A Guide to the Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection Hayne, Paul Hamilton. 6495-c

A Guide to the Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection

A Collection in the
Clifton Waller Barrett Library of American Literature
Accession number 6495-c


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© 1997 By the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Special Collections Department Staff

Repository
University of Virginia. Library. Special Collections Dept. Alderman Library University of Virginia Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 USA
Collection Number
6495-c
Title
Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection 1857-1885
Extent
38 items
Creator
Location
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection, Accession 6495-c, Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library

Acquisition Information

Deposit [ 17 Dec 1963] 3 Nov 1964

Funding Note

Funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities



Item Listing

Manuscripts
  • Poem, " In Harbor"
    1883 Apr 22
    AMsS, 3 p.
  • Poem Fragment
    1885 Jan 1
    AMsS, 1 p.

    [Begins, "I stand today as on a mountain light . . ."]

  • Poem, " May"
    [1885]
    AMsS, 1 p.

    [On second page of group of poems entitled "Quatrains."] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne")

  • Poem, " A Homeless Wind"
    n. d.
    AMsS, 1 p.

    [On first page of a group of poems entitled "Quatrains."] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne")

  • Poem, " An Aged Wind"
    n. d.
    AMsS, 1 p.

    [On first page of a group of poems entitled "Quatrains."] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne, " Barrett Room)

  • Poem, " June"
    n. d.
    AMsS, 1 p.

    [Two copies.] (one copy in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne, " Barrett Room)

  • Song, " The Winter-winds may wildly rave. "
    n. d.
    AMsS, 1 p.
  • Poem, " The Decline of Faith"
    n. d.
    AMsS, 2 p.

    [Published as " On the Decline of Faith. "]

Letters
  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Charleston, to Silas Weir Mitchell, Philadelphia
    1857 Oct 25
    ALS, 4 p.

    [Includes " Sonnet, " a poem; thanks him for hospitality received in Philadelphia; says he arrived safely in Charlestonwhere all of Mitchell's friends are well; says he has delivered letter to Bruns who tearfully remembered his old Philadelphia haunts and had to be consoled by glasses of Schnapps; finds Charlestondull, disgusting, and dismal; says most banks are in terrible shape, even editors are affected by the situation; talks about poetry, his and Mitchell's; says that Mitchell's tribute will appear in November in Russell's Magazine; invites him to Charlestonwhere Bruns, Dr. [Samuel Henry] Dickinson, and he would give him an enjoyable time; mentions Mitchell's mother and father, Dr. John Kearsley Mitchell. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Professor N. C. Crouch, Charlottesville, Virginia
    1867 Sep 10
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Says he is pleased to know the identity of their valued contributor "Publicata"; discusses business matters as well as essays and poems by Crouch; asks for another copy of Crouch's poem, " Give me a Drink of Water, Rebel, " as the greater part of it was accidentally destroyed.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Augusta, Georgia, to "My Dear Friend"
    1872 Mar 28
    ALS, 4 p.

    [Makes various statements about the lack of cleanliness of "American Citizens of African descent" after emancipation; claims that they have given up washing themselves first chance they got and during slavery, "these creatures" were forced to wash now and then; speculates on the interesting time entomologists would have with Negroes' hair, etc.; asks to be sent the article "Southern Country Life" from Appleton's Journalregarding the Negroes' robbing southern country homes which he experienced in his own household for years; implores him not to publish two of his poems in Globe Quarterly Reviewsince he has already given them to Atlantic Monthlyand Appleton's Journal; remarks on his own work; praises correspondent's essays on William Wordsworth; mentions [Margaret Junkin] Preston's review.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to "My Dear Sir"
    1874 Mar 6
    ALS, 4 p.

