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A Guide to the Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge Correspondence 1810-1861 Coolidge, Ellen Wayles Randolph, Correspondence 9090, 9090-c, 38-584

A Guide to the Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge Correspondence 1810-1861

A Collection in
Special Collections
The University of Virginia Library
Accession number 9090, 9090-c, 38-584


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Processed by: Special Collections Staff

Repository
Special Collections, University of Virginia Library
Accession number
9090, 9090-c, 38-584
Title
Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge Correspondence 1810-1861
Quantity
253 items
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

See the University of Virginia Library’s use policy.

Preferred Citation

Correspondence of Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge, 1810-1861, Accession #38-584, 9090, 9090-c Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Acquisition Information

Purchase and gift: 1930 November 5; 1969 June 24 ; 1981 April 1981


Scope and Content

The collection consists chiefly of correspondence between Ellen Wayles Randolph Coolidge and her mother Martha Jefferson Randolph, and sisters Virginia Trist, Cornelia Randolph and Mary Randolph.

They discuss family and friends; trips to Richmond, Philadelphia and Baltimore; life in Boston, and at Monticello and Poplar Forest; the University of Virginia students, faculty and Board of Visitors; Thomas Jefferson's illness and death, debts, the proposed lottery, and the sale of Monticello and his slaves.

Also Martha Randolph's life in Washington and continuing financial problems; the careers of Joseph Coolidge in the China trade, Nicholas Trist in the diplomatic service, Benjamin Franklin Randolph in medicine and George Wythe Randolph in the navy; and the publication of "Memoirs, correspondence and private papers of Thomas Jefferson."

Other topics of interest include Richmond dentistry, 1819; the panic of 1819 and financial ruin of Wilson Cary Nicholas; Thomas Mann Randolph's strained relations with his family; Lafayette's visit to Monticello; the sale of Jefferson's paintings; Harvard College politics; historian Jared Sparks; Nat Turner's rebellion; the Hemings family, Ellen's maid Sally Cottrell Cole; and contrasts between slaves in the South and domestic servants in New England.

The collection also contains autobiographical reflections by Ellen Coolidge and a volume of copies of correspondence between Ellen Coolidge and Henry Stephens Randall concerning Jefferson and his family.

Arrangement

The collection is arranged chronologically

Contents List

Thomas Mann Randolph to Joseph C. Cabell 1810 March 23
Box: 1

thanks Cabell for his willingness to be a candidate for the Senate when family obligations made it difficult for Randolph to run

Ellen Wayles Randolph to Martha Randolph [1814] March 2
Box: 1

writes concerning clothes making for the family

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randloph [1814] March 30
Box: 1

refers to the sickness of her brother James Randolph and her grandfather Thomas Jefferson, describes a large party at the home of Mrs. [Hastings] Marks ([Anna Scott Jefferson?]) during her visit to Richmond and her impressions of a Mr. Barksdale

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1814 April 24
Box: 1

describes her social life during her visit to Richmond

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1816 January 5
Box: 1

describes her journey to Richmond with Jane Hollins Nicholas Randolph to visit her Aunt [Mary] Randolph and Cousin Ann, the unexpected use of General John Hartwell Cocke's carriage on the journey, the comfort rendered by her grandfather's fur, and Jane's stopover at the Governor's Mansion to see her father, Wilson Cary Nicholas

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1816 January 22
Box: 1

describes her journey from Richmond to Washington to visit the Madisons at the White House

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1816 January 31
Box: 1

furnishes more details concerning her previous unsatisfactory visit to Richmond and her misadventures in trying to assemble a wardrobe appropriate for society in Washington, she also mentions the illness of Mrs. Madison

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816] February 7
Box: 1

provides additional details of her social life while in Washington and sends a packet of letters to Thomas Jefferson

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816] February 17
Box: 1

refers to her enjoyment of the Philadelphia circle of visitors, several suitors, her enjoyable stay with the Madisons, especially their gay parties, her visit to the House of Representatives which at times she found both amusing and fatiguing, a Marshall Grouchy with a letter of introduction to Jefferson from the Marquis de Lafayette, her meeting other members of Congress, especially John Forsyth (1780-1841) of Georgia, the painter John Vanderlyn (1775-1852) and Mann Randolph's application for a commission in the Navy promised by the Secretary of the Navy, Benjamin Williams Crowninshield

Ellen Randolph to Virginia Randolph [1816] February 28
Box: 1

refers to the former beauty of the Capitol building before its destruction by the British during the War of 1812 which was evident during her visit to its damp vaults

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816] March 9
Box: 1

describes her companions and friends in Washington, the ill health of Mrs. [Stephen?] Decatur, and her desire to visit Baltimore

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [ante 1816 March 26]
Box: 1

assures her mother that she will secure the bank notes requested by her father Thomas Mann Randolph as quickly as possible from the Bank of Columbia and that her grandfather should receive them by mail around the first of April; she also mentions her lack of success in finding a book of instruction on the guitar and her purchase of Scientific Dialoguesby [Jeremiah Joyce?] (1763-1816)

Ellen Randolph to Thomas Mann Randolph 1816 March 26
Box: 1

informs her father that she has sent the Columbia Bank notes to her grandfather for him and mentions his financial difficulties

