A Guide to the Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection Hayne, Paul Hamilton. 6495-a

A Guide to the Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection

A Collection in the
Clifton Waller Barrett Library of American Literature
Accession number 6495-a


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© 1997 By the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Special Collections Department Staff

Repository
University of Virginia. Library. Special Collections Dept. Alderman Library University of Virginia Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 USA
Collection Number
6495-a
Title
Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection 1872-1875
Extent
6 items
Creator
Location
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Paul Hamilton Hayne Collection, Accession 6495-a, Special Collections Department, University of Virginia Library

Acquisition Information

Purchase 1963 Jan 17

Funding Note

Funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities



Item Listing

Letters
  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to Edward Spencer
    1872 Feb 28
    AL,4 p.(incomplete)

    [Feels drawn to Spencer, who is a compatriot and literary brother of the South; says he has acquainted himself with Spencer's work through his essays and informal criticisms in literary magazines, particularly The Southern Magazine; says he was impressed by " Men Whose Hair Parts in the Middle"; remarks on [Elizabeth Barrett] Browning's poem " Aurora Leigh. "]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Edward Spencer
    1872 Mar 20-21
    ALS, 16 p.

    [Says he found his recent letters thought-provoking and pithy; comments on violets and how flowers affected the temperaments of Oliver Wendell Holmesand John Keats; compliments him on his critical and intellectual abilities; discusses his life at Copse Hill; feels he has benefited greatly from his withdrawal from society; comments on his daily observation of nature; thanks Spencer for criticism of his work; considers Southern Magazinethe only "trustworthy" critical magazine; feel The Atlanticand The New York Nationare imperfect; responds in detail to Spencer's evaluation of his poems, including " Daphles: An Argative Story, " " Renewed, " " The Wife of Brittany, " " Krishna and his Three Handmaidens, " " Under the Pine (To the Memory of Henry Timrod), " and " The Dream of the South Winds, " " The Bonny Brown Hand, " and " Fire Picture"; discusses the creation of " The Wife of Brittany" which involved a modernization of Chaucer mixed with the influence of Dryden and Keats.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Edward Spencer
    1872 Mar 20, 21
    ALS, 16 p.

    [Says the violets he sent to Spencer have been a great success; talks about the strange spiritual delight he gets from this flower; remarks how different temperaments are affected by certain plants, Oliver Wendell Holmesby the box-tree, Keats by jissamine; quotes part of a Keats poem; Says he is happy to have found a friend to whom he can turn; says he is very alone; praises Spencer's work at length and in detail; responds to Spencer's critical evaluation, upon his request, of his poems; says The Southern Magazineis the only trustworthy one; thinks little of The Atlantic Monthlyand The Nation; expresses gratitude to William Hand Brownefor introducing him.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Edward Spencer
    1872 Mar 30
    ALS, 6 p.

    [Thanks him for criticism of his poems in Legends and Lyrics; finds the criticism stimulating; wishes him to become his "Father Confessor"; disagrees with editor from Atlantic Monthlyin regard to the poem; feels some of his own poetry mirrors Dryden, Marlowe, Keats, and Morris; gives criticism of Spencer's " A Bow and an Arrow"; mentions William Hand Browne's urging him to take the initiative in a Southern Literary Guildwhich he gladly will, out of respect for Browne; discusses possibilities for the guild; hopes to bring out another book of poems.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Copse Hill, Georgia, to Edward Spencer
    1873 Feb 28
    ALS, 3 p.

    [Says he is disappointed that Spencer did not reply to his letter; discusses the successful publication of The Poems of Henry Timrodand request for second edition; believes Timrod's "pathetic" fate and premature death touched the reading public.]

  • Paul Hamilton Hayne, Augusta, Georgia, to Edward Spencer
    1875 Apr 28
    ALS, 3 p.

    [Says he is happy to do what he can for new book; mentions ironically that, although he is an extreme southerner, he has one literary friend in the South and three in New England; praises Sydney Lanierfor his brilliance and literary gifts.]

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Edward Spencer
  • John Keats
  • Oliver Wendell Holmes
  • Paul Hamilton Hayne
  • Sydney Lanier
  • William Hand Browne
  • [Elizabeth Barrett] Browning

Significant Places Associated With the Collection

  • Augusta, Georgia
  • Copse Hill
  • Copse Hill, Georgia
  • New England