A Guide to John Henry Ingram's Poe Collection Ingram, John Henry, Poe Collection 38-135

A Guide to John Henry Ingram's Poe Collection

A Collection in
Special Collections
The University of Virginia Library
Accession number 38-135


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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession Number
38-135
Title
John Henry Ingram's Poe Collection ca. 1829-ca. 1915.
Extent
This collection consists of ca. 1000 items.
Collector
Laura Ingram
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

John Henry Ingram's Poe Collection, Accession #38-135, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

This collection was purchased by the Library in 1922.


Biography

JOHN HENRY INGRAM : EDITOR, BIOGRAPHER, AND COLLECTOR OF POE MATERIALS

by John Carl Miller

When John Ingram died in Brighton, England, on February l2, l9l6, he had, as he expressed it, "a room-full of Poe." At that time scholars on both sides of the Atlantic were well aware of Ingram's collection of Poe materials. Both its size and value had been suggested by Ingram's four-volume edition of Poe's works, prefaced by an original and controversial Memoir, and its worth had further been proved by the two-volume biography of Poe in which Ingram had published a great deal of new and important information. So impressed was the New England editor and critic Thomas Wentworth Higginson that he addressed an anxious communication to Ingram on February l, l880, about his collection: "I hope that if you should ever have occasion to sell it or should bequeath it (absit omen! in either case) it may come to some Public Library in this country."

Ingram's Poe collection was to grow enormously through many more years, and in the end Higginson's wish was to be fulfilled: it was sold and it did come to America, to the Alderman Library at the University of Virginia.

This is the curious story of how it happened.

Interest in the life and work of Edgar Poe was part of Ingram's childhood; in his adulthood it became his obsession. By his statement, he spent sixty-two years writing about Poe and collecting Poe materials. We can be sure he spent as many as fifty-three, for he published a poem called "Hope: An Allegory," written in imitation of Poe's "Ulalume," in 1863, and in the month before he died he published a tart note, setting the record straight about Dr. Bransby's school at Stoke Newington. He filled the intervening years with almost ceaseless attention to Poe: he wrote two biographies, several Memoirs, more than fifty magazine articles, as well as Prefaces and Introductions to writings on Poe by others, and he published and republished Poe's tales, poems, and essays in eight separate editions. During these years he carried on bitter warfare in print with almost every person who wrote about Poe anywhere, especially if the writer was an American, for John Ingram secretly regarded himself as the sole redeemer of Poe's besmirched personal reputation and as the person most responsible for Poe's renewed, world-wide literary reputation.

II

John Henry Ingram was born on November 16, 1842, at 29 City Road, Finnsbury, Middlesex, and spent his childhood in Stoke Newington, the London suburb where young Poe had himself lived. The Stoke Newington Manor House School, which Poe describes in "William Wilson," was standing in Ingram's youth, and he was quite conscious of it as a tangible link between his own life and Poe's. On March 6, l874, Ingram wrote an autobiographical account to Sarah Helen Whitman, clearly acknowledging Poe's influence on his early life:

"As a child, before I could read, I determined as I looked at my father's great books and saw how they interested him, to become an author and by the time I could spell words of one syllable I began to write, but in prose. One night when I was still a boy I went into my own room, and for the five-hundreth time, began to read out of Routledge's little volume of Edgar Poe's poems. Suddenly, something stirred me till I shuddered with intense excitement. "I felt as if a star had burst within my brain." I fell on my knees and prayed as I only could pray then, and thanked my Creator for having made me a poet!"

But John Ingram was not destined to become a poet, and he soon realized it. After publishing and suppressing his first volume of poetry in 1863, he wrote a pathetic "Farewell to Poesy" in 1864, bidding adieu to what was then the dearest hope of his life.

Private tutors and private schools furnished John Ingram's formal education during his childhood, until he entered Lyonsdown. Later, after he had registered at the City of London College, his father died, and Ingram was forced to withdraw and take up the job of supporting himself, his mother, and his two sisters. On January l3, l868, he received a Civil Service Commission, with an appointment to the Savings Bank Department of the London General Post Office.

Ingram then molded his life into a pattern which he followed doggedly for the rest of his days. He spent his days working at his clerkship and he spent his evenings studying, writing, and lecturing, complaining irascibly when social invitations or professional functions forced him to break this routine.

On Saturday afternoons his friends could always find John Ingram in the Reading Room of the British Museum Library. He had learned to speak and write French, German, Spanish, and Italian (later in life he added a working knowledge of Portuguese and Hungarian). He contributed literary articles to leading reviews in England, France, and America, and he lectured frequently, for pay, on contemporary literature. He broke his persevering, even stubborn, devotion to work and study only occasionally by business trips through Ireland and Scotland or to the Continent, or by trips to the Isle of Wight and other watering places in search of relief from recurring attacks of rheumatic fever, which plagued him all of his life. He was determined to be an author of important books and in 1868, in spite of his difficulties, he made a beginning.

Ingram called his first book Flora Symbolica; or, the Language and Sentiment of Flowers. The book was a history of the floriography, with an examination of the meaning and symbolism, of more than one hundred different flowers, garlands, and bouquets. He wrote long essays on each flower and included with each one colored illustrations, legends, anecdotes, and poetical allusions. His volume was beautifully bound and printed, infinitely detailed, and it revealed clearly his method as an author: he had thoroughly sifted, condensed, and used, with augmentations, the writings of his predecessors (a method of editing and writing he was to use always, while condemning it in others) in this science of sweet things." In his Preface, he told his readers with characteristic bluntness: "Although I dare not boast that I have exhausted the subject, I may certainly affirm that followers will find little left to glean in the paths I have traversed." "It will be found to be the most complete work on the subject ever published," he wrote. He was probably right, too. The important thing is that here, very early, he had epitomized his guiding philosophy as a writer and an editor. His job, as he saw it, was to learn all that had been done on whatever subject he was engaged and to strive passionately to produce a work of his own that would be significant for its completeness.

This book on floriography was the product of a rapidly maturing scholar, not that of a youth of nineteen, as his later juggling of his birth date would have it appear. He was actually twenty-six years old when he first demonstrated his abilities as a compiler, editor, and author. Everything about this volume shows that Ingram's methods in bookmaking were rather firmly decided upon before he commenced his important work on Poe, and he altered those methods scarcely at all, no matter what his subject, in the next forty-eight years.

Having served his literary apprenticeship, John Ingram was ready, by 1870, to begin writing books that would, he hoped, be financially profitable and at the same time bring to him lasting literary fame. He had already, for a long while, studied Poe's writings, reading and collecting everything he saw about the poet, and he became possessed by a deep, almost instinctive belief that Poe had been cruelly wronged by the Memoir that Rufus W. Griswold had written and published in l850. And so, John Ingram found his work: he determined to destroy Griswold's Memoir of Poe by proving its author a liar and a forger, and, in time, to write a new biography that would present to the world Edgar Poe as he really was. In order to do these things it would be necessary, of course, for him to examine everything, both favorable and unfavorable, that had been written about Poe, to search for new material, and to learn so much about Poe that he could reconstruct, as it were, the true character of the man and writer, as he felt it to be.

At this point, Ingram's life appeared to have a certain stability. He had a respectable and obviously not too demanding job that assured financial independence, and he was the author of a book popular enough to call for three editions, which brought to him a certain amount of literary recognition. But there was another side to his nature, a darker side that tormented and divided his life. As he began assembling materials for a defense of Edgar Poe he worked spasmodically, beset by worry, self-doubt, trouble, and fear. His temper was quick to explode and his sensitive nature found injury and fault where little or none of either was intended or existed. Some explanation of this duality in his nature is found in a shamed confession he made to Mrs. Whitman about the hereditary curse that hung over his household: two aunts, his father, and a sister, one after the other, had succumbed to insanity and had either died or had to be removed from home. His own mind was as clear and acute as possible, he insisted, and the family curse appeared unlikely to fall upon him if his worldly affairs jogged along composedly, but the knowledge of the taint in his blood was a terrible thing to him. Perhaps there is enough here to explain why Ingram's disposition early became choleric, why he never married, and why he suffered all of his life from recurring sicknesses, real or imaginary.

By 1870 there was a growing international interest in Poe's genius. A new generation had grown up to be fascinated by his tales and poems, and the older generations had in a measure forgotten the unpleasant stories connected with Poe's life. A minority group of Poe's friends in America knew that Griswold's Memoir had been motivated by jealousy and hatred, but no one of them had the information, the literary ability, and the strength necessary to publish an effectively documented denial of Grisold's Memoir and to replace it with an honest biography. These friends of Poe's were widely separated, largely unknown to each other; all had been seriously affected by a decade of war and its aftermath, and all of them were growing old. If Poe's memory was to be vindicated, it was fairly certain that it would have to be done by someone younger, someone who would not personally have known Poe. Not a single one of Poe's close friends who still lived in the l870's had any idea or plan for doing the job himself, but a number of them were eager to help someone else do it.

Such, in brief, was the situation when John Henry Ingram of Stoke Newington determined to prove to the world his theory that Rufus Griswold had been a liar and that Edgar Poe had been shamefully maligned.

The first articles Ingram published in l873 and early l874 had little new information in them which would vindicate Poe's reputation; Ingram was of necessity feeling his way, and he used these magazine publications to announce clearly his purpose, before diving into the melee. He intended to refute, step by step, the aspersions cast on Poe's character by Griswold and to publish an edition of Poe's works which would not only be more complete than any hitherto published, but which, through a Memoir as its Preface, would clear Poe's name and present him to the world as the great artist and fine gentleman he really was.

After his first flight into the thin air of creative and imaginative writing, Ingram's muse brought him closer to earth and he really found himself at home in the murky atmosphere of the British Museum. Ingram was a natural researcher. Armed with righteous indignation and the tools of scholarship, he became a crusader enlisted in a holy cause; the peculiar combination within him of a sensitive, poetic soul and a zealot's concentrated energy uniquely fitted him for the challenging job of righting the wrongs he believed had been done to Poe.

Having exhausted his resources at hand, Ingram turned to America in the hope of finding there friends of Poe who still resented the injustice done to him enough to help clear his name. The adroit timing and the felicity of this plan quickly became apparent. It was not difficult for Ingram to communicate his sincere feeling that his work was a crusade against evil, and Poe's friends were delighted with the boyish fervor of this young and already distinguished English scholar who was so unselfishly championing the poet's blighted reputation. Poe had been dead for nearly twenty-five years and many of his friends were hastening to their own graves, but they responded immediately to Ingram's letters and joined in a tireless search for recollections of Poe's literary and personal activities, sending letters Poe had written to them, manuscripts, books, and even personal keepsakes Poe had given to them. Sarah Helen Whitman, excited over the prospect of Ingram's writing an authoritative biography of Poe, wrote out for him everything she could remember of her personal meetings with Poe, sent him manuscripts, hundreds of newsclippings, magazine articles, copied letters and excerpts from articles, and gave unreservedly from her remarkable store of information about what others had written and said about Poe. Annie Richmond entrusted to Ingram the only copies she had ever made of her precious letters from Poe, and sent him copies of Poe's books that had been found in Poe's trunk after he died. Marie Louise Shew Houghton sent letters and copies of letters from Poe, a miniature of Poe's mother, and at least three manuscript poems Poe had given her. Stella Lewis gave him Poe's manuscript of "Politian," and willed to him the daguerreotype which Poe had given to her in l848. Edward V. Valentine of Richmond, William Hand Browne of Johns Hopkins University, John Neal, Poe's sister Rosalie, the Poe family in Baltimore, including Neilson Poe and his daughter Amelia, and many, many others contributed to Ingram's surprisingly large store of information about Poe. And when William Fearing Gill and Eugene L. Didier came to many of these same persons asking for help on their biographies of Poe, these correspondents showed a surprising disposition to withhold everything for Ingram and to betray to him the activities of his American rivals. Later when violent personal and literary quarrels broke out between Ingram and these American biographers of Poe, Ingram's epistolary friends encouraged him in private correspondence and defended him vigorously in the public press. Poe's friends had become Ingram's partisans. A steadily rising stream of books, letters, manuscripts, pictures, and newsclippings passed from America to England, with a few of them, but very few, finding their way back again. The aggregate of Ingram's correspondence on Poe matters is staggering when one realizes that he carried it on single-handedly, and published during these years sixteen books on other subjects while holding an everyday job at the General Post Office.

From the two bound volumes of the Broadway Journal that Mrs. Whitman sent, Ingram was able to make a number of important additions to the cannon of Poe's writings when he published his edition of Poe's works. Poe had given these volumes, covering his editorship of the Journal, to Mrs. Whitman in l848, and had gone through them and initialed with "P" almost everything he had written. Mrs. Whitman had first offered to lend these volumes to Ingram, but then, feeling the time of her death drawing near, she decided to give them to him. Accordingly, on April 2, 1874, she mailed them with the injunction that they be returned to her "at the opening of the seventh seal."

In the Preface of his l880 two-volume biography of Poe, John Ingram bade farewell "to what has engrossed so much of my life and labour." He was convinced that he had garnered almost all of the genuine Poe documents there were and that his accurate and complete biography had dealt conclusively with everything of importance concerning Poe. His work was finished, he sincerely thought.

But Ingram was not through with Poe. He should have understood himself and the reputation he had acquired as a Poe scholar well enough to know that he could not be through. The popularity of his edition had created a large market for Poe's writings and his biography had stirred up so much controversy, particularly in America, that he had rather to increase sharply his activities, for he was quickly challenged about statements in his published works. Quick to resent encroachment on what he considered his private preserves, he rapidly found himself at odds with a number of persons who had begun writing on Poe, for he could detect in their publications borrowings from his own, borrowings made more often than not without acknowledgment.

Ingram could not copyright facts, and he grew steadily more embittered as he saw the fruits of his research become public property. A new era of investigation into Poe's writings and life was beginning in America, an era brought about principally by Ingram's controversial personality and by the tone of his published writings about Poe. Competent scholars were entering the field to contest Ingram's claims of being the leading Poe authority, and these new American writers were rapidly making the early efforts of W. F. Gill and Eugene Didier appear puerile indeed. George W. Woodberry, Edmund C. Stedman, and R. H. Stoddard were formidable new biographers and suitors of Poe, and Ingram had not as yet, in the 1880's, taken their measure. Far from being finished with his work, he was really only beginning. During the next thirty-five years he struck back angrily through the columns of important newspapers and journals --to which his reputation as a Poe scholar gave him easy access --at other writers who, as he saw it, had stolen his Poe materials or who had altered the Poe image he had tried so hard to create. When reviewing new editions and biographies of Poe, Ingram tried to demolish them with a wit as rapier-like as was Poe's; unfortunately for him, his witty thrusts resembled broad-ax blows. Where Poe had been original and cruel, Ingram was simply sarcastic and repetitious. But through their reviews Ingram and Poe did achieve the same result: they both made enduring, deadly, vociferous enemies.

In 1884 Ingram edited a de luxe four-volume edition of Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe for English publication, and for the Tauchnitz Press in Leipzig he edited separate volumes of Poe's Tales and Poems; in 1885 he published a volume on Poe's "The Raven"; in 1886 he prepared a one-volume reprint of the two-volume biography of Poe he had issued in 1880; and in 1888 he brought out the first variorum edition of Poe's poems. With these publications Ingram was represented on the literary market by one edition or another which covered every phase of Poe's activities. Thus, finally, was completed the body of his important work on Poe.

In still another sense John Ingram's work on Poe was finished. His whole method of investigation had been based on personal correspondence with Poe's friends, and year by year the circle had grown smaller until, in 1888, only Annie Richmond was left. His early, happy inspiration of searching out Poe's friends had yielded rich results. Now those persons were silent, but their memories, their letters, and their precious papers had been given into Ingram's keeping; and he had used most of these things in publishing in every area of Poe scholarship, until, at the close of 1888, there was literally nothing left for him to do. But his collection remained and was the envy of Poe scholars everywhere.

John Ingram was retired with a pension from the Civil Service in 1903, after thirty-five years in the General Post Office. He continued living in London with his only remaining sister, Laura, writing articles, caustically reviewing new books about Poe and new editions of Poe's works, and in 1909 Ingram led the English celebration of Poe's centenary, bringing out still another edition of Poe's poems and furnishing to the London Bookman practically all of the materials used in its Edgar Allan Poe Centenary Number. In these years of retirement Ingram began putting into final form his definitive biography of Poe. He felt he could use everything in his files, now that all of the people who had sent materials to him were dead, to achieve the distinction he wanted more than anything else --to be remembered by the world as the one authentic and complete biographer of Edgar Poe. In 1912 Ingram moved his household from London to Brighton. There for a few years he enjoyed the sea-bathing he loved so well, and there he died on February 12, 1916. His passing went unnoticed. His last sickness had evidently not been considered terminal and his death must have come unexpectedly, for he left no clear-cut arrangements for disposing of his affairs or for the huge collection of Poe materials, the pride of his life. It is strange that he had not long before made definite provision for his Poe collection, for it constituted his greatest claim to personal and literary fame, and John Ingram was a man mindful of history's judgment. Through the years, it is true, he had sold almost all of his original Poe letters and some of the more important items given him by Poe's friends, but he had kept accurate copies of everything he had sold. Ingram had justified his actions by insisting he had sacrificed his own fortune and health in trying to clear Poe's name and if his work was to continue the sales were necessary to provide money for it. Even though these original letters and manuscripts were no longer part of his collection, the things that remained were very important, and John Ingram knew it. Nothing else he had published had brought his name before the world as had his publications on Poe and the reputation he had gained as a collector of Poe materials.

III

Shortly after John Ingram's death, Miss Laura Ingram caused something of a stir in the scholarly worlds of England and America by advertising for sale her brother's entire library. Although John Ingram had become an anachronism, his out-dated biographical methods having long been superseded by the careful, painstaking, scholarly practices of Professors James A. Harrison and Killis Campbell, the number of important "first" Poe publications Ingram had scored was still green in the memories of all concerned. Poe scholars knew that in his declining years Ingram had lost his knack of ferreting out new and important facts about Poe, but they also knew that shortly before his death Ingram had completed a new biography of Poe. While they did not expect that manuscript to be among the papers offered for sale, there was every reason to believe the materials from which he had written it would be. More important than this, scholars everywhere wanted to see those original manuscripts and letters by means of which Ingram had forty years before made so many important contributions to Poe biography.

Word of the proposed sale reached the University of Virginia early in the summer of 1916. Librarian John S. Patton promptly sent an inquiry to Ingram's heirs, through the American Consul in London, asking what books and papers about Poe were to be sold. Miss Laura Ingram as promptly answered his inquiry and enclosed a partial list of the Poe books, letters, and papers she wished to sell, asking l50 pounds sterling for the lot. Patton felt this too inclusive a basis on which to buy, so he countered with a proposition that Miss Ingram send the entire collection to Virginia for examination and evaluation; for an option to buy any or all of the collection the University would pay shipping expenses and insurance from England to America, and back again, if need be. Patton's interest was principally in the letters and portraits in the collection; the University, he wrote, not altogether accurately, already had most of the books on Poe that Miss Ingram had listed.

Miss Ingram agreed to Patton's proposal but delayed the shipment because there was a great risk of losing the collection. England was at war with Germany and enemy submarines had begun taking a heavy toll of English merchant shipping. After a few months, when the immediacies of war occupied both Miss Ingram and the University officials, correspondence about the Poe papers was dropped.

In 1919, James Southall Wilson, a young Professor of English from William and Mary came to join the University of Virginia faculty. A seminar course on Poe's works was being organized for the first time at the University and Dr. Wilson was scheduled to teach it. Although he was not at the time either a Poe specialist or a specialist in American literature Dr. Wilson had, however, long been keenly interested in Poe's writings. Shortly after his arrival, John Patton mentioned to him in casual conversation that he had a partial list of John Ingram's Poe Collection which had been for sale some years before. When Dr. Wilson saw the list his imagination quickly became fired with the possibilities of what the whole collection might be; so he maneuvered hastily, to enlist President Edwin A. Alderman's support, gathered accumulated Library funds, and reopened the correspondence with Miss Ingram about her brother's papers.

Miss Ingram's health had been seriously affected by her brother's death and by the privations of the war; once the fighting was over she had begun making hurried efforts to dispose of the Poe papers to any acceptable university or library authorities. She had wanted them to go to the University of Virginia for safekeeping, since her brother had paid marked attention to Poe's alma mater, but a number of years had passed without further word from Charlottesville. Fearfully believing her own death to be at hand, she had seized an opportunity to sell the papers to the University of Texas.

Professor Killis Campbell, an editor of Poe's poems and himself a Virginian, wrote Miss Ingram, as Chairman of the Department of English at the University of Texas, that he would consider buying her Poe papers only after the University of Virginia had definitely refused their purchase.

Still another possible solution to Miss Ingram's problem then presented itself: a Harvard Professor, vacationing in England, came to Brighton to examine the Poe collection, with the idea of buying it for his university.

At this point Miss Ingram received Dr. Wilson's renewed request to ship the papers on approval to Virginia. She did not want this indefiniteness. Getting the papers packed and shipped, furthermore, would be a difficult and confusing job, for the Poe collection had somehow become mixed with the remnants of John Ingram's once enviable collections of materials about Christopher Marlowe, Chatterton, Oliver Madox-Brown, and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Sudden interest in the Poe papers on the part of an English purchaser offered her a way out. She stopped short and awaited an offer from any one of the prospective buyers who would relieve her of the trouble of packing and shipping the papers. A quick acceptance of her terms by the English agent, the Harvard professor, or by the University of Texas would have changed the fate of the Poe papers.

The University of Virginia's correspondence about the papers had not involved an agent, since it was begun and ended by personal letters between John Patton, Dr. Wilson, and Miss Ingram. Yet, some knowledge of the prospective return of John Ingram's Poe papers to America reached numerous scholars, authors, teachers, and booksellers, for they began sending requests to the University of Virginia for permission to examine and use or to purchase portions of the collection. The first word the University itself had that they were to receive the Poe Collection came from J. H. Whitty, Richmond book collector and editor of Poe's poems, who wrote John Patton on September 23, 1921, saying the papers were even then enroute from England to the University. This information, Whitty wrote in sly confidence, he had picked up through the bookseller's "grapevine."

In mid-October, 192l, the collection arrived in the United States aboard the SS Northwestern Miller, which docked at Philadelphia. The shipment, consigned by John Patton as "settler's effects," was passed through Customs free of duty. But Patton, who had not been in England for a decade, resolutely refused to sign an affidavit declaring the boxes contained his household goods; consequently, two weeks passed before official confusion was cleared up and the shipment released.

The two great packing cases actually reached the University in the first week of November and were isolated in a small room in the basement of the Rotunda to await examination by Dr. Wilson in whatever time he could spare from his teaching duties.

Dr. Wilson found his job long and tiring, but always interesting, and at times very exciting. John Ingram's Poe collection was bulky, varied and rich.

IV

Perhaps the prize single article in the Poe Collection was the original "Stella" daguerreotype of Poe --the one Poe had given to Mrs. Lewis in l848, which she in turn willed to John Ingram in l880. And among the hundreds of letters from Ingram's correspondents, perhaps none were more interesting to Dr. Wilson, nor to Poe students later, than those from Sarah Helen Whitman. This strange and charming woman had cherished for twenty-five years the image of herself as his one great love, after her brief engagement of three months to Poe in l848, and she had written to John Ingram the fullest account there is of their personal relationships. Her ninety-eight letters to Ingram narrowly escaped being destroyed by Laura Ingram, who felt, for reasons best known to herself, Mrs. Whitman's letters were unfit to be in her brother's collection. Fortunately, Miss Ingram decided to include the letters in the shipment and let the Virginia authorities decide whether or not they should be destroyed.

Ingram's letters to Annie Richmond had also evoked full and generous replies. She placed her whole trust in Ingram and wanted him to understand, as she felt sure no mortal except herself had understood, the purity and nobility of Poe's mind and spirit. The copies she made of Poe's letters to herself for John Ingram, found in this collection, are the only ones in existence; the originals have disappeared.

Dr. Wilson also found in this collection many letters from Marie Louise Shew Houghton, who had nursed Virginia Poe during her last sickness at Fordham and had watched over Poe as he suffered a long and violent attack after Virginia's death. Mrs. Houghton had sent to Ingram either the originals or copies of all the manuscripts and letters she had received from Poe, in addition to a sometimes confusing but invaluable account of Poe's family life.

Letters from these three ladies made up the largest group that Ingram had received, but Dr. Wilson found many additional letters and items of importance. There was the original drawing of Poe that Edouard Manet had made and presented to Stephane Mallarme, who had in turn given it to John Ingram ; a pen drawing of Marie Louise Shew, made by an unknown hand; letters from Rosalie Poe, begging, shortly before she died, for Ingram's financial help; a penciled letter from Poe himself to Stella Lewis written on the back of her manuscript poem "The Prisoner of Perote"; letters and documents from Edward V. Valentine, the Richmond sculptor who first persuaded Elmira Royster Shelton to relate for Ingram her early and late memories of Poe; letters from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, John Neal, Elizabeth Oakes Smith, and many other letters Dr. Wilson knew to be without parallel in any collection of Poe papers.

Miss Ingram had not included in the shipment "a good many" letters from Miss Amelia FitzGerald Poe, since they "threw too little fresh light on her nephew's life to be of an interest," nor had she included old copies of the Southern Literary Messenger and Burton's Gentleman's Magazine, feeling certain the University would already have them. Amelia Poe was the daughter of Neilson Poe, who had buried Edgar in Baltimore in l849, and the custodian of many letters from Poe, Mrs. Clemm, Mrs. Whitman, and Annie Richmond ; she had corresponded with Ingram over a period of twenty years and was important enough to him to receive the dedication of his last biography of Poe. These letters and magazines were requested from Miss Ingram and in time they were received and restored to the collection.

After a thorough examination of the collection, Dr. Wilson decided it was worth the price asked. In l916 the price had been 150 pounds; in 1922 it was 200 pounds. For the entire collection, John Patton offered 181 pounds, 14 shillings ($800), on March 24, 1922.

Miss Ingram gladly accepted the money and she wrote to the officials of the University how pleased she was that what she believed to be her dead brother's wish had been carried out: his Poe collection was at home in America, and in Virginia, where she was sure he would have wanted it to be. And she continued her interest in the University, quite often sending cordial letters accompanied by packages of books, pictures, and letters which she had come across and thought belonged with her brother's Poe collection. In 1933, when once again Miss Ingram thought her death was near, she sent to the University, as a gift, John Ingram's manuscript, "The True Story of Edgar Allan Poe. " This manuscript had been in a publisher's hands when Ingram died, but printing was delayed until the war should be over. Before that time came, however, the publisher had himself died, and Laura Ingram had tried without success to place it with other publishers. Its presence in the house made her uncomfortable. Would the University accept it and deal with it as they saw fit?

The whole tone of this manuscript convinces the reader that John Ingram considered this last biography, his farewell to Poe scholarship, to be a volume that would triumphantly answer his critics, and would be the foundation-stone upon which he would be able to stand forever as the uncontestable arbiter of all things concerning Poe. In this work he resurveyed his whole knowledge and experience and fearlessly handed down his dicta on all controversial Poe questions. But unfortunately his spleen overrode his scholarly judgment. His virulence against other Poe biographers, especially the Americans whom he accused of fraudulently using his materials, succeeded in clouding Ingram's own vision and writing, and succeeds in destroying for his present day reader the confidence necessary in an author's balanced judgment, if he is to accept, even partially, the arbitrary rulings. This manuscript is not, as Ingram thought it would be, the last word on Poe. It is unrelentingly bitter against Poe's detractors and Ingram's personal rivals, and it seeks, even more than did Ingram's other writings on Poe, to whitewash its subject completely. Ingram's perspective seems to have deserted him as he wrote this manuscript, and he had little left except futile anger.

V

The addition of the manuscript life of Poe rounded out the collection of Poe papers that once had belonged to John Ingram, now in the possession of the University of Virginia.

One can safely say that had it not been for John Ingram's skill and energy, together with the peculiarities of his temperament, we should not now have many of these unusual and dependable accounts of Poe's activities and personality. By studying Ingram's papers it is possible to trace him through a maze of editing and publishing and to watch him, step by step, slowly amass his great fund of information about Poe. One can see him make mistakes and achieve triumphs as he accepts, rejects, and fuses information to be included in his numerous publications on Poe. Then, too, it is still possible to catch fresh glimpses of Poe himself in this collection, for Ingram did not publish all of the memories of Poe set down in the letters he received. Some of these recollections Ingram deliberately shielded from public view, but they are no more apocryphal than many of the recollections he chose to believe and to publish; some of the records Ingram received he suppressed from delicacy alone.

A number of scholarly papers, theses, and doctoral dissertations have been based on this collection of Poe papers, making almost all the more important items and clusters of items more readily available to other scholars. The complete collection has made possible another kind of study, by an examination of Ingram's biographies and editions of Poe, in conjunction with the rough materials from which he shaped them, it has been possible to make a just evaluation of Ingram's place among Poe biographers and editors and to demonstrate exactly what and how many important contributions he made to the peculiarly difficult field of Poe scholarship. Finally, and by no means least important, is the fact that, since Ingram's work on Poe covered nearly his whole life span, it has been possible for the first time to trace in the great mass of his papers a thread of the biography of this nineteenth-century professional editor and biographer to whom the writer of every signifcant work about Poe since 1874 has been directly and heavily indebted.

Scope and Content Information

A calendar and index of letters and other manuscripts, photographs, printed matter, and biographical source materials concerning Edgar Allan Poe assembled by John Henry Ingram, with prefatory essay by John Carl Miller on Ingram as a Poe editor and biographer and as a collector of Poe materials.

Second Edition by John E. Reilly

To the Memory of John Carl Miller

Introduction:

In 1922 the University of Virginia paid the heirs of John Henry Ingram the munificent sum of $800 for the materials Ingram had assembled for his work as biographer, editor, and stalwart (i.e., feisty) champion of Edgar Allan Poe. What the University acquired is an unparalleled collection of letters and other manuscripts, of photographs and daguerreotypes, and of newspaper clippings and various other printed materials totaling altogether more than a thousand items. Although the University made the Collection available to serious students of Poe, the contents remained uncatalogued at the Alderman Library until, in the late 1940's, John Carl Miller, then a graduate student, undertook the chore of sorting and classifying the mass of material. As it happened, the chore proved to be even more than a labor of love: it marked for Miller the beginning of a life-long interest both in Ingram and in the materials Ingram had compiled. The first fruit of Miller's interest was his 1954 doctoral dissertation, "Poe's English Biographer, John Henry Ingram : A Biographical Account and a Study of His Contributions to Poe Scholarship." Six years later the University published the first edition of Professor Miller's John Henry Ingram's Poe Collection at the University of Virginia. This little book was a "calendar" or chronological checklist of the Collection providing a brief description of the content of each item. Professor Miller prefaced the calendar with his essay on Ingram as "Editor, Biographer, and Collector of Poe Materials" and furnished access to the calendar through an index. In the mid-1960's Professor Miller served as an advisor to the University's project of making the entire Collection available on nine reels of microfilm. At the same time, however, Professor Miller was laying his own plans to make "the more important primary source materials" used by Ingram even more available in a multi-volume annotated edition. The first of these volumes, Building Poe Biography, was published by Louisiana State University Press in 1977, and the second volume, Poe's Helen Remembers, appeared two years later from the University Press of Virginia. In declining health for a number of years, Professor Miller died in October 1979, before any other volumes could be prepared.

At the time of his death, Professor Miller was at work not only on his annotated edition of materials in the Collection but also on the second edition of the calendar published by the University of Virginia almost two decades earlier. It is his work on the second edition of the calendar that the present volume carries to its conclusion.

The format of the entries in the calendar is similarly unchanged: two paragraphs are devoted to each item, the first a bibliographical (if that word can be extended to included manuscripts) description of the item and the second paragraph a brief account of its content.

Item Listing

Part One: Letters, Manuscripts, Other Documents
  • [1]
    THE ANNUAL REGISTER
    1817 July 14.
    An 18-line MS. extract from p. 60. Copy by unidentified hand.

    Count Poe, a Polish nobleman, has induced Scottish emigrants to settle a colony on his estates.

  • [2]
    "LIFE"
    1829 October 22.
    5 4-line stanzas. Copy by William Hand Browne. 1 p.

    Baltimoreans understood that Poe wrote this in Mary A. Hand's album.

  • [3]
    GENERAL COURT-MARTIAL ORDERS IN THE CASE OF CADET EDGAR A. POE
    1830 December 31.
    D, 3 pp.

    Official copy from U.S. War Department made in 1875.

  • [4]
    TRIAL OF CADET E. A. POE OF THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY
    1831 January 1.
    D, 14 pp.

    Official copy from U. S. War Department made in 1874.

  • [5]
    Poe's "POLITIAN"
    ca. 1832.
    Facsimileof a 15-line fragment from Poe's MS.

    Given to Ingram by Sarah Anna Lewis between 1875 and 1880.

  • [6]
    POE, Baltimore, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1834 November ca. 19.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 2 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 54.

  • [7]
    POE, Baltimore, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1835 March 15.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 56.

  • [8]
    POE, Baltimore, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1835 March 15.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 56-57.

  • [9]
    POE, Richmond, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1835 September 11.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 2 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 73-75.

  • [10]
    POE, Richmond, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1836 January 22.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 4 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 81-82

  • [11]
    POE, Richmond, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1836 February 11.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 3 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 83-85.

  • [12]
    LIST OF POE'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO BURTON'S GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE
    1839 July-December.
    MS. made by Edward V. Valentine ca. 1875. 1 p.
  • [13]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1839 September 11.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 115-117.

  • [14]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1839 October 7.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 120.

  • [15]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1839 December 12.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 124-125.

  • [16]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1839 December 19.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 125-126.

  • [17]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1840 January 20.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 127-128.

  • [18]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to WILLIAM E. BURTON, Philadelphia
    1840 June 1.
    Copy by William Rouse. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 321. Text printed in Letters, 1: 129-133.

  • [19]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    [1840] June 17.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 137-139.

  • [20]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1840 December 31.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 150-151.

  • [21]
    Poe's THE CONCHOLOGIST'S FIRST BOOK
    1840.
    MS. copy of title page by John Neal. 1 p.
  • [22]
    January 17. POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1841.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 5 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 151-153.

  • [23]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1841 June [21].
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 4 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 163-166.

  • [24]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1841 July 12.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 175-177.

  • [25]
    POE, Philadelphia, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Philadelphia
    1841 September 19.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 359. Text printed in Letters 1: 183-184.

  • [26]
    POE, New York, letter to JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore
    1845 October 26.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 1: 299-300.

  • [27]
    "THE VILLAGE STREET," by Abijah M. Ide, Jr.
    1845.
    12 6-line stanzas. Facsimile of Poe's MS. 3 pp.

    After copying these verses from Ide's holograph, Poe printed them in the Broadway Journal on 13 September 1845, p. 145. See "The True Story of Edgar Allan Poe," p. 825, for Ingram's discussion of this.

  • [28]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH, Phillips, ME.
    1846 April 16.
    Copy by Ingram. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 315.

  • [29]
    POE, New York, letter to VIRGINIA POE, Fordham
    1846 June 12.
    Copy by Marie Louise Shew Houghton. 2 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 318.

  • [30]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1846 December 15.
    Copy by George W. Eveleth. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Text printed in Letters 2: 331-334.

  • [31]
    "RUPERT AND MADELON," a drama by Frances S. Osgood
    ca. 1846.
    2-page extract. Copy by Ingram.

    When a facsimile of this extract in Poe's hand had appeared in John P. Kennedy's "Autograph Leaves of Our Country's Authors," 1864, the drama was credited to Poe, but he had only copied a portion of it to use in his discussion of Mrs. Osgood's work in "The Literati of New York City."

  • [32]
    POE, Fordham, letter to MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON
    1847 January 29.
    Facsimile of Poe's MS. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 340. E. Dora Houghton sent the original of this letter to Ingram in 1875, and he reproduced it in facsimile in his 1880 Life of Poe 2: 107. [See Item 194.]

  • [33]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1847 February 16.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Text printed in Letters 2: 343-344.

  • [34]
    MARIA CLEMM, Fordham, letter to MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON
    1847 February [Friday].
    Copy by Mrs. Houghton. 4 pp.

    Mrs. Clemm expresses her appreciation for medicines and wines Mrs. Houghton had sent shortly before Virginia's death and during Edgar's sickness.

  • [35]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1847 March 11.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Text printed in Letters 2: 348-349.

  • [36]
    POE, New York, letter to MESSRS. J. F. REINMAN and J. H. WALKER
    1847 March 11.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 349-350.

  • [37]
    POE, [Fordham], letter to MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON
    1847 [May].
    Copy by E. Dora Houghton. 2 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 350-351.

  • [38]
    POE'S "THE BELLS"
    1847.
    Facsimile of four stanzas in Poe's MS. 4 pp.
  • [39]
    "LIKE ALL TRUE SOULS OF NOBLE BIRTH," verses by MARY GOVE NICHOLS
    1847?.
    MS. copy by E. Dora Houghton. 1 p.

    Mrs. Nichols sent this as a valentine to Marie Louise Shew (Mrs. Houghton), and Poe copied it in her autograph book. See Item 213.

  • [40]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1848 January 4.
    Copy by Eveleth. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Text printed in Letters 2: 354-357.

  • [41]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1848 February 29.
    Copy by Eveleth. 10 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Text printed in Letters 2: 360-362.

  • [42]
    POE'S "TO MARIE LOUISE"
    1848 February.
    Tracing of Poe's 32-line MS. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 210. Marie Louise Shew Houghton sent the original MS. to Ingram in 1875.

  • [43]
    POE, Fordham, letter to ANNA BLACKWELL, Providence
    1848 June 14.
    Copy by Sarah Helen Whitman. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 211. Text printed in Letters 2: 369-371.

  • [44]
    "ERMINA'S TALE," a poem of 30 4-line stanzas by Jane E. Locke
    1848 August.
    MS. in Mrs. Locke's hand. 4 pp.

    Copy reached Ingram through Annie Richmond. [See Item 318.] In a note appended, presumably to Poe, Mrs. Locke asks that receipt of this MS. be acknowledged immediately.

  • [45]
    POE, Fordham, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1848 October 1.
    Copy by Mrs. Whitman. 15 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 382-391. In a note appended to this copy, Mrs. Whitman asks Ingram to hold this letter sacred for Poe and for herself. She knows he will not say of it, as did Richard Henry Stoddard, "Curious, very curious, indeed."

  • [46]
    POE, Fordham, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1848 [October 18.].
    Extracts copied by Mrs. Whitman. 7 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 391-398.

  • [47]
    POE, aboard New York steamboat, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1848 November 14.
    Copy by Mrs. Whitman. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 400.

  • [48]
    POE, Fordham, letter to ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell
    1848 November 16.
    Copy by Mrs. Richmond. 4 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 400-404. "This must be burnt," written by Ingram on this copy.