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [ca. 1816 March]
Box: 1

In these four letters, Ellen talks about her initial disappointment with society in Washington and its trivial conversations, her regret at her prejudice against the Jewish religion practiced by Mr. Gratz, and her visit with the Bayard girls, Sally and Elizabeth; mentions her thankfulness that the most urgent debts of her father are paid, and the sale of Varina; asks permission to travel to Baltimore if the opportunity arises; expresses her uneasiness that the packages of bank notes have yet arrived in the mail and describes the procedure in which she made up the packages, the opportunity to visit Philadelphia, "the real capital of the country" where she proposes to stay with Mrs. Bache, her reception of additional funds from her grandfather's sale of tobacco, her worries over the cost of her travels to her father and grandfather, and Mrs. Madison's suggestion that Martha mail Ellen's letters to her in care of the President so that she might forward them to Philadelphia

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816] April 6
Box: 1

writes of her hospitable reception by the Baches of Philadelphia and the ball given upon the night of her arrival

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816 April]
Box: 1

These two letters mention that Mr. Bache is the brother of Dr. [William?] Bache so well known by her mother, a serenade in which "Jefferson's March" was played, her visit to the house where her mother lived with Mrs. [Thomas] Hopkinson while the family was in Philadelphia, and the lodgings of Jefferson as Secretary of State, and Vice President; She also mentions a visit to the vessel Franklinwith Captain Dallas

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816] May 1
Box: 1

expresses her preference for Philadelphia over Baltimore and her desire to return home as soon as an escort can be found

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1816 May 12
Box: 1

mentions her refusal of Mrs. Madison's offer to accompany her to Orange County, Virginia, and Mrs. Burwell's offer to accompany them to Albemarle because both involved delay

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816?] September 27
Box: 1

describes the visits of curious and inopportune "sightseers" to Monticello who wanted to catch a glimpse of Thomas Jefferson, while her mother was away at Poplar Forest; provides news of the family routine and of the slaves, and says "give my love to Grandpapa, I have not forgotten to wind up his clocks, and will take good care of his wines, when they arrive"

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816 November?]
Box: 1

writes of past visitors to [Poplar Forest], the possible visit of Marshall Grouchy and Mr. Lee, Consul at Bourdeaux, during the winter at Monticello, news of the slaves, and that Mr. [Godefroi?] was so taken with Natural Bridge that he wished to purchase it

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1816?] December 30
Box: 1

describes her visit with Ogle and Catharine Tayloe and mentions a party attended by the New York Senator [Martin] Van Buren, characterized as a "speculation, were he not a widower encumbered with five children"

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1817] August 18
Box: 1

writes of her trip to Natural Bridge, Virginia, "For me it was a complete chapter of accidents," but worth suffering "for the wonder and delight... at the sight of ... the most sublime of Nature's works"; she also comments on the differences in manners and characteristics of the locals, and her disappointment in the service of Maria

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1817] September
Box: 1

gives her impression of a visitor, Mr. Clay, who was "much more uncivilized than any Indian and wild Hottentots" and mentions the distress of Thomas Jefferson over the death of Mr. Du Pont [de Nemours]

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1818 January 28
Box: 1

contrasts her life in the cities she visits with that at Monticello, "At Monticello I live in the almost constant exercise of my heart and understanding - having constantly before me objects of the warmest affection and highest admiration - the conversation there is completely the [heart] of reason and I would not permanently change my situation with anyone living ... I bless God for having been born at Monticello, your daughter and so much the object of my dear Grandfather's care," and she also describes merchandise being shipped to Monticello

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1818 April 14
Box: 1

describes her journey with her grandfather to Poplar Forest, reading while waiting at the taverns, her stay at the Hunter's Inn, Campbell County, and her gossip with acquaintances

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1818 September 27
Box: 1

describes her visit to Carysbrook, Fluvanna County, remarks that the two Cary families are again on visiting terms, and mentions some music that she is copying for her mother

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1818] December 29
Box: 1

mentions family news concerning the Cary family

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1819] March 18
Box: 1

stays in Richmond where her sister Virginia will be able to see a dentist and have her teeth filled, and enumerates the items Virginia should bring with her

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1819] March 29
Box: 1

describes her Aunt [Harriet Randolph] Hackley's school for girls in Richmond, her Aunt Randolph's intention of selling her furniture and moving to Albemarle, and remarks that "the distress for money is almost universal" indicating the Panic of 1819

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1819 April 9
Box: 1

mentions her family's financial difficulties and her social activities

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1819 April 25
Box: 1

describes social life in Richmond with her sister Virginia and Cousin Harriet Randolph and describes Virginia's dental work and her own difficult extraction

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph [1819] July 18
Box: 1

describes the hailstorm damage to the windows at Poplar Forest and other damage to the building while unoccupied, reminiscences about previous visits to Poplar Forest and her profitable times of study there in Latin and history, regrets that she is a woman and thus unable to spend her life in pursuit of knowledge, and mentions Thomas Jefferson's visit to Mr. Clay

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1819 July 28
Box: 1

reveals that "Grandpapa and myself are in the habit of sitting, some time after dinner, in conversation, upon different subjects" while at Poplar Forest, particularly that of the influence of the mother upon the education of the children, the great concern of Thomas Jefferson, Cornelia, and Ellen over the serious illness of their servant Burwell Hemings, a glazier, while at Poplar Forest, John Hemmings careful nursing of Burwell, and the progress Israel has made as a waiter