    [Discusses business; acknowledges receipt of a check for 10 dollars and explains, at great length, the mystery of a lost check for 15 dollars.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Epes Sargent, Boston
    1874
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Expresses thanks to Sargent for being the first man to greet him during his visit to Boston. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to [Mary Louise] Booth, [ New York]
    1875 May 14
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Commiserates in reply to her note; says he is a rheumatic fever sufferer himself; wishes she had come further South to see him and his family; says she would have gotten into "another world"; describes his reduced circumstances, household inconveniences, but also the glory of cultivated and wild flowers; dreams of one more trip to Florida. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to Hill
    1878 Jan 18
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Talks about his and Hill's poems; praises Hill's work, especially a poem appeared in Leslie's Sunday Magazine; marvels how he has time to write poetry since he works in an insurance office; comments on exchanged photos; says Hill's photo reminds him of Captain Paul Seabrook, a friend, who was killed in battle.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
    1878 Aug 19
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Sends 4 of his unpublished sonnets to be judged; says he is isolated from the literary community and gets little critical advice in Georgia; speaks technically and at length about sonnets; mentions the terrible heat, not experienced in decades, in the South; sends him a poem by Annie Chambers Ketchum. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgiato Oran S. Baldwin, New York
    1878 Oct 15
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Sends a poem on approval; offers it for $5; asks if Baldwin has seen his poem " The South to the North" which was published in the New York Sun. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Oran S. Baldwin, New York
    1879 Jan 9
    ALS, p.

    [Promises to do all he can, as editor of several Southern papers, to circulate, and help to prosper, Baldwin's Monthlyin the South; hopes to be able to sell some of his own prose pieces on Southern life to the publication.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Oran S. Baldwin, New York
    1879 Jan 25
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Says he will let him have the poems for $6, less than he usually gets; accepts this price, as he is poor; offers short prose articles, maybe an article on Percy Bysshe Shelley, which should interest all intelligent readers.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to [Eliza Anna Farman] Pratt, Boston
    1879 Oct 31
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Says he has just returned from a trip North; regrets not to have brought his wife to her office, as they were besieged by visitors; says he will always remember her and her husband's kindness and courtesy; talks about mail that seems to have gotten lost or misdirected by his son and the loss of his business memorandum book, which makes him unsure if she has paid him for 2 pieces, etc.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to "Dear Sir"
    1880 Jan 8
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Sends requested autograph and a poem, " The Pines Mystery. "]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to "Dear Sir"
    1880 Jan 15
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Sends requested autograph with pleasure.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to "Dear Sir"
    1880 Feb 12
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Includes news clippings of " On the Death of President Garfield" and " The Centennial Ode, " both by Hayne; responds to the correspondent's request for Hayne's autograph, which he will include in his grandfather, Chief Justice Lane's, autograph volume; obliges proudly; recommends William Henry Sparks' Memory of Fifty Years; correspondent mentions Connecticut Governor Oliver Wolcottand Wolcott's opinion on Jefferson and Washington.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to unknown
    1881 Feb 3
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Responds to autograph-seeker who admires Hayne's poems.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to Mr. Collins
    1881 Apr 9
    ALS,2 p.w/typewritten copy

    [Discusses a letter, "containing a rather elaborate and important commentary of mine. . . " which he sent to Collins and has been lost in the mail; says that 2 of Collins' "most spirited pieces" were also lost with the letter; comments on the work of [Edgar] Fawcett's bitterness about the treatment of his Sixes and Sevensby the critics; doubts the editorial capacity of [Thomas Bailey] Aldrichwho has taken over The Atlantic Monthly. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to "My Dear Sir"
    1882 May 1
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Recalls that the correspondent was associated with the editorship of Appleton's Journalyears ago; responds to correspondent's request for Hayne to put the correspondent's play into blank verse for opera by saying that he will make no commitment as he has not seen the manuscript and does not even know its name; says that the task seems possible to him; wonders if he would have to collaborate with Dudley Buck; wonders if the play has been a success on stage; says his friend, Mr. Stephens seems to think the play if equal to The Lady of Lions. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to "My Dear Sir," [ Portland, Maine]
    1882 Jun 29
    ALS,2 p.w/typewritten copy

    [Says he is highly pleased and grateful to the correspondent for publishing his poem " The Pole of Death" in The Eastern Argus; appreciates the criticism published, especially the defense of on line in the poem; speaks with warmth of another citizen of Portland, his beloved friend, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, who passed away just 3 months ago.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to [ Peter Fenelon?] Collier, [ North London?]
    1882 Jul 4
    ALS, 4 p.