  • [49]
    POE, New York, letter to EDWARD V. VALENTINE
    1848 November 20.
    Copy by Valentine. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 404, where variants are noted.

  • [50]
    POE, Fordham, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1848 [November] 24.
    Facsimile of 8-line fragment. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 406-409. Mrs. Whitman sent this fragment for Ingram's use in his 1874-75 edition of Poe's works. Facsimile faces p. lxvi of vol. I.

  • [51]
    POE, Fordham, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1848 November 26.
    Copy by Mrs. Whitman. 2 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 409-411.

  • [52]
    MARIA CLEMM, Fordham, letter to ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell
    1848 November? December?.
    ALS. 16-line fragment. 1 p.

    Mrs. Clemm doubts the wisdom of Poe's marrying Sarah Helen Whitman and thanks Annie for inducing him to make to her the promise which Mrs. Clemm is sure he will die before he breaks. Mrs. Richmond's note on margin: "It is the letter containing this promise she [Mrs. Clemm] borrowed and never returned!"

  • [53]
    POE, Fordham, to WILLIAM J. PABODIE, Providence
    1848 December 4.
    ALS. Facsimile. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 411-412. At Sarah Helen Whitman's request, Poe wrote this letter to Pabodie signing it with his full name, since Pabodie wanted an autograph he could "show." Pabodie willed it to Mrs. Whitman in 1870; sometime later she gave it to Thomas C. Latto who lent it back to her for Ingram's use in 1874. Ingram had this facsimile made and reproduced it in his "Memoir" in his edition of Poe's works, Vol. 1, between pp. lxxvi and lxxvii.

  • [54]
    POE, New York, letter to SARAH ANNA LEWIS
    1848?.
    Written on Mrs. Lewis' MS. of "The Prisoner of Perote," 4 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 413-414.

  • [55]
    POE, Fordham, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1849 January 25.
    Copy by Annie Richmond. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 310. Text printed in Letters 2: 420-422. See Item 310.

  • [56]
    POE, Fordham, letter to ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell
    1849 February 19.
    Copy by Mrs. Richmond. 5 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 429-432. In an appended note, Mrs. Richmond explains to Ingram on 27 September 1876 Mr. Richmond's repudiation of the accusations made against Poe by the Locke family.

  • [57]
    POE, New York, letter to JOHN R. THOMPSON, Richmond
    1849 May 10.
    Copy by unidentified hand. 1 p.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 441.

  • [58]
    POE, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1849 June 26.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Text printed in Letters 2: 449-450.

  • [59]
    MARIA CLEMM, New York, letter to ANNIE RICHMOND
    1849 July 30.
    Copy by Ingram. 1 p.

    Tells of Poe's derangement (in Philadelphia ) and of his fancied pursuit by the police. Poe assured her that he never did anything disgraceful while deranged.

  • [60]
    MARIA CLEMM, New York, to ANNIE RICHMOND, Annisquam, MA
    1849 August 4.
    ALS. 3 pp.

    Writes of her extreme anxiety over Poe's long absence and silence.

  • [61]
    MARIA CLEMM, New York, to ANNIE RICHMOND
    1849 September 3.
    ALS. 1 p.

    Still in despair over Poe's long silence, Mrs. Clemm wants to borrow money from Mr. Richmond so that she can go in search of Poe.

  • [62]
    MARIA CLEMM, New York, to ANNIE RICHMOND
    1849 September 15.
    ALS. 1 p.

    Mrs. Clemm has received Mr. Richmond's letter with $5 enclosed. Tells of having received a letter from Poe in Richmond and of the temperance pledge he enclosed, which she now sends to Mrs. Richmond.

  • [63]
    POE, Richmond, letter to MARIA CLEMM
    1849 September 18.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 3 pp.

    Text printed in Letters 2: 461-462.

  • [64]
    JOSEPH W. WALKER, Baltimore, letter to DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS, Baltimore
    1849 October 3.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 360. Text printed in A. H. Quinn's Edgar Allan Poe, p. 638.

  • [65]
    POE'S OBITUARY. Written by SUSAN ARCHER TALLEY WEISS for the Richmond Republican
    1849 October 15.
    MS. Copy by Edward V. Valentine. 9 pp.
  • [66]
    MARIA CLEMM, Lowell, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1849 October 26.
    Copy by Ingram. 4 pp.

    Mrs. Clemm mentions Jane E. Locke, the Stanard family, General David Poe, Sr.

  • [67]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to MARIA CLEMM, Lowell
    1849 October 28.
    Copy by Amelia Poe. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 428. Mrs. Whitman expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Clemm's sorrow over Poe's death.

  • [68]
    MARIA CLEMM, Lowell, letter to NEILSON POE, Baltimore
    1849 November 1.
    Copy by William Hand Browne. 2 pp.

    Mrs. Clemm asks that Poe's trunk be forwarded to her in Lowell and insists that her right to Poe's possessions as well as the profits from his books are greater than are Rosalie Poe's. Remarks that Longfellow has paid her a sympathetic visit.

  • [69]
    POE'S "FOR ANNIE"
    1849.
    Facsimile of Poe's MS. 15 stanzas. 2 pp.

    Annie Richmond mailed this facsimile to Ingram on 14 January 1877. Poe had given the original to her, as the poem was printed in the Flag of Our Union and in the Home Journal.

  • [70]
    POE'S "FOR ANNIE"
    1849.
    Facsimile of 15 lines from Poe's MS. 1 p.

    Poe incorporated these lines into his poem "A Dream Within a Dream" and gave the original MS. to Annie Richmond.

  • [71]
    "THE LATE EDGAR ALLAN POE " -- letter from GEORGE R. GRAHAM to N. P. WILLIS, printed in "The Editor's Table," Graham's Magazine, 36 (March 1850): 224-226
    1850 February 2.
    Copy by Sarah Helen Whitman. 12 pp.
  • [72]
    MARIA CLEMM, Lowell, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1850 May 20.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Eveleth's last letter to Poe was forwarded to Mrs. Clemm from Richmond after his death. Says she has not received one dollar from the sales of Poe's works; asks Eveleth to sell a few sets of Griswold's edition for her; begs him to disregard all the evil things said about Poe. If Eveleth writes to her, she will tell him all about Poe. Graham's for March has the truth about him.

  • [73]
    MARIA CLEMM, Lowell, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1850 May 20.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Clemm is grateful and glad that Eveleth will try to sell some sets of Poe's works for her and that he does not believe all that he has heard against Poe. Will write that long letter promised.

  • [74]
    MARIA CLEMM, Lowell, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1850 June 8.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Unable at present to write that long letter about Poe.

  • [75]
    MARIA CLEMM, Lowell, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1850 September 24.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Clemm sends third volume of Poe's works. Says George R. Graham wrote her that he had a host of noble souls ready to refute the base exaggerations and vile misrepresentations Rufus Griswold has made against Poe. Admits there were times Poe was not conscious of what he wrote. Griswold has taken advantage of this.

  • [76]
    MARIA CLEMM, Milford, CT, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1852 November 7.
    Copy by Ingram. 4 pp.

    Mentions Jane E. Locke, the Stanard family, General David Poe.

  • [77]
    JOHN H. B. LATROBE, Baltimore, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1852 December 7.
    Copy by Eveleth. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Latrobe denies Griswold's statement that Poe won the Saturday Visiter prize only because his handwriting writing was legible. Describes the difficulty the Committee had in choosing a winning story from the rich contents of the "Tales of the Folio Club." When he met Poe after the prize was awarded, Latrobe was impressed by his eloquence and accuracy of minute detail in describing an imaginary voyage to the moon.

  • [78]
    SARAH ELMIRA ROYSTER SHELTON, Richmond, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1852 December 22.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Shelton still has a deep interest in Poe and the deepest respect for his memory. Believes him to have been misrepresented, but begs to be excused from communicating anything that would bring her before the public in any form whatever. Intends, when opportunity offers, to render some assistance to Mrs. Clemm.

  • [79]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, letter to MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON
    1853 February 9.
    Copy by Ingram. 2 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond laments the cruel suffering she has endured as a result of sharing her secrets and confidences with Mrs. Clemm.

  • [80]
    JOHN P. KENNEDY, Baltimore, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1853 April 13.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Kennedy agrees with Latrobe's statement about the manner in which the Baltimore Saturday Visiter prize was awarded to Poe. Lost sight of Poe after he left the Southern Literary Messenger. Kennedy heard stories that Poe was given to drink and dissipation; Thomas W. White told him that Poe could not be relied upon for work; and William E. Burton said the same.

  • [81]
    J. S. REDFIELD, New York, ALS to MARIA CLEMM
    1853 April 26.
    2 pp.

    Redfield forwards to her a Bible and a prayer book which cost $7. Asks if Mrs. Clemm has received copyright pay for English, French, and German editions of Poe's works.

  • [82]
    SARAH ANNA LEWIS, Brooklyn, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1854 January 3.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Lewis says Mrs. Clemm has been a member of her household for several months, that she knew much of Poe and that in her presence he was always the refined gentleman, scholar, and poet. Knows Griswold, too, and does not think he has consumption. Asks about John Neal's proposed critical survey of American literature. Denies that her name is Sarah Anna,although it was mistakenly printed so; it is Stella Anna, or Estelle Anna. Intends to place the remains of Poe and Virginia Poe in Greenwood Cemetery; this much done, their literary friends will probably erect a monument over their remains.

  • [83]
    SARAH ANNA LEWIS, Brooklyn, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1854 February 11.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Lewis does not believe that Poe was a drunkard or that he could have been a vulgar man, under any circumstances, but does not doubt that despair did sometimes drag him to the very verge of insanity. Poe dined with her at 3 p.m. and left at 5 p.m. for Richmond on 29 June 1849. She thinks she should see both Neal and Eveleth before they publish anything about Poe.

  • [84]
    ANNE C. LYNCH, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1854 March 8.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Miss Lynch's relations with Poe were superficial rather than intimate; in consequence of a wide difference between them over his treatment of another lady, saw very little of him the last two or three years of his life. Never saw him under the influence of wine.

  • [85]
    ANNE C. LYNCH, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1854 March 19.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. In society Poe had the bearing and manner of a gentleman: his conversation was interesting; his manner polite and engaging; he was elegant in his toilet; he was quiet and unpretentious, never abstracted or dreamy; and he would never have attracted attention but for his strikingly intellectual head and features which bore the unmistakable character of genius. Not intimate with Poe and not under the influence he exercised over many.

  • [86]
    SARAH ANNA LEWIS, Brooklyn, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1854 November 6.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Lewis saw Poe once or twice a month from January of 1847 until 29 June 1849. She freely admits having told Rufus Griswold that Poe had wanted him to become his editor, in case of his death, claiming that Poe had asked her to do it, for he had great confidence in Griswold's editorial ability. Poe and Griswold had become friends prior to Poe's departure for the South in June of 1849.

  • [87]
    ELIZABETH F. ELLET, New York, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1856 April 5.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Ellet writes that she has always understood that Poe, though a man of genius, was intemperate and subject to attacks of lunacy and that he was frequently in the asylum.

  • [88]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, Winnsboro, SC, AL to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1858 April 23.
    Fragment. 4 pp.

    Davidson writes that he is deeply interested in efforts to vindicate Poe's character. His own defense of him was printed in Russell's Magazine (November 1857). Comments on John R. Thompson's conversation about Poe with Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Offers a critical estimate of the truth in Harriet Beecher Stowe's book. Mrs. Whitman has written at the top of the letter a brief account of her own relationship to Davidson and of Davidson's relationship to Poe.

  • [89]
    MARIA CLEMM, Alexandria, VA, to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1859 April 14 & 22.
    Copies of extracts by Ingram. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 138. Poe family history and biographical notes about Edgar Poe.

  • [89-a]
    MARIA CLEMM, Alexandria, VA, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1859 April 14.
    Fragment in Ingram's hand. 2 pp.

    A variant of Item 89 with note appended by Mrs. Whitman on the persistence of Poe's love from Annie Richmond even were he to marry Mrs. Shelton.

  • [90]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, Columbia, SC, AL to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence
    1859 April 15.
    Fragment. 2 pp.

    Thinks Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie's letter about Poe seems to "get at" much that was poorly found by others before. Expresses enthusiasm over performance of singer Marietta Piccolomini.

  • [92]
    WILLIAM WERTENBAKER'S STATEMENT ABOUT POE
    1860 May 12.
    Copy by John Parker. 4 pp.

    In 1826 Dr. Socrates Maupin, Presiding Officer of the Faculty, directed William Wertenbaker to draw up this statement about Poe's scholarship and behavior at the University of Virginia in 1826. On 22 May 1860, Dr. Maupin appended a note to this statement attesting to its validity.

  • [93]
    MARIA CLEMM, Alexandria, VA, letter to NEILSON POE, Baltimore
    1860 August 19.
    Copy by Nathaniel Holmes Morison. 7 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 184. Biographical facts of Edgar's early life, description of his home life at Fordham, his work habits, his devotion to Virginia. Mrs. Clemm has heard that Edgar's grave is in the basement of the church in Baltimore, covered with rubbish and coal. Morison appends a note to Ingram denying the rumor about Poe's grave.

  • [94]
    MARIA CLEMM, Alexandria, VA, letter to NEILSON POE, Baltimore
    1860 August 26.
    Copy by Nathaniel Holmes Morison. 6 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 184. Edgar did not think it worth while during his lifetime to deny reports of his having travelled to Greece and Russia. After his death, Mrs. Clemm burned hundreds of letters written to him by literary ladies. Fearing poverty might induce her to accept Rufus Griswold's offer of $500 for the letters of a certain literary lady, she burned them, too. Other letters she gave to Griswold and now is unable to recover them from Griswold's executors. She has spent some time in Longfellow's house in Cambridge, MA, and he has recently asked for and received the last two of Poe's autographs that she had. Encloses two of Poe's letters to Neilson Poe, one written shortly before his death and the other written when Neilson offered to take Virginia into his home for several years.

  • [95]
    MARIA CLEMM, Putnam, CT, AL to ANNIE RICHMOND
    1861 June 29.
    Fragment. 1 p.

    Recalls that eleven years ago this day she looked upon her dear Eddie for the last time. Ingram corrects to read twelve years.

  • [96]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1864 December 15.
    Copy by Eveleth. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Whitman has proof that Rufus Griswold purposely falsified Poe's MSS. and notes about him. Has seen a note Griswold wrote to a New York friend in 1850: "I am getting on rapidly with my Life of Poe and am trying hard to do him justice, for Fanny's spirit looks down on me while I write." Griswold could not forgive Poe the interest he had inspired in Mrs. Frances Sargent Osgood. Mrs. Whitman has proof, too, from the University of Virginia that Poe was not expelled. He did not graduate simply because at that time the University conferred no degree. Poe had told her of his intention to write a pendant to his "Domain of Arnheim," and after his death, when she first saw "Landor's Cottage," she realized that he had introduced into it the delicate tints of the wallpaper he had noticed and praised in the room in which they had been sitting as they talked.

  • [97]
    "FAREWELL TO EARTH." Verses delivered by Miss Lizzie Doten, a trance speaker, in Clinton Hall, New York. Printed in Ryde Tracts, No. 3. 8 pp. "THE KINGDOM." A 6-stanza verse, taken from Poems from the Inner Life by Lizzie Doten
    1864.
    MS. copy by Ingram. 2 pp.

    Both verses were allegedly delivered by Poe's departed spirit.

  • [98]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1865 January 15.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. There was a strange spiritual energy or effluence which seemed to surround Poe, acting on those en report with him. At one time she and Poe simultaneously received impressions of the original identity of the names Power ( Sarah Helen Whitman's maiden name) and Poe.

  • [99]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1865 February 27.
    Copy by Eveleth. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Poe saw her one July midnight in 1845; later he sent her anonymously the poem beginning "I saw thee once --once only...." A partially obscured date on the torn fly-leaf of an old family Bible fixes Mrs. Whitman's birth date, very likely, as 19 January 1803.

  • [100]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1866 January 17.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Since she cannot live much longer, Mrs. Whitman wishes to put into Eveleth's hand a statement about one of Rufus Griswold's myths, a statement only once before put into writing and to but one person, Sallie E. Robins. Had she not wished her book about Poe to be entirely impersonal, she could long ago have refuted Griswold's story of Poe's riotous conduct at the house of a New England lady having made necessary the summoning of police. She writes a summary of Poe's visit to Providence during which he had to be cared for by a doctor at the home of William J. Pabodie.

  • [101]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1866 May 28.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Davidson is grateful Eveleth has said in his memoranda in the Old Guard for June that much of Griswold's Memoir of Poe is untrue.

  • [102]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Fairfield, IA, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1866 December 30.
    4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 141. If Mrs. Whitman is to be the memorist of either of the two forthcoming editions of Poe's works, Eveleth will furnish for her use Poe's "Rejoinder" to Thomas Dunn English, a letter about the Poe-English quarrel, and a statement about the conclusion of "Marie Roget" that Poe made to him.

  • [103]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1867 March 2.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Strangely, Mrs. Whitman has just seen a copy of the Round Table containing Eveleth's paragraph about Poe's "Marie Roget." Poe told her the fact Eveleth states [i.e., that the murderer had confessed] and said that the name of the young naval officer was Spencer.

  • [104]
    WILLIAM D. O'CONNOR, Washington, DC, AL to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1869 January.
    Fragment. 8 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 143. Walt Whitman is grateful for Mrs. Whitman's remarks relayed to him by O'Connor: "I kept back nothing of all you wrote, except one line, the one in which Jeannie Channing was reported as saying that W. W. loved me better than anyone living, which I guess is absurd and mistaken." Mentions Eugene Benson's article on Poe in the Galaxy, December 1868.

  • [105]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1869 February 8.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Maria Clemm said years ago that Poe was in Europe only once, with the John Allan s. Poe's brother was the one in the St. Petersburg affair, an episode Edgar Poe attributed to himself, a course in keeping with his mental bent. He cared not a button for the Greeks, and still less, if possible, for liberty.

  • [106]
    WILLIAM D. O'CONNOR, Washington, DC, AL to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1869 March 12.
    Fragment. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 143. "The personal interest Poe excites is due to his intellectual sincerity."

  • [107]
    " EDGAR A. POE, " by William Wertenbaker
    1869.
    MS. Facsimile. 3 pp.

    Wertenbaker's recollections of Poe's student days at the University of Virginia. Dr. J. F. Harrison, Chairman of the Faculty, appended a note dated 1 August 1874, attesting to the validity of this statement.

  • [108]
    THOMAS C. LATTO, New York, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1870 July 8.
    4 pp.

    Reports conversation with William Gowans, the secondhand book dealer who had boarded with Maria Clemm and the Poes in New York City : Poe "was uniformly quiet, reticent, gentlemanly in demeanor and during the whole period he lived there, not the slightest trace of intoxication or dissipation in the illustrious writer.... [Poe] kept good hours."

  • [109]
    THOMAS C. LATTO, New York, AL to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1870 December 1.
    2 pp.

    William Gowans is dead. Latto offers a tribute to Poe. A note appended by Mrs. Whitman suggests that it was through the publication of her poem "The Portrait" that Latto became acquainted with her.

  • [110]
    THOMAS C. LATTO, Brooklyn, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1871 May 15.
    Fragment. 4 pp.

    A New York Tribune article compares some of Charles Swinburne's irregularities to Poe's "demoniac eccentricities." "So long as C. F. Briggs & Tho[ma]s Dunn English are'to the fore,' any thing I could say here would be overborne by their vituperation, for I understand they are perfectly rabid on the subject of Poe's enormities & they are both connected with the New York press."

  • [111]
    WILLIAM D. O'CONNOR, Washington, DC, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1871 July 23.
    4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 143. "The July `Westminster' will have an extended review of [ Walt Whitman ], favorable! This will be anguish for his American detractors. After all their efforts, one of the great British Quarterlies comes out for him. Eheu!"

  • [112]
    WILLIAM D. O'CONNOR, Washington, DC, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1872 January 7.
    8 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 143. Mentions Walt Whitman's American Institute poem, his "Carol of Harvest," and "The Mystic Trumpeter," and he adds that there is an article in Harper's on Poe's lack of earnestness. Mrs. Whitman adds a note: "Article in Harper's Easy Chair praising Ellery Channing for his earnestness & saying that if Poe, who laughed at him was slipping out of sight it was for want of this very earnestness."

  • [113]
    Hand-written excerpts from three critical notices of Sarah Helen Whitman's Edgar Poe and His Critics
    1872 September 16.
    MSin Ingram's hand. 4 pp.
  • [114]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1872 November 26.
    Copy by Eveleth. 2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Davidson comments on Poe's Eureka. He and Mrs. Whitman think that Eveleth's chirography almost identical with Poe's, with less ego-personality. Richard Henry Stoddard's article in Harper's is very readable. Stoddard has written Davidson since the article was published that if he had not personally seen Poe he does not know that he should believe in his existence.

  • [115]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 January 13.
    9 pp.

    In reply to his first letter, dated 20 December 1873, Mrs. Whitman expresses her gratification at his efforts to write a truthful Memoir of Poe, offers her assistance, but fears he will find the facts of Poe's life so elusive, the dates so contradictory, the details so perverted by relentless enemies and injudicious friends that his task will be very difficult. Has given to Richard Henry Stoddard letters and documents which prove that Poe was not expelled from the University of Virginia and that he wrote his first "To Helen" in memory of the beloved mother of one of his schoolmates. In his article on Poe in Harper's Monthly for September 1872, Stoddard discredits both, quotes from her Edgar Poe and His Critics without acknowledgement, and now evades direct replies to her questions. Mrs. Whitman agrees with Ingram that "The Fire Fiend" is a forgery. Mentions: Thomas C. Clarke, William F. Gill's proposed lecture on Poe, William J. Pabodie's refutation in the New York Tribune of 7 June 1852, Rufus Griswold's charge that Poe committed outrages in the house of a New England lady on the eve of his marriage to her, and the coolness or estrangement which Poe said existed between himself and his sister Rosalie.

  • [116]
    EUGENE SCHUYLER, St. Petersburg, Russia, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 2.
    1 p.

    The Secretary of the U. S. Legation reports that a search of the Legation papers from 1820 to 1830 reveals no case involving Edgar A. Poe.

  • [117]
    ROBERT W. HALL, U. S. Military Academy, West Point, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 3.
    1 p.

    Academy records show that Poe was admitted as a cadet on 1 July 1830, was tried by a General Court-Martial during January 1831, and was dismissed from the Academy on 6 March of that year.

  • [118]
    EUGENE SCHUYLER, St. Petersburg, Russia, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 6.
    1 p.

    The books of the American Consulate have been searched and no record found of Edgar A. Poe having been detained in Russia.

  • [119]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 11.
    16 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman believes that Mrs. Clemm, not Poe, might have borrowed money from "a distinguished lady of South Carolina." Quotes from Poe's letter to her, 24 November 1848, explaining his conduct when Sarah Margaret Fuller and Anne C. Lynch (Botta) called on him to retrieve Frances S. Osgood's letters. Relates a visit she had from Professor Thomas Wyatt and all she knows of The Conchologist's First Book and Poe's part in it. Does not think Poe wrote "To Isadore," since he did not mark it in the two volumes of the Broadway Journal which he gave to her. Tells of James W. Davidson's attempts to clear Poe's name. George Eveleth is a loyal supporter of Poe and thinks Rufus Griswold fabricated the letter in which Poe is quoted as calling Eveleth "a Yankee impertinent," for Poe knew Eveleth was a Marylander and Griswold did not. Will try to recover from William F. Gill the printed account of William Gowans' recollections of Poe. Both John P. Kennedy and J. H. B.Latrobe have assured Eveleth that they and the Committee did not award the Baltimore Saturday Visiter prize to Poe for his tale under "anything like the circumstances" given by Griswold.

  • [120]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, New York, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 February 15.
    3 pp.

    Davidson offers help in getting books for Ingram. Graham's can be had at secondhand book dealers' shops. A book dealer has told him that he once had an English Grammar written by Poe. Mentions that he kept a personal diary during the Civil War and that all his books and memoranda were destroyed when General Sherman burned Columbia.

  • [121]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 16.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman tells Ingram that she is not able to place for publication advance sheets of his article on Poe. Discusses Richard Henry Stoddard's correspondence and attitude toward Poe. Menttions: Mrs. Elizabeth F. Ellet, Mr. and Mrs. Sylvanus D. Lewis, and the possibility of Rufus Griswold's having improperly reprinted Poe's articles on the New York literati.

  • [122]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 19.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman can have articles copied from American and English magazines for him. Offers to lend to him her two volumes of the Broadway Journal; if she dies soon, as she thinks she may, she will see to it that they are sent to him as a gift. Discusses her own poetry and remarks that her poem "Stanzas for Music" undoubtedly suggested "Annabel Lee" to Poe. Mentions: Horace Greeley, Whitelaw Reid, Poe's favorite compositions being listed on the flyleaf of one of the Broadway Journal volumes, and the Atlantic's hostility toward Poe. Encloses copies of "Sleeping Beauty" and "Cinderella," poems by Mrs. Whitman and her sister Anna Power.

  • [123]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 20.
    8 pp.

    History of the composition of Mrs. Whitman's poem "Stanzas for Music." Gives an account of Poe's exemplary conduct at the University of Virginia, as written by John Willis of Orange County, Virginia. Mentions: Hiram Fuller, John Savage, Maria Clemm, Thomas C. Clarke, William F. Gill's irresponsibility, and Richard Henry Stoddard's error in saying that Poe attended the University of Virginia in 1825.

  • [124]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 24.
    5 pp.

    William F. Gill cannot find William Gowans' printed recollections of Poe. Mrs. Whitman lent him also a letter from Rufus Griswold to herself, written in the autumn of 1849, which was full of virulence and bitterness against Mrs. Clemm who had told Griswold that all of Mrs. Whitman's letters had been returned to her. Francis Wharton and Moreton Stille, in A Treatise on Medical Jurisprudence (1855), cite Poe's "Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "The Mystery of Marie Roget" as remarkable illustrations of the value of inductive reasoning and regret the author's early death and the causes which diverted his genius from the serious branches of study.

  • [125]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 February 27.
    12 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman trusts Ingram "implicitly." She never spoke with Poe about his expedition to Greece. Quotes from a letter from Mrs. Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie written in 1859 to Mrs. Julia Deane Freeman in which she details John R. Thompson's stories about Poe's unhappy relations with the Allan family, his scandalous conduct in Richmond in 1848 and 1849, and his efforts to challenge John M. Daniel to a duel. Mrs. Clemm asked Mrs. Whitman for a sample of Poe's handwriting to give to Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton, who did not have a line of it.

  • [126]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 3.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman has sent two photographs of Poe to Ingram. She encloses William Gowans' recollections of Poe, just returned by William F. Gill. Mentions: John Savage's article on Poe in the Democratic Review, Hiram Fuller, Richard Henry Horne's Orion, Robert Browning's "Paracelsus," and James Clarence Mangan.

  • [127]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 4.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman encloses a photograph of Poe taken from the "Ultima Thule" daguerreotype. Comments on Poe's criticisms and critical abilities.

  • [128]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 6.
    4 pp.

    When Rufus Griswold visited Mrs. Whitman early in the summer of 1848, he appeared to be Poe's defender. Miss Anna Blackwell gave Mrs. Whitman the letter she had received from Poe. Miss Maria J. McIntosh had heard Poe say gratifying things about Mrs. Whitman. When Poe sent her the anonymous poem beginning "I saw thee once --once only," she replied, also anonymously, with six lines from her poem "A Night in August."

  • [129]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 10.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks Ingram's article on Poe in the London Mirror for February is admirable, but she offers a few a corrections. Mrs. Botta ( Anne C. Lynch ) is very much afraid of being socially compromised and likes to keep the peace with everyone. Mrs. Elizabeth F. Ellet still lives and would be implacable toward anyone who told the true story of her part in Poe's affairs. Poe's article on William Ellery Channing is not less amusing than true. Poe erred in calling him the son of the distinguished clergyman of the same name. He was his nephew.

  • [130]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, New York, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 March 11.
    4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 131. Mrs. Clemm told Davidson that Poe never left the United States after his boyhood trip to England.

  • [131]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 13.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman doubts the stories about Poe's having three wives and his mother having been a widow when she married David Poe. Poe himself told 1874 her that he had allowed the lines to Eliza to be republished as addressed to Frances S. Osgood. [Items 88, 90, 130 enclosed.]

  • [132]
    WILLIAM F. GILL, Boston, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 March 14.
    Copy by Mrs. Whitman. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 133. Gill asks Mrs. Whitman to write a personal sketch of Poe which will help him in the defense of Poe that he is composing.

  • [133]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 16.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks William F. Gill's ambition exceeds his ability. She compares daguerreotypes of Poe that were made in Providence, offers an account of how she wrote her poem "Lines to Arcturus," and expresses her feeling that "To Isadore" was not written by Poe. [Item 132 enclosed.]

  • [134]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 17.
    1 p.

    Mrs. Whitman will write for Ingram's private satisfaction only the story of her acquaintance and engagement to Poe.

  • [135]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 20.
    6 pp.

    If a book of her poems which she sent to Ingram had not been lost, Mrs. Whitman would send the two volumes of the Broadway Journal, which Ingram could keep until the breaking of "the seventh seal." She looks forward to death as the hour of triumph. She discusses Poe's relations with Mrs. Jane ("Helen") Stith Stanard, Mrs. Whitman's family's attitudes towards Poe, and her engagement to marry him. She mentions Henry T. Tuckerman and Richard Henry Stoddard, sends a German sketch of Poe and a translation of "The Raven" which has Poe's autograph, and again expresses her conviction that "To Isadore" was not written by Poe.

  • [136]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, AL to INGRAM
    1874 March 23.
    4 pp.

    Ingram must not use Poe's remarks about Mrs. Jane Stith Stanard in his letter to Mrs. Whitman of 1 October 1848, or publish any of her other letters from Poe during her lifetime. William F. Gill is writing a refutation of all the calumnies against Poe; yet he did not know that Mrs. Frances S. Osgood's reminiscences of Poe were to be found in Rufus Griswold's Memoir! She has written a peremptory letter to Gill asking for the return of her Poe biographical materials.

  • [137]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 27.
    12 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman discusses Poe's pencilled words in the Broadway Journal, the vivid and lifelike dreams said by him to have preceded his compositions, and daguerreotypes of Poe. John Willis said that Poe's room at the University of Virginia was covered with drawings. When William J. Pabodie died in 1870, he willed to her Poe's letter to him of 4 December 1848; she gave it to Thomas C. Latto who has now returned it to her for Ingram to have copied. Mrs. Whitman denies that Poe borrowed money from Elizabeth F. Ellet and urges Ingram to use caution in what he writes about the alleged incident. She writes of Poe's attitudes toward John Allan, the first and second Mrs. Allan, and his sister Rosalie. And she sends both volumes of the Broadway Journal to Ingram as a gift. Mentions: Marguerite St. Leon Loud, Maria Clemm, Frances S. Osgood, Evert A. Duyckinck, and Algernon Charles Swinburne's poetry. [Item 53 enclosed.]

  • [138]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 March 30.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman trusts Ingram's heart and intellect but fears his impetuosity in his work on Poe. Mrs. Maria Clemm had written that Poe was in Richmond only once after Virginia died. Tells the story of Poe's leaving out the last stanza of "Ulalume" when it was republished in the Providence Journal. Thinks Ingram's paper on Poe in the Temple Bar (June 1874) is very fine, but again she suggests corrections. Poe had no consumptive tendencies; he died unquestionably of inflammation of the brain. Mentions: Sarah Anna Lewis and Rosalie Poe. [Items 66 and 89 enclosed.]

  • [139]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, New York, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 March 31.
    2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 140. Davidson thinks Ingram's article on Poe in the Temple Bar will be fatal to Rufus Griswold.

  • [140]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 2 & 3.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman has never seen a ghost but once saw a beautiful luminous hand write for her three initials, which she still keeps. Retells Poe's story of his devotion to Jane ("Helen") Stith Stanard and of his lonely vigils at her grave. Thinks that Poe's "Lines to M. L. S." were addressed to Sarah Elmira Royster (Mrs. Shelton). Ingram may use for publication Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie's letter to Julia Deane Freeman. Quotes from Maunsell B. Field's book about Poe's lectures on the universe and his interview with Putnam about publishing it. Mentions: Winwood Reade's article on Charles Swinburne in the Galaxy (15 March 1857), Marguerite St. Leon Loud, the American Metropolitan Magazine, discrepancies in dates assigned for Poe's birth. [Item 139 enclosed.]

  • [141]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 7.
    7 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman cannot find old numbers of Graham's Magazine. Mentions James Parton's sketch of Poe in the New York Ledger. [Item 102 enclosed.]

  • [142]
    WILLIAM D. O'CONNOR, Washington, DC, AL to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 April 10.
    4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 144. Ingram's disclosures in his Temple Bar article are astounding. What a reprobate Rufus Griswold was!

  • [143]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 10.
    4 pp.

    William J. Pabodie committed suicide in 1870, just after inheriting $100,000 from his brother. William F. Gill is scheduled to give a special series of dramatic readings in Boston. Mrs. Whitman tells the story of having read "Ulalume" in the Whig Review in December 1847 and of how one day when she and Poe were in the Athenaeum Library, she asked him if he knew the author. He turned, took a bound volume of the magazine, and wrote his name beneath the printed poem. Nearly twenty-six years later, she again found the volume in the library stacks. Poe had then agreed with her that the poem would be better without its last stanza and had so prepared it for republication in the Providence Journal. Mentions William D. O'Connor's defense of Walt Whitman, The Good Grey Poet.

  • [144]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 14.
    4 pp.

    After meeting Walt Whitman when he visited the Channings in Providence, Mrs. Whitman has overcome somewhat her repugnance for his writings, but she has torn out a third of the volume of his poems that he gave to her. A deadly enemy wrote the notice of Poe in Allibone's Dictionary. Discusses paintings and photographs of herself. Mentions: Cephas G. Thompson, Thomas C. Latto, and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

  • [145]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 17 & 21.
    10 pp.

    Poe autographs are very rare. Mrs. Whitman is unable to point out any letter in Rufus Griswold's Memoir of Poe as authentic. Though she has reason to believe many of them are not, it is difficult to prove. Cuts the Preface and Index from her autographed copy of Poe's The Raven and Other Poems and encloses them to Ingram. William E. Burton has been dead many years. Mrs. Whitman relates her visit to the Poe cottage in 1856. Miss Anna Blackwell boarded at the cottage for several weeks in 1847. Mentions: Poe's reading of "The Raven" at one of Anne Lynch's (Mrs. Botta) soirees, James T. Fields, Thomas C. Latto, Phoebe Cary and Alice Cary, Mary R. Mitford, Rosalie Poe, and Clarence Mangan.

  • [146]
    WILLIAM D. O'CONNOR, Washington, DC, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 April 23?.
    8 pp.

    Could Mrs. Whitman not edit a new and complete edition of Poe's works? Mrs. Whitman commented on the margin: "Could I not discover the longitude or square of the circle!!!" O'Connor expresses his faith in Ingram.

  • [147]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 24.
    6 pp.

    The mournful heritage of madness in Ingram's household creates a closer bond of sympathy between him and Mrs. Whitman, for she has long been subservient to the fluctuating moods of her dear sister, Anna, whose insanity compels her to lead a life of comparative seclusion, or to have all social relations obstructed and complicated. Mrs. Whitman describes William D. O'Connor's personality and official situation in Washington, D. C., Poe's having made two versions of the last line of "Annabel Lee," the identity of M. L. S., and "Landor's Cottage" as a pendant to Poe's "The Domain of Arnheim."

  • [148]
    ROSALIE POE, Epiphany Church Home, Washington, DC, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 April 28.
    5 pp.

    Rosalie Poe did not know she had a brother or brothers until a few years before Edgar's death and can give Ingram no information about him. Begs for money to relieve her destitution.

  • [149]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 May 1.
    9 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman worries about Ingram's mental and emotional disturbances over his work on Poe. Maria Clemm told Sarah Anna Lewis that Poe had written "Annabel Lee" for her, and Frances S. Osgood was openly scornful at the idea. Mrs. Whitman has no doubt her own "Stanzas for Music" called forth Poe's poem as an expression to her of undying love and remembrance. She relates in detail the painful scenes in her home when she parted from Poe. Mentions: James W. Davidson, William J. Pabodie, John Nelson Arnold, and Anna Blackwell.

  • [150]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 May 4.
    3 pp.

    Senator William Sprague's sister, Mary Anna (Mrs. Frank W. Latham ), has found two volumes of Graham's Magazine, and the March 1850 number carries the longsought letter of George R. Graham to N. P. Willis in defense of Poe! Mrs. Whitman will copy it "verbatim" for Ingram if not allowed to cut it from the magazine. Also, in this volume are two articles by Thomas A. Wyatt, of Conchology fame.

  • [151]
    REV. GEORGE W. POWELL, Baltimore, ALS to JAMES W. DAVIDSON
    1874 May 5.
    4 pp.

    Powell describes Rosalie Poe's destitute condition, her lack of mental ability, Neilson Poe's want of interest in her, and Edgar Poe's grave being level with the ground.

  • [152]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 May 6.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman encloses MS. copy of George R. Graham's 1850 letter to N. P. Willis. When Thomas C. Clarke came to see her in New York City in 1859, he and Graham rode together on the omnibus; Graham was much pleased over Mrs. Whitman's defense of Poe.

  • [153]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 May 11.
    12 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman encloses copies of excerpts from Eugene Benson's article, "Poe and Hawthorne," from the Galaxy, December 1868. She hopes that Ingram can obtain Sarah Anna Lewis' permission to use a reproduction of her daguerreotype of Poe in his forthcoming edition of Poe's works. Why does not Mrs. Lewis like Maria Clemm ? "Annabel Lee" is an expression of Poe's remembrance of Mrs. Whitman. Mentions: Frances S. Osgood and Poe, Poe's habit of writing only short letters, Richard Henry Stoddard, George W. Eveleth, Poe's contributions to Graham's Magazine in the January-July 1842 volume, and woodcuts of the University of Virginia in Harper's for May 1872.

  • [154]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 May 14.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman is glad to give the two volumes of the Broadway Journal to Ingram; her copies of the 1845 edition of Poe's poems and of Eureka are to be his, too. She offers to share a lock of Poe's hair with Ingram. The palpable forgery "MS. Found in a Barn" demonstrates the interest still evoked by Poe's name. Poe's friends have declined George W. Childs' offer to erect a monument over Poe's grave.

  • [155]
    DENIS DONOHOE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 May 15.
    3 pp.

    Official from the British Consulate writes that the Reverend George W. Powell of Baltimore is willing to answer questions about Rosalie Poe and that Powell believes that if he had time to do so, he could put his hands upon "many" unpublished letters of Poe. Laments the disgraceful condition of Poe's grave.

  • [156]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 June 2.
    6 pp.