Ellen Randolph to Virginia Randolph 1819 August 4
Box: 1

mentions the unusually high temperatures experienced at Poplar Forest, a vist to Dr. [Thomas?] Walker's brother's home, meeting the family of one of Jefferson's political enemies, Mr. Watts, and another of Burwell's attacks of illness

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1819 August 11
Box: 1

discusses the financial ruin of Colonel [Wilson Cary] Nicholas whose estate was placed in the hands of trustees to be sold for payment of his debts, Thomas Jefferson's severe attack of rheumatism, the need for rain, and her pleasure at reading Virgil's Aeneidin the original Latin

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1819 August 24
Box: 1

voices her concern about the effect of the financial failure of Colonel Wilson Cary Nicholas upon her grandfather's affairs, as well as the emotional impact of possible ruin, and her surprise that Thomas Jefferson had endorsed the notes of Nicholas and also describes their dining habits at Poplar Forest

Ellen Randolph to Virginia Randolph [1819] August 31
Box: 1

regrets the death of Burwell's wife, [Griffy?] and his grief over her death, and expresses her concern for the future of their children

Ellen Randolph to Virginia Randolph 1820 January 9
Box: 1

complains about the disagreeable schedule at Wilmington, Virginia, her trouble with toothache and her use of the tobacco plant to alleviate the pain, and the isolation experienced in Fluvanna County

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1820 May 18
Box: 1

writes from Richmond at the home of her Aunt Hackley, mentions th musical ability of Mr. Nicholas of Philadelphia, and her dislike of learning to play waltzes

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1820 May 31
Box: 1

mentions the affection and regard of her family and friends in Richmond, a period of depression and lassitude, and her disappointment over Mr. Nicholas' refusal to sing

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1820 September 13
Box: 1

while at Poplar Forest she recounts her disagreeable sojourn at [Noah] Flood's Tavern, Buckingham County, where they stayed because of the heavy rain on the journey, her grandfather's trouble with swelling of his legs, and finding the harpsichord in poor condition and the books moldy

Ellen Randolph to Marth Randolph 1821 November 19
Box: 1

describes her travel to Washington with Nicholas [Trist?] and their stop-over at Fredericksburg

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1821 December 14
Box: 1

mentions the sickness of her Aunt Randolph in Washington, an ardent admirer William Taylor of Norfolk, a Colonel Freeman who credits Thomas Jefferson with his promotion, and her social prospects

Ellen Randolph to Martha Randolph 1822 April 3
Box: 1

stresses her need for financial support in order to visit Baltimore, asks her father to press President Monroe to pay money due him, remarks upon her father's strange temper, and regrets her own thriftless temperament

Joseph Coolidge, Jr. to Martha Randolph 1825 May 9
Box: 1

writes concerning Ellen's illness and gives her the advice of his own physician, Dr. Spooner

Joseph Coolidge, Jr. to Martha Randolph 1825 June 25
Box: 1

describes Ellen and his honeymoon trip, to Fredericksburg and on their way home to Boston

Ellen Wayles (Randolph) Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1825 June 26
Box: 1

describes the society they enjoyed while waiting for their luggage to arrive, and discusses the disposition of the slave Sally [Cole] saying, "if she chooses to be sold let her choose her own master, if to be hired she should have the same liberty, or at least not be sent anywhere she is unwilling to go."

Virginia (Randolph) Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1825 June 27
Box: 1

mentions the sense of loss the family has experienced at Ellen's absence from their society at Monticello, especially felt by Thomas Jefferson, and speaks of her own love for her absent sister

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1825] July 9
Box: 1

mentions seeing the ascent of a balloon at Castle Garden and seeing the Marquis [de Lafayette] who promised to be at Monticello by the end of July or August

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 July 13
Box: 1

mentions Thomas Jefferson's poor health, refers to the family's impending financial misfortunes, shares the gossip about the University of Virginia, including finding Mr. Raphael's sister in the dormitories at midnight, the "war" between the girls of Charlottesville and the students at the University, the girls boycott of one of the University barbecues, the equine exploits of her escort Mr. Charles Bonnycastle, and the birth of a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Key

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1825 July 31
Box: 1

Ellen describes her arrival in Boston and her reception from the Coolidges, and begrudges the selfishness of the family of T. Eston and Jane Cary Randolph at Ashton who took her mother away from attending her father at Monticello

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1825 July?]
Box: 1

writes from Baltimore on his honeymoon trip to Boston describing their itinerary

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph [ca. 1825 August]
Box: 1

shares her difficulty in adjusting to the peculiar customs and prejudices of her new countrymen in Boston, her abhorrence of the New England diet staples of fish, pudding, and pork, the lack of interest in books and literature or nonconventional ideas

Joseph Coolidge, Jr. to Martha Randolph 1825 August
Box: 1

describes their trip to Boston, Ellen's reaction to travel and her reception among his friends, his thankfulness at Thomas Jefferson's improving health, and says about Jefferson "public opinion in this section of our country has changed, of late, much, very much, in regard to him: public and private testimony to his patriotism, and character are no longer infrequent; to his literary merits they have never been."