    [Praises him lavishly regarding his character, humor, and wholesomeness; says Collier reminds him of Leigh Huntwho is his favorite among the poets and essayists of the century; passes judgement on [James Berry] Benzel, who has a "morbid view of feeling" but a heart of gold; comments on Collier's Longfellow poem; praises his other poetic efforts; speaks of Lothrop's edition of his works and the gratitude of he owes his younger brethren of the "guild", Collier included.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Georgia, to "Gentlemen"
    1884 Dec 15
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Congratulates them on the success of their publication, especially the Swinburne number; talks about his correspondence with Swinburne; mentions an engraving by Kaulbach; says he is impressed by the figure of Titan; encloses another "Sonnet," as they already have several of his; hopes they can use it and give him a fair honorarium; mentions one of his works which has won high praise.] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne")

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to "Gentlemen"
    1885 Jan 8
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Says he has been very ill; inquires if his sonnets " King Huimbert" and " The Renegade" ever reached them; says he had also "begged" them to continue sending their paper to him.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to [ Henry Chandler Bowen], New York
    1885 Feb 5
    ALS, 2 p.

    [Discusses money matters; says he is incredulous that " Sonnets" should fetch only $5; inquires about another set of verses he has sent; expresses gladness about Dr. Ward's safety; praises poem by Eric Mackayto Swinburne.] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne")

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to [Henry Chandler] Bowen, New York
    1885 Mar 15
    ALS, 3 p.

    [Calls him a person with heart and character, a gentleman, a Christian, and an "Editorial Machine"; inquires after the Londonaddress of Eric Mackay, a genuine poet; wonders if his piece " The Children of the [Wood]" is in Bowen's possession; reports that the " Gordon lyricis attracting attention and praise; reflects on the relationship of poets, they ought to be brothers or, at least, courteous rivals; requests an article by [Robert Williams] Buchananon George Eliotwhich appeared in Bowen's paper.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hillto [Henry Chandler] Bowen, New York
    1885 Mar 23
    ALS, 3 p.

    [Hopes that Eric Mackay, "a man of genius," will become known in Americaonce his work is published in Bowen's paper; discusses Hayne's poetry in progress.] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne, " Barrett Room)

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to [Henry Chandler] Bowen, New York
    1885 May 6
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Mentions Dr. [William Hayes] Ward's return from the Orient; discusses verse-form, his published poem " May"; encloses " June" for possible publication.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to Henry Chandler Bowen, New York
    1885 May 28
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Inquires after Bowen's wishes as to the form of the "In Memoriam" for Victor Hugohe is writing; calls Hugo the greatest Frenchman "perhaps" since Francois Rabelais. ]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to Henry Chandler Bowen, New York
    1885 Jun 5
    ALS, 1 p.

    [Thanks him for friendly notice in the Independentabout " Robins in the Wind"; discusses financial matters, the Victor Hugoverses.] (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne")

Miscellaneous
  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, to Oran S. Baldwin, New York
    1876 Dec 19
    ANS, 1 p.

    [Receipt to Baldwin for $10.]

Engraving
  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, head and shoulders, signed
    n. d.
    Engraving

    (in purple slipcase, "MS Poems and Letters of Paul H. Hayne")

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Annie Chambers Ketchum
  • Copse Hill
  • Dudley Buck
  • Epes Sargent
  • Eric Mackay
  • Francois Rabelais
  • George Eliot
  • Henry Chandler Bowen
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • John Kearsley Mitchell
  • Leigh Hunt
  • N. C. Crouch
  • Oliver Wolcott
  • Oran S. Baldwin
  • Paul H. Hayne
  • Paul Hamilton Hayne
  • Paul Seabrook
  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
  • Peter Fenelon?] Collier
  • Silas Weir Mitchell
  • Victor Hugo
  • William Henry Sparks
  • William Wordsworth
  • [Edgar] Fawcett
  • [Eliza Anna Farman] Pratt
  • [Henry Chandler] Bowen
  • [James Berry] Benzel
  • [Margaret Junkin] Preston
  • [Mary Louise] Booth
  • [Robert Williams] Buchanan
  • [Samuel Henry] Dickinson
  • [Thomas Bailey] Aldrich
  • [William Hayes] Ward

Significant Places Associated With the Collection

  • America
  • Augusta, Georgia
  • Boston
  • Charleston
  • Charlottesville, Virginia
  • Copse Hill
  • Copse Hill, Augusta, Georgia
  • Copse Hill, Georgia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • London
  • New York
  • North London
  • Philadelphia
  • Portland
  • Portland, Maine