    Anna Blackwell described to Mrs. Whitman the interior of the Poe cottage, the two parlor tables made by Poe and covered with green baize held with brass-headed nails. Jane E. Locke visited the Poe cottage in June 1848. Frances S. Osgood was not a true friend of Poe if she did endorse Rufus Griswold's estimate of his intercourse with "men." Mrs. Whitman has been told that Maria Clemm professed to believe Rosalie was the child of the nurse who had charge of her in her infancy. Mrs. Clemm did not inspire Mrs. Whitman with confidence in her sincerity, but she did love Poe and Virginia, and Poe believed in her, at least. Mentions: Sarah Anna Lewis, Elizabeth F. Ellet, Ingram's sickness and her own, George W. Eveleth and the "continuation" of "The Mystery of Marie Roget," George W. Powell, and Rosalie Poe.

  • [157]
    NATHANIEL HOLMES MORISON, Provost of Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 June 6.
    3 pp.

    Neilson Poe is a lawyer and any information he might give about Edgar will be authentic. John P. Kennedy's letters from Poe will come to the Peabody Institute upon Mrs. Kennedy's death.

  • [158]
    ROSALIE POE, Washington, DC, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 June 9.
    2 pp.

    Rosalie begs Ingram for financial help. She encloses a clipping from a Boston newspaper which will confirm her destitution.

  • [159]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 June 16.
    3 pp.

    Ingram has been sick in London and Mrs. Whitman in Providence. This note is simply to keep lines of communication open.

  • [160]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 June 30.
    11 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman does not wonder that Sarah Anna Lewis thought Poe "an angel." Despite his irregularities, Mrs. Whitman always felt that he was essentially noble, gentle, and good. George W. Eveleth writes that Poe said he meant "The Mystery of Marie Roget" to mystify the reader. Mrs. Whitman has written to John Neal. She knows "by instinct" that Poe was descended from the Le Poers. Her relatives thought that Mrs. Whitman's father strongly resembled George Poe of Georgetown. She agrees that Ingram was appointed for his Poe work; he is equipped to be Poe's champion as no other ever was or could be. She has only five copies of Edgar Poe and His Critics left. Mentions: Ingram's article on Poe's early poems in Every Saturday, James W. Davidson, Reverend George W. Powell.

  • [161]
    JOHN NEAL, Portland, ME, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 July 6.
    2 pp.

    Neal cannot remember when or where his defense of Poe was published. A note from Mrs. Whitman on the back of this letter accompanies a newspaper clipping announcing the death of Samuel Masury, Providence daguerreotypist.

  • [162]
    EMMA C. DODD, Ramsgate, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 July 6.
    3 pp.

    Gives Ingram permission to have her house in Stoke Newington photographed for his work. There have been many changes in it since her father took it.

  • [163]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 July 21.
    10 pp.

    William D. O'Connor thinks Ingram's article in the August Eclectic, from the Temple Bar, not savage enough on Rufus Griswold. Three Baltimore editors are roused by the renewed interest in Poe. Mrs. Whitman has just seen for the first time a copy of the 1831 edition of Poe's poems, recently purchased by Caleb Harris, who clearly recalls having seen an allusion to a volume of poems called Tamerlane and published in Boston. She offers a critical estimate of James Hannay's edition of Poe's poems (London, 1853). She reports that Caleb Harris's consternation over her having cut the pages from Poe's presentation copy of his 1845 edition of poems has caused her to promise to give him the book when Ingram returns the leaves. Mrs. Whitman concludes cryptically that if she "had never seen Poe intoxicated, [she would] never have consented to marry him; had he kept his promise never again to taste wine, [she would] never have broken the engagement." Mentions: article by M. J. Lamb in Appleton's Journal, 18 July 1874, about Poe's house at Fordham; Leslie Stephen's disparaging remarks about Poe and praise of Nathaniel Hawthorne in Fraser; William F. Gill, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Neilson Poe, bad illustrations in Redfield's edition of Poe's works; and articles in St. Paul's (November and December 1873) by Roden Noel on Byron; Poe's detractors being greatly stirred in Baltimore.

  • [164]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 July 27.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman encloses newsclippings received from William D. O'Connor about Rosalie Poe's death in Washington, DC. She thinks that Ingram's efforts to raise money for her must have cheered her last moments.

  • [165]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 July 31.
    10 pp.

    Maria Clemm never mentioned Rosalie Poe in any of her letters to Mrs. Whitman. She relates an account of an evening spent with Phoebe Cary and Alice Cary and comments upon Mary Clemmer Ames' book about them. Mentions: Poe's popularity in Germany, James W. Davidson, Colonel Gamaliel Lyman Dwight, Bret Harte, George Poe.

  • [166]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 August 7.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman's young friend, Rose Peckham, leaves Providence to study art in Paris and will call upon Ingram in London. Thomas C. Latto has received his autograph Poe letter returned by Ingram.

  • [167]
    JAMES F. HARRISON, University of Virginia, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 August 10.
    2 pp.

    Poe was a great favorite among his classmates and was remarkable for the quickness with which he prepared all his recitations.

  • [168]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 August 18.
    10 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman believes in the stars and the great truths of the occult sciences. She once made an anagram of her name, Sarah Helen Poer : "Ah Seraph Lenore." To have heard Poe read "Ulalume" or "The Bridal Ballad" is a never-to-be-forgotten memory. She is enjoying this summer beyond any in her life; she has unmistakable "tokens" of the presence of loved ones ever near. Mentions: illustrations in various editions of Poe's works, Rufus Griswold and Elizabeth F. Ellet, Griswold's marriage, an article on Poe in the Southern Magazine for August, William F. Gill's lecturing, publication of Gill's The Martyred Church, and Gill's fear that Mrs. Whitman will think he has plagiarized one of her poems from her translation of Ludwig Uhland's "Lost Church."

  • [169]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 August 24.
    5 pp.

    Browne defends Poe's character, attacks Rufus Griswold and James Russell Lowell vehemently for their treatment of Poe, tells Ingram the story of drugging and cooping of voters in Baltimore, and offers to assist Ingram in Poe's defence.

  • [170]
    COLONEL GAMALIEL LYMAN DWIGHT, Providence, ALS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1874 August 27.
    2 pp.

    Donaldson, an aeronaut, has tried and proved Poe's theory of "staying" a balloon in mid-air. Mrs. Whitman notes on the back of this letter that Washington Harrison Donaldson was engaged by P. T. Barnum to make thirty successive balloon ascensions to determine the wind, in view of an ocean balloon voyage to be undertaken.

  • [171]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 September 28.
    4 pp.

    Valentine describes Poe's personal appearance. He has a portion of a Poe MS. given to him by John R. Thompson. Valentine is now busy modeling a recumbent marble figure of General Robert E. Lee. When time permits, he will perhaps model a bust of Poe from a daguerreotype.

  • [172]
    SARAH HELEN POER (WHITMAN), Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 September 29 and 30; October 1.
    10 pp.

    A woman's married name is not to be used in evolving anagrams that reveal the secrets of her destiny. Mrs. Whitman is delighted to learn from Ingram that his name means "Son of the Raven." She thinks her Edgar Poe and His Critics will be better understood later as revealing one dominant phase of Poe's genius. William F. Gill is disturbed that Ingram's Memoir will take the wind out of his sails, and Mrs. Whitman believes Gill already has too much wind for his amount of ballast on board. She did not recognize Rufus Griswold when she met him briefly at Alice Cary's home in New York ; his appearance was much altered, and he turned away in confusion. Gill claims to have got from George R. Graham much fresh information that is damaging to Griswold and says that he has a magazine article prepared that is very strong against Griswold. Mrs. Whitman directs Ingram to destroy or keep anything she sends to him, unless she expressly requests its return. Mentions: Rose Peckham, Ingram's advice about a new edition of Edgar Poe and His Critics, John M. Daniel's powerful and graphic delineation of Poe, Jean-Baptiste-Louis Gresset's Vert-Vert, Jane (Helen) Stith Stanard, Elizabeth F. Ellet, Richard Henry Stoddard's secret hostility to Poe, and William Wertenbaker's refutation of stories about Poe's dissolute habits and expulsion from the University of Virginia.

  • [173]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1874 September 30.
    Copy by Eveleth. 1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Whitman comments upon reproductions of photographs of Poe in Harper's taken from engravings.

  • [174]
    EUGENE L. DIDIER, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 October 1.
    3 pp., with 1 p. note by Ingram.

    Didier knows almost certainly where Poe was in 1831, 1832, and 1833. He has information about Poe's brother, about Poe's family in Baltimore, and about Poe in Richmond and at the University of Virginia. He knows the exact date and place of Poe's birth and has in his possession a copy of a MS. poem by Poe never printed. Didier offers to sell all this to Ingram for $100.

  • [175]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 October 22.
    4 pp.

    Caleb Harris will send his copy of the 1831 edition of Poe's poems for Ingram's use. Mrs. Whitman will inquire about Edward Coote Pinckney's poems.

  • [176]
    " EDGAR A. POE, " by JOHN NEAL
    1874 October 30.
    MS in Neal's hand? 3 pp.2 copies.

    Neal recalls his associations with Poe, including a copy of Poe's letter to him of 4 June 1840. Text in Letters 1: 137.

  • [177]
    DENIS DONOHOE, British Consulate, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 October 30.
    1 p.

    Donohoe has given Ingram's letter to Reverend George W. Powell and declines to be of further assistance in Ingram's quest for information.

  • [178]
    REV. GEORGE W. POWELL, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 October 31.
    1 p.

    Poe did not die drunk, as the world believes.

  • [179]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 6.
    6 pp.

    The New York Tribune has a long notice of Ingram's forthcoming edition of Poe's works. Caleb Fiske Harris "feels sure" there was an 1827 edition of Poe's poems, and he thinks Richard Henry Stoddard's article in the Aldine on Poe was written with malicious intent. Colonel Gamaliel Lyman Dwight reports from Germany that students there pour over Poe's works. George Ripley noticed Mrs. Whitman's poems in the Tribune, 14 November 1853.

  • [180]
    J. HEWETT KEY, University, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 6.
    3 pp.

    Key has no recollection of Poe's having attended his class in mathematics at the University of Virginia. Professor George Blaettermann is dead. Professor George Long is alive and hearty.

  • [181]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to Ingram
    1874 November 13.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman has received the first volume of Ingram's edition of Poe's works and thinks the Memoir cannot fail to refute Rufus Griswold's fabrications. John Nelson Arnold, the artist, admires the reproduction of Poe's portrait. Senator Henry Bowen Anthony, who knew Poe, thinks the portrait fine.

  • [182]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 24.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman suggests a few changes and offers gentle criticisms of Ingram's Memoir of Poe. She gives a character sketch of William J. Pabodie.

  • [183]
    MARY GOVE NICHOLS, Malvern, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 24.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Nichols identifies "M.L.S." as the former Marie Louise Shew, now the wife of Dr. Ronald S. Houghton. William E. Burton and George R. Graham are dead. She will tell Ingram many things about Poe that she does not care to write.

  • [184]
    NATHANIEL HOLMES MORISON, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 27.
    24 pp.

    Morison encloses copies of Maria Clemm's letters to Neilson Poe. Nathan C. Brooks still lives in Baltimore. Poe's father was disowned by his family because he married an actress. Neilson Poe planned in 1860 to write a Memoir of Edgar but never wrote anything. He has told Morison that a single glass of wine would set Edgar's brain on fire, that he took care of Edgar in his last sickness, had him suitably buried, and ordered a tombstone that was destroyed by a railroad car that jumped the track, that Poe's brother, William Henry, was even more a genius than Edgar, that it was William Henry who went to Greece and Russia and got into trouble, not Edgar, and that Edgar and Virginia were first married in Christ's Church in Baltimore by the Reverend John Johns. Though the true story of Edgar's death has never been told, Neilson might not be willing to tell it. In her letters to Neilson, Mrs. Clemm denies that Edgar was ever unfaithful to Virginia and that he attempted to seduce the second Mrs. Allan.

  • [185]
    MARY GOVE NICHOLS, Malvern, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 28.
    4 pp.

    Maria Clemm's maternal love and fidelity to Poe cannot be questioned. Letter mentions: Marie Louise Shew (Mrs. Houghton), Sarah J. Hale, Anne Lynch Botta, William E. Burton, and John Brougham.

  • [186]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 November 30; December 4.
    9 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman offers criticisms of Ingram's Memoir by both Caleb Fiske Harris and herself. Hon. John Russell Bartlett, when a partner in the publishing firm of Bartlett and Welford, lived on the same street as Poe in New York. He never saw Poe stimulated by anything other than strong coffee, which he drank freely. Frances S. Osgood was an intimate friend of the Bartletts, and Poe often visited them when she was staying in their home. Poe told Mrs. Whitman that he was born on 19 January, but did not give the year.

  • [187]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 December 10.
    2 pp.

    Valentine continues his search for Poe biographical materials. Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton is disinclined to help, but he will try to get Dr. Richard C. Ambler and Thomas Bolling to write out their recollections of Poe. Valentine has a life-size crayon drawing of Poe's head made from a daguerreotype. Mentions Ebenezer Burling.

  • [188]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1874 December 15.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman has broken off relations with Elizabeth Oakes Smith and believes Mrs. Smith relied on her imagination for the "facts" in her sketch of Poe. Mrs. Whitman remembers Mary Gove Nichols and her novel Mary Lindsey [Mary Lyndon]. She is glad to know that Poe's "M.L.S." was Marie Louise Shew (Mrs. Houghton). Dr. Abraham H. Okie, who met Poe at Mrs. Whitman's home, thinks Ingram's portrait good but not so handsome as Poe was. John Russell Bartlett has given her his partner Welford's address; he might furnish new information. Mentions: Anna Blackwell, Anne Lynch Botta, Dr. Max E. Lazarus, and hotels in Providence where Poe stayed.

  • [189]
    RICHARD HENRY STODDARD, New York, APCS to JAMES W. DAVIDSON
    ca. 1874.

    The revised edition of Rufus Griswold's Poets of America gives Frederick W. Thomas' death as 1864.

  • [190]
    PORTION OF A MEMOIR OF POE
    ca. 1874.
    MS., in Ingram's hand, not discernible. Facsimile. 18 pp.
  • [191]
    MONCURE DANIEL CONWAY, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1874? December 25.
    4 pp.

    Conway's cousin, John M. Daniel, had an article in the Southern Literary Messenger on Poe's death. Poe was generally looked upon as "a hard case," for he borrowed sums of money that he knew he could not repay; in such matters he had no principle.

  • [192]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 January 4.
    14 pp.

    Caleb Fiske Harris found in New York a copy of the 1829 edition of Poe's poems and hired a copyist to make a list of the contents which Mrs. Whitman copies and encloses to Ingram. Samuel Kettell's Specimens of American Poetry proves there was an 1827 edition also. Richard Henry Stoddard's Revised Memoir of Poe contains an account of Poe's having bought and charged to John Allan seventeen broadcloth coats. Maria Clemm's assertions in reference to Longfellow should be taken cum grano. Mrs. Whitman wishes Ingram's Memoir of Poe had been less personal. Perhaps she will eventually entrust to Ingram all of her letters from Poe.

  • [193]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 January 7.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman criticizes Mary Gove Nichols' reminiscences of Poe which Ingram has reprinted in part: there was no restlessness in his movements or features, a calmness of eye and gesture, self-control and poise, yes. Richard Henry Stoddard's new edition of Poe's poems are not complete, since he has omitted the first "To Helen." "For Annie" was written after Poe had succumbed to temptation in Lowell, MA, and had been nursed by Annie Richmond ; the poem was first published in a Boston paper in 1849. Rufus Griswold's reported offer of $500 for a certain lady's correspondence with Poe can be accounted for because it often has been said that Maria Clemm left a letter from Frances S. Osgood where it could be seen by a visitor. Mrs. Whitman encloses a parody of "The Bells" which she assumes to be "a fling" at Stoddard's "Grecian Flute."

  • [194]
    E. DORA HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 January 9.
    4 pp.

    Miss Houghton's mother is willing to help Ingram by pointing out false statements in Rufus Griswold's Memoir. Maria Clemm lived in their household until the publication of Poe's works by Griswold gave her support. She encloses as a gift Poe's letter to Marie Louise Shew (Mrs. Houghton), dated 29 January 1847 [Item 32].

  • [195]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 January 15.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman points out errors in Maria Clemm's letters to Neilson Poe. Poe's Tamerlane is listed in Samuel Kettell's Specimens of American Poetry; there is an article on The Conchologist's First Book in the Home Journal. William F. Gill says that George R. Graham is alive; Ingram says that he is dead. Caleb Fiske Harris lists four books published by Sarah Anna Lewis and signed with three versions of her name.

  • [196]
    ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH, Hollywood, NC, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 January 18.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Oakes Smith's thirty-page sketch of Poe amounts to an analysis of his mentality. She met Rufus Griswold and accused him of having scalped Poe and taken his life. Poe had a warm attachment to Eliza White and was to have married her. He did not "claim" Virginia as his wife for two years after they were married. She mentions Sarah Margaret Fuller.

  • [197]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 January 23 and February 16.
    46 pp.

    Mrs. Houghton encloses Poe's letter to her uncle, Hiram Barney, ca. 1847. She diagnosed Poe's sickness as lesion of the brain which produced insanity when stimulated; Dr. Valentine Mott confirmed this. Poe dictated to her incidents of his past, including a part of a poem to her called "The Beloved Physician," which he later finished and she bought for $25. She offered to pay Rufus Griswold to change his Memoir of Poe, leaving her watch and diamond bracelet with him as security; he later said that the book would sell best as it was and that Longfellow and Maria Clemm approved of it or were reconciled to it. Later, Mrs. Clemm sold the bracelet, returned to her by Griswold, for $300 (though this is difficult to believe because it was worth $500), and tried to find Mrs. Houghton in order to return the watch. Poe "often" said that he had never prospered by "honest" writing because "when he wrote a really honest criticism of any author or work, he made himself enemies either from the publishers or the authors." He once predicted that Longfellow would coldly stab his reputation after his death. Poe showed anger when Mrs. Clemm called on Griswold and accepted favors from him. Mrs. Houghton bought Virginia Poe's coffin, grave clothes, and Edgar's mourning suit. After Virginia's death, she persuaded a gentleman to start a collection for Poe and Mrs. Clemm; General Winfield Scott contributed $5. She has found a copy of Poe's Tales published by Wiley and Putnam in 1845 and will send it and a copy of The Raven and Other Poems if Ingram wishes her to do so. She tells the stories of Poe's writing "The Bells" at her house, of Virginia Poe giving to her a portrait of Poe (since stolen) and a little jewel case that belonged to his mother, and of the miniature of Poe's mother which he possessed being saved at the hospital when he died. Poe never asked Griswold for money, but Mrs. Clemm did. Mrs. Houghton told Poe that he must find a woman strong enough and fond enough of him to manage his affairs or he faced sudden death. She saw Poe intoxicated only once, after he had dined with Griswold; he was not given to drink until madness had begun from other causes; and he was "not a sensualist in his mature manhood." She has the MSS. of "To Mrs. M.L.S." and the valentine to Marie Louise. Poe's old military cloak was used to cover Virginia during her last sickness, and Poe wore it to her funeral. She dislikes Sarah Anna Lewis.

  • [198]
    MARY GOVE NICHOLS, Malvern, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 February 3.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Nichols urges Ingram to do justice to Maria Clemm in his biography of Poe. Mentions John Neal.

  • [199]
    MARY GOVE NICHOLS, Malvern, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 February 4.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Nichols suggests corrections for Ingram's Memoir. Poe's sacrifice of his literary conscience in praising Sarah Anna Lewis' poems was justified by his gratitude for favors received from her. Poe asked Rufus Griswold to be literary executor. She will write her recollections of Poe for Ingram's use.

  • [200]
    JOHN PARKER, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 February 8.
    3 pp.

    The Poe family in Baltimore is now influential. Neilson Poe is said to have important documents about Edgar. A monument is to be erected over Poe's grave.

  • [201]
    REVEREND JOHN HENRY HOPKINS, JR., Plattsburg, NY, ALS to MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON
    1875 February 9.
    4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 197. Hopkins tried to persuade Poe in 1848 to omit pantheistic elements from his Eureka, but Poe refused, saying, "My whole nature utterly revolts at the idea that there is any Being in the Universe superior to myself!" He and Dr. Roland S. Houghton on one occasion found Poe "crazy-drunk" and took him home to Fordham, leaving $5 with Maria Clemm for immediate necessities. Poe thought that the Jesuit fathers at Fordham College were highly cultivated gentlemen and scholars because they smoked, drank, and played cards like gentlemen and never said a word about religion.

  • [202]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 February 14.
    12 pp.

    Anna Blackwell, not Elizabeth, boarded with Maria Clemm at Fordham to rest from her literary labors, the cottage having been recommended by Mary Gove Nichols, who headed a water-cure establishment in New York. It was Anna, who seems not to have been friendly to Poe, who gave Mrs. Whitman Poe's letter to her of 14 June 1848. Mrs. Whitman is certain that Ingram printed nothing without her implied authority. Mentions: articles in the Examiner, the Saturday Review, the Spectator; William F. Gill's blunders with the Poe materials he received from Mrs. Whitman; Richard Henry Stoddard's Philobiblion article on Poe; another in Hearth and Home by A. B. Harris.

  • [203]
    ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH, Hollywood, NC, ALS toINGRAM
    1875 February 25.
    2 pp.

    Poe was chameleon-like, taking on his coloring from those about him. Mrs. Oakes Smith encloses her thirty-page sketch of Poe.

  • [204]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 March 9.
    4 pp.

    A friend has dissuaded Caleb Fiske Harris from paying $50 for the 1829 edition of Poe's poems. Harris will send his copy of the 1831 edition to Ingram within a fortnight.

  • [205]
    MARY GOVE NICHOLS, Malvern, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 March 10.
    3 pp.

    Marie Louise Barney married first Dr. Joel Shew, then Dr. Roland Houghton. Poe went intoxicated to Sarah Helen Whitman's home, followed by a crowd of boys, which caused his engagement to her to be broken. Mrs. Whitman took money from her mother to pay his way out of town.

  • [206]
    REVEREND JOHN HENRY HOPKINS, Plattsburg, NY, ALS to MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON
    1875 March 10.
    2 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 226. Hopkins remembers Thomas Dunn English as a scoundrel. He has written Dr. Caleb Sprague Henry, editor of the New York Review, to inquire about Poe's connection with that publication.

  • [207]
    CALEB S. HENRY, Stamford, CT, ALS to REVEREND JOHN HENRY HOPKINS
    1875 March 13.
    1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 226. Poe never was "engaged as a writer on the New York Review"; he contributed one article on his own account.

  • [208]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 March 26.
    4 pp.

    Caleb Fiske Harris has sent Ingram his copy of the 1831 edition of Poe's poems. Edmund Gosse's criticism of Poe's poetry in the Examiner (27 January 1875) is presumptuous; he would appreciate "Ulalume" if he understood its weird symbolism. Mentions: Ingram's article in the International Review and the Athenaeum's notice of his edition of Poe's works.

  • [209]
    E. DORA HOUGHTON, The Chestnuts, Whitestone, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 March 26 and 29.
    4 pp.

    Mary Star was loyal to Poe and Maria Clemm, but Poe spoke of her with scorn as being married to a merchant-tailor and content with her lot.

  • [210]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 March 28.
    10 pp.

    Because everyone knew who it was Poe had praised so extravagantly in "To M. L. S--," Mrs. Houghton did not want him to publish "The Beloved Physician." Rufus Griswold wanted it at one time, and if he got it he must have suppressed it out of enmity to her. Mrs. Houghton encloses MSS. of "To Marie Louise" and another valentine Poe sent to her "a year" later. The day before she died, Virginia Poe took a worn letter from her portfolio, written by the second Mrs. Allan, in which she acknowledged that she alone had been responsible for John Allan's neglect of Poe because she thought Poe really might be blood kin to Allan. Griswold must have gotten this letter along with Poe's other papers. She has found in a vase some leaves from the journal she kept while Poe was sick. Poe laughed at the perplexity people showed over the identity of the persons to whom his poems were written.

  • [211]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 March 30.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman does not object to her book Edgar Poe and His Critics being called her "finest poem." She cautions Ingram to keep cool and not to provoke a fight with Richard Henry Stoddard. Last week's Nation has critical reviews of both Ingram's and Stoddard's Memoirs of Poe. John Russell Bartlett has made a copy of Anna Blackwell's letter from Poe; Mrs. Whitman will copy it verbatim for Ingram [Item 33]. Maria Clemm did not mention Marie Louise Shew Houghton to Mrs. Whitman.

  • [212]
    THOMAS LOW NICHOLS, Malvern, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 3.
    3 pp.

    Nichols returns Richard Henry Stoddard's book which he thinks a shabby and nasty biography.

  • [213]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 3.
    18 pp.

    Poe was mortified over Maria Clemm's accepting money from Sarah Anna Lewis, which obliged him to praise her verse in print; he fled the house to escape her. He had a bundle of his mother's letters and two sketches, one of Boston harbor, 1808; Mrs. Clemm gave them to Rosalie Poe. Poe's estimate of John Henry Hopkins was wrong. Mrs. Clemm dressed very plainly, lectured her hostess, and worshiped the world; had she not covered over many things, many charitable persons in New York would willingly have helped save Poe. Mrs. Houghton has a picture very like the side view she had copied of Elizabeth Poe. Poe carefully wrote into Mrs. Houghton's album the verse "Like All True Souls of Noble Birth," sent to her by Mary Gove Nichols. She has two of Poe's letters to her. He always treated her with respect, but he was "so excentric [sic] and so unlike others" that she was forced "to define a position I was bound to take." A man named Jones came to her house recently asking to buy Poe biographical materials. She encloses a letter from Annie Richmond to her in which Mrs. Clemm is described as treacherous and cruel.

  • [214]
    ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH, Hollywood, NC, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 7.
    8 pp.

    Poe suffered from "mental isolation, living in dreams and bewildered by the real." He saw nothing wrong in his fulsome praise of Sarah Anna Lewis's poetry, since he was indebted to her. Maria Clemm engineered his marriage to Virginia to keep him from marrying Eliza White, who was capricious and addicted to morphia; but to Poe women were no more than a dream. He appeared to be faithful to Virginia during her lifetime. Rufus Griswold said that Poe left a bushel basket of letters addressed to him by women. He, Griswold, returned Elizabeth F. Ellet's letters to her. Thomas W. White distrusted Poe and was irritated by him. It was said that Poe had tried to seduce his stepmother, the second Mrs. Allan.

  • [215]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 9.
    12 pp.

    John Henry Hopkins has returned forty pages of her journal which contain Poe's accounts of having been wounded in a duel in a foreign port, of having written a sensational novel called "Life of an Artist at Home and Abroad," which was later credited to Eugene Sue, and a poem called "Humanity," credited to George Sand, and of having been nursed by a Scottish lady to whom he wrote a poem entitled "Holy Eyes." He wrote "The Beloved Physician" two months after Virginia's death. Poe said that his brother was a dashing cavalier with more of the Poe nature than he himself had. Mrs. Houghton is suspicious and antagonistic toward Sarah Anna Lewis.

  • [216]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 14.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman finds Ingram's article on the philosophy of handwriting very piquant and entertaining; his article on Poe in the March International will live while Poe's memory endures. She remarks that Ingram has found Mary Gove Nichols "fanciful."

  • [217]
    GEORGE LONG, Porterfield, Chichester, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 15.
    4 pp.

    Long, Professor of Ancient Languages at the University of Virginia in 1826, vaguely remembers Poe as being "not among the worst and among the best" students. He remarks on the faculty-student trouble during the first year of the University. Mentions: William Wertenbaker, Robert M. T. Hunter, Henry Tutwiler, and Gessner Harrison.

  • [218]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 ca. April 15.
    12 pp.

    Mrs. Houghton has sent copies of his works that Poe gave her. The miniature of his mother was left in his satchel on the Baltimore train. She had copied this miniature on ivory, and that copy is now in the possession of one of her children. Poe once attended church services with her. During the first part he followed the service and sang the psalms, but he became excited and rushed out. At the end of the service he reappeared. After that, he called on Dr. William Augustus Muhlenberg, the pastor. Mrs. Houghton offers to give Sarah Helen Whitman the jewel case that had belonged to Poe's mother.

  • [219]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 April 27.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks Ingram's article on Poe in the Civil Service Review, ca. 1 April 1875, tears Richard Henry Stoddard's Memoir of Poe to shreds, but she fears it will cause trouble, since Stoddard controls the New York Tribune. She feels, too, that Ingram has brought her too openly in conflict with Stoddard. The two parodies of "The Bells" were by different writers. Letter encloses Item 603, a tribute to the late Colonel Gamaliel Lyman Dwight.

  • [220]
    JOHN PRENTISS POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 1.
    6 pp.

    Responds to Ingram's interest in Poe genealogy. Poe says that there is no good reason to suppose that Edgar was descended from the De La Poers. Poe's brother was said to be a poet of genius. Maria Clemm was married only once. Virginia Clemm was born in Baltimore on 13 August 1822 and married Edgar on 16 March 1836.

  • [221]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Flushing, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 2 and 3.
    7 pp.

    Mrs. Houghton has sent Ingram a daguerreotype of Poe and a note from Poe to Virginia. She is moving from Flushing to Whitestone, Long Island.

  • [222]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 4.
    4 pp.

    Valentine declines either to give or to post Ingram's letter to Mrs. John Allan because the subject of Edgar is disagreeable to her. She has stated that she saw Poe only once or twice and that she did not know him when he called at the Allan house. Ingram's letter to Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton has been left where it can be sent to her.

  • [223]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 7.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks that Elizabeth Oakes Smith's story about Eliza White is without foundation. Paulina Davis told Mrs. Whitman of Marie Louise Shew Houghton's admirably appointed water-cure establishment in upper New York. She suggests that Ingram consider carefully before reprinting the copies of Poe's letters sent by Mrs. Houghton because they lack his characteristic style.

  • [224]
    JOHN NEAL, Portland, ME, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 10.
    4 pp.

    Neal has given away his Poe autographed letters. He either never knew or has forgotten that Poe dedicated his Tamerlane to him. He wrote the first praise Poe received in a notice in the Yankee in September 1829 and wrote another notice in December quoting selected lines from Poe's poems.

  • [225]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 11.
    5 pp.

    William F. Gill has sent Mrs. Whitman a revised edition of his Lotos Leaves containing his article on Poe. She urges caution in Ingram's accepting as Poe's all that is sent to him as unpublished writings, especially "copies." Something about the reported poem "The Beloved Physician" is "not quite... vraisemblable." Mentions: unfavorable criticism of Ingram's Memoir in the Nation; Mary Gove Nichols being imaginative; Caleb Fiske Harris having sent to Ingram both the 1829 and the 1845 editions of Poe's poems; Anna Blackwell witnessing spiritualistic phenomena in the presence of Hume; Ingram's remark that George R. Graham's letters have replaced Rufus Griswold's Memoir in a new American edition of Poe's works.

  • [226]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Whitestone, NY, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 16.
    16 pp.

    Ingram is not to let the Poe family know that he has the miniature of Elizabeth Poe and is to try to get the one Poe had with him when he died. Maria Clemm burned a package of Mrs. Houghton's letters to Poe. Poe spent a year abroad and never betrayed his whereabouts to anyone. Only Virginia knew how he got the scar on his left shoulder. Mrs. Clemm used Mrs. Houghton only when she needed protection and money. It was Mary Gove Nichols who sent her to visit the Poe family. Friends wondered that she was not afraid of Poe. Poe's cat ("Caterina") seemed to be possessed; it would not eat when he was absent and was found dead when Mrs. Clemm returned to Fordham for her last load of boxes. Mrs. Houghton says that she had promised Virginia Poe that she would listen patiently to Poe's lamentation, and Mrs. Clemm reproved her for indulging Poe in his fancies. Mentions: Sarah Anna Lewis being old and ugly, David Poe's faithfulness to his wife, Poe's belief that he owed his gifts of intellect and heart to his mother, and his statement that he had burned the sweetest poem he ever wrote in order to conciliate Mrs. Clemm and his father's family.

  • [227]
    JOHN PARKER, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 17.
    4 pp.

    Professor J. A. Anthony says that Thomas Wyatt paid Poe for the use of his name as author of a book on conchology because he had been unable to sell his original book on the subject. Francis B. Davidge edited the Baltimore Minerva between 1830 and 1835. Eugene L. Didier of Baltimore is collecting materials and writing about Poe.

  • [228]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 18.
    4 pp.

    Valentine encloses an extract of a letter from Dr. Richard Carey Ambler of Richmond who swam with Poe in Shockoe Creek. Poe wrote a satire in verse on a debating society. Rosalie Poe gave a likeness of Poe to Dr. Claude Baxley. There was trouble between Poe and Thomas W. White about copy for the Southern Literary Messenger.

  • [229]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 May 27.
    6 pp.

    Ingram has been invited to the semi-centennial celebration of the University of Virginia. Marie Louise Shew Houghton has written to Mrs. Whitman protesting Ingram's crediting Sarah Anna Lewis with service which Mrs. Houghton had performed for the Poe family; Mrs. Whitman does not like the tone of the letter and thinks the "Rival Queens" might get Ingram into trouble. Mentions: Maria Clemm's long visits in the homes of the Lewis family and of Mrs. Houghton, Mrs. Mary Higgins Macready's claim that she received "The Fire Fiend" from Mrs. Clemm as an unpublished poem by Poe, and Ingram's review of Henry Curwen's Sorrow and Song.

  • [230]
    OSSIAN E. DODGE, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 June 1.
    2 pp.

    Dodge offers to show Ingram a daguerreotype of Poe.

  • [231]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, AL to INGRAM
    1875 June 2.
    Fragment. 6 pp.

    Samuel Stillman Osgood's portrait of Poe created the false impression of weakness in his mouth and chin. Richard Henry Stoddard's article about Poe's mendacity was in the Aldine in the spring of 1873. Mrs. Whitman quotes from Stoddard's letter to her apologizing for appearing to have discredited her statements in Edgar Poe and His Critics. She does not wish to be drawn into a conflict with him. Mrs. Whitman has received another letter from Marie Louise Shew Houghton in which she makes "rash charges" against Maria Clemm and Sarah Anna Lewis. William F. Gill has asserted that he furnished Ingram with facts for his Memoir of Poe.

  • [232]
    MARIE LOUISE SHEW HOUGHTON, Whitestone, NY, AL to INGRAM
    1875 June 7.
    Fragment. 3 pp.

    Mrs. Houghton thinks the MS. of "The Beloved Physician" is in a desk in Pierrepont Manor, 300 miles away. Her son Henry says that Poe cut it down to nine stanzas for publication. She promises the MS. of the poem and a letter in which Poe mentions it for Ingram's use in his Memoir of Poe.

  • [233]
    ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH, Hollywood, NC, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 June 8.
    6 pp.

    Rufus Griswold's last years were without dignity or happiness. Alice Cary, Mary E. Hewitt, and Mary Bean championed him; Sarah Anna Lewis, Ann S. Stephens, and Elizabeth F. Ellet pursued him with malice. Poe lived unhappily with Mrs. Lewis for a part of one summer. He was not a lover in the common sense, for his feelings toward women were totally of an ideal kind. Mentions: Mary Gove Nichols, Eliza White, and Sarah Helen Whitman.

  • [234]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 June 25.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman is pleased that Ingram is to visit the United States in the autumn. Jane E. Locke has been dead for many years; Poe was her guest in Lowell in the autumn of 1848, and it was she who introduced him to Annie Richmond. Anne Lynch Botta is eminently practical, enterprising, prudent, circumspect, and cautious.

  • [235]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 June.
    4 pp.

    Edward V. Valentine's recumbent statue of General Lee has been unveiled, and the public schools in Baltimore plan to erect a monument to Poe. Maria Clemm was one of those gentle, childlike, weak women whom you could not help loving but losing all patience with. However, a Southerner, remembering the war, must not speak ill of a Southern woman, for what they endured is beyond belief.

  • [236]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 July 2.
    12 pp.

    Valentine copies for Ingram a long account, almost certainly the joint work of Mrs. Ellis and Mary Jane Poitiaux Dixon of Richmond, which states that Poe's mother died in 1813, casts doubt upon Rosalie Poe's legitimacy, and claims that Poe was a mischievous youth, that he ran up debts in Charlottesville for champagne and broadcloth coats which he later gambled away, and that he attempted to force his way into John Allan's sickroom. Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton was engaged to marry Poe in 1849, and she gave him money to bear his expenses to Baltimore. Valentine repeats a rumor that Elizabeth Poe died in a poorhouse. He also sends a copy of her obituary in the Richmond Enquirer, 10 December 1811.

  • [237]
    MARY JANE POITIAUX DIXON, Richmond, to MESSRS. EDITORS
    1875 July 2.
    MS. 6 pp.

    As a youth Poe wrote doggerel lines and was adept in athletic sports. He told her on his last visit to Richmond that he had written "The Raven" while on the verge of delirium tremens. He had been alternately petted and punished in his early life.

  • [238]
    JOHN PARKER, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 July 7.
    6 pp.

    Professor J. A. Anthony has learned that for the abridgment of The Conchologist's First Book the name of "some irresponsible person" was needed whom it would be idle to sue for damages. Poe was selected and paid for the use of his name.

  • [239]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 July 20.
    6 pp.

    Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton is reported to be denying that she was either engaged to marry Poe or that she wore mourning after his death. Thomas Bolling of Nelson County, VA, has written that Poe was an excellent athlete, that he used his fine talent for drawing by filling the space in his dormitory room at the University of Virginia and by copying a life-sized drawing of Byron on the ceiling, and that he also had a habit of listening to a conversation and dividing his mind by writing sense on a different subject. Copies of Al Aaraaf were on sale in a Richmond bookstore.

  • [240]
    JOHN PARKER, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 July 28.
    3 pp.

    William Gilmore Simms' novel Beauchampe was based on an account of an actual execution found in Lewis Collins' History of Kentucky (Covington, 1874) 1: 32.

  • [241]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 August 10.
    10 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman discusses daguerreotypes of Poe made in Providence in 1848. She understands that Ingram has discouraged her from detailing for him any more of her personal experiences with Poe because she does not wish them to be published. She assures Ingram that she is profoundly interested in his work and that she has genuine personal sympathy and affectionate regard for him. Mentions: Richard Henry Stoddard as the author of those "dastardly articles" in the Round Table, the MS. of the second "To Helen" that she had sent to Professor Joseph Rhodes Buchanan for a psychometric reading, an article on Poe in the British Quarterly for July, and how she is sometimes "very anxious" to escape "this fever called living."

  • [242]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to INGRAM. Note appended to INGRAM from ROSE PECKHAM, dated 15 August.
    1875 August 13.
    Copy by Ingram. 2 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks that the article on Poe in the British Quarterly is the best critique on his life and genius that she has seen, and she anxiously inquires the name of the author. [Dr. Alexander Hay Japp had written the article.] Mrs. Whitman expresses her doubt of the good will of Poe's relatives. Ingram adds a note: "Original to Dr. Japp, 2/3/80."