Martha Randolph 1825 August 2
Box: 1

discusses the disposition of the slave Susan, Ellen's impression of Saratoga Springs, the injunction Mr. Randolph secured to prevent the public sale of his property set for the 8th and to allow Francis Gilmer to sell the estate at private sales, her dread of the sale of the slaves, "the Negroes may be disposed of to people that we know, in many instances friend, and neighbor; my Father no doubt being allowed time can also assist in the purchase. My mind is greatly relieved by this arrangement. The discomfort of slavery I have borne all my life, but its sorrows in all their bitterness I had never before conceived. The sale of Susan was only a prelude in my imagination to the scenes which the 8th would exhibit in all their horrors, for the country is overrun with those trafficers in human blood the Negro buyer, and that advertisement would have been the signal to have collected them from every part of the state."

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 August 3
Box: 1

writes concerning the considerable number of visitors at Monticello due to the popular convention in Staunton to discuss the need for a state constitutional convention which helped to pave the way for the Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830, Dr. Dunglison's care of Thomas Jefferson as his physician, their dislike of the George Blaettermanns, the new faculty including Robley Dunglison, Charles Bonnycastle, Thomas Key, John Patton Emmet, and George Tucker, the hope of Jefferson that Judge Dade will accept the law professorship, and the consideration of Francis Gilmer for that position

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 August 18
Box: 1

writes of the Marquis de Lafayette's impending visit, the disruption it will cause and its effect upon Thomas Jefferson's health and comfort, family news, and Maria Carr's serious illness

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 August 26
Box: 1

writes about the visit of Lafayette to Monticello, the dinner given by the University for him, Jefferson's occasional rides in his carriage, her opinion of Charlottesville doctors, and Simon Bolivar's execution of Spanish prisoners

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 September 1
Box: 1

remarks upon the press of constant visitors to Monticello on her energy and time, the poor health of her father and his problems with rheumatism, the visit of Lafayette and his promise to write Ellen from Washington, the delay in the sale of Edgehill, and attempts at a reconciliation between Thomas Mann Randolph and his son Jefferson Randolph

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1825 September 3
Box: 1

mentions the many visitors of summer, Nicholas Trist's visit to White Sulphur Springs for his health, her plan to secure a piano, and her brother Jefferson's disapproval of her plans

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 September 11
Box: 1

discusses her heavy duties as a housekeeper at Monticello and the large number of guests, refers to Ellen's maid Sally [Coles] and her contentment as a nurse for little Miss Key, mentions an unpleasant encounter of the family with Charles Lewis Bankhead while he was intoxicated, and Mann Randolph's illness

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge, Jr. 1825 September 16
Box: 1

describes the flood of visitors due to the opening of the University, her attempts to screen the visitors to keep them from wearying her father, Thomas Jefferson's hope of visiting the University himself prevented by his poor health and the bad roads, and Jefferson's dose of 85 drops of laudanum each night for pain

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 September 18
Box: 1

writes concerning the University "this neighborhood is becoming a place of general resort during the summer season, many parents who have sons at the University come to Charlottesville instead of going to the Springs," mentions that the [Rivanna?] River is too low for navigation that fall, and that Sally [Cole] was still working for Mrs. Key

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 October 2
Box: 1

mentions the visit of Mrs. Madison and the members of the Board of Visitors at Monticello prior to their meeting at the University which Jefferson was finally able to visit by carriage

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 October 13
Box: 1

expresses concern that Jefferson's health was damaged by his activity with the Board of Visitors of the previous week, describes the riot which occurred at the University involving Ayre, Wilson Cary, and Thompson who were expelled, the actions of George Long and Thomas Key who tried to withdraw from the faculty and offered their resignations, the Board's enactment of a rigid code of conduct for the students, General Cocke's advice to Wilson Cary's mother to place him in the country to read law, and lists the contents of Ellen's trunks subsequently lost at sea

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1825 October 16
Box: 1

mentions Cornelia's visit to Carysbrook, the terrible ordeal of Jefferson when a visiting plasterer, [J.H.I.] Browere, tried to make a mold of Jefferson's face but allowed the clay to harden too much causing much pain upon the mask's removal, and who also began working on a view of the University and some caricatures of several Monticello residents

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 October 23
Box: 1

writes of her expectation of more visitors due to the meeting of the Presbyterian Synod at Charlottesville, on October 27, the decline of Maria Carr, the visit of Captain [Claudius] Crozet and Mr. Fairfax with Nicholas [Trist?] following their survey of the Kanawha [River?], John Patton Emmet's interest in Mary Byrd Tucker, a visit to the Library at the University where the rules forbid anyone to carry a volume past the precincts of the institution, and Francis Gilmer's poor health

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 October 31
Box: 1

writes concerning General John Hartwell Cocke and his wife at Bremo in Fluvanna County, her impatience with Presbyterian preachers, the birth of a girl to the Dunglison's, and a riding accident involving two University students

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 November 10
Box: 1

sends the news that Ellen's trunks were lost at sea on the brig Washingtonwhich included all of the letters from her grandfather and mother, and refers to a letter to the editor of Central Gazettefrom [J.H.I.] Browere jesting about the episode with Jefferson's life mask and misrepresenting what actually occurred

J[oseph] C[oolidge], Jr. to Randolph 1825 November 11
Box: 1

refers to Ellen's lost trunks, a recent fire suffered by the Coolidge family, and Ellen's adjustment to life in Boston

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 November 16
Box: 1

talks about her distress over the loss of Ellen's trunks, mentions some of the things remaining at Monticello that they might send to her, including her grandfather's plan to send her the writing desk upon which the Declaration of Independence was written, her suspicion of Ellen's pregnancy, news of Virginia Trist's pregnancy, and Thomas Jefferson's disappointment in the color of the pillar for his bust

