday dinner. 1925 Mar 4