  • [243]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 August 17.
    4 pp.

    Browne asks whether Alfred, Lord Tennyson would write a poem or a few verses for reading at the ceremony when Poe's monument is unveiled. Poe loved Virginia and was faithful to her, although his dangerous power over women subjected him to great temptations. Rufus Griswold married for money, divorced, and remarried, but the decree of divorce was reversed, and he was sued for bigamy, but he died before the suit came to trial. Poe's criticism of Richard Henry Horne's Orion was careless and full of errors.

  • [244]
    ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH, Hollywood, NC, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 September 8.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Oakes Smith requests the return of her MS. article on Poe. She says that Elizabeth F. Ellet, who is not to be trusted, gave Sarah Anna Lewis "a blighting name." Mentions Mrs. Lewis' drama Sappho.

  • [245]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 September 28.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks that Eugene L. Didier's publication of "Alone" in Scribner's for September, as a facsimile of a poem by Poe, an audacious forgery, although the poem itself might be readily accepted as genuine. [See Item 611.] She discusses at length Francis Gerry Fairfield's article on Poe, "A Mad Man of Letters," in Scribner's for October. Mrs. Whitman shares Ingram's lack of confidence in Neilson Poe. Mentions: William F. Gill, Richard Henry Stoddard, Thomas C. Clarke.

  • [246]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 1.
    2 pp.

    Valentine has seen that day a daguerreotype of Poe which possibly had belonged to Rosalie Poe. He encloses some blades of grass from Poe's grave and will give Ingram a cane when he visits Richmond.

  • [247]
    JOHN PRENTISS POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 2.
    3 pp.

    John Poe is unable to answer Ingram's questions about Edgar Poe and the persons connected with him. There is no prospect of recovering verses by Poe's brother, William Henry Leonard Poe, which were said to have great merit.

  • [248]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 5.
    8 pp.

    William Hand Browne believes that all Americans owe Ingram a debt of gratitude for the disinterested zeal he has shown in clearing Poe's memory from the fiendish malice of Rufus Griswold and his followers. Mrs. Whitman's article in reply to Francis Gerry Fairfield's which claimed that Poe suffered from cerebral epilepsy will soon be printed in the New York Tribune, according to the editor, Whitelaw Reid. She thinks that Richard Henry Stoddard has a purchase on the Tribune. Mrs. Whitman comments upon William J. Widdleton's willingness to preface his next edition of Poe's poems with Ingram's Memoir, upon J. S. Redfield's 1858 edition of Poe's poems, followed by the small Blue and Gold edition, having an "Original Memoir" which claimed that "Annabel Lee" was addressed to Mrs. Whitman, and upon Dr. George B. Porteous, who lectured on Poe to raise money for Rosalie, having drowned near Brooklyn under somewhat mysterious circumstances.

  • [249]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 12.
    10 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman discusses at length Francis Gerry Fairfield's article on Poe as a madman that was published in Scribner's. She is surprised to learn that William F. Gill has published, garbled and without her authority, versions of Poe's letters she loaned to him. Mentions: Rufus Griswold, Chauncy Burr, and gross insinuations that were made regarding Poe's relations with Maria Clemm.

  • [250]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 14.
    1 p.

    Susan Archer Talley Weiss and Mr. Tyler of Richmond promise to give Valentine their recollections of Poe. It was at the home of the latter that Poe took tea the night he joined the Shockoe Hill Division of the Sons of Temperance.

  • [251]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 22.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman's article in reply to Francis Gerry Fairfield has been endorsed in the New York Tribune on 18 October by Drs. Abraham H. Okie and Frederick K. Marvin. She mentions William F. Gill's articles about Poe in his volumes Lotos Leaves and Laurel Leaves.

  • [252]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 25.
    18 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks that Elizabeth Oakes Smith is very imaginative and that her article on Poe in Beadle's Monthly for March 1867 is of no value. She relates stories of Poe's meeting and visiting Jane E. Locke and Annie Richmond in Lowell, MA, and of her own association with Mrs. Locke. She gives a lengthy account of Poe's urging her to an immediate marriage, of his taking laudanum and his ensuing illness, and of his return to Providence and the prolonged distressing scenes at her mother's house. She discusses the daguerreotype of Poe made in Providence after a night of wild excesses.

  • [253]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, letter to PROFESSOR JOSEPH RHODES BUCHANAN, Louisville, KY.
    1875 October 25.
    Copy by Mrs. Whitman. 2 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman requests the return of the MS. of Poe's second "To Helen," which was submitted to him by Eliab Wilkinson Capron in the summer of 1855 or 1856 for a psychometric reading.

  • [254]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 October 28.
    3 pp.

    Poe's views in Eureka are supported in a recent paper by Richard Anthony Proctor, "Leverrier's Balance." Colonel John Thomas Scharf is sending Ingram a copy of his Chronicles of Baltimore.

  • [255]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 1.
    8 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman hopes she may live to receive Stephane Mallarme's promised copy of Le Corbeau; she will present it to the Providence Athenaeum Library when she dies, and there it will be embalmed forever. Everyone thinks she "used up" Francis Gerry Fairfield in her published reply to his article about Poe having cerebral epilepsy. She has been invited to attend the ceremonies at the unveiling of Poe's monument in Baltimore or to send something to be read on that occasion. William F. Gill is to be the orator at the ceremonies. Marie Louise Shew was married to Dr. Roland Houghton in November 1850.

  • [256]
    SARA SIGOURNEY RICE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 1.
    3 pp.

    A monument has been placed over Poe's grave. Miss Rice will send newspaper accounts of the scheduled unveiling ceremonies. These courtesies are in recognition of Ingram's edition of Poe's works.

  • [257]
    OSSIAN E. DODGE, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 7.
    2 pp.

    Dodge grants Ingram permission to use his daguerreotype of Poe when and how he pleases.

  • [258]
    JOHN NEAL, Portland, ME, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 17.
    2 pp.

    Neal does not remember the "Stylus" and is unable to verify dates for Ingram.

  • [259]
    JAMES JOCELYN POE, Nenagh, Ireland, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 17.
    4 pp.

    J. J. Poe gives Ingram genealogical information about the Poe family in Ireland and inquires about the American branch, particularly Edgar Poe's immediate family.

  • [260]
    SARA SIGOURNEY RICE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 ca. November 17.
    3 pp.

    Miss Rice asks Ingram's permission to use his Memoir of Poe to preface the proposed memorial volume of the dedication ceremonies to be held at the unveiling of Poe's monument.

  • [261]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 20.
    12 pp.

    Valentine encloses five pages of notes he took the day before as Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton gave him an account of her early engagement to Poe and of their last meeting in Richmond. She denied that she was engaged to marry Poe or that she wore mourning for him.

  • [262]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 20.
    11 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman copies for Ingram John S. Hart's published letter in the New York Tribune, 17 November 1875, in which he relates the histories of the publication in Sartain's Magazine of "The Bells" and "Annabel Lee." She praises William Winter's poem that was read at the Poe monument unveiling ceremonies. Poe had spoken to her of Sarah J. Hale's kindness and liberality to him; Mrs. Hale had published some of Mrs. Whitman's early poems in The Ladies' Wreath in 1837. As her death approaches, Mrs. Whitman feels less sensitive about her personal relations with Poe being revealed and is now willing to copy for Ingram or to show to him if he comes to America the letters from Poe which she has held back. Professor Joseph Rhodes Buchanan has replied that he cannot find her MS. of Poe's second "To Helen"; he thought he had returned it to her.

  • [263]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 22.
    4 pp.

    Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton has told Valentine that Ebenezer Burling was a youthful friend of Poe, that there was a "partial understanding," but no engagement, between her and Poe when he left Richmond in 1849, that Poe drew beautifully, once sketching a likeness of her in a few minutes, and that he was fond of music.

  • [264]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, APCS to INGRAM
    1875 November 26.

    Mrs. Whitman is sending Ingram newsclippings from New York and Baltimore papers about the Poe monument dedication ceremonies. Sylvanus D. Lewis is not accurate in his remarks about Maria Clemm living in his home from 1849 to 1856, for she spent several of those years with Marie Louise Shew Houghton and Annie Richmond.

  • [265]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 November 30.
    4 pp.

    William F. Gill's part in the Poe monument ceremonies consisted only in his reciting "The Raven." Annie Richmond is still alive. Mrs. Whitman offers corrections for Ingram's quotation in his International Review article concerning the lines Poe had pencilled about the second "To Helen" in the margin of her copy of his Broadway Journal.

  • [266]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, fragment of a letter to GEORGE W. EVELETH
    1875 November 30.
    Copy by Eveleth. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Mrs. Whitman learned from Sallie E. Robins of Ohio that Poe was born in 1809; this information has come from Dr. Socrates Maupin and William Wertenbaker of the University of Virginia. Maria Clemm had once written to Mrs. Whitman that Poe could never remember dates and had to apply to her; it is possible that it was she who told him he was two years younger than he imagined, for Poe would not consciously have misrepresented his age. The portrait of Poe in Richard Henry Stoddard's article in Harper's does not resemble either of the two daguerreotypes of him that were taken in Providence. Mrs. Whitman shares George W. Eveleth's doubt that Poe "habitually" resorted to intoxicating liquors. She thinks that Ingram admits too much in his references to this subject and that he will see "occasion" to qualify his statements.

  • [267]
    HENRY TUTWILER, Green Springs, AL, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 3.
    4 pp.

    Tutwiler knew Poe at the University of Virginia as belonging to a set of wild and dissipated students. He encloses extracts from a letter from Robert M. T. Hunter to him in which Hunter wrote on 20 May 1875 that Poe's habits were bad when he worked on the Southern Literary Messenger and that he was reckless about money and drinking, although not in the habit of drinking constantly. Hunter remembers that Poe gave strict attention to metre and quantity in Professor George Long's class at the University.

  • [268]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 3.
    4 pp.

    Dr. John J. Moran's recently published account of Poe's last moments should be taken with a considerable modicum of salt. Browne relates memories of jokes Poe's eccentric uncle played on a volunteer company of Germans in Baltimore. James W. Alnutt of Baltimore, who knew Poe intimately, says that he was without doubt cooped, drugged, voted, and then turned loose to die.

  • [269]
    JAMES JOCELYN POE, Nenagh, Ireland, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 4.
    2 pp.

    J. J. Poe appreciates the genealogical information Ingram has sent him about the American branch of the Poe family.

  • [270]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 7.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman has received Ingram's valuable paper on Poe's "Politian" published in the London Magazine. Harper's Weekly (dated 11 December, though issued 7 December) has a copy of a daguerreotype of Poe taken ten days before his death. It is the best Mrs. Whitman has seen because it has more of his habitual and characteristic expression than any other. William D. O'Connor, who has an affectionate interest in Ingram and his proposed biography of Poe, still intends to "pitch into" Francis Gerry Fairfield himself and has given Mrs. Whitman an intensely amusing account of William F. Gill's reciting "The Raven" at the Poe monument dedication ceremonies. Mrs. Whitman encloses a newsclipping story about Poe's mother having been a daughter of Benedict Arnold, who was a kinsman of Mrs. Whitman's maternal grandmother, Mary Arnold Wilkinson.

  • [271]
    JOHN PARKER, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 13.
    7 pp.

    Parker furnishes Ingram with details of William L. Didier's having published a facsimile of a poem entitled "Alone," which he claims was written by Poe. [See Item 611.]

  • [272]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 14.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman returns Ingram's paper on Francis Gerry Fairfield's article about Poe, which the New York Tribune has refused to print.

  • [273]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 21.
    4 pp.

    Because Richard Henry Stoddard keeps silent after Ingram's attacks, Mrs. Whitman suggests that now is a good time for Ingram to say publicly that Samuel Kettell's Specimens of American Poetry does list Tamerlane and Other Poems, undoubtedly Poe's suppressed volume of 1827.

  • [274]
    WILLIAM J. WIDDLETON, New York, letter to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1875 December 26.
    Copy by Mrs. Whitman. 1 p.

    Edgar Allan Poe : A Memorial Volume is dedicated to Mrs. Whitman because Ingram's Memoir of Poe which prefixes it was dedicated to her.

  • [275]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1875 December 28.
    6 pp.

    William J. Widdleton has inserted in his publisher's preparatory notice to the volume about the Poe memorial ceremonies a statement that "a considerable portion" of Ingram's Memoir reprinted there was "gathered" from materials previously used by William F. Gill in his lecture written in 1873. Sara S. Rice has written Mrs. Whitman that it was at his own request that Gill read or recited "The Raven" at the Baltimore ceremonies.

  • [276]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    ca. 1875.
    1 p.

    An acquaintance recalls an old-fashioned chest in his home which contained chatty, smart, entertaining letters from the Allan s and Miss Nancy Valentine written from London to Edward Valentine's mother. There was much in these letters about Edgar Poe, and the friend will try to find if these letters survive.

  • [277]
    "AU TOMBEAU D'EDGAR POE," MS. poem by STEPHENE MALLARME
    ca. 1875.
    1 p.

    This is possibly the poem Mallarme sent to Sarah Helen Whitman.

  • [278]
    " EDGAR A. POE, " MS. extracts from JAMES W. DAVIDSON'S article in Russell's Magazine, November 1875
    ca. 1875.
    Copy by Davidson. 4 pp.
  • [279]
    JAMES W. DAVIDSON, ALS to INGRAM
    ca. 1875.
    2 pp.

    Evert Duyckinck wrote on 25 January 1875 that his acquaintance with Poe was almost entirely a business-literary one and that he always found Poe to be a polished, courteous gentleman, refined and fastidious in his manner. Davidson encloses to Ingram a one-page biographical sketch of Park Benjamin.

  • [280]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 January 4.
    8 pp.

    Elizabeth Oakes Smith seemed to credit the story of Poe's mother being a daughter of Benedict Arnold when she told it to Mrs. Whitman while they were on a trip to the mountains in 1858. Mrs. Whitman is glad to know that Ingram has heard from Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton. William F. Gill has published portions of letters from Poe to Mrs. Whitman in the Daily Graphic. Sara S. Rice has confided that Gill persuaded President William Elliot, Jr., to allow him to read "The Raven" at the Poe monument dedication ceremonies.

  • [281]
    J. W. VORNER, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 January 31.
    3 pp.

    Vorner is pleased to report that Ingram's four volumes of Poe's works will be placed in the Philadelphia Exhibition, as requested.

  • [282]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 February 1.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman is profoundly grieved and surprised at the tone of Ingram's letter of 13 January. She denies that she was in any way responsible for William F. Gill's published claim that Ingram was indebted to him for materials he used in his Memoir of Poe; she has given nothing to Gill since Ingram's first letter to her in 1873. William J. Widdleton possibly had pecuniary reasons for inserting the statement. Mrs. Whitman reminds Ingram that she warned him how difficult his task would be and repeatedly urged him to curb his impetuous spirit and not to believe every new story or to resent every suspected wrong or insult. Although Ingram now has decided to wipe his hands of all Northerners and to give up his work on Poe, Mrs. Whitman will not cease to care for his prosperity and success in any new literary enterprise to which he may devote his genius and talents. The Scribner's facsimile poem published by Eugene L. Didier was written in the album of Lucy Holmes Balderston, the wife of Judge Isaiah Balderston. [See Item 611.]

  • [283]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 February 13.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman "had no idea" that her criticisms of Ingram's publications wounded his "feelings" or transgressed "the critical license" he had invited. Poe was not a Sir Galahad, but his faults were not of a nature to alienate her love and loyalty. She believes she has dealt fairly with both William F. Gill and Ingram. The latter's remark that his Southern correspondents were strictly honorable in answering questions only when they were certain implies that his Northern correspondents willfully misled him. Is this so?

  • [284]
    HENRY L. WILLIAMS, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 February 20.
    2 pp.

    George R. Graham was ousted from his business by his two clerks and died a "low `bummer." [Graham, in fact, died in 1894.]

  • [285]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 February 29.
    7 pp.

    Having read William F. Gill's "Reply" to Ingram's "Disclaimer," Mrs. Whitman is not so surprised at the aggressive tone of Ingram's last two letters to her. She quotes praise of his work written by William D. O'Connor to Sara S. Rice. Mrs. Whitman copies for Ingram her letter to Gill of 26 February 1876, in which she informed Gill that she read his "Reply" with "regret & amazement" and that she thinks he should have abandoned his untenable claim that Ingram had used materials about Poe which had been "assigned" to Gill. She reprimanded Gill for having invited false inferences by quoting incorrectly from letters to her from Poe.

  • [286]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 March 7.
    4 pp.

    William F. Gill's evasive answer to her letter of 26 February now matters little because his creditors, having consented to accept thirteen cents on the dollar, have learned that he withheld $60,000 of his assets, and they intend to hold him to strict account. The publisher's pamphlet in which Gill inserted his "Reply" to Ingram has little circulation, and if Gill returns to the charge against her of having violated the international copyright law, she will meet him herself.

  • [287]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 March 17.
    3 pp.

    Browne and Sara S. Rice plan to use a daguerreotype of Poe taken in Richmond and never before printed as the frontispiece of the memorial volume of the Poe monument dedication ceremonies which is now being prepared.

  • [288]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 March 24.
    8 pp.

    William J. Widdleton has recently issued a new volume of Poe's poems, using as an Introduction William F. Gill's Lotos Leaves article; and Elizabeth Oakes Smith has republished a portion of her article on Poe in the Home Journal, Wednesday, 15 March, in which she repeats her charge of Poe's insincerity and mentions his "myriad little loves." Poe admired Ross Wallace's poetry. Mrs. Whitman assures Ingram that she has been "perfectly sincere" with him "about Gill," that she has never wavered in her loyalty to him "as a trusted friend," and that she has never spoken of him and his work on Poe in any way other than that in which he would have liked. Mrs. Whitman is glad that Ingram found "Siope."

  • [289]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 April 7.
    6 pp.

    Ingram's "Rejoinder" to William F. Gill's "Reply" punishes Gill for using material Mrs. Whitman had expressly forbidden him to publish and for not submitting to her the MS. of his Lotos Leaves article. Mrs. Whitman alludes to Ingram's having found a copy of Poe's Tamerlane and his plans to publish an article on the suppressed poems. Caleb Fiske Harris will pay more than any other purchaser if the owner of the copy will sell. A scandalous paragraph attributed to Elizabeth Oakes Smith is going the rounds of the press saying that Poe's death was caused by a beating he received from the friend of a woman whom he had deceived and betrayed. Mrs. Whitman urges Ingram to ask Mrs. Smith to confirm or to deny this story.

  • [290]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 April 18.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman is very anxious to know on what authority Ingram says that Poe's second "To Helen" was first published in Sartain's Union Magazine and not Graham's Magazine. Professor William Whitman Bailey, who knew Richard Henry Stoddard when he was editor of the Aldine, presented Mrs. Whitman with a spray of arbutus, and she encloses a copy of the poem she wrote to him to show her gratitude. Bailey shares her and Ingram's opinions of Stoddard's unquestionable hatred of Poe. Mrs. Whitman believes that George Parsons Lathrop is in league with Poe's enemies and has taken opportunity to assail Poe behind "the flimsy mantle" of Francis Gerry Fairfield.

  • [291]
    GEORGE PERRY, New York, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 April 27.
    4 pp.

    At Ingram's request, Perry has searched the files of the Home Journal for printings of Poe's poems. He encloses a newsclipping in which Susan Archer Talley Weiss denies Elizabeth Oakes Smith's story of Poe having been beaten to death.

  • [292]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 May 19.
    8 pp.

    Ingram's challenge to Mrs. Whitman's statement that the second "To Helen" first appeared in Graham's Magazine in the autumn of 1848 "is not a trivial matter." She thinks that he has not dealt frankly with her on this subject and that he is withholding his reasons for calling her to question. Stephane Mallarme has had a copy of Le Corbeau made for Mrs. Whitman as a present. Sara S. Rice has written that Eugene L. Didier, her close friend, proposes to prepare a life of Poe and would be glad to be of service to Mrs. Whitman. Caleb Fiske Harris advises that Ingram print the twenty-seven poems in Tamerlane without letting it be known where the copy is or that it was signed "By a Bostonian." He also thinks that Ingram might find something of interest in a pamphlet entitled "The Musiad or Ninead, by Diabolus."

  • [293]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 June 6.
    3 pp.

    Browne has seen the eight-page pamphlet in the Maryland Historical Society Library entitled "'The Musiad or Ninead,' by Diabolus. Published by Mr. Baltimore, 1830." He thinks it might have been written by Poe, since it is much in his style. Browne has located for Ingram copies of Burton's Gentleman's Magazine for January to July 1840.

  • [294]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 June 16.
    9 pp.

    Both Mrs. Whitman and Ingram have been mistaken about the identity of the magazine in which Poe's second "To Helen" made its first appearance, and she makes an effort to establish renewed faith and trust between herself and Ingram. William J. Widdelton wants Eugene L. Didier's MS. of his biography of Poe by July. Mentions: Ingram's article, "The Unknown Poetry of Edgar Poe " in the Belgravia magazine for June 1876; his continued ill health and troubles, and the alarming increase in her sister's insanity.

  • [295]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 July 11 and 18.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman thinks that Poe's note on cowardice in "Marginalia" which Ingram wants to suppress is absurd but hardly "hateful." It was, she believes, intended as a play on words. "In all matters not affecting important truths," however, she is heartily in favor of suppressing whatever seems to an editor irrelevant or likely to injure the reputation of his subject. Caleb Fiske Harris is surprised that Poe's first "To Helen" was not included in Tamerlane. All of Ingram's discoveries about the order of Poe's prose articles, stories, and poems are intensely interesting to her. Eugene L. Didier thinks the long letter about Poe which Mrs. Whitman wrote to him at his request will have great weight in disproving scandals about him, if it is published exactly as she wrote it. Mrs. Whitman is sure that her treatment of the subject will interest Ingram and meet with his cordial approval. His article on Poe's early poems has been reprinted in the New York Daily Graphic sometime in June or July of 1876.

  • [296]
    ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH, Hollywood, NC, APCS to SARAH HELEN WHITMAN
    1876 July 15.

    Enclosed in Item 299. Mrs. Oakes Smith denies that she wrote the story about Poe's having been beaten to death by the friend of a lady whom he had deceived and betrayed.

  • [297]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 August 15.
    2 pp.

    Since receiving Ingram's letter in June, Mrs. Richmond has been trying to recover from William F. Gill the MS. of a sketch of Poe. She cannot let her letters from Poe out of her keeping, but if Ingram comes to see her she will place them at his disposal. She believes the letters to be without parallel in the annals of love and shrinks from allowing the purity of them to be revealed to other eyes, but for the sake of refuting the calumnies that have been heaped on Poe through jealousy and envy, she is willing that Ingram use them.

  • [298]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 August 20.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond encloses copies of her sister Sarah Heywood's "Recollections of Poe" and Poe's letter of 23 November 1848, to Sarah Heywood. [For the text of Poe's letter see Letters, 2: 405-406].

  • [299]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 August 25.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman has received a copy of Ingram's article, "The Bibliography of Edgar Poe " in the London Athenaeum, 19 August 1876. After a silence of ten or twelve years, she has written to Elizabeth Oakes Smith to say that she has not hesitated to deny that Mrs. Oakes Smith was the author of a personal assault on Poe. Mrs. Oakes Smith has replied in a postcard and two "most kind" letters. William F. Gill has achieved notoriety by sliding down a ravine in the White Mountains. To Mrs. Whitman, Gill is like the "missing link" or the "Lost Pleiad."

  • [300]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 September 27.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond encloses a "small portion" of her letters from Poe, trusting to Ingram's honor that neither the living nor the dead shall ever suffer in consequence. She will send to Ingram copies of pictures of Poe and Maria Clemm. She was unable to see Mrs. Clemm during her last illness, but would be glad to regain possession of Poe's letters to her which Mrs. Clemm had. Poe sent or gave to her MS. copies of "The Bells," "For Annie," and "A Dream Within a Dream."

  • [301]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 October 3.
    3 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond has mailed a package containing letters from Poe and Maria Clemm as well as a photographs of both. Ingram may keep the pictures, and if this package reaches him safely, she will send more letters or copies. Poe told her little of his early history, but Mrs. Clemm cared to talk of nothing else when she had an attentive listener. Mrs. Richmond regrets that she cannot be certain about dates and names, but she is thankful to know that at last justice will be done to Poe's dear memory.

  • [302]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 October 19.
    6 pp.

    The "advisers" of Sara S. Rice want William D. O'Connor to modify some of the things he said [about Walt Whitman ] in the article he submitted for the Poe memorial volume. Annie Richmond's letters to Maria Clemm, which were passed on to Mrs. Whitman, convinced Mrs. Whitman of Mrs. Richmond's fidelity to Poe's memory, and Mrs. Whitman is glad to know that Ingram has received from Mrs. Richmond a gracious tribute to Poe's "genuine goodness of heart & character." Mentions: Eugene L. Didier's "Memoir" being scheduled to preface the Household Edition of Poe's poems; Ingram's saying that he has in his possession the MS. of Elizabeth Oakes Smith's paragraph about Poe's violent death; Robert T. P. Allen's article in Scribner's, November 1875, about Poe's having worked in a Baltimore brickyard in 1834; and William F. Gill's having written to Mrs. Whitman two letters within one week after a year's silence.

  • [303]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 November 14 and 20.
    14 pp.

    Poe told Mrs. Whitman of his intention to write a pendant to his "The Domain of Arnheim." The things Ingram writes to Mrs. Whitman about "Landor's Cottage" convinces her that Ingram was "destined" to the work which he is "so effectually performing." Stephane Mallarme wishes to dedicate to her his volume of translations of Poe's poems. She has related to Mallarme "all" that Poe said to her about "Ulalume." Her feeling now is that Poe's omitting of the closing stanza of "Ulalume" at her request was a mistake because the stanza "is necessary to the comprehension of the poem." Mrs. Whitman tells Ingram of Poe's reading of "Ulalume" to her in the Providence Athenaeum Library and then signing the bound volume of the American Whig Review, in which it had first appeared. William F. Gill informs Mrs. Whitman that he proposes to publish a volume on Poe, and Mrs. Whitman has insisted that Gill show her proofs of anything of hers that he uses or anything that he writes relating to her. Gill wanted William J. Widdleton to publish his things together with Eugene L. Didier's, but Didier would not consent. Mentions: Poe daguerreotypes and copies made from them, Mary Osborne, Ingram's obituary of John Neal, and Mary Gove Nichol's "Reminiscences of Poe."

  • [304]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 November 21.
    3 pp.

    Only the intense desire to have full justice done to Poe's memory could have tempted Mrs. Richmond to put her correspondence with Poe in Ingram's hands, but she is certain he will not allow it to be made public. Her remaining letters from Poe are so personal and contain so few allusions "to matters that would interest" Ingram, she is not sure that copying them would be worthwhile, but if Ingram comes to America, she will place the originals in his hands. She is surprised to learn that her MS. copy of "The Bells" is not the original one, for Poe copied it while at her house and left her what she thought was the first copy. One very valuable letter of Poe's belonging to her was in Maria Clemm's possession.

  • [305]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 December 15.
    4 pp.

    The proofs of William F. Gill's volume on Poe are at hand and are a curious melange mostly of things heretofore published, the "profoundly interesting" exception being Sarah Heywood's "Recollections of Poe."

  • [306]
    SARAH H. HEYWOOD, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 December 25.
    2 pp.

    Miss Heywood introduces Franklin E. Brown, who will hand Ingram a package containing an early edition of Poe's Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, 2 volumes, which were found in the trunk belonging to Poe that was forwarded to Maria Clemm at Lowell soon after his death.

  • [307]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1876 December 31.
    8 pp.

    Eugene L. Didier writes in his "Memoir" that Poe's mother had been twice married and that she and Poe's father died in the Richmond theater fire. Ingram is to be very careful not to allow Maria Clemm's letters, which have Mrs. Whitman's marginal comments, to pass into other hands. To her surprise, Mrs. Whitman's letter to Didier about Poe is printed as an "Introductory Letter" in his volume which she will send to Ingram if he wants it. Baltimoreans seem greatly pleased over Ingram's "Memoir" as he prepared it for the memorial volume which Sara S. Rice has edited. Mrs. Whitman urges Ingram to change the words "fierce flame" as describing the interest she first aroused in Poe because at that time Virginia Poe was still alive. "But there is nothing of earthly passion in the poem he sent me --is there?"

  • [308]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS on the back of an announcement of Poe's Stylus, April 1848.
    ca. 1876.
    1 p.

    Mrs. Richmond is willing to answer Ingram's questions about Poe and is thankful for the romance which found its way into the web and woof of her early life and for the sweet memories that brighten its present day.

  • [309]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 January 9.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman discusses Poe daguerreotypes and photographs taken from them. William F. Gill has been burned out; consequently, the publication of his biography of Poe will be delayed. Mrs. Whitman will send a copy of Eugene L. Didier's new biography of Poe to Ingram by the next day's steamer.

  • [310]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 January 14.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond copies for Ingram Poe's letter to Sarah Helen Whitman of 25 January 1849 [Item 55]. She encloses a note from Charles Dickens' agent which had accompanied a sum of money sent to Maria Clemm by Dickens. "Mr. Poe as a Cryptographer" was written by Reverend Warren A. Cudworth of East Boston.

  • [311]
    RICHARD GARNETT, British Museum, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 January 15.
    3 pp.

    A Boston Theatre advertisement in the Centinel, 18 April 1809, lists Mrs. Poe as playing Amelia in The Robbers and as Ella in James Kenney's Ella Rosenbery. This was the benefit night for the Poes. David Poe's part is not listed.

  • [312]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 January 31.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond will search in Boston for a file of the Flag of Our Union and for a number of Graham's which Ingram needs. She sends all of the letters she received from Maria Clemm before Poe's death; Ingram need not return them. Two or three of Poe's letters to Mrs. Richmond are missing. When Mrs. Clemm visited Lowell she had access to them, and after she left they were missing. Later, Mrs. Clemm borrowed a letter that never was returned, though she said that she had sent it back. Mrs. Richmond met William F. Gill through a friend who had urged her to help him prepare a lecture on Poe, and when Gill went to Baltimore, he borrowed her MS. copy of "The Bells" so that he might read it there with more effect. She is enthusiastic about Ingram's work and is sure that it will be a complete and thorough vindication of that "dear and tenderly cherished name."

  • [313]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 February 2.
    6 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman compares "vraisemblance" in portraits, daguerreotypes, and photographs of Poe. She has heard nothing lately about William F. Gill's biography of Poe. Julian Hawthorne is incensed over George P. Lathrop's publication of Nathaniel Hawthorne's private journal. After Algernon Charles Swinburne's noble rebuke of Thomas Carlyle's barbarous and brutal policy, will Carlyle not wear sackcloth and ashes the rest of his dishonored days? Mrs. Whitman has at last received her copy of Stephane Mallarme's Le Corbeau but finds some of Edouard Manet's illustrations beyond the range of her appreciation.

  • [314]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 February 5.
    3 pp.

    If Ingram wishes, Mrs. Richmond will cut an article on secret writing and two chapters of "Autography" for Ingram from bound volumes of Graham's for 1841 and 1842. She is unable to answer definitely many of Ingram's questions, for she did not comprehend the rare opportunities she had when Poe talked because wonder and admiration completely absorbed her. As he related them, the events of his life had a flavor of unreality, just like his stories.

  • [315]
    ANNA BLACKWELL, Pas de Calais, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 February 12.
    4 pp.

    Miss Blackwell denies that Ingram could possibly have a copy of a letter written to her by Poe because she had never received one from him. She remembers that she visited the Poe s at Fordham in company with someone whose name she now does not recall to deliver a basket of delicacies suitable for an invalid and that Poe had returned that visit. She will not permit Ingram to use her name in connection with the letter or with anything he is writing about Poe. [For a complete text of Poe's letter to Miss Blackwell, written from Fordham on 14 June 1848, see Letters 2: 369-371. Anna Blackwell herself gave this letter to Sarah Helen Whitman. ]

  • [316]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 March 2.
    6 pp.

    All that Mrs. Whitman has written Ingram about Anna Blackwell she learned from the lady herself. It was Mary Gove Nichols who advised Anna Blackwell to board at the Poe cottage for a few weeks of country air and rest from her literary labors. After Miss Blackwell had given her Poe's letter, Mrs. Whitman gave it to the Hon. John Russell Bartlett of Providence for his valuable collection of autographs, and it was he who had allowed her to make the copy which she sent to Ingram. Mrs. Whitman is deeply wounded by the tone of Ingram's letter to her and by his disposition to cross-examine her testimony so peremptorily. She is not aware that Eugene L. Didier has ever spoken an unkind word about Ingram, and she wonders why they should be enemies.

  • [317]
    SARA SIGOURNEY RICE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 March 8.
    4 pp.

    The inclusion of Ingram's "noble" "Memoir" has rendered the Poe memorial volume an "angel of reparation."

  • [318]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 March 13.
    6 pp.

    The files of the Flag of Our Union and some of Poe's MSS. were destroyed by fire in 1872 or 1873, but Mrs. Richmond knows where there is a collection of Graham's and Burton's Gentleman's Magazine, and if the numbers Ingram wants are among them they will be forwarded. The gossip connected with Poe and Sarah Helen Whitman, relayed from Providence by Mr. Richmond's family, came close to putting to an end her correspondence with Poe. Mrs. Richmond is sorry that William F. Gill ever crossed her path, and her sister, Sarah Heywood, will write Gill requesting that he not publish her recollections of Poe. Jane E. Locke was deeply in love with Poe. Since her death, Mrs. Richmond has destroyed a large package of her letters that Poe had sent to her, but she encloses one memento of Mrs. Locke. She has given Poe's MS. of "A Dream Within a Dream" to Mrs. Crane of East Boston, at the intercession of her pastor, Reverend Warren H. Cudworth.

  • [319]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 April 13.
    4 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman considers the review of Eugene L. Didier's "Memoir of Poe" in the London Athenaeum, 10 February 1877, an unprovoked assault upon herself. Ingram had said that he had lent her copy of the book to "a friend" who wrote the review. Mrs. Whitman considers the matter itself of little moment, but the animus of it is a rude shock to all her previous impressions of the young Englishman who had invoked her aid, had sought her confidence and criticism, and had hailed her as his "Providence." She and Ingram seem to have been like ships that meet on sea, then pass to meet no more.

  • [320]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 April 27.
    2 pp.

    Valentine encloses copies of the inscriptions on the gravestones of John Allan, Frances Allan, and Ann Moore Valentine which are in the Allan section of the Shockoe Hill Cemetery in Richmond.

  • [321]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 May 27.
    4 pp.

    William F. Gill has taken her to task for helping Ingram and has asked her to request Ingram not to use Sarah Heywood's "Recollections of Poe" without letting him know that Gill desires that he not do so. Maria Clemm always spoke in strong terms of denunciation about the treatment Edgar received from the Allan family, but Mrs. Richmond thinks that Mrs. Clemm either did not know or would not reveal the real truths of the matter. She does not want to meet Sarah Helen Whitman but would like to meet Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton and Marie Louise Shew Houghton, and she shrinks from Sarah Anna Lewis. [Item 18 is enclosed.]

  • [322]
    SARAH H. HEYWOOD, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 July 6.
    4 pp.

    Miss Heywood gives Ingram permission to us her "Recollections of Poe" in any way he pleases and wishes the sketch had gone into other hands because she has no confidence in William F. Gill's scholarly ability or literary taste; she allowed Gill to have it only because she thought it might help him write a better lecture on Poe. She encloses a newsclipping copy of a sonnet addressed to Annie Richmond by Benjamin West Ball.

  • [323]
    H. B. W. [" HELEN BULLOCK WEBSTER, " i.e., GEORGE W. EVELETH ], "Nemonia, U. S.," letter to the Editor of Scribner's Monthly
    1877 October 7.
    Copy by Eveleth. 3 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 340. Eveleth questions a notice of William F. Gill's biography of Poe reporting in Scribner's that it has been well ascertained that Poe's intoxication was a thing caused by even the smallest quantity of wine and took the form of strange and highly intellectual but deranged orations on abstruse subjects. Eveleth wants to know how this has been ascertained. He points out that even Rufus Griswold did not charge Poe with habitual use of intoxicants and that N. P. Willis, George R. Graham, Frances S. Osgood, and Sarah Helen Whitman have said that they never discovered signs of strong drink in Poe. Why do the New York literati with whom Poe was personally acquainted not come forward to answer these questions about his drinking? Who has reported these "deranged orations"? Were they set down by Poe or by anyone for him? Are they part, or all, of his printed volumes? If so, the disorder assumed is nowhere manifest in the contents. Eveleth does not believe the stories of Poe's common drunkenness or of the crazing power of a drop of wine.

  • [324]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 October 8.
    4 pp.

    William F. Gill has shown himself to be an unscrupulous mountebank by using her sister Sarah Heywood's recollections of Poe in his volume after she had written him that she wanted to use her paper for an article of her own. Mrs. Richmond has reason to believe that at least one favorable review of Gill's biography was written for a consideration. She never liked Gill, found his personality disagreeable, but when Ingram wrote to her she felt immediately that he "ought to know," that he "must know," the things she knew about Poe. Poe told her that Flag of Our Union was a miserable paper but that the editors paid well. Maria Clemm had promised to leave to her all of her papers and letters. William Rouse has Edgar Poe's letter to William E. Burton of 1 June 1840 [Item 18].

  • [325]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 November 25.
    4 pp.

    William F. Gill's publishing of extracts from letters of Poe to Mrs. Richmond is incomprehensible to her because Gill had only heard her read aloud portions of them some six or seven years earlier and the letters have never been out of her keeping. Bound volumes of Graham's for 1843, 1846, and 1848 can be bought in Boston for $6 for all three. Is that too much? Mrs. Richmond thinks that Gill's scandalous attack on Ingram in the Boston Sunday Herald for 18 November is beneath Ingram's notice. She is sorry that Marie Louise Shew Houghton has died. Elizabeth F. Ellet was once Poe's friend, but he said that she exasperated him beyond forgiveness. Poe made remarks about Mrs. Ellet and one or two other literary ladies in a letter to Mrs. Richmond, and for that reason, she suspects, Maria Clemm wanted to get possession of it.

  • [326]
    SARAH H. HEYWOOD, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 December 24.
    3 pp.

    Although often urged to do so, Annie Richmond has never sat for a photograph. Perhaps Ingram's request may prevail.

  • [327]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1877 December 30.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond feels that she is in Ingram's power since she has sent to him her letters from Poe, but she trusts him implicitly and is confident that she will never have cause for regret. She met William F. Gill at the Old South Fair and shrank from him as if he had been a reptile. If she can make up her mind to sit for a photograph, Ingram shall have one.

  • [328]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 January 8.
    3 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond's MSS. of "The Bells" and "A Dream Within a Dream" have been lost by the photographer who was to make copies of them for Ingram.