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1825 November 20
Box: 1

reflects upon her lost treasures in the brig Washingtonand her concern over her family's misfortunes

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 November 24
Box: 1

shares her frustration at having no time to read or to draw, saying "I know I wish I could do something to support myself instead of this unprofitable drudgery of keeping house here, but I suppose not until we sink entirely will it do for the granddaughters of Thomas Jefferson to take in work or keep a school, and we shall hold out for some time yet; ours is not a gallopping consumption but one of those lingering diseases which drags on for years and years," and mentions the resumption of Jefferson's horseback rides

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1825 November 26
Box: 1

lists the contents of a new shipment of articles to Ellen the chief of which is the desk associated with the Declaration of Independence, and including Jefferson's sugar dish used in Paris, sends some recipes except those unnecessary for a "town lady" and mentions Wilson Cary's agreement to work in the Fluvanna County Clerk's office

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1825] November 27
Box: 1

writes of details concerning the destruction of her belongings at sea and her devotion to her family

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1825 December 4
Box: 1

tells how she misses Ellen's lively conversation in the drawing room, mentions the lack of opportunity for self improvement, her preoccupation with the sewing needle, Sally [Cole's] visit to Monticello with Mrs. Key, Sally's contentment nursing the Key baby, and her inquiry about Ellen

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1826 January 2
Box: 2

voices her discouragement concerning the ignorance of Americans on the subject of the North American Indian, especially in the book by [John Dunn?] Hunter which General George Rogers Clark pronounced in error concerning the region of the Osages; and remarks upon the respect shown to New England clergymen by her neighbors

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1826 January 23
Box: 2

writes concerning the public sale of Edgehill, her high opinion of her brother Jefferson, her use of the Declaration of Independence desk, the safe arrival of items shipped from Monticello, and refers to a letter from Mrs. [Gouverneur Morris] abusing De Witt Clinton and other individuals who bother her husband from time to time for favors

Joseph and Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1826 February 8
Box: 2

express concern that Cornelia may not get to visit them due to financial problems with the tobacco sales, items sent to Thomas Jefferson and family include a piano and French brandy

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 February 23
Box: 2

describes Thomas Jefferson's lottery scheme to sell the mill and some land to pay his debts and the difficulty in getting the bill through the General Assembly due to the precedent it might set, and refers to the death of Anne Cary Bankhead and the illness of her baby

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1826 February 27
Box: 2

writes of her regret at not being present to comfort her mother over the death of her sister, mentions the passage of the lottery bill for Thomas Jefferson by the Virginia Legislature, the sympathy of New England for his plight and their proposal of voting a sum to "an old revolutionary patriot and the friend of science and the arts," and discusses the progress of female education in Massachusetts

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1826 March 1
Box: 2

relates the problems of getting Cornelia to Boston for a visit, the success of Thomas Jefferson's lottery proposal, Jefferson Randolph's future trip to New York on that business, the plan for Ellen Bankhead and the newborn infant to live with Martha, and the reconciliation of the family with Charles Lewis Bankhead

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 March 18
Box: 2

plans to accompany Jefferson Randolph to Boston as soon as his business is completed at Bedford, says that the family is awaiting the arrival of Virginia's piano by boat, describes meeting Mrs. Bonnycastle, Virginia's health, Dr. Emmet's poor health and his brother who was involved in several escapades at the University

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1826 March 23
Box: 2

shares her opinion of Mrs. Ritchie and her ideas on child rearing, her opinion of society in Boston, and a description of the Coolidge household

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 April 5
Box: 1

discusses Thomas Jefferson's financial condition after the passage of the lottery bill, which would pay his debts and leave him Monticello for his lifetime, her worries over their future, the five thousand dollars a year in interest alone her father had to pay, describes the circumstances of the sale of Edgehill, the impatience of Thomas Mann Randolph's creditors, Jefferson Randolph's role in the sale, the injunction brought by T.M. Randolph against his son Jefferson, the slanderous and untrue rumors concerning Jefferson taking advantage of his father over the sale of Edgehill, since he was the highest bidder, stoutly defends Jefferson's motives and actions concerning the whole affair, describes the shock to Thomas Jefferson when he realized that Monticello would have to be sold and how Jefferson conceived the idea of the lottery to satisfy his debts, and Harriet [Randolph's?] plan to open a school for girls

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1826 April 8
Box: 2

thanks Joseph for news of Ellen's successful childbirth, shares their enjoyment of the piano, her father's intention of buying one if the lottery turns out well, and the reduction of his dose of laudanum to seventy drops without ill effect

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 April 16
Box: 2

writes concerning the health of Anne Cary Bankhead's children, her grandfather's resumption of the practice of inviting students to Sunday dinner to the annoyance of the family, the refusal of the law professorship by William Wirt, and Sally [Cole's] concern and inquiries concerning Ellen

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1826 May 9
Box: 2

describes her daughter Ellen Randolph Coolidge's baptism, her nervousness at the affair, her enjoyment of having Cornelia visit, and discusses childbirth

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 May 12
Box: 2

the completion of the Episcopal church at the University where she heard Mr. Meade preach, a description of Virginia's new baby, the plan of Harriet, Lucy, and Jane Randolph to open a school for girls in New London and leave Ashton, the mention of Jefferson's arrangement to purchase a clock for the University when finances allowed