  • [329]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 January 16.
    4 pp.

    If Ingram's words in some of his letters caused Mrs. Whitman pain during the past eventful year, the "via dolorosa" which she has "of late" been called to tread has "effaced all minor sorrows, and regrets." She remembers only the happiness she felt in his earlier sympathy and friendship. She is now in the beautiful home of the Dailey's, surrounded by her own "household goods," save those that fell under the auctioneer's hammer.

  • [330]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 February 5.
    4 pp.

    The lost MSS. of "The Bells" and "A Dream Within a Dream" have been found among the dead letters in the local post office! "A Dream Within a Dream" was sent to her by Poe in "a sort of farewell letter" that is now lost; later Poe made additions to the poem and published it in the Flag of Our Union. For Poe's sake, Mrs. Richmond has placed her correspondence and herself willingly and completely in Ingram's hands, asking only that he use the correspondence as he would wish another to use it if his wife or his sister were in her position. She feels acutely the delicacy of her relationship with Poe and knows well what nine out of ten people would make of it, given the opportunity Ingram has.

  • [331]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 February 12.
    5 pp.

    Poe's affection for Mrs. Richmond is the most precious memory her heart holds, and she has always spoken of him as an acquaintance and not as a friend because the world could not understand their friendship. She is thankful that William F. Gill did not get the MS. of "A Dream Within a Dream" and that Ingram will have the privilege of printing it in its original form. She encloses a copy of the MS. of "The Bells."

  • [332]
    THOMAS G. CLARKE, Richmond, ALS to EDWARD V. VALENTINE
    1878 February.
    1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 339. Clarke was present when Poe easily swam five miles in the James River and heard him read "The Raven" in the Concert Room of the Exchange Hotel.

  • [333]
    SARAH HELEN WHITMAN, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 March 9.
    Written on both sides of a small envelope.

    Mrs. Whitman has much to say to Ingram, much to ask. She is preparing something to leave, after her "dematerialization," to those who love her. Ingram's sorrow is a sorrow to her, always. "Benedicte."

  • [334]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 March 17.
    3 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond gives Ingram permission to associate her name with Poe's, "the dearest one I have ever known." She thinks Susan Archer Talley Weiss' reminiscences of Poe are "very pleasant."

  • [335]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 April 1.
    1 p.

    Mrs. Richmond hopes to hear soon that all the MSS. and magazines she has forwarded to Ingram are in his possession.

  • [336]
    I. LESLIE POE, Abbeyleix, Ireland, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 May 10.
    2 pp.

    On what authority does Ingram write that the Poe family is descended from Le Poers ?

  • [337]
    ROSE PECKHAM, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 July 3.
    4 pp.

    Miss Peckham informs Ingram that Sarah Helen Whitman is dead. At the last she talked much of Ingram and had something for Miss Peckham to tell him, but she did not see Mrs. Whitman before the end came. Mrs. Whitman had requested that no announcement be made of her death until after she was buried. Miss Peckham is sorry that Ingram has cause for bitterness toward American critics.

  • [338]
    ROSE PECKHAM, Providence, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 August 14.
    8 pp.

    Dr. William F. Channing and Caleb Fiske Harris are Sarah Helen Whitman's literary executors. Ingram's correspondence with her will be kept with her papers about Poe and will be used in writing a memoir of Mrs. Whitman and Poe, one of Mrs. Whitman's most cherished plans. With all of her amiability and generosity, Mrs. Whitman was both cautious and prudent; she never gave to anyone her letters from Poe in their entirety. Miss Peckham discusses Mrs. Whitman's will. There was much complaint about the way her funeral was ordered, for her kinsmen and close friends were not notified. Only the "Spiritualists" and the "radicals" knew.

  • [339]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 September 16.
    2 pp.

    Valentine encloses a statement from Thomas G. Clarke about Poe's having swum five miles in the James River. Item 332 enclosed.

  • [340]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Lewiston, ME, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 October 1.
    44 pp.

    Eveleth encloses his contribution toward the making-up of something close to a true estimate of Poe: newsclippings of Poe's exchange with Thomas Dunn English in 1846, copies of six letters from Poe to Eveleth, copies of letters to him from Maria Clemm, Sarah Anna Lewis, Elizabeth F. Ellet, Anne C. Lynch Botta, Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton, John H. B. Latrobe, John P. Kennedy, James Wood Davidson, Mrs. Whitman, and a copy of a letter Eveleth wrote to the editor of Scribner's Monthly. Eveleth has used the initials "H. B. W.," which belong to Helen Bullock Webster, and Ingram is to do the same when he prints the letters. If Ingram can pay a trifle for these copies, it will be welcome, for Eveleth admits that he is poor enough. [This letter enclosed the following items: 30, 33, 35, 40, 41, 58, 72, 73, 74, 75, 77, 78, 80, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 96, 98, 99, 100, 101, 103, 105, 114, 173, 266, 323.]

  • [341]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Lewiston, ME, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 October 30.
    4 pp.

    Ingram now has copies of all the correspondence Eveleth received from Poe except a mere note which was given away years ago to someone who wrote asking for a specimen of Poe's handwriting. Eveleth thinks John Neal's, George R. Graham's, and portions of James Wood Davidson's defenses of Poe had an undercurrent of the Rufus Griswold slanders while seeming to run in the opposite direction. John H. B. Latrobe's reminiscences are those of an old man in his second childhood. Ingram is at perfect liberty to reprint Eveleth's letters from Poe but without Eveleth's name or initials. Eveleth prefers not to part with the originals just yet but thinks that by and by he will send them to Ingram, if Ingram intimates an acceptance of them. The question of remuneration lies wholly with Ingram: if none, no grumbling.

  • [342]
    WILLIAM ELIJAH HUNTER, Durban, Natal, South Africa, ALS to INGRAM
    1878 December 1.
    13 pp.

    Neither of Dr. John Bransby's sons survives. Hunter sends Ingram the names of Dr. Bransby's three daughters and encloses manuscript and printed copies of six of his own poems that he wishes Ingram to have inserted in some respectable English magazine.

  • [343]
    JOHN PARKER, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1879 January 14.
    3 pp.

    Newspapers for 1810-1811 make no mention of David Poe appearing at the Baltimore Theatre. Judge Neilson Poe says that he has given away to autograph collectors nearly all of Poe's letters that were in his keeping. Thomas A. Edison keeps a copy of Poe's poems with him in his laboratory.

  • [344]
    SARAH ANNA LEWIS, London, AL fragment to INGRAM
    1879 April 15.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Lewis saw much of Poe during the last year of his life and found him sensitive, gentle, and refined. The night before he left New York for Richmond in 1849, he had dinner and spent the night at her home. Having a presentiment that he would never see her again, he asked her to write his life, but she never felt equal to the task. Now Ingram has done it far better than she could have.

  • [345]
    JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, U. S. Legation, Spain, letter to INGRAM
    1879 May 12.
    Copy by Ingram. 2 pp.

    On his return to America, Lowell will send extracts from Poe's letters to him. Lowell visited Poe once in his New York lodgings, by appointment, and found Poe "a little tipsy." The shape of Poe's head was peculiar: there was "something snakelike about it." Lowell does not intend a moral judgment by this, only "a physical suggestion." All impartial persons who had known Poe were of the opinion that he was untrustworthy.

  • [346]
    THOMAS W. HIGGINSON, Cambridge, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 February 1.
    2 pp.

    The three published numbers of James Russell Lowell's Pioneer can still be picked up. If Ingram should sell or bequeath his Poe collection, it is to be hoped that it will come to some library in America. An American can better appreciate Poe's malice and fury as a critic of his contemporaries than can one at a distance. Poe gave a tone of vulgar personality to American criticism and was probably a sycophant in the direction of flattery. Higginson suggests that Ingram write to Charles J. Peterson, now owner of Peterson's Magazine.

  • [347]
    FREDERICK LOCKER-LAMPSON, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 February 6.
    1 p.

    Locker-Lampson gives Ingram permission to copy two letters now in his possession: one from Poe to Annie Richmond dated October 1848, the other from Poe to John P. Kennedy dated 1836.

  • [348]
    CHARLES J. PETERSON, Philadelphia, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 March 3.
    4 pp.

    Peterson was associated with both Rufus Griswold and Poe on a magazine and knows and understands their characters thoroughly. Griswold was a coward unchecked by any high sense of honor; he hated and feared Poe; his biography of Poe was a malicious libel. Poe was, conventionally, a gentleman; his great fault was drinking. One or two drinks intoxicated him, and all that he did was done when thus half-demented; his mind was analytical rather than synthetical; he wrote "The Raven" and "The Gold Bug" backwards, and he spent hours discussing secret writing and inventing ciphers.

  • [349]
    NATHANIEL HOLMES MORISON, Peabody Institute, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 April 28.
    4 pp.

    Judge Neilson Poe is kindly disposed towards the memory of Poe, but he is very slow in executing his promises. His wife and daughter feel great repugnance in having Virginia Poe's picture copied, for it was made after her death and shows unmistakable marks of that fact. Judge Poe has some poetry written by Virginia.

  • [350]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, APCS to INGRAM
    1880 May 7.

    Browne is mailing to Ingram an engraved portrait of General Robert E. Lee and two photographs of Poe taken from negatives. These photographs are unvarnished and unmounted; they can be colored, if Ingram chooses.

  • [351]
    DR. MILES GEORGE, letter to EDWARD V. VALENTINE
    1880 May 18.
    Copy by Valentine. 4 pp.

    Enclosed in Item 352. Poe was not his roommate at the University of Virginia. Poe roomed on the West side of the Lawn, afterwards moving to the West Range. George remembers a "pugilistic combat," but "it was a boyish freak & frolic." Poe was fond of reading other poets and his own poetry to entertain his friends, then suddenly he would begin sketching with charcoal on the walls of his room. He was excitable, restless, at times wayward, melancholic, and morose. In other moods he would be frolicsome, full of fun, and a most attractive and agreeable companion. He was of a delicate mold and slender; his legs were not bowed, and he weighed between 130 and 140 pounds. To calm himself he too often put himself under the influence of wine.

  • [352]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 May 19.
    2 pp.

    Valentine passed an evening lately with Mrs. John Allan at her home, but of course no mention was made of Poe. Valentine encloses a copy of Dr. Miles George's letter to him of 18 May 1880.

  • [353]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 May 19.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond hopes her letters from Poe will not be printed in Ingram's new volume; if they are, she will not be surprised or shocked, but there will be life-long regret. She is pleased with E. C. Stedman's remarks about "For Annie" in his sketch of Poe in Scribner's Monthly.

  • [354]
    TWO FOUR-LINE STANZAS, by RICHARD HENRY STODDARD
    1880 May 19.
    MS. 1 p.

    "Day and night my thoughts incline / To the blandishments of wine."

  • [355]
    E. C. STEDMAN, Swampscott, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 June 30.
    4 pp.

    The tone of Ingram's letter is more gratifying than "the hidden and unexpected blast" he gave Stedman in the London Athenaeum. His article is merely a chapter in a book; after that, Stedman will have done with Poe. He thinks Poe's tales are his finest and strongest work. Stedman is not on friendly terms with Richard Henry Stoddard but regards him as a man of talent and a formidable adversary.

  • [356]
    SARAH ELMIRA ROYSTER SHELTON, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 June 30.
    2 pp.

    Mrs. Shelton appreciates the copy of Ingram's two-volume biography of Poe that he sent to her; it brings both sad and pleasant memories to her. She is glad that Ingram is doing Poe the justice she believes he deserves.

  • [357]
    ANNIE RICHMOND, Lowell, MA, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 July 9.
    3 pp.

    Mrs. Richmond is terribly shocked to see her letters from Poe printed "word for word" in Ingram's new biography of Poe, for she had assumed that he would "merely give the ideas of the writer." There are things in the letters which might be construed to Poe's disadvantage, and she thought the liberty granted for publication had been restricted and confined to very narrow limits by her injunction that he was to give to the public only what he would have been willing to be known had the letters been addressed to his wife or to his sister. Would he have printed Sarah Helen Whitman's letters from Poe had she been alive?

  • [358]
    JOHN B. TABB, Mattoax, VA, ALS to WILLIAM HAND BROWNE
    1880 August 24.
    1 p.

    Father Tabb sends information about Poe that he has gathered from various persons who had known him well. He encloses a sonnet about Poe to be forwarded to Ingram.

  • [359]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 September 28.
    26 pp.

    This letter contains copies of nine letters from Poe to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass. The copies were made for Ingram by Browne "with the exactest care." [They are Items 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 22, 24, 25.] Browne mailed this letter together with Item 360.

  • [360]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1880 October 16-November 4.
    4 pp.

    The old vindictiveness against Poe still crops up in the Northern newspapers, partly because they hate the South and partly because some of the old mutual-admiration set still survive and have never forgiven Poe for telling them the truth about themselves. Browne encloses reminiscences of Poe which had been collected by Reverend John B. Tabb and a copy of the note sent by Joseph W. Walker to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass on 3 October 1849, informing him that a man named Poe was at Ryan's 4th ward polls in Baltimore and in need of assistance. Browne accompanied this letter with Item 359, containing copies of nine letters from Poe to Snodgrass. Item 359 enclosed.

  • [361]
    RECOLLECTIONS OF POE BY VARIOUS PERSONS WHO HAD KNOWN HIM
    1880 ca. November 4.
    MS. Copy by Reverend John B. Tabb. 6 pp.

    Charles Ellis, Richmond : as a child Poe constantly led other youngsters into mischief. I. F. Allen, Richmond : Miss Jane Mackenzie, who educated Rosalie Poe and to whom Edgar submitted his juvenile poems, said the poems were worthless imitations of Byron, blended with some original nonsense; she tells the story of Poe's having pushed his way into the Allan house during John Allan's last days. Mr. Poiteaux, Richmond : Poe's two natures, tenderness and cruelty, swayed him in turn; at one time, to spite Mrs. Allan, he cut the throat of her pet fawn; he once crossed a ravine on the timbers of an old bridge, to the surprise and admiration of the boys; he recited "Al Aaraaf" for the girls' amusement and laughter. Dr. George W. Rawlings, Richmond : attended Poe in one of his drunken spells not long before his death; Poe told him, when his mind was quite clear, that the phantasms of mania were always delightful, that he saw nothing but visions of beauty and heard sweet music. Dr. [James?] Beale and Dr. [William P.?] Palmer, Richmond : Poe was utterly devoid of all moral sense, seemed really incapable of distinguishing between right and wrong. Lewis E. Harvie, Amelia County, VA : as a fellow student at the University of Virginia, he once saw Poe, debauched and raving, lying on the grass and uttering terrible blasphemies. Dr. and Mrs. Ray Thomas, Richmond : when in their school after returning from England, Poe was ambitious, enjoyed Horace, was good at scanning, had a fight once with Bill Allen, and read his poems to a theatrical audience in the school; once, as Officer of the Day in the local military company, he put the clock two hours ahead to solve a problem about the military watch, showing by this that he was wholly unreliable.

  • [362]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1881 July 18.
    4 pp.

    Nothing of Poe's was put up for sale at the auction at the Allan house in Richmond which Valentine attended. Poe's letters went to young Allan. The public knows nothing about these letters, but Valentine thinks they were written from Fortress Monroe. If they are published, Ingram shall have copies.

  • [363]
    CHRONICLES OF BALTIMORE, by COLONEL JOHN THOMAS SCHARF
    1881.
    MS. extract by William Hand Browne. 2 pp.

    The Poe family is mentioned.

  • [364]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1882 January 28.
    6 pp.

    The date of Poe's birth was in the Allan family Bible. Valentine has seen letters the Valentine s in Richmond wrote to the Allan s while they were in Europe, and he has urged the gentleman in charge of the late Mrs. Allan's papers not to burn any of the letters, papers, receipts, or accounts because there may be some mention of Poe in John Allan's business letters. Dr. Miles George and Mr. Thomas Bolling are still living, but Dr. Orlando Fairfax, another fellow student of Poe at the University of Virginia, is dead.

  • [365]
    EMILE HENNEQUIN, Paris, ALS in French to INGRAM
    1882 October 24.
    2 pp.

    Hennequin sends Ingram a volume of Poe translations that he has edited and writes that more than half of the book is Ingram's. He requests a letter of introduction to some Parisian journalist Ingram might know.

  • [366]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Denver, CO, ALS to INGRAM
    1882 November 19.
    4 pp.

    Eveleth comments upon and asks sharp questions about Ingram's biography of Poe. He doubts Mary Gove Nichols' story about the straw bed and the cat and Poe's military overcoat warming the dying Virginia Poe. Eveleth tells a story of Poe's blood relationship to Sarah Helen Whitman.

  • [367]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Denver, CO, APCS to INGRAM
    1882 November 26.

    Eveleth points out to Ingram that in the first volume of his biography Ingram alludes to Poe's "gradual but slow deterioration" but contradicts this statement many times throughout the two volumes.

  • [368]
    "POE." A sonnet by REV. JOHN B. TABB
    1882.
    TCsigned. 1 p.
  • [369]
    P. J. MULLIN, Leith, Scotland, ALS to INGRAM
    1883 February 10.
    2 pp.

    Mullin encloses a parody of "The Raven" entitled 'The Shavin' (A Piece of Ravin a la Edgar A. Poe )" which he first met in an old number of a Scottish magazine, the People's Friend. It consists of five stanzas, signed by John F. Mill.

  • [370]
    LOUIS TRIDON, Paris, ALS in French to INGRAM
    1883 May 4.
    3 pp.

    Tridon considers Poe the greatest poet, man of letters, and thinker who has ever appeared on earth. He reproaches Ingram for accepting without refuting the diagnosis of "that ignorant doctress Shew" who insisted that Poe had a brain lesion. Tridon plans to publish a study on Poe, Baudelaire, and Rollinat.

  • [371]
    LOUIS TRIDON, Paris, ALS in French to INGRAM
    1883 May 17.
    3 pp.

    Tridon requests Annie Richmond's address so that he might write to her. He thinks that Poe is misjudged in France as well as in America.

  • [372]
    RICHARD GARNETT, British Museum, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1884 March 25.
    2 pp.

    Garnett certifies that the authorship of Tamerlane was unknown at the British Museum until Ingram pointed it out.

  • [373]
    E. C. STEDMAN, New York, ALS to INGRAM
    1884 May 29.
    4 pp.

    Because of an overload of work, Stedman declines assisting Ingram in preparing a variorum edition of Poe's works. He thinks there is no complete, correct edition of the poems; and although not all Poe's verse is worth the trouble, he believes that it would be well to preserve everything that could throw light upon the growth and quality of so marked a genius.

  • [374]
    I. LESLIE POE, Earsham Rectory, Bungay, England, ALS to INGRAM
    1884 June 5.
    2 pp.

    On what authority does Ingram write that there is still a family calling themselves "de la Poe"? Does Ingram know anything of a Dr. Poe in the time of Elizabeth and James I? Does he know anything of the Mr. Poe who got into trouble in the reign of Charles I?

  • [375]
    I. LESLIE POE, Earsham Rectory, Bungay, England, ALS to INGRAM
    1884 July 29.
    2 pp.

    I. L. Poe believes the Upper Palatinate of the Rhine was the cradle of the Poe family. He encloses a newsclipping about the marriage of an Irish landowner, Lord Emly, to a Miss Frances de la Poer.

  • [376]
    MANN S. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1884 December 17.
    1 p.

    Valentine encloses a 5" x 7" photograph of the Allan mansion in Richmond, which is to be razed for a hotel to be built on the site.

  • [377]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Denver, CO, APCS to INGRAM
    1884 December 28.

    George E. Woodberry has written to Eveleth that it is a pity Poe suffers by his friends as much as by his enemies and that he has seldom seen "a more disingenuous book than Ingram's." In another letter Woodberry has said, "I have no doubt that all the documents published by [Rufus] Griswold are genuine and ungarbled. Poe's character cannot be sustained, except on the theory that he was of unsound mind. If he was responsible, he was a bad fellow.... His nature was, from the first, of a sinister cast.... Griswold, in his facts, is very near the truth.... The Conchology is a frightful affair --as plain a theft as ever was. Poe had no capacity for truth telling." Eveleth judges that Woodberry's forthcoming work on Poe is to be Griswold's over again, only more so.

  • [378]
    STEPHANE MALLARME, Paris, APCS in French to INGRAM
    1885 February 9.

    Mallarme discusses translations of Poe's works into French and Emile Hennequin's magnificent study of Poe which has recently appeared in La Revue Contemporaine (25 January 1885).

  • [379]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Denver, CO, ALS to INGRAM
    1885 February 22.
    2 pp.

    Eveleth poses searching, abrupt questions about Ingram's two-volume biography of Poe.

  • [380]
    "POE'S CRITICS." MS. poem of ten lines by REV. JOHN B. TABB
    1885 February.
    1 p.

    Enclosed in Item 397.

  • [381]
    STEPHANE MALLARME, Paris, ALS in French to INGRAM
    1885 November 8.
    8 pp.

    Mallarme appreciates Ingram's having used his translation of Poe, as representing France, in his "memoir." Mallarme's translations of Poe's poems will be published in book form, illustrated by Edouard Manet.

  • [382]
    E. C. STEDMAN, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1885 November 22.
    2 pp.

    Stedman appreciates the presentation copy of Ingram's volume The Raven and the dedication of it to him.

  • [383]
    EDOUARD EUGET, Berlin, APCS to INGRAM
    1885 November 23.

    Euget has received Ingram's volumes on Poe and promises to write on this "splendid enrichment of the Poe literature."

  • [384]
    MAURICE ROLLINAT, Fresselines, Creuse, France, ALS in French to INGRAM
    1885 November 26.
    2 pp.

    Rollinat encloses a five-page rhyming interpretation of "The Raven" made to prove to himself how much he could admire that miraculous genius.

  • [385]
    INGRAM'S REVIEW OF STEPHANE MALLARME'S FRENCH EDITION OF POE'S POEMS
    ca. 1885.
    MS. 1 p.
  • [386]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, APCS to INGRAM
    1887 April 5.

    Browne calls Ingram's attention to a pathological-psychological study of Poe by Dr. Henry Maudsley in the Journal of Mental Science 45: 328, London, 1860, and a criticism of Poe's genius by Bleibtren in his Geschicte der Englischer Litteratur, Leipzig, 1887.

  • [387]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Denver, CO, APCS to INGRAM
    1887 November 6.

    Eveleth requests return of a Poe portrait that had been cut from Graham's and asks what Ingram thinks of Bacon as Shakespeare.

  • [388]
    F. W. RODEN, Crewkerne, England, ALS to GEORGE REDWAY, ESQ
    1888 January 26.
    3 pp.

    Roden points out misplaced verses and a serious error in a French translation in Ingram's volume, The Raven, published by Redway in 1885.

  • [389]
    "ABOUT NEW YORK WITH POE," by JOHN PRESTON BEECHER
    1888 January-February.
    MS. 17 pp. Copy by Amelia Poe.

    Copied from the Curio, January-February 1887.

  • [390]
    W. T. D. CLEMM, Cantonsville, to DR. ELMER ROBERT REYNOLDS, Washington, DC.
    1889 February 20.
    TL. 2 pp.

    Challenging Dr. John J. Moran's recently published statements about the causes of Poe's death, Clemm gives an account of Moran's version when he called on Clemm to bury Poe in 1849.

  • [391]
    GEORGE W. EVELETH, Denver, CO, ALS to INGRAM
    1889 April 24.
    2 pp.

    Eveleth points out that Ingram's narrative of Poe's movements is sundry scraps of information that are rather disconnected and not very easy to put into form as reliable history.

  • [392]
    JOHN PRESTON BEECHER, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1889? July 16.
    4 pp.

    Beecher encloses a copy of his article from the Curio, January-February 1887, about the houses in New York where Poe lived, which he thinks is itself abominable and full of the most atrocious errors, but he hopes that Ingram may get an idea of the houses as they were. He knew many persons who had known Poe intimately, but of these, only Thomas Dunn English survives.

  • [393]
    "IL CORVO," by GUIDO MENASCI
    1890.
    TL. 6 pp.

    An eighteen-stanza translation of "The Raven" into Italian.

  • [394]
    ULISSE ORTENSI, Rome, APCS in Italian to INGRAM
    1892.

    Ortensi requests that Ingram encourage favorable reception of his Italian prose version of Poe's poetry with the English editors to whom he has mailed copies.

  • [395]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1893 June 22.
    2 pp.

    Newspapers are reprinting verses, obviously spurious, said to have been written by Poe on the flyleaf of a book he had borrowed from the University of Virginia. Browne encloses a copy of a letter from Henry C. Carey to John P. Kennedy, 8 December 1834, sending Kennedy "a small sum" in payment to his "friend" for "one of his tales" (i.e., "MS. Found in a Bottle"); Kennedy noted on 12 April 1851 that the sum was $20 forwarded to Poe from Eliza Leslie, editor of The Atlantic Souvenir (i.e., The Gift).

  • [396]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1895 April 29.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses a photograph of a portrait of Poe that now belongs to her brother John Prentiss Poe, a photograph of a water-color portrait of Virginia Poe that is now hers, and an autograph taken from a letter from Poe to her father Judge Neilson Poe. Stone and Kimball Publishing Company has been allowed to use these things in their new edition of Poe's works; after they appear in those volumes they may be offered for sale. She thanks Ingram for his appreciation of her illustrious kinsman.

  • [397]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1895 May 16.
    4 pp.

    That stuff about Poe and helium, if there be such a thing, is all newspaper silliness; because Poe wanted his balloon to go higher than any had gone before, he had to suppose a gas lighter than hydrogen. That Poe did anticipate some of the general conclusions of later science, Browne did try to show once in an article. Reverend John B. Tabb has recently written an epigram on Poe and his critics, especially George Woodberry, and the enclosed autographed copy is for Ingram's collection. Mentions Mark Twain. [Item 380 enclosed.]

  • [398]
    E. C. STEDMAN, New York, ALS to INGRAM
    1895 September 5.
    4 pp.

    Stone and Kimball Publishing Company wishes to use Ingram's photographs of Poe and his mother in order that they might have all the pictures of Poe in one edition.

  • [399]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1895 October 26.
    3 pp.

    There is an engraved picture of Judge Neilson Poe and none of any kind of General David Poe, Sr. Stone and Kimball's fourth volume contains Miss Poe's photograph of Edgar; the ninth is to have that of Virginia. The poem "Alone" is in an album belonging to Mrs. Dawson, whose mother was a Mrs. Lucy Holmes Balderston, for whom Poe wrote the poem. A miniature and an old daguerreotype of Edgar are now owned in Baltimore, but they are not for sale.

  • [400]
    JAMES S. COTTON, Kensington, England, ALS to INGRAM
    1897 February 22.
    3 pp.

    Cotton sees a "striking" similarity between the last stanza of George Darley's "The Wedding Wake" and two half-lines in Poe's "Lenore."

  • [401]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1897 June 2.
    1 p.

    The University of Virginia is to honor Poe on the fiftieth anniversary of his death, and Valentine has furnished the figure of $750 as the cost of a bust, for which Professor James A. Harrison is appealing for funds; his idea is to establish a memorial to Poe at the University, and the bust is to be placed in an alcove in the new library. [Item 907 is enclosed.]

  • [402]
    ROBERT D'UNGER, M.D., Chicago, ALS to CHEVALIER ELMER ROBERT REYNOLDS, Washington, DC
    1897 October 29.
    10 pp.

    D'Unger gives an account of his association with Poe, which began in 1846, of Poe's heavy drinking, glumness, carping, and inability to make and keep friends. He thinks the story of Poe's having been "cooped" is "mere twaddle." Poe was a believer in "spirit friends," spiritualism not then being known. D'Unger was told that it was on a visit to "an improper house" that Poe met a girl named Lenore.

  • [403]
    INGRAM'S REVIEW OF THE RAVEN. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM
    1899.
    MS. 1 p.

    In Ingram's judgment the combination of these two selections in the same volume published by Leonard Smithers and Company is curious and unexplained. He finds the book awkward, the illustrations childishly absurd, and the frontispiece a caricature; and he believes that whoever wrote "Some Account of the Author" has done nothing but retail libels gathered from the garbage of journalistic gossip.

  • [404]
    J. M. CHEMFIELD [?], Lisbon, Portugal, ALS to INGRAM
    1901 April 20.
    4 pp.

    Chemfield lists Portuguese translations of Poe's works and the volumes he used in writing his Memoir of Poe.

  • [405]
    "POE'S PURGATORY," by REV. JOHN B. TABB
    1904 May 21.
    MS. 1 p.

    A three-stanza poem written for the Poe Alcove to be established at the University of Virginia.

  • [406]
    "REJECTED," by REV. JOHN B. TABB
    1905 November 7.
    MS. 1 p.

    One four-line stanza prompted by Poe's second rejection for admission to the Hall of Fame.

  • [407]
    EDWARD V. VALENTINE, Richmond, ALS to INGRAM
    1906 September 12.
    2 pp.

    Does Ingram know of Robert or Robin Povall of St. Martin's-in-the-Field, about 1650? Virginians pronounced the name "Porsy." Samuel Pepys repeatedly mentions the name "Povey." Valentine encloses a clipping from the New York Herald, 9 September 1906, but the likeness in it of Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton is not good.

  • [408]
    SIR EDMUND T. BEWLEY, Dublin, Ireland, ALS to INGRAM
    1906 November 13.
    3 pp.

    Bewley has criticized Sarah Helen Whitman's "romance" about Poe's ancestry in his book on the origin and early history of the Poe family and has given Ingram credit for the "surest testimony" on the subject gathered from Poe's family in Baltimore.

  • [409]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1908 October 20.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe gives Ingram permission to use her photographs to illustrate his forthcoming articles on Poe. American magazines and newspapers are clamoring for Poe contributions for their January 1909 issues. Poe's The Raven and Other Poems can be bought for $30.

  • [410]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1908 November 10.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses a photograph of Judge Neilson Poe that has not been reproduced in any American edition, a photograph of her brother the Honorable John Prentiss Poe, and one of William Clemm, Jr., Virginia Poe's father. Ingram may use these in his articles, but he is to return them to her later on.

  • [411]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1908 November 16.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe surveys her correspondence with Sir Edmund T. Bewley about Poe family ancestry.

  • [412]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1908 December 7.
    2 pp.

    No picture of Rosalie Poe was ever made. She was a nervous, eccentric creature who idolized Edgar, and he was as considerate of her as was possible. American newspapers are full of articles about the forthcoming Poe centennial celebrations.

  • [413]
    ULISSE ORTENSI, Aquila-Abruzzi, Italy, APCS in French to INGRAM
    1908 December 26.

    Ortensi declines to make a new impression of Poe's poems for the centennial, but he will do something worthy for the 19 January occasion.

  • [414]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1908 December 28.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe copies for Ingram from family records the birth and death dates of David Poe, Jr., Elizabeth Arnold Hopkins Poe, William Henry Leonard Poe, Edgar Allan Poe, and Rosalie Poe. She has a water-color portrait of Sam Poe, Edgar's uncle, who was a local wit and writer of clever verses. She knows of no portraits of David Poe or of David Poe, Jr., but she bought an oil painting of Edgar in a Baltimore shop in 1896. Professor James A. Harrison has a paper in the January Century Magazine entitled "Poe and Mrs. Whitman." Miss Poe has in her possession most of Sarah Helen Whitman's letters to Maria Clemm from 1859 on.

  • [415]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 January 13.
    2 pp.

    Browne has forwarded an article from the Cosmopolitan magazine, the silliest thing about Poe that has yet appeared; the author is probably the wife of one of the younger generation of Poes. Browne has searched the October 1849 newspaper files for the name of the boat that probably brought Poe from Richmond to Baltimore, but without success. "Ryan's," where Joseph W. Walker reported finding Poe ill, was a public house called "Gunner's Hall" at 44 E. Lombard Street, which would be in the Fourth Ward. At that time the polls were usually held in the public houses, and the candidates saw that every voter had all the whiskey he wanted.

  • [416]
    ULISSE ORTENSI, Aquila-Abruzzi, Italy, APCS in French to INGRAM
    1909 January 26.

    Ortensi has sent his new translation of Poe's life and poems and a copy of La Tribuna (Rome) for 20 January with his article on the Poe centennial. The publishers did not wait for the dedication of the new edition of the poems to Ingram, and the book was published without it.

  • [417]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 January 26.
    3 pp.

    The Poe centennial celebration was a great success in Baltimore. The University of Virginia has awarded Poe medals to Miss Poe and to Ingram.

  • [418]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 January 30.
    6 pp.

    Miss Poe has no absolute proof that Edgar was born in Boston, but it is a family record and a family tradition. The Richmond Times-Dispatch, 17 January, has a photograph of the Reverend John Buchanan who baptized Edgar in December 1811. Poe's brother William Henry Leonard is said to have written beautiful verses in the album of a woman whom Ingram identifies as a Miss Durham. Edgar's uncle, Samuel Poe, was the son of General David Poe and Elizabeth Cairnes Poe. Miss Poe is "almost certain" that her old portrait of Edgar Poe was not taken from life; it has been copied by and for Professor James A. Harrison who plans to use it as he has used some of Sarah Helen Whitman's letters and many of Maria Clemm's letters to Neilson Poe. Ingram has Miss Poe's permission to use these as well as letters from Annie Richmond and Gabriel Harrison. She encloses a copy of the Latin inscription that was on the stone which Neilson Poe had prepared for Edgar's grave.

  • [419]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 February 11.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe has received permission from her nephew, Edwin W. Poe of Chicago, to have the water-color portrait of Sam Poe copied, at Ingram's expense, for his use.

  • [420]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 February 14.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe is posting to Ingram the photograph of Sam Poe ; he may return by money order for $1.75 to cover cost. [The letter identifies Edwin Poe as residing in Baltimore, not Chicago : cf. Items 418 and 419.]

  • [421]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 February 22.
    6 pp.

    Browne once wrote a now "forgotten paper of no account" for the New Eclectic magazine in which he plotted Poe's last trip from Richmond to Baltimore. He vouches for the validity of the note Joseph Walker wrote in October 1849 to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass asking him to come to Ryans' to help Edgar Poe ; it was found in a bundle of letters from Poe to Dr. Snodgrass. Browne asks Ingram to write the life of Sir Francis Nicholson, soldier, statesman, and governor of Virginia and Maryland at the close of the seventeenth century. Browne has sent Ingram a report on James H. Whitty, a map of Baltimore showing Ryan's place, the place where Poe died, and the place he is buried. He encloses a poem by Reverend John B. Tabb entitled "In Touch."

  • [422]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 February 27.
    6 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses a copy she has made of Walter K. Watkins's newspaper article, "Where Poe was Born," the Boston Transcript, 13 January 1909, in which he discusses the plays in which David and Elizabeth Poe appeared from 1806 through 1809 and the songs they sang in them. He also attempts to fix the number of the house in which Poe was born.

  • [423]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 March 2.
    6 pp.

    Miss Poe lists the nine letters from Poe to John P. Kennedy that are in the Peabody Institute as well as the letters and parts of autograph letters in her possession which were written by Poe.

  • [424]
    JOHN H. INGRAM, London, TLS in French to LE DIRECTEUR DU MERCURE DE FRANCE, Paris
    1909 March 9.
    6 pp.

    Ingram asserts that M. Calvocoressi's article, " Edgar Poe, his biographers, his editors, his critics," which appeared in Le Mercure on 1 February 1909, contains numerous assertions which are inexact and prejudicial to himself and to the honor of Poe, for Calvocoressi says that there was no complete edition of Poe's works before the twentieth century and points to Professor James A. Harrison's seventeen-volume edition, published by T. Y. Crowell in 1902, as proof. Ingram's own edition of 1874, published by Adam and Charles Black, Edinburg, and the Stedman-Woodberry edition, published by Stone and Kimball, Chicago, 1895, are better, Ingram insists, because on the whole Professor Harrison's edition is bad.

  • [425]
    ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE, Sussex, England, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 March 10.
    1 p.

    Conan Doyle appreciates Ingram's letter and his present of a book about Poe, which he shall always prize. He alludes to a dinner honoring Poe centennial which is reported in Items 990 and 991.

  • [426]
    ALFRED VALLETTE, Paris, ALS in French to INGRAM
    1909 March 11.
    2 pp.

    Vallette will publish Ingram's letter correcting M. Calvocoressi's article in Le Mercure de France on 1 April.

  • [427]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 March 22.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe justifies the charge of $1.75 for the photograph of Sam Poe. She gives Ingram permission to use all of the letters she has sent him in his new biography of Poe.

  • [428]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 March 24.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe sends Ingram copies of the nine letters from Poe to John P. Kennedy that are in the Peabody Institute as well as a copy of Sarah Helen Whitman's letter to Mrs. Clemm of 28 October 1849. [Item 67 enclosed.]

  • [429]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 March 26.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe sends Ingram a copy of Poe's letter to Maria Clemm, 18 September 1848.

  • [430]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 April 1.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe asks Ingram when his new biography of Poe will be forthcoming.

  • [431]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 April 16.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe has received Ingram's money order [for $1.75 to cover the cost of photographing the water-color of Sam Poe ]. Her brother, John Prentiss Poe, was present at the second burial of Virginia Poe and believes he has an account of it in his library at home. William F. Gill died several years ago. [Gill was not to die until 1917.]

  • [432]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 May 18.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe encloses an account of the reinterment of Virginia Poe from the Baltimore Sun, 20 January 1885. [Item 846 enclosed.]

  • [433]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 June 22.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe regrets Ingram's continued indisposition. She has given her nephew, Reverend Neilson Poe Carey, a letter of introduction to Ingram.

  • [434]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 October 11.
    1 p.

    Eugene L. Didier, author of The Poe Cult, has for years been "giving out articles," most of them of no literary or other value, and readers quite understand his status.

  • [435]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 November 9.
    3 pp.

    John Prentiss Poe is dead, and Miss Poe encloses a copy of the Memorial Meeting of the Bench and Bar of Baltimore City held in his honor. She gives Ingram permission to use the valentine poem by Virginia Poe in any way he chooses and regrets that she has no other verses by her.

  • [436]
    WILLIAM HAND BROWNE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 end of November-December 9.
    2 pp.

    Browne encloses a copy of an undated letter from Maria Clemm to an unidentified addressee requesting money for herself and her children. Browne obtained this letter from the addressee's grandson who very positively refuses to allow his grandfather's name to be mentioned.

  • [437]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 December 14.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses Professor Killis Campbell's articles on Poe from the Nation, 11 March and 1 June 1909. She thinks that Ingram should put on dynamo speed and finish his new biography of Poe, or in the face of new competition, he may be made to blush at his want of knowledge and lack of materials. Neilson Poe was born in Baltimore on 11 August 1809 and died there on 3 January 1884; his wife, Josephine Emily Clemm Poe, died in Baltimore on 13 January 1889; both are buried in Greenmount Cemetery, Baltimore.