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1826 May 29
Box: 2

congratulates her on the arrival of her daughter, reports she has had no nurse for some time saying, "The curse of domestic life in New England is the insolence and insubordination of the servants and the difficulty of getting any that do not give more trouble than they save." She then describes her child care experiences, and says she has not heard from brother Jeff

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 June 6
Box: 2

mentions seeing an elephant at an exhibition of animals in Charlottesville, her visit to the Rotunda, hearing a speech from a member of the Patrick Henry Society at the University, and Thomas Jefferson's ride into Charlottesville

Virginia Trist to Cornelia Randolph 1826 June 30
Box: 2

describes the state of Thomas Jefferson's declining health after his recent attack, the bedside vigils of the family, her regret that they are not all together [Ellen and Cornelia did not arrive before the funeral

Nicholas P. Trist to Joseph Coolidge 1826 July 4
Box: 2

writes that Thomas Jefferson has lived to see the fourth of July, and describes the desperate condition of Jefferson at the point of death, his determination to follow the doctor's instructions without complaint, and the importance of their coming to Martha

Joseph Coolidge to [?] 1826 July 5
Box: 2

writes that they will leave as soon as possible for Monticello refers to the death of President John Adams at Quincy on July fourth

Ellen Coolidge to Jeff Randolph 1826 September 7
Box: 2

thanks him for the use of the carriage to begin their journey home, informs Jeff that they missed the Norfolk boat, and that Joseph was too unwell to travel further

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 September 11
Box: 2

expresses her regret at their absence, describes the beautiful surroundings at Monticello, and reveals Martha's fear that she will return home from a trip to Boston to find Monticello sold and gone forever

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1826 September 14
Box: 2

describes her stay in Richmond, refers to her home in Boston as "a state of exile," describes the rivalry of two steamboats plying from Richmond to Norfolk, and her fear of disease at Richmond

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph and Nicholas Trist 1826 September 27
Box: 2

requests that Martha and Nicholas supply information concerning the private life of Thomas Jefferson and the causes of his indebtedness in old age for an article, and lists causes known to her as 1) he lost much in the Revolutionary War 2) the depreciation of paper money 3) his father-in-law's debts assumed by Jefferson 4) lack of time during his Presidency to watch over his affairs at Monticello 5) the enormous establishment at Monticello far beyond his means of support

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 October 1
Box: 2

reports that the success of the lottery is extremely doubtful and that the lottery has been put off until December 5, but it seems impossible to sell even half of the tickets by then, should the lottery fail the Bedford property will be sold on January 1, 1827, including the furniture from Monticello and part of the slaves, if everything must be sold then Martha might open up a school upon her return from Boston, the rest of the family will go to Tufton until she returns, Jefferson's proposal of abandoning Monticello to accentuate the real state of the family's financial affairs, and the visit of Mrs. Madison during a meeting of the Board of Visitors at the University

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 October 30
Box: 2

writes concerning Martha's departure for Boston, her visit to Montpelier, the work in shutting up the house at Monticello to leave for Tufton, her sorrow and despair at the thought of leaving Monticello, and Mr. Madison's mother

Cornielia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 November 12
Box: 2

sends a package of trees to Ellen and some to Mrs. Coolidge and other objects for the rest of the family, including clothes, books, pincusions and hams, and mentions Yellow Fever raging in Norfolk

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 November 26
Box: 2

writes concerning her homesickness for Monticello which they have just left for Tufton, plans for Lewis Randolph to attend Mr. Giles' school next session, the removal of Virginia's piano from Monticello, the destruction of Carysbrook by fire, and her experiences in teaching the household children

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1826 December 11
Box: 2

discusses all possible ways of making a living, her fear of being dependent on her brother Jefferson who believes them all extravagant, her work in copying her grandfather's letters, her admiration for Thomas Jefferson's perservering attitude under adversity in his public and private life, and speaks of the exodus of Virginians seeking a better life elsewhere

"Essay on Thomas Jefferson by Ellen Coolidge 1826
Box: 2

concerning Thomas Jefferson's financial affairs and the causes of his indebtedness and financial ruin

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1827 January 7
Box: 2

writes concerning the health of her mother, and her desire of some relic of her grandfather's from the library or bedroom

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1827 January 25
Box: 2

refers to the financial help rendered to the family by the South Carolina legislature, the proposal of opening a school in Charlottesville to be taught and run by the girls, requests her mother's ideas on the subject, hopes to eventually recover Monticello in a few years, refers to the sale of Monticello and the slaves and the pain it brought to the family

Cornelia Randolph and Nicholas Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1827 February 4
Box: 2

writes concerning the education of Ben and Lewis, her bitterness against the Virginia Legislature which offered no financial help for Thomas Jefferson, the inactivity about starting the proposed school, where they want to teach French, Italian, English, drawing, music, and for which she is busy collecting everybody's ideas

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1827 February 11
Box: 2

writes concerning the proposed division of labor in the school, the possibility of Nicholas setting up a law practice in Washington, and the desire of Jeff for his grandfather's octagon table