  • [438]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1909 December 24.
    1 p.

    Professor Killis Campbell has sent Miss Poe copies of his articles on Poe printed in the Nation, and she forwards them to Ingram.

  • [439]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1910 January 4.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe encloses another installment of Professor Killis Campbell's articles on Poe from the Nation.

  • [440]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1910 February 1.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses a copy of what is possibly the last of Professor Killis Campbell's articles on Poe in the Nation. She has deliberately refrained from writing to Campbell, but he is coming to call on her in Baltimore.

  • [441]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1910 March 30.
    2 pp.

    There is an uncut edition of Poe's poems advertised for sale in the Armstrong Library sale to be held in Boston in April.

  • [442]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1910 July 12.
    4 pp.

    Miss Poe furnishes dates from the Poe family records: children of William Clemm, Jr., and Maria Poe Clemm -- Henry Clemm, born 10 September 1818, died young and unmarried; Maria Clemm, born 22 August 1820, died 5 November 1822; Virginia Elizabeth Clemm, born 13 August 1822, baptized by Bishop James Kemp on 5 November 1822, married to Edgar Poe by the Reverend Mr. Converse, Richmond, 16 May 1836, died at Fordham on 30 January 1847. It is said that J. P. Morgan and Dodd, Mead and Company have the most valuable collections of Poeana. Now that Ingram has finished writing his biography of Thomas Chatterton, he should give his Raven the right of way and push it to a finish and have the "last word" before he is eclipsed by a score of presumptuous amateurs.

  • [443]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1910 November 15.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe is pleased that Ingram is hard at work on his biography of Poe. The commendations of his biography of Thomas Chatterton are interesting.

  • [444]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 January 3.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe asks Ingram for a list of old American papers and magazines that he needs for reference.

  • [445]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 February 6.
    1 p.

    Eugene Didier apparently thinks his The Poe Cult, and Other Poe Papers is the only worthwhile "edition" of Poe.

  • [446]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 February 28.
    3 pp.

    William Henry Leonard Poe wrote some verses in an album belonging to Rosa Durham, to whom he was supposed to have been engaged; but the album was destroyed by fire. Miss Poe copies for Ingram an account of the death of General David Poe, from the Baltimore American, Saturday, 19 October 1816.

  • [447]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 July 7.
    1 p.

    Professor Killis Campbell has visited Miss Poe and has promised to share his Poe materials with her, which she will send to Ingram.

  • [448]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 July 18.
    1 p.

    She sends Ingram a clipping, and notes that "Dr. Charles W. Kent will doubtless give you 1500 authorities to verify his declaration." The unidentified newsclipping pasted on this letter states that Dr. Kent, Professor of English at the University of Virginia, declared at Morgantown, WV, 14 July 1911, that Edgar Poe "was not killed by excessive drinking but was the victim of a thief" who drugged him in order to rob him of a purse containing $1,500.

  • [449]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 September 5.
    3 pp.

    The completion of the Poe monument to be erected in Baltimore is assured by adding a gift of $5,000 from Orrin C. Painter to the sum already in hand. Sir Moses Ezekiel has signed the contract, and the monument is to be finished in two years. Miss Poe has given Professor Killis Campbell a list of Ingram's "wants," and he has promised to write to Ingram.

  • [450]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1911 September 9.
    3 pp.

    Professor Killis Campbell writes to Miss Poe that his Poe gleanings this summer were disappointingly small.

  • [451]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 January 5.
    4 pp.

    Orrin C. Painter has had a $500 wrought-iron gate put in the wall of Westminster Churchyard, giving a fine view of Poe's grave from the street. Miss Poe's nephew Edgar has been elected by a large vote to the office of Attorney General of Maryland, the same office his father, John Prentiss Poe, held for twenty years.

  • [452]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 March 15.
    2 pp.

    On 19 January 1912, the Poe monument in Westminster churchyard was decorated with laurel wreaths and superb white roses.

  • [453]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 March 27.
    6 pp.

    Poe's impassioned letter from Richmond to Maria Clemm in Baltimore, which Neilson Poe refused to allow anyone to publish because it was so personal, was dated 29 August 1835. None of the Poe family knows anything of William Henry Leonard Poe's visits to Greece and Russia. Miss Poe encloses a copy of some "puerile verses" by W. H. L. Poe which Ingram may use as he sees fit. She quotes from Mrs. Clemm's letter to Neilson Poe, 27 September 1870: "You have been a dear kind son to me. I wish you, when God calls me, to see to my burial." Mrs. Clemm's last note to Neilson Poe was dated 9 January 1871; she died the following month.

  • [454]
    LEWIS NATHANIEL CHASE, London, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 April 11.
    2 pp.

    Chase requests permission to quote from Ingram's "magnum opus" in his "Poe" contribution to the "Poetry and Life" series. Chase encloses an article on Coleridge to indicate the nature of his own task in writing about Poe.

  • [455]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 May 2.
    5 pp.

    Miss Poe has no idea why William Henry Leonard Poe was named Leonard. Miss Dawson has allowed her to copy from her album Poe's poem "Alone," which he wrote in it, and his brother's poem "I Have Gazed on Woman's Cheek," which Poe copied into it. If Ingram wishes, she will copy for his use all of the last letters Poe wrote to Sarah Helen Whitman [Published in James A. Harrison's 1909 volume on the subject].

  • [456]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 May 10.
    4 pp.

    Professor C. Alphonso Smith of the University of Virginia has a chapter on Poe in a volume of lectures. The "Henry" to whom John Allan wrote on 1 November 1824 must be William Henry Leonard Poe, who was then living with his grandfather in Baltimore. "Eliza" was the late Mrs. Henry Herring, sister of Maria Clemm. Would Maria Clemm's letters from Sarah Helen Whitman and Annie Richmond, written after 1849, be of any use to Ingram?

  • [457]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 May 29.
    3 pp.

    An editor of the Philadelphia Public Ledger has searched out and sent to her a syndicated article, 14 January 1912, which is a reprint of an article by Poe in the Columbia Spy.

  • [458]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 June 13.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe knows no "Herring" in Baltimore and has never heard of an album owned by them. She encloses a copy of Sarah Helen Whitman's "unutterable affection" letter, as the late Professor Harrison called it, and describes the letters she has from Mrs. Whitman to Maria Clemm, offering to send them to Ingram.

  • [459]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 June 18.
    1 p.

    Miss Poe encloses an eighteen-page MS. copy of John Preston Beecher's article in the Curio, January-February 1888, on the houses in which Poe lived in New York City, and some newspapers of 1909, in one of which is the photograph of Jane Stith Stanard's tomb which Ingram desires.

  • [460]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 June 24.
    3 pp.

    J. P. Morgan's collection of Poeana is said to be the most complete.

  • [461]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 June 24.
    2 pp.

    Ingram's letter of 13 May 1912 did not go down on the Titanic; it reached Miss Poe safely. She keenly appreciates the honor Ingram bestows on her in inscribing to her his new biography of Poe.

  • [462]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 July 15.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe is glad to be of help to Ingram in collecting Poe materials. She sends him a copy of Professor James A. Harrison's The Last Letters of Edgar Allan Poe to Sarah Helen Whitman, New York, G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1909.

  • [463]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 July 22.
    2 pp.

    Professor Killis Campbell has written to Miss Poe that in 1903 Mr. William Nelson of Patterson, NJ, sold to Mr. George H. Richmond of New York the two poems which were said to have been written by Edgar Poe in an album belonging to Elizabeth Rebecca Herring.

  • [464]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 August 5.
    4 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses all there is about the Arnold and Poe matter in the Historical Society of Portland. She will have a friend in Richmond make a photograph of the Stanard family tomb. James H. Whitty of Richmond has an article on Poe in the Nation, July 1912; Professor Killis Campbell has sent it to her with his comments, not compliments. She notes that Ingram is moving his household to Brighton.

  • [465]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 August 16.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe encloses a photograph of the Stanard family tomb in Richmond and an eight-line parody of "The Raven" beginning, "Then the vessel sinking, lifting...."

  • [466]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 October 15.
    4 pp.

    It was John R. Thompson who brought the MS. of "O Tempora O Mores" to Eugene L. Didier. Miss Poe notes that Ingram has completed his move to Brighton.

  • [467]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 November 5.
    2 pp.

    Miss Poe sends a newsclipping reprinting the Latin inscription prepared for Poe's gravestone by Neilson Poe and informs Ingram that William F. Gill has printed a portion of it in his biography of Poe.

  • [468]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1912 November 20.
    3 pp.

    Miss Poe is certain that Professor Killis Campbell will not be annoyed by Ingram's criticism of his "Poe Canon." She finds Woodrow Wilson's election to the presidency especially gratifying.

  • [469]
    AMELIA F. POE, Baltimore, ALS to INGRAM
    1913 January 3.
    3 pp.

    The George Poe mentioned in document of 1762 belongs, so far as Miss Poe knows, to the Adam and Andrew Poe line of famous Indian fighters in Ohio and not to her branch of the Poe family. President Howard Taft is busy giving all plums possible to his friends, and the Democrats are devising schemes to turn them out the first minute before or after 4 March. [Two printed items enclosed.]

  • [470]
    CAPTAIN GEORGE VIDMER, United States Military Academy, TLS to INGRAM
    1913 April 12.
    1 p.

    Thomas W. Gibson was found guilty by the same Court Martial Board that tried Poe. Allan B. Magruder and Timothy P. Jones were cadets at the Academy at that time. Letter encloses a copy of Poe's letter, 10 March 1831, to the Superintendent of the Academy [See Letters 1: 44-45].

  • [471]
    CAPTAIN GEORGE VIDMER, United States Military Academy, TLS to INGRAM
    1913 May 5.
    1 p.

    Because the records of the Academy were destroyed by fire in 1838, it is impossible to furnish Ingram a copy of Colonel Sylvanus Thayer's reply to Poe's letter of 10 March 1831.

  • [472]
    TRANSLATION OF "THE RAVEN" INTO POLISH
    1914 [?] June 3.
    TC. 10 pp.

    Inscribed by Ingram to an unidentified donor.

  • [473]
    LEWIS CHASE, London, APCS to INGRAM
    1915 April 12.

    Chase shares Ingram's interest in Thomas Marlowe. He regrets that Ingram suffers insomnia and wishes him a summer of good health.

  • [473-a]
    "RECOLLECTIONS OF SWINBURNE," by John H. Ingram
    n.d..
    MS. fragment. 13 pp.

    Fragements of a draft of an account of Ingram's acquaintance with Algernon Charles Swinburne and with a number of other "most interesting people of London and Paris " in the 1870's, including "poets, artists, sculptors, editors, and clubmen." Ingram explains that he became acquainted with Swinburne while attempting "to raise a fund" for the "permanent benefit" of Poe's destitute sister, Rosalie, and he describes how he was drawn" into the maelstrom of [Swinburne's] attraction" by "the nobility of his ideals and the heroic way in which they were advocated" as well as by "the irresistible, inexhaustible music of his poetry." Ingram reports that Swinburne considered Poe "the first true and great genius of America, " that he preferred Poe to Nathaniel Hawthorne, that he "commented upon the'nymphomanic habit of body or mind which seems to have regulated the relations of the literary ladies with Poe,' " and that he expressed his appreciation of Ingram's efferts to rescue Poe from the machinations of Rufus Griswold. Ingram mentions numerous individuals including Baudelaire, Ford Madox Brown, Robert Browning, Lord Byron, George Chapman, R. H. Horne, Victor Hugo, Frederick Locker-Lampson, Stephane Mallarme, Edouard Manet, Christopher Marlowe, the Rossettis, Shelley, Thackeray, and Voltaire.

Part Two: Photographs, 1809-1911
  • [474]
    PHOTOGRAPH MADE FROM A MINIATURE OF EDGAR POE'S MOTHER, ELIZABETH ARNOLD HOPKINS POE
    1809?.
    4" x 3"

    Marie Louise Shew Houghton sent a miniature of Poe's mother to Ingram in 1875 [see Item 226], and he reproduced it as a frontispiece to the second volume of his 1880 Edgar Allan Poe : His Life, Letters, and Opinions. This photograph was forwarded by Laura Ingram to the University of Virginia Library after the bulk of her brother's Poe materials had reached the Library in 1921.

  • [475]
    MS. OF POE'S "TO MRS. M. L. S."
    1847 February 14.

    Photograph made by the London Stereoscopic Company. Marie Louise Shew Houghton sent the original to Ingram in 1875. [See Item 210.]

  • [476]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF A PROSPECTUS OF POE'S "THE STYLUS"
    1848 April.

    The original of this prospectus was sent to Ingram by Sarah Helen Whitman.

  • [477]
    THE "STELLA" DAGUERREOTYPE OF EDGAR ALLAN POE
    1848.
    (Photographic copy only.)

    This daguerreotype was made in 1848 and presented in that year to Sarah Anna Lewis by Edgar Poe. She allowed Ingram to use copies of it in the mid-1870s and bequeathed it to him at her death in 1880.

  • [478]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF MARIA POE CLEMM
    1849.
    7" x 5"

    Photograph made by Warren of Boston and Cambridge, MA. Annie Richmond sent it to Ingram in 1876. [See Items 300 and 301.]

  • [479]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF THE ALLAN MANSION IN RICHMOND, VA.
    1884.
    5 1/2" x 7 1/2"

    Mann S. Valentine sent this photograph to Ingram in December 1884. [See Item 376.]

  • [480]
    PROOF OF A LITHOGRAPH OF A PEN DRAWING OF EDGAR ALLAN POE MADE BY EDOUARD MANET FOR STEPHANE MALLARME
    1888.
    5" x 7"

    The original of this pen drawing was presented to Ingram by Mallarme.

  • [481]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF THE POE COTTAGE AT FORDHAM
    1911 June 20.
    6" X 8">

    Photograph made by A. E. Willis, New York, NY.

Part Three: Undated Photographs, Sketches, and a Drawing
  • [482]
    INGRAM'S COLLECTION OF TEN ASSORTED PHOTOGRAPHS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE
    n.d..
  • [483]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF "SHERWOOD COTTAGE"
    n.d..
    4" x 5"
  • [484]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF EDWARD V. VALENTINE'S STATUE OF THOMAS JEFFERSON
    n.d..
    7" x 9"

    Modelled for the Jefferson Hotel, Richmond, VA.

  • [485]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF JOHN HENRY INGRAM
    n.d..
    6" x 5"

    Forwarded to the University of Virginia Library on 9 October 1933 by Laura Ingram.

  • [485-a]
    TWO PENCIL SKETCHES OF MARIE LOUIS SHEW HOUGHTON
    n.d..

    These sketches show Mrs. Houghton as she was ca. 1877 and were made by an unknown artist, probably in 1908.

  • [485-b]
    BOOK PLATE OF A RAVEN
    n.d..

    This drawing was made by Edouard Manet ; it is signed by both Manet and Stephane Mallarme and was presented to Ingram probably in 1875.

Part Four: Printed Matter from Magazines, Newspapers, and Books
  • [486]
    SUMMARY OF CURRENT REPERTOIRES OF DRURY LANE, COVENT GARDEN, AND KING'S THEATRES, unsigned
    1830 April and May.
    Pp. 145-152 clipped from the Dramatic Magazine.
  • [487]
    "ILLUSTRATED MEMOIRS OF OUR EARLY ACTORS AND ACTRESSES," unsigned
    1830 December 1.
    Pp. 321-328 clipped from the Dramatic Magazine

    Includes "Mr. Lacy," "The Guilty Mother," and "Emigrant Actors." Item is annotated by Ingram.

  • [488]
    "THE HISTORY OF THE MOON OR AN ACCOUNT OF THE WONDERFUL DISCOVERIES OF SIR JOHN HERSCHEL, " unsigned
    1835.
    16-page article clipped from an unidentified magazine

    Item has been made into a booklet.

  • [489]
    "THE CITY OF SIN," by Poe
    1836 August.
    5 stanzas clipped from the Southern Literary Messenger.
  • [490]
    "ONE OF POE'S LETTERS," unsigned article
    1838 September 4.
    Clipping of 1/3 column from an unidentified issue of the Baltimore Gazette

    Introduces and prints letter from Poe, in Philadelphia, to Dr. Nathan C. Brooks, in Baltimore, 4 September 1838. Text printed in Letters, I, 111-113.

  • [491]
    "REVIEW OF NEW BOOKS," unsigned.
    1842 January.

    From Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine, XX, 68-72. Item consists largely of reviews by Poe.

  • [492]
    "A FEW WORDS ABOUT BRAINARD" and "REVIEW OF NEW BOOKS," by Poe
    1842 February.

    From Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine, XX, 119-121, 124-133.

  • [493]
    "THE POETRY OF RUFUS DAWES, " by Poe
    1842 October.

    From Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine, XXI, 205-209.

  • [494]
    "AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY. EDGAR ALLAN POE, " signed J. E. S. [Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass ]
    1843 July 29.
    Four columns clipped from the Baltimore Saturday Visiter

    A biographical sketch of Poe.

  • [495]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by James Russell Lowell
    1845 February.

    From Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine, XXVII, 49-53.

  • [496]
    TITLE PAGE AND INDEX TO THE BROADWAY JOURNAL, Vol. I.
    1845.
    3 pp.

    Charles F. Briggs, Edgar A. Poe, and Henry C. Watson identified as editors.

  • [497]
    "PLAGIARISM," unsigned
    ca. 1845.
    Clipping from unidentified newspaper, 2 paragraphs

    An account of the Poe-Outis controversy that was serialized in the Broadway Journal and the New York Evening Mirror.

  • [498]
    "MARGINALIA," by Poe, and "THE MOTHER'S TRAGEDY," by James K. Paulding
    1846 March.

    From Graham's Lady's and Gentleman's Magazine, XXVIII, 116-122. Installments of both items.

  • [499]
    "MR. ENGLISH'S REPLY TO MR. POE," by Thomas Dunn English
    1846 June 23.
    Three columns clipped from the New York Evening Mirror
  • [500]
    "MR. POE'S REPLY TO MR. ENGLISH AND OTHERS," by Poe
    1846 ca. July 12.
    3 columns clipped from the Philadelphia Saturday Gazette

    This reprinting of Poe's article which appeared originally in the Philadelphia Spirit of the Times on 10 July was misdated by Ingram as 27 June.

  • [501]
    "MARGINALIA," by Poe
    1846 November.

    From Graham's American Monthly Magazine, XXIX, 245-248. An installment.

  • [502]
    " EDGAR A. POE, ESQ.," unsigned
    1846.
    Clipping of 2 paragraphs from the Philadelphia Saturday Courier

    Biographical-critical sketch of Poe in "Our Classic Niche."

  • [503]
    "MR. POE," by N. P. Willis
    1847 January 9.
    1/2 column clipped from the Home Journal

    Article publishes Poe's letter of December 30, 1846, responding to Willis's report of the pitiful condition of Poe and Virginia.

  • [504]
    "MARGINALIA," by Poe
    1848 March.

    From Graham's American Monthly Magazine, XXXII, 178-179. An installment.

  • [505]
    "EUREKA; A PROSE POEM. BY EDGAR A. POE, " by Epes Sargent
    1848 July 20.
    2 paragraphs clipped from "New Publications" in the Boston Transcript

    An adverse review.

  • [506]
    " NEW YORK IN SLICES. SLICE XXVI. .. THE LITERARY SOIREES," unsigned [ George G. Foster ]
    ca. 1848 September 26.
    Two columns clipped from the New York Tribune

    Comments on New York society and mentions John Inman, Rufus Griswold, Lewis Gaylord Clark, Grace Greenwood, Lydia M. Child, Elizabeth F. Ellet, Elizabeth Oakes Smith, Frances S. Osgood, and Sarah Margaret Fuller. On verso is a Henry Clay letter, 12 September 1848.

  • [507]
    "ULALUME. A BALLAD," by Poe
    1848 November 22.
    1/2 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Editor introduces this 9-stanza second printing of the poem from which, at the suggestion of Sarah Helen Whitman, Poe had omitted the final stanza, subsequently restored.

  • [508]
    "ODD POEM," by N. P. Willis
    1849 April 28.
    1/4 column clipped from the Home Journal

    Willis suggests that Poe be given a competent annuity so that he can be done with editing magazines and devote his time to belles lettres. Poe's "For Annie" was printed following this paragraph, but it is missing from the item.

  • [509]
    "DEATH OF EDGAR A. POE, " by Ludwig [ Rufus W. Griswold ]
    1849 October 9.
    2-column clipping, incomplete, from the New York Tribune
  • [510]
    "DEATH OF EDGAR POE, " unsigned [by N. P. Willis ]
    1849 October 20.
    Three columns clipped from the Home Journal
  • [511]
    "OUR ISLAND OF DREAMS," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1849.
    7 4-line stanzas clipped from the original eight stanzas in Mrs. Whitman's Hours of Life, and Other Poems (1853), pp. 115-117. 2 pp.

    Mrs. Whitman shuffled stanzas and altered the text of this clipped copy to make it approximate a version of this poem entitled "Stanzas for Music" published in the American Metropolitan Magazine for February 1849.

  • [512]
    "THE LATE EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by George R. Graham
    1850 March.

    From Graham's American Monthly Magazine, XXXVI, 224-226.

  • [513]
    "CRYPTOGRAPH -- MR. POE AS A CRYPTOGRAPHER," unsigned [Reverend Warren H. Cudworth ]
    1850 April 19.
    1 1/4 columns clipped from the Lowell Weekly Journal
  • [514]
    POE'S THE NARRATIVE OF ARTHUR GORDON PYM FOR SALE AT $1.50
    post 1850.
    3/4 page clipped from an unidentified London sales catalogue

    The advertisement includes a derogatory paragraph about Poe's life and character quoted from Fraser's Magazine and a favorable statement by William Gowans testifying to Poe's personal sincerity and well-ordered domestic life.

  • [515]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned [ John Savage ]
    1851 January and February.

    15-page booklet made up of the second and third installments of Savage's article which appeared in the Democratic Review. Annotated by Ingram.

  • [517]
    "MRS. WHITMAN'S POEMS," unsigned [Senator Henry Bowen Anthony ]
    ca. 1852.
    1/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Senator Anthony notes that an edition of Sarah Helen Whitman's poems is forthcoming and that Rufus Griswold has expressed his approbation of its title poem, "Hours of Life."

  • [518]
    "THE LIFE AND POETRY OF EDGAR POE, " unsigned
    1852 April 16.
    Pp. 157-161 clipped from Living Age, and reprinted from Chamber's Journal, 26 February 1853, pp. 137-140

    Annotated by Sarah Helen Whitman.

  • [519]
    "HAS THE SPIRIT OF EDGAR POE WRITTEN A POEM?" by an unidentified correspondent to the Brighton Herald
    ca. 1853 April 26.
    4 8-line stanzas

    These verses are said to have been dictated by Poe through the medium of Lydia Tenney of Georgetown, MA. Published in Henry Spicer, Sights and Sounds: The Mystery of the Day, 1853; reprinted in an unsigned article, "Manifestations of the Spirit!" in Tait's Edinburgh Magazine, March 1853, pp. 157-164.

  • [520]
    REVIEW OF SARAH HELEN WHITMAN'S HOURS OF LIFE, AND OTHER POEMS, by George William Curtis
    1853 November.
    2 1/4 columns clipped from Putnam's Magazine, II (November 1853), 563-564
  • [521]
    HOURS OF LIFE AND OTHER POEMS, by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1853.
    Pp. 75-98, 119-122, 193-198

    The pages are annotated and the poems heavily emended by Mrs. Whitman before she sent them to Ingram in 1874. The penciled notes which were added and enclosed in this folder were made by Professor Armistead Churchill Gordon, Jr., in 1952.

  • [521-a]
    "THE RAVEN," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    ca. 1853.
    11 6-line stanzas clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Text of the poem is introduced by a favorable editorial comment quoted from the Boston Commonwealth.

  • [522]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1855 May.

    From Biographical Magazine, VII (May 1855), 211-220. An inaccurate biographical article on Poe in "Lives of the Illustrious."

  • [523]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by W. Moy Thomas
    1857 April.

    From Train, III (April 1857), 193-198. Thomas defends Poe's character and bluntly suggests that Rufus Griswold tampered with Poe's letters and papers.

  • [524]
    "OUR OWN SCENERY," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1857 October.
    3/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Mrs. Whitman compares the beauty of autumn in Providence with the fairest scenery in France and southern England. Article mentions: Sarah Margaret Fuller, Anne C. Lynch Botta, and Ellery Channing.

  • [525]
    " EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned [by James W. Davidson ]
    1857 November.

    From Russell's Magazine, II (November 1857), 161-173.

  • [526]
    "LETTER ABOUT EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by N. P. Willis
    1858 October 30.
    Two columns clipped from the Home Journal

    Willis describes Poe's appearance and manner when he worked as a paragraphist on the newspaper he and George P. Morris edited.

  • [527]
    "A PANSY FROM THE GRAVE OF KEATS," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1859.
    7 stanzas of varying lengths clipped very likely from the Providence Journal, reprinted from Harper's "Easy Chair."
  • [528]
    "TO MRS. M. C., THE'MORE THAN MOTHER' OF EDGAR POE, " by James W. Davidson
    1860 September 27.
    34 lines on a single printed sheet.
  • [529]
    "CUATRO PALABRAS CON UNA MOMIA," by Poe
    1862 August 18.
    Pp. 106-107 clipped from El Mundo Ilustrado

    Translation into Spanish of Poe's "Some Words with a Mummy."

  • [530]
    "TRIBUTE TO EDGAR POE, " by N. P. Willis
    1864 October 8.
    3 columns clipped from the Home Journal

    Willis prints a letter from an unnamed correspondent in Waterloo, NY, who offers financial help for Maria Clemm and for a monument to be erected over Poe's grave. Willis adds his own tribute to Poe printed earlier and appends a few paragraphs in which he writes that he loved Poe.

  • [531]
    "THE RAVEN," unsigned
    1864 October 21.
    1/4 column clipped from the Montgomery Daily Appeal

    J. E. E. writes the Editor asking if Poe had copied "The Raven" from the Persian, as a Mr. [John Dunmore?] Lang, "the Eastern traveller," [John Dunmore Lang] asserted in the London Star. The Editor replies that the poem was Poe's imaginative creation.

  • [532]
    NEILSON POE, letter to GABRIEL HARRISON
    1864 December 3.
    1/4 column clipped from the Home Journal, [p.] 2

    In a letter dated 21 August 1855, Neilson Poe thinks the place where Poe is now buried is singularly appropriate, but if Maria Clemm wishes, he will consent to Poe's body being moved to Greenwood Cemetery in Brooklyn. He is now about to have a slab placed over the grave, with the dates of Poe's birth and death, and a suitable inscription.

  • [533]
    "PEN AND I -- AT IDLEWILD," by N. P. Willis
    1865 February 4.
    1 column clipped from the Home Journal

    Willis prints a translation of passages from a review of Poe's works in the German Monthly.

  • [534]
    "POE AS AN IMAGINATIVE WRITER," by Francis Gerry Fairfield
    1865 March 14.
    4 1/4 columns clipped from the Home Journal

    Fairfield writes in praise of Poe's imaginative powers.

  • [535]
    "POE'S MASTERPIECES," by Francis Gerry Fairfield
    1865 March 28.
    2 columns clipped from the Home Journal, p. 4.

    Enthusiastic critical article in which Fairfield calls for a new edition of Poe's masterpieces and suggests a table of contents for the volume.

  • [536]
    "PROSERPINA ON EARTH TO PLUTO IN HADES," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1865 March 28.
    11 6-line stanzas. 1/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal, p. 1, reprinted from Harper's "Easy Chair."

    Copy signed by Mrs. Whitman.

  • [537]
    " EDGAR A. POE, AGAIN," unsigned
    1865 May 30.
    1/2 column clipped from the Home Journal, p. 2.

    This unsigned item, reprinted from the Mobile Tribune, comments upon appraisals of Poe published in the Home Journal and announces that William J. Widdleton will bring out a volume of Poe's masterpieces.

  • [538]
    "REMINISCENCES," by Elizabeth Oakes Smith
    1867 February.
    2 1/4 columns clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Mrs. Smith recalls Poe's personal appearance and mannerisms.

  • [539]
    "POE'S DEATH AND BURIAL," by Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass
    1867 February.
    1 column clipping from the New York Times which reprints item entitled "The Facts of Poe's Death and Burial" from Beadle's Monthly for March

    Dr. Snodgrass responds to Elizabeth Oakes Smith's reminiscences of Poe published in Beadle's Monthly for February 1867.

  • [540]
    UNSIGNED PARAGRAPH FROM UNIDENTIFIED PUBLICATION ADVERTISING DR. JOSEPH E. SNODGRASS'S REPLY IN BEADLE'S MONTHLY FOR MARCH TO ELIZABETH OAKES SMITH'S REMINISCENCES CONCERNING POE'S DEATH
    1867 ca. February.
  • [541]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE -- HIS LAST HOURS," unsigned
    1867 ca. March.

    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, printing "extracts" from Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass' article in Beadle's Monthly for March 1867.

  • [542]
    "POE AT WEST POINT," by Thomas W. Gibson
    1867 October 27.
    3/4 column clipped from an unidentified New York newspaper, reprinted from Harper's, November 1867.
  • [543]
    "POE AT WEST POINT," unsigned [ Thomas W. Gibson ]
    1867 November.
    Pp. 754-756 clipped from Harper's

    Gibson had been a classmate of Poe at West Point. Item is annotated by Ingram.

  • [544]
    "THE LATE N. P. WILLIS, AND LITERARY MEN FORTY YEARS AGO," unsigned
    1868 January.
    Pp. 234-242 clipped from the Northern Monthly

    Item accompanied by note by Thomas Ollive Mabbott, 3 April 1965, 1 p. Ingram was of the opinion that Thomas Cottrell Clarke was the author of this article, but in 1965 Professor Mabbott disputed him, declaring that Major Mordecai M. Noah had written it. Mabbott, however, made no attempt to explain why the publisher had waited nearly twenty years after Noah's death to print the item.

  • [545]
    "EVENINGS WITH THE AUTHOR OF'OLD GRIMES'," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1868 March 27.
    1/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Mrs. Whitman describes evenings spent with distinguished company in the home of Albert G. Greene in Providence and discusses Sarah Margaret Fuller's conversation.

  • [546]
    "A DEAD MAN DEFENDED: BEING SOME REMINISCENCES OF THE POET POE," by Captain Mayne Reid
    1869 April.
    Pp. 305-308 of Onward
  • [547]
    "POE'S'EUREKA' AND RECENT SPECULATIONS," by William Hand Browne
    1869 August.
    Pp. 190-199 clipped from the New Eclectic Magazine, V
  • [548]
    "THE ROUT OF THE CHILDREN," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1870 March 24.
    6 stanzas clipped from the Providence Journal, p. 1

    The poem is from Victor Hugo's "A Des Oiseaux Envolves."

  • [548-a]
    "OUR HAUNTED ROOM," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1870 April 25.
    17 3-line stanzas clipped from the Providence Journal, p. 1
  • [549]
    "SOUTHERN LITERATURE," unsigned
    1870 June 8.
    1 column clipped from the New York Tribune

    Writer furnishes a nasty picture of Poe in the course of criticizing Southern literature. The item may be the work of Kate Field.

  • [549-a]
    "THE PORTRAIT," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1870 July 2.
    10 4-line stanzas clipped from the Providence Journal, p. 1, which reprints from Old and New for July

    In forwarding this clipping to Ingram in 1874, Mrs. Whitman wrote in the margin: "You must not think that this is a literal transcript from any canvas but rather from a picture seen in the mind's eye[,] Horatio."

  • [550]
    "DID POE WRITE'THE RAVEN' ?" by Reverend J. Shaver, and "POE'S POEM OF'THE RAVEN'," by "J."
    1870 July 29.
    3/4 column clipped from the New York Tribune

    The J. Shaver item is a letter to the New Orleans Times claiming to have found a letter to a Mr. Daniels of Philadelphia in which Poe admits stealing "The Raven" from Samuel Fenwick. The "J" item is a letter, pasted on a sheet with the first, from a purported classmate of Poe to the Editor of the Richmond Dispatch denying the charge.

  • [552]
    "LITERARY RETROSPECTIONS," by William Leggett
    1870 December 10.
    2 columns clipped from the New York Evening Mail

    Article prints comments upon Poe, William Leggett, John J. Audubon, John Howard Payne, McDonald Clarke, Aaron Burr, Edwin Forrest, and Fanny Kemble made by the late William Gowans in his "Western Memorabilia."

  • [555]
    "POE'S GUARDIAN ANGEL," by James Wood Davidson
    1870 April 21.
    3/4 column clipped from the Home Journal, p. 1

    Obituary of Maria Clemm, who died on 16 February 1871.

  • [556]
    "THE AMERICAN CRITIC," by Eugene Benson
    1870 August.
    1/2 column clipped from the Season

    A severe summing up of Poe as a critic. The item is annotated by both Sarah Helen Whitman and Ingram.

  • [557]
    "THE CHIMES DONE IN RHYMES. AFTER POE AND NEWMAN," by "D. P."
    1870 November 26.
    4 stanzas. 1/2 column clipped from the Capital
  • [558]
    "THE GRAVE OF POE," by Eugene L. Didier
    1872 January 27.
    Clipped from Appleton's Journal, p. 104. With a 11/2 column reprint of portions of this article in an unidentified Washington, DC, newspaper.
  • [559]
    "A STORY ABOUT EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1872 April.
    1/4 column reprint in an unidentified newspaper of "Monthly Gossip" in Lippincott's Magazine, May 1872

    An account attributed to John R. Thompson of Poe's drinking a glass of brandy at one swallow after having previously drunk thirteen mint juleps.

  • [560]
    "MORE ABOUT POE. HOW'ANNABEL LEE' CAME TO BE PUBLISHED," by " Paul Peebles "
    1872 May 8.
    3/4 column clipped from the Home Journal, p. 1

    In return for a loan of $5, Poe allegedly flung the MS. of "Annabel Lee" to John R. Thompson, remarking that it was "a little thing I knocked off last night --it's not much."

  • [560-a]
    "HOW POE'S'ANNABEL LEE' CAME TO BE PUBLISHED"
    1872 May 8.
    1/4 column reprint of the Home Journal item clipped from the Providence Evening Press

    Same as Item 560.

  • [561]
    "A GRAND POEM," unsigned
    1872 August.
    Clipping from an unidentified newspaper. 1/2 column

    Reprints "Resurrexi," purportedly a posthumous poem by Poe delivered through the agency of the Spiritualist medium Lizzie Doten.

  • [561-a]
    "SPIRIT POETRY," unsigned
    1872 ca. August.
    Clipping from unidentified publication. 1 1/4 columns

    Reprints "The Kingdom," an imitation of "Ulalume" which is purportedly a posthumous poem by Poe delivered through the agency of the Spiritualist medium Lizzie Doten.

  • [561-b]
    "TO PERDITA," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1872 ca. August.
    5 stanzas clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from Old and New for August, 1872, p. 184.
  • [562]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE'S LAST DAYS," unsigned
    1872 September 21.
    Pp. 371-372 clipped from Public Opinion, reprinted from Harper's New Monthly Magazine. 1/2 column.
  • [563]
    "PORTRAITS OF POE," by Chandos Fulton
    1873 March 12.
    1/2 column clipped from the Home Journal, p. [1]

    Surveys both portraits and daguerreotypes of Poe.

  • [565]
    "OUR LAST WALK," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1873 October 4.
    9 4-line stanzas clipped from the Providence Daily Journal

    The poem is addressed to "R. B. B."

  • [566]
    "SANTA CLAUS," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1873 December 24.
    13 4-line stanzas clipped from the Providence Daily Journal.
  • [567]
    "LITERARY MORCEAUX," unsigned
    ca. 1873.
    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Augusta Constitutionalist

    Reports visit by Paul Hamilton Hayne to Poe's grave in Baltimore and his appeal for a monument to be erected over Poe's remains.

  • [568]
    "THE LIFE AND CHARACTER OF EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    ante 1874.
    1/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Reports a lecture by John Reuben Thompson before the YMCA on Poe as a critic, a romancer, and a poet. Quotes from the close of the lecture.

  • [569]
    ON ROSALIE POE, unsigned
    1874 February 16?.
    2 paragraphs separately clipped from unidentified newspapers

    One clipping reports from the Newark Advertiser that Poe's sister is residing in the utmost poverty at Hicks Landing on the James River in Virginia. The other clipping declares that she is now poor, aged, and helpless and is residing in Baltimore.

  • [570]
    "MORE NEW FACTS ABOUT EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by John H. Ingram
    1874 February 21.
    Pp. 248-250 clipped from the London Mirror

    These pages are the single known copy of this article which is based almost entirely upon information about Poe that Ingram had begun receiving from Sarah Helen Whitman in January 1874. He had previously published an article called "New Facts about Edgar Allan Poe " in the Mirror on 24 January 1874, but no known copy of it has survived.

  • [571]
    ON ROSALIE POE, unsigned
    1874 ca. March.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified Baltimore newspaper

    Reports Rosalie Poe's straitened circumstances and requests contributions of clothing and comforts of life to be sent to her at the Epiphany Church Home, Washington, DC.

  • [572]
    "LES DEUX ASSASSINATS DE LA RUE MORGUE" ("THE MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE"), by Poe
    1874 April 18 & May 2.
    Pp. 39-40, 42-44; 70-75 of Muse Universel, III-IV

    A "traduction nouvelle" accompanied by a grisly illustration.

  • [573]
    "POE. HIS POETRY AND HIS GRAVE," unsigned
    1874 May 5.
    1/5 column clipped from the Baltimore Evening Post

    "B. G. T." inquires about the authorship of the opening lines to Poe's first "To Helen." In his reply, the Editor urges the inquirer to show his appreciation of Poe by helping to keep his neglected grave in order and adds that the Counting Room of the Post will receive subscriptions for that purpose.

  • [574]
    "LITERARY NOTES," unsigned
    1874 ante May 14.
    3 paragraphs clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    An offer by George W. Childs of Philadelphia to erect a monument over Poe's grave has been declined by friends and relatives of the poet, who prefer that the memorial be the one proposed by the teachers and public school officials, as well as admirers of Poe in Baltimore, who have already placed a considerable sum for it in the hands of the proper committee.

  • [575]
    "A MONUMENT TO POE," unsigned
    1874 May 17.
    Paragraph clipped from the Baltimore Gazette, reprinted from the Baltimore Sun

    After describing the efforts by Paul Hamilton Hayne to raise money for the monument to Poe, the article offers a mixed account of Poe's character and genius.

  • [576]
    "THE POE MONUMENT," unsigned
    1874 ca. May 18.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    It was Mr. J. C. Derby of Baltimore who suggested to George W. Childs that a suitable monument be erected over Poe's grave.