[Mary Randolph] to Ellen Coolidge 1827 March 18
Box: 2

writes concerning her visit to the University, the completion of the portico of the Rotunda and its beauty, remarks on the quietness of the session at the University due in part to the new regulations which limit the amount of pocket money allowed to students and discourages visits to the confectioners and taverns, the family's dental work, the aid of the Louisiana Legislature to the family, her hopes that a school will yet be unnecessary, Louisiana as a land of opportunity, and mentions that Simon Bolivar's nephew, Fernando Bolivar, attends the University

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1827 March 20
Box: 2

reveals her intense trouble with her domestic servants and her frustrations in dealing with them, her mother's health improved, the receipt of a letter from her father in Georgia mentioning oranges in leaf and the delicious climate, arguments among Martha's children and Septimia's bad behavior, waiting for a clock by Simon Willard to be finished for the University, mentions the $ 10,000 contribution of the Louisiana Legislature, the octagon table, and the many personal treasures of Thomas Jefferson already possessed by Jeff

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1827 March 23
Box: 2

discusses the idea of moving the family to Louisiana to the Trist sugar plantation where they might make a good living, her fears of the climate there, mentions brother Jeff is in New York about the sale of the lottery tickets and her fears that they will not be a success, hopes her mother does not intend to use the money from the South Carolina and Louisiana Legislatures to pay the creditors of Thomas Jefferson instead of her own needs, shares their uncertainty over Nicholas' plans, her desire to be settled, depredations on the Monticello property perpetuated by visitors to the estate, quarrels over the octagon table, and the relinquishing of the plan to start a school

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1827 April 10
Box: 2

writes concerning the failure of the lottery scheme due partially to laws passed against it by New York and Maryland, Jeff's hopes of using the proceeds from the sale of Jefferson's papers to pay Jefferson's debts, and describes several members of the early University faculty

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1827 April 22
Box: 2

describes her visit and the routine at Bremo Recess, and the visit of Philip St. George Cocke on holiday from the University to Bremo Recess, which John Hartwell Cocke lent to Aunt Cary because Carybrook burnt to the ground

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1827 May 1
Box: 2

acknowledges the receipt of the box of gifts, writes concerning her irritation at the vulgar visitors who traveled to Monticello, the devotion of Burwell who remained at Monticello to take care of the yard and the house, and the interest of Jared Sparks in Thomas Jefferson's papers

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1827 May 18
Box: 2

describes a visit to Monticello to air out the house and bedding, Burwell's faithful keeping of the house and yard at Monticello, her mixture of pleasure and pain experienced during her visits to Monticello, the house Jeff intends to build at Edgehill and the property there

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1827 June 11
Box: 2

mentions the visit of Virginia and Nicholas to the Dunglisons, the upcoming marriage of Louisiana Cocke and Dr. Falcon, the ride to Edgehill with Jeff and Jane and describes Edgehill as being in disrepair and covered with vegetative growth

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1827 July 16
Box: 2

mentions her discomfort from her pregnancy, her enjoyment of living in Cambridge, news of George and Septimia, her father's refusal of a position as an Indian agent

Joseph Coolidge to Virginia Trist [1827] July 23
Box: 2

urges that Martha should stay in Cambridge a while longer, and not return to live with Thomas Mann Randolph who was back in Albemarle County, citing her liking of Cambridge, the company of his aunt, and the new school for boys begun by Mr. Wells, a well-known classical scholar, author of Scriptores Romani, which George could attend, believes that if she remained with them it would discourage Thomas Mann Randolph from staying in Albemarle and force him to support himself, suggests that Benjamin accept the position as a junior engineer to gain experience in surveying and includes other advice for the family

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1827 July 29
Box: 2

writes of opening up Monticello for the Dunglisons to spend their vacation, their plan to return to Monticello for the fall in preparation for Martha's return from Boston, her fear that Aunt Cary will again suggest a uniting of the two misplaced families in one house, or indulge in several long visits to Monticello during the winter, suggests an arrangement to secure furniture for Monticello from the interest on the South Carolina appropriation and ways to economize and discourage guests, notes that the Keys have left for England, Sally Cole plans to work for Dr. Emmet when he returns from New York with his bride, and mentions the law forbidding her to remain in the state after she has secured her freedom

Joseph Coolidge to Jefferson Randolph 1828 February 10
Box: 2

passes on an inquiry from the trustees of the Boston Athenaeum who hope to purchase any of Thomas Jefferson's collection of pamphlets at Monticello not included in the sale of books

Thomas Mann Randolph to and from Nicholas Trist 1828 March 10-11
Box: 2

Randolph requests permission to occupy the North Pavilion at Monticello since Martha intends on returning to Monticello in May under the following conditions, "Mr. R. means to live entirely in his own room, at his own charge, making no part of the family, and receiving nothing from it in any way whatever. He will come on no other terms; & he assures Mr. T. that there shall be no other communication than the sight of him as he goes in and out. He wants only a place for his horse; the cellar under the house; one of the carriage houses for his fuel which he will procure himself; and a small spot for a garden, to be enclosed by him." Trist gives him permission to live there and invites him to do so as one of the family, but Randolph replys that his own peace of mind requires an absolute separation from the others at Monticello

Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge 1828 March 19
Box: 2

gives an account of Thomas Mann Randolph's return to Monticello occupying the North Pavilion in solitude which no one disturbs except to inquire about his health, the family's determination not to let him disturb her mother's peace of mind, the need for Nicholas to seek employment elsewhere, the prospects in Louisiana and her opposition to moving there and leaving her mother, the rising fortune of the Nicholas family