  • [577]
    NOTICE OF THE PUBLICATION OF AN ARTICLE BY INGRAM, unsigned
    1874 June 6.
    Paragraph clipped from the Academy

    Ingram's article appears in the Gentleman's Magazine for May and in the Temple Bar for June 1874.

  • [578]
    "THE LONDON PRESS ON EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1874 June 30.
    Paragraph clipped from the Providence Journal

    Calls attention to Ingram's article on Poe appearing in the Gentleman's Magazine for May and in the Temple Bar for June 1874.

  • [579]
    "POE'S HOUSE AT FORDHAM, " by M. J. Lamb
    1874 July 18.
    Pp. 75-77 clipped from Appleton's Journal, XI

    Lamb describes the Poe cottage and furnishes an illustration captioned "The House in which Poe Wrote 'The Raven'."

  • [580]
    "LITERARY NOTES," unsigned
    1874 July 18.
    Paragraph clipped from the Boston Commonwealth

    Item notes three upcoming lectures by William F. Gill, one of which is entitled "The Romance of Edgar A. Poe. "

  • [581]
    "ADVENTURE INCOMPARABLE D'UN CERTAIN HANS PFAALL," by Poe
    1874 July 18.
    Pp. 248-252 of Muse Universel, IV

    One installment of a translation of Poe's "Hans Pfaall" accompanied by an illustration of a balloon's ascent.

  • [582]
    ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE DEATH OF ROSALIE POE, unsigned
    1874 July 22.
    Paragraph clipped from the Washington Evening Star

    Rosalie Poe died in Epiphany Church Home in Washington on this date at 68 years of age.

  • [583]
    "DEATH OF THE SISTER OF EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " unsigned
    1874 July 23.
    Paragraph clipped from the Washington Daily Critic

    Rosalie Poe came to the Epiphany Church Home on 1 March. Following her funeral on 23 July, she was buried at the Rock Creek Cemetery.

  • [584]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " unsigned
    1874 November 29.
    3/4 column clipped from the New York Herald

    A favorable review of Richard Henry Stoddard's new edition of Poe's poems.

  • [585]
    "STODDARD'S EDITION OF POE," unsigned
    1874 December 8.
    2 columns clipped from the New York Daily Tribune

    A favorable review of the book and a censorious account of the "tragic" life of an "erratic genius." The clipping is annotated by Ingram.

  • [586]
    A MEMORIAL OF LOUIS A. GODEY
    1874 December 15.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    John Scott of Pennsylvania presented before the Senate a memorial of the publisher of Godey's Lady's Book in which he set forth alleged unjust discriminations against periodicals in the new postage law.

  • [587]
    "HOLIDAY BOOKS," unsigned
    1874 December 21.
    1 column clipped from the New York Herald

    Review of William F. Gill's article " Edgar Poe and His Biographer, Rufus W. Griswold, " in Lotos Leaves, Boston, 1875, pp. 279-306.

  • [588]
    OBITUARY OF THOMAS COTTRELL CLARKE, unsigned
    1874 ca. December 23.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from Potter's American Monthly

    Clarke died in Camden, NJ, on 23 December 1874.

  • [589]
    "LOST TO THE WORLD," unsigned
    1874 December 26.
    2 columns clipped from the Flushing Journal

    A sketch of Poe's life abounding in inaccurate details. Possibly the work of Dr. Roland S. Houghton.

  • [590]
    " GEORGE W. CHILDS ERECTING A MONUMENT TO POE," unsigned
    1874.
    Paragraph clipped from the New York Evening Post

    George W. Childs has offered to erect a suitable monument over Poe's grave, allowing the money already collected for one to be kept as a maintenance fund.

  • [591]
    "WHAT BALTIMORE EDITORS THINK OF POE," unsigned
    ca. 1874.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Commercial Appeal

    Despite the report that three Baltimore editors deny genius to Poe and wish he had died and been buried somewhere else, Paul H. Hayne and George W. Childs still want to erect a monument over his grave in Baltimore.

  • [592]
    AN INTERVIEW WITH INGRAM, unsigned
    ca. 1874.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified London newspaper

    Ingram denies to an American correspondent that he intends to take to lecturing and that he is not going to make a lecture tour of the United States.

  • [593]
    "THE MONUMENT TO EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1874?.
    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Baltimore American

    Funds for a monument are to be gathered by subscription and supplemented by a gift from George W. Childs of Philadelphia.

  • [594]
    " EDGAR POE'S POEMS," unsigned
    1875 January 5.
    1 column clipped from a proof sheet of the Daily Review

    Review of Volume III, Poems and Essays, from The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, edited by Ingram and published by A. and C. Black, Edinburgh. The reviewer considers prose to have been Poe's "strength" and verse his "byework."

  • [595]
    "PERSONALITIES," unsigned
    1875 January 28.
    1 column clipped from the Independent

    A slashing attack upon Poe and upon Moncure D. Conway's defense of him recently published in the Cincinnati Commercial Tribune.

  • [596]
    REVIEW OF RICHARD HENRY STODDARD'S RECENT EDITION OF POE'S POEMS, unsigned
    1875 ca. January.
    1/2 column clipped from the Daily Graphic
  • [597]
    "ROSALIE OR ROSE POE," by Erl Rygenhoeg
    1875 February.
    Paragraph clipped from the American Bibliopolist, VII, p. 18
  • [598]
    ENGLISH PRESS TEEMS WITH PRAISES FOR INGRAM'S NEW AND COMPLETE EDITION OF POE'S WORK, unsigned
    1875 ca. February.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified Richmond newspaper.
  • [599]
    "ROSALIE, OR ROSE POE," by S. H. K.
    1875 March 4.
    Paragraph clipped from the American Bibliopolist

    In answer to Erl Rygenhoeg's comments [Item 597], "S. H. K." of Washington, DC, writes that Miss Poe herself had doubtless furnished her name to the Epiphany Church Home authorities as "Rose" and not "Rosalie."

  • [600]
    REVIEW OF RICHARD HENRY STODDARD'S NEW EDITION OF POE'S POEMS, unsigned
    1875 March 9.
    Paragraph clipped from the Providence Journal

    The reviewer believes that Stoddard's Memoir of Poe adds something of interest to the volume but that Poe's poems need no praise, for they will live forever on the lips and in the hearts of his readers.

  • [600-a]
    "MEMORIES OF POE," unsigned
    1875 March 10.
    1/2 column clipped from the Home Journal, p. [4]

    Comments upon an article about Poe written by Moncure D. Conway.

  • [601]
    MENTION OF INGRAM'S ARTICLE, " EDGAR A. POE " IN THE ECLECTIC FOR MARCH, unsigned
    1875 March.
    Paragraph clipped from the Boston Commonwealth

    The commentator finds Ingram's article a compromise between Rufus W. Griswold's bitterness and Ingram's customary admiration.

  • [602]
    MENTION OF INGRAM'S ARTICLE, " EDGAR A. POE, " WHICH IS TO APPEAR IN THE INTERNATIONAL REVIEW FOR MARCH, unsigned
    1875 March.
    Paragraph clipped from the Boston Commonwealth

    The commentator labels Ingram's article a defense of Poe against Rufus W. Griswold's posthumous slanders.

  • [602-a]
    "THE ORIGIN OF POE'S RAVEN," unsigned
    1875 April 14.
    Paragraph clipped from the Home Journal

    The Athenaeum reports that Poe took the name "Lenore" and the burden "Nevermore" from two poems that Alfred, Lord Tennyson had published in The Gem in 1831.

  • [603]
    OBITUARY OF COLONEL GAMALIEL LYMAN DWIGHT, unsigned
    1875 April 21.
    1/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Enclosed in Item 19. Colonel Dwight was a close personal friend of Sarah Helen Whitman.

  • [604]
    DESCRIPTION OF MONUMENT TO BE ERECTED OVER POE'S GRAVE, by E. L. D. [ Eugene L. Didier ]
    1875 May 15.
    11/2 columns clipped from "Editor's Table" of Appleton's Journal.
  • [605]
    NOTICE OF LAUDATORY RECEPTION GIVEN BY THE ENGLISH PRESS TO INGRAM'S EDITION OF POE'S WORKS, unsigned
    1875 May 21.
    Paragraph clipped from the Richmond Daily Enquirer.
  • [606]
    NOTICE OF A LECTURE ON PSYCHOMETRY DELIVERED BY PROFESSOR JOSEPH RHODES BUCHANAN, unsigned
    1875 May 22.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified Boston newspaper

    The lecture was delivered at Parker Memorial Hall, Boston, on 2 April 1875. Pasted to this notice is another paragraph stating that Professor Buchanan had read a chapter of his forthcoming work, Philosophy and Philosophers, to a coterie of literary gentlemen assembled in his home in Louisville, KY. It was to Buchanan that Sarah Helen Whitman submitted her MS. of "To Helen" given to her by Poe, for a psychometric reading. He did not return the MS. to her, and it has never been located. See Items 241, 253, 262.

  • [607]
    "SOMETHING ABOUT EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1875 June 9.
    Paragraphs clipped from the Baltimore Sun and the Richmond Evening Journal

    Reports Colonel Robert Mayo's memories of youthful swimming feats he shared with Poe in Richmond.

  • [608]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by John Watson Dalby
    1875 August.
    Pp. 473-487 clipped from St. James's Magazine, XXXVI

    A biographical-critical article based upon Ingram's four-volume edition of Poe's works. Dalby notes omissions and suggests needed changes to be made in the next edition.

  • [609]
    "POE AND BYRON," unsigned
    1875 September 21.
    1 1/4 columns clipped from the Baltimore American

    The article compares the posthumous reputations of the two poets.

  • [610]
    "SCRIBNER," unsigned
    1875 ca. September 27.
    1/4 column clipped from an unidentified New York newspaper

    The item notices the second installment of E. C. Stedman's "Minor Victorian Poets" in Scribner's Magazine and quotes with approval a long paragraph from Francis Gerry Fairfield's "A Madman of Letters," which was an essay on Poe published in Scribner's Monthly for October.

  • [610-a]
    "GENIUS OF POE," unsigned
    1875 September 29.
    3 columns clipped from the Home Journal, p. [4]

    A biographical-critical article.

  • [611]
    "AN EARLY POEM BY EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " signed E. L. D. [ Eugene L. Didier ]
    1875 September.
    Pp. 607-608 clipped from Scribner's Monthly

    P. 607 carries a facsimile of what purports to be a holograph copy of "Alone," signed by Poe and dated 17 March 1829. Ingram's notation on it reads, "Not Poe's calligraphy."

  • [612]
    MONUMENT TO BE ERECTED AT POE'S GRAVE IS TO BE SURMOUNTED BY A RAVEN IN MARBLE, unsigned
    1875 ca. September.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper.
  • [614]
    "POE," unsigned
    1875 October 8.
    3/4 column clipped from the New York World

    Eulogy evoked by the tardy honor done to Poe's ashes by the plans to erect a monument over his hitherto unmarked grave.

  • [615]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 October 9.
    2 1/4 columns clipped from the Baltimorean

    Article is accompanied by a picture of Poe reproduced from a photograph by C. S. Mosher of Baltimore. On the obverse of this clipping there is a paragraph stating that the monument is already in place over Poe's grave.

  • [616]
    "TO ISADORE. A POEM BY EDGAR ALLAN POE "
    1875 October 9?.
    5 10-line stanzas clipped from the Columbia Register [SC]

    These verses were written by Abijah M. Ide, Jr., of South Attleboro, MA, who sent them to Poe who printed them in the Broadway Journal in 1845. Because Poe's MS. copy survives, the poem has been proffered from time to time as Poe's own composition. See Item 678.

  • [616-a]
    "DISINTERMENT OF THE REMAINS OF EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1875 October 11.
    Paragraph clipped from the Providence Daily Journal, p. 1, which reprints item from the Baltimore American

    Describes the condition of Poe's remains when exhumed.

  • [617]
    "POETIC PORTRAITS," by Edgar Fawcett
    1875 October 12.
    1/3 column clipped from the Richmond Daily Enquirer

    Two sonnets in tribute to "Poe" and "Whittier."

  • [618]
    " EDGAR A. POE'S MONUMENT," unsigned
    1875 October 12?.
    1/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Augusta Constitutionalist, June 1875

    After describing the monument, the Constitutionalist takes credit for having given impetus to the movement to place it over Poe's remains, arguing that its story of Paul Hamilton Hayne's description of the neglected grave had been widely circulated and thereby brought to the attention of J. C. Derby, who in turn was instrumental in convincing George W. Childs, the Philadelphia philanthropist, to underwrite the expense of the monument.

  • [619]
    "A REPLY TO MR. FAIRFIELD," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1875 October 13.
    1 column clipped from the New York Tribune

    In this long letter to the Editor, dated 29 September 1875, Mrs. Whitman cuttingly refutes Francis Gerry Fairfield's arguments, published in Scribner's Monthly in October 1875, that Poe was an epileptic, a "madman of letters."

  • [620]
    DR. ABRAHAM H. OKIE SUPPORTS SARAH HELEN WHITMAN'S DENIAL OF FRANCIS GERRY FAIRFIELD'S CHARGE THAT POE WAS AN EPILEPTIC, unsigned
    1875 post October 13.
    Paragraph clipped from the Providence Journal

    Dr. Okie had attended Poe in Mrs. Whitman's home in Providence in October 1848.

  • [621]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. A LETTER FROM FRANCIS GERRY FAIRFIELD "
    1875 October 18.
    1/4 column clipped from the New York Tribune

    In this weak reply to Sarah Helen Whitman's spirited defense of Poe, Fairfield publicly repents of his former admiration of the poet.

  • [622]
    "THE POET NOT AN EPILEPTIC," by F. K. M. [Dr. Fred K. Marvin ]
    1875 October 18.
    1/4 column clipped from the New York Tribune

    Marvin supports Sarah Helen Whitman's attack on Francis Gerry Fairfield's allegations against Poe.

  • [623]
    "'THE BELLS' AND'ANNABEL LEE'," by John S. Hart
    1875 October 18.
    1/4 column clipped from the New York Tribune

    In this letter to the Editor of the Tribune, the former editor of Sartain's Magazine discusses the dates of Poe's writing "The Bells" and "Annabel Lee" and gives dates of the various MSS. of "The Bells," which Poe submitted to Sartain's.

  • [624]
    "THE MONUMENT TO EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 October 28.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Herald

    The author expresses a sense of the fitness in erecting a memorial to Poe.

  • [625]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. A MONUMENT TO THE MEMORY OF THE POET," unsigned
    1875 October 28.
    3 columns clipped from the New York Herald

    The article furnishes a history of the monument and quotes Dr. John J. Moran's account of Poe's last hours and death. Sarah Helen Whitman has inserted marginal comments and has added in a footnote to this clipping: "We have hardly got the straight story yet, I fancy --the truth and nothing but the truth. Still it is very interesting."

  • [626]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. A MONUMENT TO THE MEMORY OF THE POET," unsigned
    1875 October 29.
    2 columns clipped from the Richmond Guide and News

    A partial reprint of the article in the New York Herald, 28 October [Item 625].

  • [627]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 October 29.
    1 1/2 columns clipped from the Baltimore Sun

    Prints Dr. John J. Moran's account of Poe's last hours and death.

  • [628]
    "A MAD MAN OF LETTERS," unsigned [by Francis Gerry Fairfield ]
    1875 October.
    Pp. 690-699 clipped from Scribner's Monthly

    Fairfield claims that Poe suffered from cerebral epilepsy. One of two copies of this item is heavily annotated by Ingram.

  • [629]
    "THE POE MONUMENT," unsigned
    1875 ca. October.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified New York newspaper, reprinted from the Baltimore American

    The monument to be erected over Poe's grave is being manufactured by Hugh Sisson and Company of Baltimore.

  • [630]
    "THE MONUMENT TO EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 ca. October.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified Baltimore newspaper

    The article describes the monument and notes that Professor Henry E. Shepherd is to be in charge of the dedication ceremonies.

  • [632]
    ON POE'S ALLEGED EPILEPSY, by "Medicus" [Dr. Abraham H. Okie ]
    1875 ca. November 1.
    3 paragraphs clipped from the Providence Journal

    Addressing Francis Gerry Fairfield's contention, Dr. Okie observes that if Poe had indeed been an epileptic, then in the interest of once again having such glorious poetic manifestations, it would be well if the malady were to prove epidemic among the poets.

  • [633]
    " EDGAR A. POE. HIS LIFE AND LITERARY LABORS," unsigned
    1875 November 2.
    31/4 columns clipped from the St. Louis Republican

    The Republican marks the dedication of the Poe monument by reprinting an essay by A. E. Kroeger which it had carried eleven years earlier. Kroeger is inaccurate in his facts.

  • [634]
    "HOOD'S SONG OF THE SHIRT AND POE'S RAVEN," unsigned
    1875 ca. November 8.
    1/2 column clipped from the South

    The article compares the difficulties Thomas Hood and Poe experienced in getting these two poems into print.

  • [635]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 November 16.
    Front and back pages of the Daily Graphic. 8 columns

    The article is accompanied by a picture of Poe taken by Stanton and Butler of Baltimore from a daguerreotype, pictures of Maria Clemm and the Poe Cottage at Fordham, and facsimiles of letters to Sara S. Rice from William Cullen Bryant, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell.

  • [636]
    "POE ON HIS CRITICS," unsigned
    1875 November 16.
    1/2 column clipped from the Daily Graphic

    Portions of Poe's letter to Sarah Helen Whitman, 18 October 1848, taken from advanced sheets of William F. Gill's "New Facts about Edgar A. Poe, " to be published in Laurel Leaves.

  • [637]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. HIS LIFE, CHARACTER AND WORKS," unsigned
    1875 November 17.
    11/2 columns clipped from the New York Tribune

    Sympathetic biographical-critical article evoked by the dedication of Poe's monument in Baltimore.

  • [638]
    "POE AN EPILEPTIC. NEW EVIDENCE OF THE ASSERTION PROMISED -- A PHYSICIAN'S OPINION," by Francis Gerry Fairfield
    1875 November 17.
    Paragraph clipped from the New York Tribune

    Fairfield replies to Dr. Fred K. Marvin's article, "The Poet Not an Epileptic," which had appeared in the Tribune on 18 October 1875.

  • [639]
    "A TRIBUTE TO GENIUS," unsigned
    1875 November 17.
    2 1/4 columns clipped from the Baltimore Daily Gazette

    Program of the exercises held at the dedication of the Poe monument. Article includes texts of poems by William Winter, E. Norman Gunnison, and Sarah J. Bolton and letters from Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Longfellow, Sylvanus D. Lewis, James Russell Lowell, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sarah Helen Whitman, Walt Whitman, and John G. Whittier.

  • [640]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. BALTIMORE'S TRIBUTE," unsigned
    1875 November 17.
    Full page clipped from the Baltimore Evening News

    An account of the exercises, the letters read, a list of important personages attending, and the addresses made by Professor William Elliot, Jr., Professor Henry E. Shepherd, John H. B. Latrobe.

  • [641]
    "THE POE MONUMENT," unsigned
    1875 November 17.
    2 columns clipped from the New York Evening Post

    An account of the ceremonies.

  • [642]
    "THE POET EDGAR ALLAN POE, unsigned
    1875 November 17.
    1 1/4 columns clipped from the Baltimore Sun

    A sketch of Poe's life and work.

  • [643]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 November 17.
    4/5 column clipped from the New York Evening Post

    A biographical-critical account of Poe's life and work.

  • [644]
    ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON CONSENTS TO WRITE AN EPITAPH FOR POE'S MONUMENT, unsigned
    1875 post November 17.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper quoting an English journal.
  • [645]
    "IN MEMORIAM. A CROWNING TRIBUTE TO THE GENIUS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 November 18.
    3 1/2 columns clipped from the Baltimore Daily Gazette

    Account of the unveiling of the monument at Poe's grave.

  • [646]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. DEDICATION OF THE MEMORIAL," unsigned
    1875 November 18.
    2 columns on the front page, and 2 1/2 column on p. 4 clipped from the Washington Daily Advertiser

    Account of the unveiling ceremonies.

  • [647]
    "THE POET EDGAR ALLAN POE. DEDICATION OF A MONUMENT TO HIS MEMORY," unsigned
    1875 November 18.
    5 columns on front page, of which 2 have been cut out, 1/2 column on p. 4, clipped from the Baltimore Sun

    Account of the unveiling of the monument at Poe's grave.

  • [648]
    "THE POE MONUMENT. CEREMONIES AT THE UNCOVERING," unsigned
    1875 November 18.
    2 1/2 columns clipped from the New York Daily Tribune

    Account of the unveiling ceremonies.

  • [649]
    " EDGAR A. POE'S MONUMENT. THE DEDICATION CEREMONIES IN BALTIMORE YESTERDAY," unsigned
    1875 November 18.
    3/4 column clipped from the New York Sun

    Account of the unveiling ceremonies.

  • [650]
    " EDGAR A. POE. UNVEILING OF THE MONUMENT TO THE POET IN BALTIMORE, " unsigned
    1875 November 18.
    Paragraph clipped from the Providence Journal

    Account of the unveiling of the monument at Poe's grave.

  • [651]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE. THE MONUMENT TO HIS MEMORY UNVEILED AT BALTIMORE, " unsigned
    1875 November 18?.
    1 1/2 columns clipped from the Boston Globe

    Account of the ceremonies.

  • [652]
    " BALTIMORE'S TRIBUTE TO E. A. POE, " unsigned
    1875 November 18?.
    3/4 column clipped from the Richmond Enquirer

    Account of the unveiling of the monument at Poe's grave.

  • [653]
    "THE POE MEMORIAL EXERCISES," by "E. O. P."
    1875 November 19.
    1/2 column clipped from the Boston Globe

    "The atmosphere of the occasion was rather that of a grand triumphal pageant than of a funeral service."

  • [654]
    " EDGAR A. POE. EXERCISES AT THE UNVEILING OF THE MONUMENT," unsigned
    1875 November 19.
    3/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal
  • [655]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1875 November 20.
    4 columns clipped from the Baltimorean

    Includes pictures of Poe and of the monument.

  • [656]
    ACCOUNT OF POE'S BURIAL IN 1849, unsigned
    1875 November 20.
    1/4 column clipped from the Baltimorean

    George W. Spence, the sexton who officiated at Poe's burial in 1849, superintended the exhumations and reburials of Poe and Maria Clemm in 1875.

  • [657]
    " PEORIA IN A PASSION ABOUT THE POETS AND EDGAR POE, " unsigned
    1875 November 26.
    1 1/4 column clipped from the New York World

    Satirical verses about the Northern poets who refused to attend the dedication ceremonies of the Poe monument in Baltimore.

  • [658]
    " EDGAR A. POE. THE BALTIMORE MONUMENT CELEBRATION," unsigned
    1875 November 28.
    3/4 column proof from an unidentified newspaper

    Account of the ceremonies, including an excerpt from Professor Henry E. Shepherd's address and a letter from an unidentified New England poet describing the occasion.

  • [659]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by Eduard Engel
    1875 November.
    Pp. 377-389 of Neue Monatschefte fuer Dichtkunst und Kritik, II

    In German. A biographical-critical essay.

  • [660]
    JOHN HENRY INGRAM AND ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON INVITED TO TAKE PART IN THE UNVEILING OF THE POE MONUMENT IN BALTIMORE, unsigned
    1875 ca. November.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified English newspaper.
  • [661]
    "THE POE MONUMENT," unsigned
    1875 December 4.
    2 1/2 columns clipped from the New York Weekly Graphic

    A brief survey of Poe's life and reputation accompanied by a reproduction of the Stanton and Butler photograph.

  • [662]
    JAMES WOOD DAVIDSON COINED THE WORD "GRISWOLDIZE," unsigned
    1875 December 13.
    Paragraph clipped from the Providence Journal

    In remarks prompted by the dedication of the Poe monument in Baltimore, Davidson said, "In the future, when we wish, in one single, stinging word, to stigmatize a being who has exhausted all his resources of malignity, falsehood, and dishonor against a dead man who had trusted him, we will say that he Griswoldized him."

  • [663]
    "ONLY A QUESTION OF TIME," by S. H. W. [ Sarah Helen Whitman ]
    1875 December 21.
    3/4 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Mrs. Whitman explains the efforts being made to settle dates and chronological order of Poe's poems. She mentions Ingram's article on "Politian" in the New London Magazine (reprinted in the Southern Magazine, November 1875) and alludes to Algernon Charles Swinburne's growth as a poet.

  • [664]
    "THE OLD MIRROR," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1875 December 28.
    12 4-line stanzas clipped from the Providence Journal, reprinted from Laurel Leaves, pp. 405-407
  • [665]
    INGRAM INVITED TO VISIT THE UNITED STATES, unsigned
    1875.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified English newspaper

    Among many invitations to visit the United States, Ingram has received one from the Alumni Society of the University of Virginia asking that he be a guest at the semi-centennial of the University.

  • [667]
    "A QUESTION OF ORIGINALITY," unsigned
    1875.
    Paragraph clipped from the New York Herald

    Reports the claim by the Athenaeum that the name Lenore and the phrase "Nevermore" were suggested to Poe by works by Alfred, Lord Tennyson published in The Gem in 1831.

  • [668]
    " EDGAR A. POE. HOW'THE RAVEN' WAS WRITTEN," unsigned
    1875.
    1/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Repeats Francis Gerry Fairfield's conflicting stories, published in Scribner's Monthly, October 1875, about how "The Raven" was composed.

  • [669]
    "THE GRECIAN FLUTE," by Richard Henry Stoddard
    1875.
    4 stanzas. Galley for Civil Service Review

    A parody of Poe's "The Bells."

  • [671]
    POT-POURRI, edited by "Abel Reid" [ William James Linton ]
    1875.
    24 pp.

    Ten parodies of Poe's work ("The Ruined Palace," "Dream-Mere," "Israfiddlestrings," "The Ghouls in the Belfry," "Hullaloo," "To Any," "Hannibal Leigh," "Raving," "The Monster Maggot," "Poetic Fragments") and one criticism of current efforts to honor Poe ("Under-Lines").

  • [672]
    ANNOUNCEMENT OF MALLARM'S LE CORBEAU, unsigned
    ca. 1875.
    2 paragraphs clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    An edition of 240 copies has been printed of Stephane Mallarme's translation of "The Raven." The text is illustrated by Edouard Manet.

  • [673]
    "THE BALTIMORE PRESS ON THE GRAVE OF POE," unsigned
    ca. 1875.
    1/3 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Baltimore American

    The Baltimore press is disgusted with "those literary'dead beats' " who for a quarter of a century have been "worrying and wearying" editors with pretended sympathy for Poe, especially those "dead beats" in Baltimore who have been agitating for a monument over his grave, all of this just to get their names into print.

  • [674]
    "THE POE MONUMENT," unsigned
    ca. 1875.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified Baltimore newspaper

    An Englishman has contributed twenty sixpenny stamps to the Poe monument fund.

  • [675]
    "POE'S WIFE," unsigned
    ca. 1875.
    2 paragraphs clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Baltimore Sun

    Fordham citizens are surprised that nothing has been done to move Virginia Poe's remains from Fordham to rest with those of her husband in Baltimore. The Sun suggests that the Fordham citizens take steps to effect the removal.

  • [677]
    THE INGRAM-GILL CONTROVERSY, unsigned
    1876 post January 15.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Report of the controversy between Ingram and William F. Gill over originality of material used by Ingram in his Memoir in Edgar Allan Poe, A Memorial Volume.

  • [678]
    "TO ISADORE," unsigned
    1876 February 2.
    Paragraph and 5 10-line stanzas clipped from the Carolina Spartan

    The Carolina Spartan attributes these verses to Poe, but they are the work of Abijah M. Ide, Jr., of South Attleboro, MA, who sent them to Poe in 1845 as Editor of the Broadway Journal. See Item 616.

  • [679]
    RICHMOND LADY COLLECTS POE MATERIALS FOR INGRAM, unsigned
    1876 ca. February 17.
    Paragraph clipped from the Petersburg Daily News

    The daughter of an old black servant of the Allans is reported to have said, "Mammy often tole me he [Poe] was the very wust child she had ever seed, but he had an extra head."

  • [680]
    "RECOLLECTIONS OF POE," by Elizabeth Oakes Smith
    1876 March 15.
    4 1/2 columns clipped from the Home Journal

    Among other things, Mrs. Smith declares that Poe was beaten to death by the emissary of a woman whose letters he had refused to return.

  • [681]
    "OBITUARY," unsigned
    1876 ca. March 24.
    1/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Obituary of Dr. Roland Stebbins Houghton who died in Hartford, CT, on Thursday, 23 March 1876.

  • [682]
    "ARBUTUS," by Sarah Helen Whitman, 3 stanzas dated April 14; and "EPIGAE," by Professor William Whitman Bailey, 3 6-line stanzas dated April 15
    1876 April 14 and 15.
    Both clipped from the Providence Journal

    Mrs. Whitman's poem, retitled "Epigaea" in 1878 edition of her works, is addressed to Professor Bailey, of Brown University, and his is in reply.

  • [683]
    " EDGAR A. POE, " letter to the Editor by Susan Archer Talley Weiss
    1876 April 26.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Herald

    A letter to the Editor, 10 April 1876, responding to the story by Elizabeth Oakes Smith that Poe was beaten to death and offering her own account of his last visit to Richmond in 1849.

  • [684]
    "POE AND HIS DEFAMERS," unsigned
    1876 April 28.
    3/4 column clipped from the Brooklyn Daily Times

    Criticizes Elizabeth Oakes Smith for her story about Poe's having been beaten to death that appeared in the Home Journal, 15 March 1876.

  • [685]
    "POE, IRVING, HAWTHORNE," unsigned [by George Parsons Lathrop ]
    1876 April.
    Pp. 799-808 clipped from Scribner's Monthly

    Lathrop explores the "American-ness" of these three writers.

  • [686]
    "AN OLD GRAVEYARD," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1876 May 12.
    1 column clipped from the Providence Daily Journal

    Mrs. Whitman describes a walk through the Old North Burying Grounds in Providence and a visit to the grave of her friend, Gamaliel Lyman Dwight. Mrs. Whitman was buried in this cemetery on 30 June 1878.

  • [687]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " by W. E. H. Searcy
    1876 ca. May 15.
    1/2 column clipped from the Sunny South

    A biographical-critical article in which the author writes that Poe's death occurred when he "stopped to drink with some friends" in Baltimore while on his way to Philadelphia to take his mother-in-law, Mrs. Clew [sic], to his wedding in Richmond.

  • [688]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE AGAIN," unsigned
    1876 May 27.
    1/2 column clipped from the Sunny South

    The article publishes a letter from Susan Archer Talley Weiss correcting statements made by W. E. H. Searcy [Item 687] about Poe's last days in Richmond and his proposed marriage to Sarah Elmira Royster Shelton and correcting Searcy's misspelling of Maria Clemm's name.

  • [689]
    "OUR NEW YORK LETTER. BOHEMIAN... EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " by Jay Charlton
    1876 May 27.
    4 1/4 columns clipped from the Danbury News

    Lengthy account of Poe's drunkenness and his behavior before a Boston audience. In a marginal note, Ingram assigned authorship of the article to Charles F. Briggs.

  • [690]
    NEWSPAPER PHOTOGRAPH OF POE
    1876 May 27.
    Clipped from an unidentified Atlanta newspaper
  • [691]
    " EDGAR A. POE. THE TRAGICAL CIRCUMSTANCES OF HIS DEATH," by Dr. John J. Moran
    1876 May?.
    2 columns clipped from the Detroit Tribune?

    Dr. Moran's account of Poe's last hours and death.

  • [692]
    "POE'S SUPPRESSED POETRY," by John H. Ingram
    1876 June 8.
    3 columns clipped from the New York Daily Graphic, reprinted from the Belgravia (London), June 1876

    Ingram found the first known copy of Tamerlane and Other Poems in a bale of pamphlets shipped from America to the British Museum Library in 1866, thus achieving an important prize which enabled him to prove that Richard Henry Stoddard and Rufus W. Griswold had erred when they denied that Poe had printed a volume of poems in 1827.

  • [693]
    " JOHN NEAL, " unsigned
    1876 ca. June 20.
    1/4 column clipped from the Boston Advertiser

    Article publishes excerpt from Reverend Dr. Brooks' elegy for John Neal, who died on 20 June 1876.

  • [694]
    "RESOLUTIONS ON THE DEATH OF JOHN NEAL, " unsigned
    1876 ca. June 20.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Article publishes resolutions on the death of John Neal made on behalf of the Cumberland Bar Association.

  • [695]
    "UNKNOWN POETRY OF EDGAR POE, " by John H. Ingram
    1876 June 21.
    2 columns clipped from the Home Journal, reprinted from the Belgravia (London)
  • [696]
    "LITERARY COMITY," letter to the Editor by William Hand Browne
    1876 July 20.
    1/4 column clipped from the Nation

    Browne asks if newspapers which have reprinted Ingram's copyrighted article "The Suppressed Poetry of Poe" have violated literary comity.

  • [697]
    " JOHN NEAL, OF PORTLAND, " by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1876 July 24.
    1 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Mrs. Whitman's recalls her three meetings with Neal and a story of his having published a novel in 1823 entitled Randolph which contained "certain strictures" on the Baltimore lawyer William Pinckney, who had died just as the volume came from the press. Challenged to a duel by Pinckney's son, Edward, Neal refused and was posted a coward. Within six weeks after the challenge, Neal brought out Errata, another two-volume novel, which purported to be the confessions of "a coward" which tells the story of the challenge and publishes the correspondence concerning it.

  • [698]
    "THE BIBLIOGRAPHY OF EDGAR POE, " by John H. Ingram
    1876 July 29.
    Pp. 145-146 clipped from the Athenaeum

    Having discovered the first known copy of Tamerlane and Other Poems, Ingram is able in this article to collate the texts of all four volumes of Poe's poetry for the first time.

  • [699]
    "THE BIBLIOGRAPHY OF EDGAR POE " and "THE LUNAR HOAX," by John H. Ingram
    1876 August 19.
    Pp. 241-242 clipped from the Athenaeum (London)

    Ingram announces in the first of these short articles that he is unable to answer questions about his essay on Poe's bibliography [Item 698] because he is travelling. In the second article he corrects some of the errors in an essay on "The Lunar Hoax" by a Richard Anthony Proctor which appeared in the Belgravia (London) for August [Item 700].

  • [700]
    "ON THE LUNAR HOAX," by Richard Anthony Proctor
    1876 August.
    Pp. 177-194 clipped from the Belgravia (London)
  • [701]
    ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE PUBLICATION OF THE EDGAR ALLAN POE : A MEMORIAL VOLUME, edited by Sara S. Rice
    1876 ca. November 21.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Messrs. Turnbull Brothers of Baltimore will issue on about 1 December Edgar Allen [sic] Poe : a Memorial Volume prepared by Miss Rice.

  • [702]
    " JOHN NEAL. AN AMERICAN AUTHOR IN ENGLAND FIFTY YEARS AGO," unsigned
    ca. 1876.
    1 1/2 columns clipped from the Portland Advertiser

    John Neal answered Sidney Smith's notorious question, "Who reads an American book?" by going to London and establishing himself as a writer.

  • [703]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " by S. E. Gabbett
    1877 January 20.
    1/2 column clipped from the Sunny South (Atlanta)

    This favorable review of the Memorial Volume has high praise for Ingram as a pioneer in vindicating Poe's character from Rufus W. Griswold's slanders.

  • [704]
    "BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF NEW PUBLICATIONS," by Paul Hamilton Hayne
    1877 ca. January.
    1 1/2 columns clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Hayne furnishes a very favorable review of the Memorial Volume edited by Sara S. Rice.

  • [705]
    "RECENT EDGAR POE LITERATURE," unsigned
    1877 February 17.
    Pp. 161-162 clipped from the English Civil Service Review

    This article combines a complimentary review of the Edgar Allan Poe : A Memorial Volume and a scathing review of Eugene L. Didier's Life and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe. [These reviews were not altogether Ingram's work; nevertheless, he clearly had a major role in them. He had access to the columns of the Civil Service Review, and he had a "friend" to whom he could give notes and suggestions for reviews, thus enabling him, if occasion demanded, to deny that he was the reviewer.]

  • [706]
    "A WOMAN THE CAUSE!" unsigned
    1877 March 3.
    1/4 column clipped from the Sunny South

    Mary Hewitt declares that Griswold's jealousy of Poe's relationship with an unnamed woman [ Frances S. Osgood ] was the basis of his hatred for Poe.

  • [707]
    "BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL SKETCH. THE LIFE AND LITERATURE OF EDGAR A. POE, " by Francis Gerry Fairfield
    1877 April.
    Pp. 31-32 clipped from the Library Table

    Fairfield surveys recent editions of Poe's works and publications about Poe by Ingram, Edward L. Didier, and Charles Baudelaire.

  • [708]
    "TO A. L. R.," unsigned [by B. W. Ball ]
    1877 ca. April.
    Clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Enclosed in Item 322. A sonnet celebrating Poe's love for Annie Richmond.

  • [709]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by James Ashcroft Noble
    1877 July.
    Pp. 409-[410] clipped from the New Quarterly Magazine

    Portion of an article.

  • [710]
    "LEONAINIE," unsigned [by James Whitcomb Riley ]
    1877 August 2.
    4 8-line stanzas. TC. From the Kokomo Dispatch

    These lines were deliberately forged by Riley to gain attention, as he admitted, by pretending to have found them written by Poe in an old book and left as payment for a night's lodging in a small hotel in Chesterfield, VA.

  • [711]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned and "AN INTERESTING LITERARY CURIOSITY," unsigned
    1877 August 5.
    2 clippings, one from the New York Herald, another from the New York Sun

    Story of the discovery of "Leonainie," taken from the Kokomo Dispatch (IN).

  • [712]
    "E. A. P.," unsigned
    1877 August 8.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York World

    The unidentified writer denies that Poe wrote "Leonainie."

  • [713]
    "A FRAUDULENT POEM," unsigned
    1877 August 29.
    1/4 column clipped from the New York Sun, reprinted from the Kokomo Tribune (IN)

    Exposes James Whitcomb Riley as the author of "Leonainie," a poem he attributed to Poe. When asked by an Eastern publisher for the MS., Riley employed an expert penman to copy the verses on the flyleaf of an old copy of Ainsworth's Dictionary, imitating the facsimile of "Alone" that had recently been published in Scribner's Monthly.

  • [714]
    "THE AUTHOR OF'THE RAVEN'," by William F. Gill
    1877 August.
    P. 5 clipped from Baldwin's Monthly

    A biographical-critical sketch.

  • [715]
    "NEW VERSION OF AN OLD STORY," by Sarah Helen Whitman
    1877 September 25.
    1 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Refuting the account given by an unsigned article in the latest number of the Library Table (30 August 1877, pp. 149-150), Mrs. Whitman retells the story of the Poe-Ellet "scandal."

  • [716]
    "THE JOURNAL OF JULIUS RODMAN. A NEWLY DISCOVERED WORK BY THE LATE EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1877 November 3.
    Pp. 9-10 clipped from the English Mirror of Literature

    Article tells the story of how Ingram "discovered" this work by Poe in Burton's Gentleman's Magazine.

  • [717]
    DENIAL THAT INGRAM DISCOVERED "A HITHERTO UNKNOWN ROMANCE" BY POE, unsigned
    1877 ca. November 21.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the New York Herald

    The unidentified writer, very likely Eugene L. Didier, dismisses the claim that Ingram had discovered "The Journal of Julius Rodman" and identifies the tale not as a "romance" but as merely a resume of explorations.

  • [718]
    THE GERMAN PRESS ON INGRAM'S DISCOVERY OF "JULIUS RODMAN," by Dr. F. L.
    1877 November.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified German newspaper and pasted on a postcard from Leopold Katscher to Ingram

    Comments on Ingram's discovery of Poe's "romance."

  • [719]
    CHARLES F. BRIGGS ON POE'S CHARACTER, unsigned
    1877 December 14.
    Paragraph clipped from the New York Sun

    Paragraph quotes from a posthumous article by the late Charles F. Briggs, "The Personality of Poe," published in the Independent, 13 December 1877.

  • [720]
    "POE AS HE WAS," by Charles F. Briggs
    1877 ca. December 24.
    3/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Independent

    Briggs accuses Poe of being a terror to his wife and his mother-in-law when he was drunk.

  • [722]
    MS. OF "THE BELLS" LOST, unsigned
    1878 ca. January 8.
    Paragraph clipped from the Lowell Courier (MA)

    Item announces a liberal reward for the return of a lost MS. of "The Bells" to N. C. Sanborn, a Lowell photographer. Poe had given the MS. to Mrs. Richmond, and she had given it to Sanborn to make a copy for Ingram.

  • [723]
    "LOST, A POEM," unsigned
    1878 January 8.
    Paragraph clipped from the Lowell Courier (MA)

    Reprints for its "richness" and "local interest" a derisive paragraph from the Detroit Free Press about the Courier's advertisement for the lost MS. of "The Bells" [Item 722]. Because the Courier failed to identify the MS., the Free Press warns the Lowell postmaster to "prepare to wrestle with several tons of manuscript poetry."

  • [724]
    NEW EDITION OF WILLIAM F. GILL'S LIFE OF POE IS FORTHCOMING, unsigned
    1878 January 26.
    Paragraph clipped from the San Francisco Argonaut

    This clipping is pasted together with Item 741 and with two undated clippings, both paragraphs, from the Argonaut, one denying that Ingram had discovered a new Poe "romance" in "Julius Rodman," the other repeating a tart remark by Ambrose Bierce about Poe's "The Bells."

  • [725]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE AND HIS POETRY," unsigned
    1878 January.
    Pp. 8-10 clipped from the Glasgow University Magazine

    A biographical-critical survey.

  • [726]
    THE GERMAN PRESS ON INGRAM'S DISCOVERY OF "THE JOURNAL OF JULIUS RODMAN," unsigned
    1878 January.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified German newspaper and pasted on a postcard from Leopold Katscher to Ingram
  • [727]
    "POE RECITING'THE RAVEN'," by Susan Archer Talley Weiss
    1878 February 25.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond Dispatch, reprinted from an article by Mrs. Weiss in Scribner's for March
  • [728]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE -- SOME REMINISCENCES BY ONE WHO KNEW HIM," unsigned
    1878 February 26.
    1/4 column clipped from the State (Richmond?)

    A news reporter writes of Poe's drunken conversation about his Eureka and of his being a hero to an old colored Richmond barber.

  • [729]
    " EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1878 ca. March 9.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified Boston newspaper, reprinted from the Library Table

    Takes issue with the severity with which William F. Gill attacks the veracity of Rufus W. Griswold in his recently published biography of Poe. "The truth is, there are bowlders of fact still verifiable as to Poe's unprincipled conduct on various occasions that render the vindications of Messers. Gill, Ingram and Eugene L. Didier subject for sly laughter in well-informed literary circles. And some day, in a fit of disgust at such puny Boswellism, some clever litterateur will collect and print them, brushing away the theories of these rhapsodizing biographers as if they were cobwebs."

  • [730]
    "REMINISCENCES OF E. A. POE," unsigned
    1878 March 21.
    2 columns clipped from the Richmond Evening Telegram. Also a second clipping of the same from an unidentified newspaper

    Mrs. Jane Clark of Louisville, KY, relates her memories of Poe, whom she knew particularly well during his last two visits to Richmond.

  • [731]
    "LAST DAYS OF EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned [ Susan Archer Talley Weiss ]
    1878 March.
    Pp. 707-716 clipped from Scribner's Monthly

    Annotated by Ingram: "A pack of lies."

  • [732]
    NOTICE OF SUSAN ARCHER TALLEY WEISS' "LAST DAYS OF EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1878 ca. March.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Reports that Mrs. Weiss' reminiscences "are said to be full of interest."

  • [733]
    "THAT MANUSCRIPT POEM," unsigned
    1878 ca. April 1.
    Paragraph clipped from the Lowell Courier (MA)?

    The lost MS. of "The Bells" [See Items 722-723] has been found.

  • [734]
    REVIEW OF WILLIAM F. GILL'S THE LIFE OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, unsigned
    1878 April 11.
    P. 248 clipped from the Nation

    A caustic review of the 4th edition.

  • [735]
    NOTICE OF PUBLICATION OF ARTICLE BY INGRAM, unsigned
    1878 April 14.
    Paragraph clipped from Le Rappel. In French

    The Ingram article is "Unknown Correspondence of Edgar Poe, " in New Quarterly Magazine, XIX.

  • [736]
    "APPLETONS' [sic] JOURNAL," unsigned
    1878 ca. late April.
    1/4 column clipped from the New York Evening Post

    Item notes publications of Ingram's "Unpublished Correspondence on Edgar A. Poe " in Appleton's Journal, IV (May 1878), 421-429, and comments that the letters Ingram publishes there "would blast a very much sounder reputation that Poe ever had for propriety of conduct and morality of mind."

  • [737]
    " EDGAR POE E IL SUO CARTEGGIO INEDITO," unsigned
    1878 May.
    Pp 89-104, 318-343, clipped from Revista Europea. In Italian

    Reprints Ingram's article on Poe's unpublished correspondence from the New Quarterly. See Item 735.

  • [738]
    NOTICE OF PUBICATION OF ARTICLE BY INGRAM, unsigned
    1878 ca. May.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified English newspaper

    Favorable notice of Ingram's "Unpublished Correspondence of Edgar Poe," the New Quarterly Magazine, XIX.

  • [739]
    "THE FUNERAL OF MRS. WHITMAN," unsigned
    1878 ca. July 1.
    2 paragraphs and 1 column clipped from the Providence Journal

    Mrs. Whitman, who died on 27 June, had requested that no notice be sent to the newspapers until after her funeral. The items describe the services and burial.

  • [740]
    "[DIED IN PROVIDENCE, R. I., SARAN HELEN WHITMAN. - 75 YEARS.]," a sonnet by G. W. P.
    1878 ca. July 3.
    Clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    A sonnet enclosed to Ingram in letter from Rose Peckham, 3 July [Item 337].

  • [741]
    "THE DEATH OF POE'S SWEETHEART," unsigned
    1878 July 13.
    Paragraph clipped from the San Francisco Argonaut

    This clipping on the death of Sarah Helen Whitman is pasted together with Item 724.

  • [742]
    "POE'S SWEETHEART'S DEATH," unsigned
    1878 July.
    1/4 coulmn clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the New York Daily Graphic

    Quotes a portion of Poe's letter to Sarah Helen Whitman, 18 October 1848.

  • [743]
    " EDGAR POE'S'RAVEN'," by John H. Ingram
    1878 August 17.
    P. 210 clipped from the Athenaeum

    Ingram draws parallels between "The Raven" and Albert Pike's "Isadore."

  • [744]
    "A POPULAR ERROR CONCERNING POE," by Robert S. Burkholder
    1878 August.
    Pp. 373-375 clipped from the South Atlantic

    Denies the report that Poe was expelled from the University of Virginia.

  • [745]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by Leopold Katscher
    1878 September 23 and 30; October 7.
    Pp. 293-294, 301-302, 309-310 clipped from Blaetter fuer Handel, Gewerbe, und Sociales Leben, Nos. 38, 39, 40

    In German. Katscher's translation of a biographical sketch of Poe by Ingram.

  • [746]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " letter to the Editor by John H. Ingram
    1878 October 16.
    1/3 column clipped from the Richmond Standard

    Ingram accuses William F. Gill of plagiarism and declares that his book is a gross infringement upon Ingram's copyrights.

  • [747]
    "POE AND HIS ENGLISH SCHOOLMASTER," by William Elijah Hunter
    1878 October 19.
    1 1/2 columns clipped from the Athenaeum

    Hunter writes that Dr. John Bransby reported that "Edgar Allan" was "intelligent, wayward, and wilful," and believed the Allans spoiled him with too much pocket money. The portrait of Dr. Bransby in "William Wilson" is "quite as much a product of Poe's imagination as is the school-house itself."

  • [748]
    "POE AND HIS ENGLISH SCHOOLMASTER," by John H. Ingram
    1878 October 26.
    1 column clipped from the Athenaeum

    Ingram corrects William E. Hunter's statements about Poe and Dr. John Bransby [Item 747]. The Ingram item is preceded by letters from Reverend Richard B. Porson Kidd and John T. D. Kidd refuting Hunter's remark that their father, the Reverend Thomas Kidd, flogged his students at the school at Stoke Newington.

  • [749]
    "POE'S BRAIN PETRIFIED," unsigned
    1878 November 8.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the St. Louis Republican

    The sexton who supervised the removal of Poe's body from its original grave reported that Poe's brain had dried and hardened so much that when the sexton picked up his skull, it "rattled around inside just like a lump of mud."

  • [750]
    REVIEW OF SARAH HELEN WHITMAN'S POEMS, unsigned
    1878 November 28.
    Paragraph clipped from the Nation, p. 337

    Houghton, Osgood and Company, Boston, published this edition of Mrs. Whitman's poems which she had prepared shortly before her death in June.

  • [751]
    "POEMS BY MRS. WHITMAN," unsigned
    1878 November 29.
    1 column clipped from the Hartford Daily Times

    Long, favorable review.

  • [752]
    "TOO FAIR," "SONNET," "AN APPEAL," "SONNET," "INSCRIPTION," by William Elijah Hunter
    1878 ante December 1.
    Clippings from unidentified newspapers

    Hunter sent these verses to Ingram for insertion in some English magazine. See Item 342.

  • [753]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE. WHAT A SAN FRANCISCAN KNOWS OF THE POET," unsigned
    1878.
    1/2 column clipped from the San Francisco Chronicle, second copy reprinted in unidentified newspaper

    A San Francisco Bohemian tells a story to a reporter about Poe's writing "The Gold Bug" at the Widow Meagher's place, about being cooped, drugged, and voted together with Poe in Baltimore, and about Poe's death from laudanum.

  • [754]
    POE'S UNBALANCED CHARACTER, unsigned
    ca. 1878..
    1/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Poe's "destiny" was sad not because he was an unappreciated genius but because he had "a totally unbalanced character."

  • [755]
    EULOGY AND OBITUARY FOR EDWARD VALENTINE, unsigned
    1879 February 27.
    1/4 column clipped from the Southern Churchman
  • [756]
    "POE," by Thomas Wentworth Higginson
    1879 March 15.
    Pp. 89-90 clipped from the Literary World

    This is installment II in Higginson's "Short History of American Authors."

  • [757]
    "THE POETRY OF POE'S LADY LOVE," unsigned
    1879 March 21.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond State

    A favorable review of the posthumous edition of Sarah Helen Whitman's Poems (1879).

  • [758]
    "POE'S WONDERFUL INTERPRETER," unsigned
    1879 August.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Sun

    The story of an old Richmond Negro who recited Poe's poetry from memory, claiming to have been taught by Poe himself.

  • [759]
    "SONNETS TO EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by Stella [ Sarah Anna Lewis ]
    1879 December.
    Clipped from an unidentified London newspaper

    "The First Meeting" and "Beneath the Elm," identified as "original poetry," were reprinted in the Home Journal on 11 February 1880.

  • [760]
    "THE AUTHOR OF'TIRED OUT' AND POE," by Alexander T. Crane
    1880 January 30.
    2 paragraphs clipped from the New York Tribune

    An office boy in the offices of the Broadway Journal thirty-five years earlier, Crane writes that he saw Poe drunk on only one occasion.

  • [762]
    "DREI GEDICHTE VON EDGAR ALLAN POE, " translated by Eduard Engel, and "EINE NEUE GESAMMTAUSGABE VON EDGAR POE'S WERKEN," by Eduard Engel
    1880 February 28.
    Pp. 117-121 clipped from Magazin fuer die Literatur des Auslandes

    In German. Engel translates three of Poe's poems into German ("To Helen," "The Raven," "To One in Paradise"), pp. 117-119, and reviews Ingram's four-volume edition of Poe's works, pp. 119-121.

  • [763]
    ANNOUNCEMENT OF INGRAM'S FORTHCOMING EDGAR ALLAN POE : HIS LIFE, LETTERS AND OPINIONS, unsigned
    1880 March 27.
    Paragraph clipped from the London Weekly Chronicle
  • [764]
    ANNOUNCEMENT THAT BARBARA NICHOLAVNA ELAGIN MacGAHAN IS TRANSLATING POE'S POEMS AND STORIES INTO RUSSIAN, unsigned
    1880 April 10.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    The edition will appear in three volumes.

  • [765]
    "POE AT THE UNIVERSITY," unsigned
    1880 May 11.
    2 1/4 columns clipped from the Richmond State

    Reprint of a portion of Douglass Sherley's 4th "Oddity Paper" from the Virginia University Magazine, XIX (March and April 1880).

  • [766]
    MEMORIES OF POE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, letter to the Editor from Dr. Miles George
    1880 May 22.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond State

    George denies that he and Poe were ever roommates.

  • [767]
    "DR. SNODGRASS," unsigned
    1880 May 28.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond State

    Challenges the account of Poe's burial given by Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass in Beadle's Monthly for March 1867.

  • [768]
    "POE'S TWO UNPUBLISHED POEMS," unsigned
    1880 May 29.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond State

    Tells the story of a poem Poe wrote as a young man to a lady who had broken her engagement with him and of a second poem he wrote when she married someone else.

  • [769]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned [ Edmund Clarence Stedman ]
    1880 May.
    Pp. 107-124 clipped from Scribner's Monthly

    Annotated heavily by Ingram.

  • [770]
    "INGRAM FOR THE DEFENCE," unsigned
    1880 June 5.
    1/2 column clipped from the Richmond Standard

    Reports Ingram's rough handling of E. C. Stedman and William F. Gill as biographers of Poe in his letter to the Athenaeum.

  • [771]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by Helen Zimmern
    1880 July 17.
    6 columns clipped from Beilage zur Allgemainen Beitung

    In German. Favorable review of Ingram's Edgar Allan Poe : His Life, Letters, and Opinions.

  • [772]
    THE MANOR HOUSE, STOKE NEWINGTON, TO BE RAZED, unsigned
    1880 July 24.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Poe's English school house is to be destroyed to make room for a row of shops.

  • [773]
    REVIEW OF INGRAM'S EDGAR ALLAN POE : HIS LIFE, LETTERS, AND OPINIONS, unsigned
    1880 July 24.
    Pp. 107-109 clipped from the Athenaeum

    Annotated by Ingram.

  • [774]
    REVIEW OF INGRAM'S EDGAR ALLAN POE : HIS LIFE, LETTERS, AND OPINIONS, by Moncure Daniel Conway
    1880 July 24.
    Pp. 55-56 clipped from the Academy

    Though generally favorable, Conway takes Ingram sharply to task for various inaccuracies and inelegancies of style.

  • [775]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by William Minto
    1880 July.
    Pp. 69-82 clipped from the Fortnightly Review

    Heavily annotated by Ingram.

  • [776]
    INGRAM ON POPULARITY OF POE IN FRANCE, unsigned
    1880 ca. July.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified English newspaper

    Cites Ingram's comment in his new life of Poe.

  • [777]
    WILLIAM MINTO ON POE AS A REVIEWER, unsigned
    1880 ca. July.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Cites Minto's comments in the Fortnightly Review [Item 775] agreeing with Ingram that Poe was too scrupulous as a reviewer.

  • [778]
    "THE POE WRANGLE. THE INDEPENDENT AND MR. INGRAM," letter to the Editor from John H. Ingram
    1880 August 4.
    1 column clipped from the Home Journal

    Ingram bitterly denies assertions made about him and his work on Poe in two articles that were published in the Independent, 24 June 1880.

  • [779]
    "GRISWOLD GRILLED," unsigned
    1880 August 7.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond Standard

    Extract from a favorable review of Ingram's new biography of Poe printed in the British Quarterly.

  • [780]
    " EDGAR POE, " by "Corsair" [ James Wood Davidson ]
    1880 September 2.
    1/4 column clipped from the Columbia Register (SC)

    Commendatory review of Ingram's new biography of Poe.

  • [781]
    " EDGAR A. POE AND HIS POETRY," by William Weidemeyer
    1880 September.
    Pp. 132-140 clipped from the Phrenological Journal and Science of Health, N.S. XXII

    Biographical-critical survey.

  • [782]
    STYLUS, I
    1880 October 2.

    The first issue of a New York "critical, social and satirical" magazine. An unsigned article entitled "New York Bohemians. Richard H. Stoddard, " is on p. 3.

  • [783]
    REVIEWS OF TWO BIOGRAPHIES OF POE, unsigned
    1880 October 19.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Daily Tribune

    Joint review of recent biographies by Ingram and Stedman.

  • [784]
    "TWO LIVES OF EDGAR A. POE, " unsigned
    1880 October 24.
    2 1/2 columns clipped from the New York Times

    Reviews of Ingram's new biography and of Richard Henry Stoddard's Memoir of Poe.

  • [785]
    "INGRAM'S LIFE OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1880 October 25.
    3 columns clipped from the New York Herald.
  • [786]
    " EDGAR A. POE AT THE UNIVERSITY," unsigned
    1880 ca. November 26.
    Paragraph clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Charlottesville Chronicle (VA)

    Lists those classmates of Poe who are still living and a number of his contemporaries now dead who were prominent men.

  • [787]
    "STELLA' (S. A. LEWIS)," by John H. Ingram
    1880 December 4.
    1/4 column clipped from the Athenaeum

    Obituary of Sarah Anna Lewis, who died in London on 24 November 1880. Another obituary of Mrs. Lewis, unsigned, clipped from an unidentified London newspaper is included with this item.

  • [788]
    ABOUT POE'S ADVENTURES IN FRANCE, unsigned
    1880 ca. 1880.
    Paragraph clipped from Appleton's Journal

    Reports that Ingram has a full account of Poe's adventures in France which he dictated to "a lady-friend" ( Marie Louise Shew Houghton ) at Fordham.

  • [789]
    "AS TO POE'S DEATH," letter to the Editor by William Hand Browne
    ca. 1880.
    1/4 column clipped from the Baltimore Sun

    Giving an account of Poe's death in Baltimore, Browne quotes in full the note from Joseph W. Walker to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass, 3 October 1849, notifying Snodgrass of Poe's whereabouts and condition. This note was discovered in 1880 by Mrs. Snodgrass while going through the papers of her late husband.

  • [790]
    "THE MONKEY ASSASSIN," unsigned
    ca. 1880.
    1 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Reports a true story said to rival Poe's "Murders in the Rue Morgue": a red ape murdered his master in a Venezuelan mining camp in 1877.

  • [791]
    POE IN AMERICA, unsigned
    1881 January 26.
    2 columns clipped from the London Daily Mail?

    A survey of Poe's reputation in America prompted by plans to erect the actors' monument to him.

  • [792]
    "POE'S MEMORY HONORED BY ACTORS," unsigned, and AN ANNOUNCEMENT
    1881 January 30.
    2 clippings, both 1/4 column, from the New York Sun

    Plans for an entertainment to be given to raise funds for a life-size alto-relievo in bronze of Poe to be presented to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in Central Park. The second clipping announces an entertainment to be given at Booth's Theater on 11 February to raise money for the Poe memorial and lists Executive, Entertainment, and Honorary Committees, together with a roster of the artists who are to appear.

  • [793]
    " POE ALLAN EDGAR, " by John H. Ingram
    1881 January.
    Pp. 93-108 clipped from Budapesti Szemle

    In Hungarian. An abridgment of Ingram's 2-volume biography of Poe translated into Hungarian by Leopold Katscher.

  • [794]
    "WHY POE?" unsigned
    1881 February 9.
    1/2 column clipped from Puck

    Asks bitterly why the New York actors should be imposed upon to erect a monument to Poe.

  • [795]
    "UN CONTE INEDIT D' EDGAR POE, " by Gaston Vassy
    1881 February 15.
    3/4 column clipped from Gil Blas

    In French. States that "La Chanson de J.-S.-T. Hollands" was written by Poe in June 1849.

  • [796]
    POE AND THE AUTHORSHIP OF "LA CHANSON DE J.-S.-T. HOLLANDS," letter to the Editor by John H. Ingram
    1881 March 1.
    1/5 column clipped from Gil Blas

    In French. Ingram protests that an article by Gaston Vassy [Item 795] claiming Poe as author of "La Chanson de J.-S.-T. Holland" is not accurate.

  • [797]
    "POE'S'AFFECTATION OF LEARNING'," letter to the Editor by John H. Ingram
    1881 March 10.
    1/2 column clipped from the Washington Daily Critic

    Ingram regrets Thomas Wentworth Higginson's inability to find in Tieck's works "Journey into the Blue Distance," to which Poe alludes in "The Fall of the House of Usher."

  • [798]
    " EDGAR POE VS. SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE," a letter to the Editor by John H. Ingram
    1881 March 10.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond Standard

    Ingram writes about Thomas Wentworth Higginson's inability to find in Tieck's works "Journey Into the Blue Distance," to which Poe alludes in "The Fall of the House of Usher."

  • [799]
    ACTORS' MONUMENT TO POE, unsigned
    1881 March 12.
    Paragraph clipped from Funny Folks

    In light of the controversy over erecting the monument to Poe, this item suggests that Ingram's biography is all the memorial Poe needs.

  • [800]
    " EDGAR ALLEN [sic] POE, " a letter to the Editor by "A Correspondent of Poe."
    1881 ca. March 16.
    1/4 column clipped from the Great West

    A defense of Poe against criticism by a Mr. Rothaker in the New York Tribune.

  • [801]
    INGRAM'S AND STEDMAN'S WORK ON POE, unsigned
    1881 March 26.
    Paragraph clipped from the Newcastle-upon-Tyne Chronicle

    Favorable comments.

  • [802]
    "THE MEMORY OF POE," unsigned
    1881 March 27.
    4 columns clipped from the New York Herald

    Publishes letters by and about Poe to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass. These letters were found by Mrs. Snodgrass after her husband's death in 1880 and lent by her to William H. Carpenter, Editor of the Baltimore Sun. Carpenter allowed William Hand Browne to make transcripts and press copies of them for Ingram and himself, and he, in turn, loaned his press copies to Edward Spencer who edited them for printing in the New York Herald.

  • [803]
    ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE SECOND ENTERTAINMENT TO BE HELD FOR THE POE MEMORIAL FUND ON 23 APRIL, unsigned
    1881 April 3.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Times.
  • [804]
    "POE ON POE," unsigned
    1881 April 4.
    1/2 column clipped from the Baltimore American

    An additional letter from Poe to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass, 1 April 1841, found by Mrs. Snodgrass after she had lent the first nine to the editor of the Baltimore Sun.

  • [805]
    "POE IN HIS OWN DEFENCE," unsigned
    1881 April 4.
    1/2 column clipped from the Baltimore American

    Notes that the recently published letter of 1 April 1841 does much to vindicate Poe from charges of drunkenness during that period of his life.

  • [806]
    "POE AND BURTON," unsigned
    1881 April.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York World

    Prints Poe's letter to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass of 1 April 1841.

  • [807]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE'S HABITS," unsigned
    1881 April 4.
    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified New York newspaper

    Prints Poe's letter to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass of 1 April 1841.

  • [808]
    "POE'S DEFENSE OF HIMSELF," unsigned
    1881 ca. April 5.
    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper, reprinted from the Baltimore American

    Prints portions of Poe's letter to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass of 1 April 1841.

  • [809]
    " EDGAR POE, " letter to the Editor by Dr. William Gibbon Carter
    1881 ca. April 6.
    Paragraph clipped from the Richmond Dispatch

    Poe's friend and physician agrees with Poe's declaration in his letter to Dr. Joseph E. Snodgrass of 1 April 1841 that he was not a drunkard: "dress Poe in rags, and the gentleman is there."

  • [810]
    "THE POE MEMORIAL," unsigned
    1881 April 17.
    1/2 column clipped from and unidentified newspaper

    The New York Academy of Music plans another entertainment to raise money for the Poe memorial in New York City. Nearly $3000 has already been raised by two entertainments: one at the Madison Square Theater, another at Booth's Theater.

  • [811]
    ACTIVITIES AND DIFFICULTIES OF THE POE MEMORIAL COMMITTEE, unsigned
    1881 ca. April 20.
    3 clippings from unidentified newspapers pasted on a strip of paper
  • [812]
    "THE POE FESTIVAL," unsigned
    1881 ca. April 23.
    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified New York newspaper

    Report of the benefit entertainment for the Poe memorial which was held at the New York Academy of Music.

  • [813]
    "RETURNED TO DUST," unsigned
    1881 April 26.
    1/2 column clipped from the Richmond Dispatch

    Obituary of Louisa Gabriella Allan (Mrs. John Allan ), who died on Sunday, 24 April, and was buried on Monday, 25 April.

  • [814]
    "DEATH OF MRS. ALLAN," unsigned
    1881 April 26.
    Paragraph clipped from the Richmond State

    Obituary of Louisa Gabriella Allan (Mrs. John Allan ).

  • [815]
    LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CONCERNING POE, by "J. C. L." and Edward A. Oldham
    1881 April 27.
    1/2 column clipped from the Richmond State

    "J. C. L." corrects statements about Poe's history that were printed in the State's obituary of Mrs. Allan. Oldham requests names and addresses of those living who attended West Point with Poe.

  • [816]
    "A FEW WORDS OF EXPLANATION FROM DR. CLOVER," letter to the Editor
    1881 April 28.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond Dispatch

    Dr. Clover makes several corrections in the obituary of Mrs. Allan.

  • [817]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " letter to the Editor by Colonel Thomas H. Ellis
    1881 May 7.
    3 columns clipped from the Richmond Standard

    Ellis' letter is essentially a eulogy to Louisa Gabriella Allan (Mrs. John Allan ).

  • [818]
    "CONCERNING POE'S BIRTHPLACE," letter to the Editor, unsigned
    1882 January 25?.
    Paragraph clipped from the Richmond State

    Raises the question of where Poe was born: Boston or Baltimore ?

  • [819]
    ON DR. JOHN J. MORAN'S ACCOUNT OF POE'S DEATH, unsigned
    1882 April 12.
    Paragraph clipped from the Washington Evening Critic

    Suggests that there is some question about Moran's motives in waiting so long to give his account of Poe's death, so long that everyone else who knew the circumstances is now dead.

  • [820]
    REVIEW OF ANDREW LANG, EDITOR, THE POEMS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, WITH AN ESSAY, "THE POETRY OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, " BY ANDREW LANG, unsigned
    1882 May 13.
    1 1/2 columns clipped from the Academy

    Annotated by Ingram.

  • [821]
    "IN DEFENCE OF POE," unsigned
    1882 May 28.
    1 1/4 columns clipped from the Spartanburg Carolinian (SC), reprinted from the Baltimore American

    Report of Dr. John J. Moran's lectures on Poe at the YMCA Hall.

  • [822]
    "TIT-BITS FROM THE WORKS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1882 July 29.
    Pp. 236-237 clipped from Tit-Bits

    Excerpts from some of Poe's tales and from "Marginalia."

  • [823]
    "RECENSIONEN," unsigned
    1882 August 15.
    Pp. 3-4 clipped from Das Telephon

    In German. Discusses Poe and Thomas Carlyle.

  • [824]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by Eduard Engel
    post 1882.
    Pp. 157-160, 169-172, parts II and III, clipped from Das Magazin fuer die Literatur des Inund Auslandes, No. 13

    In German.

  • [825]
    REVIEW OF A. WINTERFIELD'S TRANSLATION OF POE'S WEIRD TALES ["UNHEIMLICH GESCHICHTEN"] INTO GERMAN, by E. E. [ Eduard Engel ]
    post 1882.
    Pp. 689-690 clipped from Magazin fuer die Literatur des Auslandes, No. 44

    In German.

  • [826]
    "THE SHAVIN' (A PIECE OF RAVIN' A LA EDGAR A. POE )," by John F. Mill
    1882 February 10.
    5 6-line stanzas clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    This parody was sent to Ingram by P. J. Mullin [Item 369] who claimed that he first saw it in a Scottish magazine entitled the People's Friend.

  • [827]
    REVIEW OF CONTES GROTESQUES BY POE, TRANSLATED BY MILE HENNEQUIN, by Emile Bergerat
    1882 March 6.
    6 1/4 columns clipped from Le Voltaire

    In French.

  • [828]
    "SOME NEW MEMORIES OF POE," by Melville Phillips
    1882 May 26.
    5 1/4 columns clipped from Texas Siftings

    Recollections of Poe told to Phillips by John Sartain. Freely annotated by Ingram with comments such as, "Full of self-evident lies."

  • [829]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE'S HOME," unsigned
    1882 June 10.
    1/4 column clipped from the New York Times

    The cottage at Fordham sold at auction to Milton [Nelson?] Strang for $5,700.

  • [830]
    " EDGAR POE'S COTTAGE," unsigned
    1882 June 10.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Herald

    The cottage at Fordham was sold at auction to Nelson [Milton?] Strang for $7,000. A neighbor of the Poes reminisces about the family when they lived there.

  • [831]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by B. Montgomerie Ranking
    1882 September.
    Pp. 352-360 clipped from Time; A Monthly Magazine, Vol. IX

    A defence of Poe's personal and literary reputations.

  • [832]
    REVIEW OF THE RAVEN, BY POE, ILLUSTRATED BY GUSTAVE DOR, WITH A COMMENT UPON THE POEM BY EDMUND CLARENCE STEDMAN, unsigned
    1882 November 3.
    3/4 column clipped from the Academy
  • [833]
    PROGRAM OF A LECTURE ON POE, WITH ILLUSTRATIVE READINGS, BY MAJOR EVAN R. JONES, AMERICAN CONSUL FOR WALES
    1884 March 20.
    Single sheet

    The lecture was sponsored by the Fine Art Loan Exhibition, New Public Hall, Cardiff, Wales.

  • [834]
    " EDGAR A. POE AND HIS COLLEGE CONTEMPORARIES," by William McCreery Burwell
    1884 May 18.
    4 columns clipped from the New Orleans Times-Democrat

    Annotated by Ingram: "Mr. W. M. Burwell's few personal reminiscences are derived from T[homas] G[oode] Tucker's highly imaginative remembrances."

  • [835]
    "POE'S FIRST BOOK," by George Birdley
    1884 June 15.
    1 1/4 columns clipped from the Richmond Dispatch, reprinted from the Current

    Attributes to Poe authorship of verses entitled "The Skeleton Hand" and "The Magician," which were printed in the Boston Yankee in 1829.

  • [836]
    "A QUESTION OF AUTHORSHIP," letter to the Editor by John H. Ingram
    1884 July 3.
    1/4 column clipped from the Richmond Dispatch

    Ingram takes exception to George Birdley's attributing "The Skeleton Hand" and "The Magician" to Poe [Item 835].

  • [837]
    "POE IN PARIS, " by Lewis Rosenthal
    1884 August.
    Pp. 174-179 clipped from the Manhattan Illustrated Monthly Magazine

    Surveys Poe's popularity in France : "the literature of the United States... is, in our time, represented there by Poe, one of the most gifted, if one of the least distinctively national, of American writers."

  • [838]
    "MAJOR JONES ON EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1884 December 9.
    1 column clipped from the London Daily Express

    Major Evan R. Jones, American Consul for Wales, offered a favorable account of Poe and paid tribute to Ingram for rescuing his reputation from "the odium that for twenty-five years had been cast upon it by his American biographers."

  • [839]
    "POE: THE POET AND THE CRITIC," by Walter L. Sawyer
    1884 December 25.
    Pp. 304-305 clipped from the Index

    Eulogistic paper read before the Northern and Southern Club at Portland, ME, 22 October 1884.

  • [840]
    "SEQUEL TO'THE RAVEN'," by R. Allston Lavender, Jr.
    1884.
    9 8-line stanzas clipped from the Funny Folks Annual

    Lavender is reported to have been "a maniac in the lunatic asylum at Raleigh, NC. He fancied that it was dictated by the spirit of Edgar A. Poe. "

  • [841]
    "EIN DICHTERLEBEN," by John H. Ingram, translated by Leopold Katscher
    1884.
    Pp. 26-39 clipped from Der Salon fuer Literatur, Kunst und Gesellschaft, VII

    In German. Critical-biographical sketch of Poe.

  • [842]
    NOTICE OF THE TALES BY EDGAR ALLAN POE ; POEMS AND ESSAYS BY EDGAR ALLAN POE, EDITED BY JOHN H. INGRAM, by Leopold Katscher
    1884.
    P. 237 clipped from Die Gegenwart

    This volume was published by the Tauchnitz Press, Leipzig.

  • [843]
    REVIEW OF THE TALES AND POEMS OF EDGAR ALLAN POE ; WITH BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY BY JOHN H. INGRAM, unsigned
    1884.
    1/2 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    This edition, in four volumes, was published in London by John C. Nimmo.

  • [844]
    "A NEW POEM SAID TO BE BY POE," by "Frantic Jerry Foodle"
    ante 1885.
    7 8-line stanzas clipped from the Daily Graphic, reprinted from the Looking Glass

    The "new poem" is a parody of "The Raven" entitled "The Demon of the Doldrums."

  • [845]
    "EDGARD POE," by Leo Quesnel
    ante 1885.
    Pp. 156-157 clipped from Le Muse Artistique et Littraire

    In French. Brief biographical sketch of Poe and an explanation of "The Raven."

  • [846]
    "LAID BY THE POET'S SIDE," unsigned
    1885 January 20.
    1/2 column clipped from the Baltimore Sun

    Account of the reinterment of Virginia Clemm Poe by Poe's side in Westminster Churchyard in Baltimore on 19 January.

  • [847]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by Emile Hennequin
    1885 January 25.
    Pp. 24-56 clipped from La Revue Contemporaine, I

    A critical study.

  • [848]
    PARODIES OF THE WORKS OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN AUTHORS, collected and annotated by Walter Hamilton
    1885 January, March, April.
    Vol. II, pts. 14, 16, 17

    Parodies of many of Poe's poems. Ingram contributed a number of these, as well as many of the notes, especially those on "The Fire Fiend."

  • [849]
    "WOODBERRY'S LIFE OF POE," unsigned
    1885 March 25.
    1/4 column clipped from the Lowell Morning Mail, reprinted from the Worcester Daily Times

    A review of George E. Woodberry's Edgar Allan Poe, a volume in the American Men of Letters Series, published by Houghton Mifflin Company. The reviewer finds the book, "considered as a biography," to be "beneath the standard which critical opinion long ago fixed for works of this sort; judged as a whole it is beneath contempt."

  • [849-a]
    "MANUSCRIPT OF POE," unsigned
    1885 March.
    Pp. 249-250 clipped from the American Antiquarian

    J. W. Johnston of Lancaster, PA, at one time the owner of the MS. of "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," relates the numerous close calls the MS. had with fire and loss. The MS. is now the property of George W. Childs.

  • [850]
    "THE ACTORS HONOR POE," unsigned
    1885 May 5.
    4 columns clipped from the New York World

    Presentation ceremonies of the Poe Memorial to the Metropolitan Museum of Art on 4 May 1885. Annotated by Ingram.

  • [851]
    "MORE PITY FOR POOR POE," unsigned
    1885 May 5.
    1/3 column clipped from the New York World

    Notice of the unveiling of the actors' monument to Poe at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

  • [852]
    "AN UNCANNY STORY OF ANNABEL LEE," unsigned
    1885 June 6.
    Paragraph clipped from the Detroit Free Press

    Story of a New York gentleman ( William F. Gill ) having removed the bones of Virginia Clemm Poe from the Fordham cemetery and kept them in his home in New York City for two years before they were finally brought to Baltimore and reinterred by Poe's side.

  • [853]
    "WHO MURDERED MARY ROGERS ?" by W. A. Croffut, and "WHERE POE WROTE'THE RAVEN'," unsigned
    1885 June 13.
    2 columns and an attached paragraph clipped from the Detroit Free Press

    The first item surveys the Mary Rogers case and Poe's connection with it. The second reports that Dr. John J. Moran believes he has identified the house where Poe wrote "The Raven."

  • [854]
    "THE GHOST OF MARIE ROGET," unsigned
    1885 October 16.
    1/2 column clipped from the New York Sun

    Report that the ghost of Mary Rogers appeared at a seance.

  • [855]
    "POE THE POET," unsigned
    1885 November 29.
    11/4 columns clipped from the Richmond State

    Reports James Albert Clarke's reminiscences of Poe at the University of Virginia and David Bridges' recollections of Poe's early days in Richmond.

  • [856]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " by M. W. H.
    1885.
    3/4 column clipped from an unidentified newspaper

    Laudatory review of George E. Woodberry's Edgar Allan Poe.

  • [857]
    A DEFENSE OF EDGAR ALLAN POE, by John J. Moran, M.D.
    1885.
    88 pp.

    Published by William F. Boogher, Washington, DC, this booklet is heavily annotated by Ingram.

  • [858]
    PHOTOGRAPH OF EDMUND CLARENCE STEDMAN
    ca. 1885.
    Clipped from an unidentified newspaper.
  • [859]
    REVIEW OF THE RAVEN BY EDGAR ALLAN POE ; WITH LITERARY AND HISTORICAL COMMENTARY BY JOHN H. INGRAM, unsigned
    1886 February 27.
    P. 3 clipped from the Free Press

    Favorable review.

  • [860]
    POE'S ALLEGED AUTHORSHIP OF "LEONAINIE," unsigned
    1886 April 28.
    Paragraph clipped from the Daily News

    Repeats stories from the Critic (New York) and the Kokomo Dispatch (IN).

  • [861]
    " EDGAR ALLAN POE, " unsigned
    1886 December 26.
    Paragraph clipped from Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper

    Review of the reissue of Ingram's two-volume Edgar Allan Poe : His Life, Letters and Opinions in a single volume in 1886 by Minerva Library of Famous Books. [This reissue was widely hailed and review