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1828 May 2
Box: 2

describes her voyage from Boston to New York City, where she visited Morrisania [home of Gouverneur Morris]

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1828 May 6
Box: 2

sends news of acquaintances in Cambridge and the family who miss her greatly, and the wedding of [Sarah ?] Bradford

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1828 May 13
Box: 2

mentions her sorrow on the absence of her mother, her fears for her peace of mind, the safe arrival of the Jefferson paintings formerly at Monticello, and her dreams involving Monticello

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1828 May 24
Box: 2

describes several gentlemen they met on the voyage home from Philadelphia to Baltimore, including a Congressman [Richard Henry] Wilde (1789-1847) from Georgia, her distaste for the fiction of Mrs. Royal, especially The Black Book, the ruin and desolation of Richmond, their arrival home and the good health of Martha, speaks of "one of those industrious plebians of Fluvanna," a Mr. Magruder of the Union Mills in Fluvanna and his difficulty in getting women to work in his mill "as hirelings and particularly in so public a manner." and mentions the sickness of Thomas Mann Randolph

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1828 May 28
Box: 2

describes the celebration of the election day in Boston, her visit to the Athenaeum in Boston where she saw many of the paintings from Monticello, some of which she lists by name and gives their estimated value, mentions Joseph's intention of getting [Washington?] Allston the painter to make a fourth evaluation of their worth, and reveals her low estimation of the quality of Boston domestics

Autobiographical Writings of Ellen Coolidge 1828 June 15-July 13
Box: 2

she discusses how her unique background and education did not prepare her for the normal adversity experienced in life, mentions the influence of good books and "the very perfect characters of my grandfather and mother always before my eyes, [which] gave me a high standard of moral and intellectual worth with which perpetually to compare myself," her reflections concerning the danger of personal anger and the necessity for energy in all of life's tasks, agreeable or not

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1828 June 24
Box: 2

mentions her concern over the news of her father's illness, Joseph's financial difficulties, George's account with his teacher Mr. Wells, Allston's confirmation of the judgement of the other appraisers as to the value of the paintings and their ruinous state, and informs the family that Joseph does not wish to purchase a Virginia horse

Martha Randolph to George Wythe Randolph 1828 June 30
Box: 2

sends news of his father's last illness and death, his reconciliation with all of the family, even Jefferson, and their attention to him in his last days, her advice as to good habits in youth, news that Monticello will be sold this fall with the remaining property of the family, and her uncertainty of where she will live

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1828 June [30?]
Box: 2

recounts the reconciliation of Jeff and his father who sent for him while on his deathbed, John Hemings took the message, Randolph asked forgiveness of the whole family and admitted he followed his passion rather than his head

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1828 July 6-8
Box: 2

furnishes details about the illness and death of her father, the sickness and death of Aunt Marks, reflections upon their afflictions, describes Monticello with its wild growth in the yard and the unpruned trees, compares her feelings on Monticello being sold to that of profaning a temple, mentions that Martha is considering living in Philadelphia, and mentions Julia Maria Dickenson Tayloe's autograph album of great men of America

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1828 July 20
Box: 2

describes some of the delegates to the Virginia Convention, James Monroe, James Madison, Justice Marshall, the argument between Charles Fenton Mercer and Chapman Johnson, the meeting of the Board of Visitors, and Mrs. Madison's suggestion of living in Washington

A fragment addressed to Joseph Coolidge 1828 July 21
Box: 2

concerns the death of Thomas Mann Randolph, noting that his absence was not a source of permanent grief

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1828] August 7
Box: 2

strongly urges Nicholas and his family to seek their fortune in Washington by cashing in on the obligations of the nation to the heirs of a President of the United States and to contact influential friends of the family for a position in government, gives bad news concerning the sale of the paintings from Monticello, since so far only the Benjamin Franklin had been sold to the Boston Athenaeum but promises to continue to try selling the others, comments upon the building activity in Boston, and the prosperity of the Athenaeum

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1828 August 10
Box: 2

writes concerning the prevalence of the measles and dysentery in the Charlottesville vicinity, three deaths at the University due to illness, an alteration in one of the rooms at Monticello once containing Thomas Jefferson's books by filling up the smaller of two arches and making a sleeping room, Jeff's uncertainty about whether Monticello could be sold or rented, and Mrs. Dunglison staying at Monticello to isolate her children from the measles

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1828 August 19
Box: 2

mentions news of Boston, her domestic staff, the marriage of Thomas Coolidge, Joseph's brother who will live at the old Coolidge house temporarily, and the difference in the reception given the new bride with her own

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1828 September 3
Box: 2

relates her opinion of French opera singers in Boston, the social error of Mrs. Thomas Coolidge (the former Miss Goldsborough) committed while in the opera box and the full band playing on the Boston Common two nights a week

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1828 October 28
Box: 2

asks about the news of an appointment for Nicholas secured by Henry Clay, expresses her concern for George's progress at school, and tells her mother that the painting of Franklin sold by Joseph has paid all of George's expenses

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1828 December 29
Box: 2

announces the birth of Joseph Randolph Coolidge to Ellen and himself, and gives the amount received for the painting of Franklin as two hundred dollars and one hundred for a Lafayette

A Copy of the Epitaph of Thomas Mann Randolph by [Ellen Coolidge] [1828?]
Box: 2
Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1829 January 1
Box: 2

mentions problems with naming his son, financial failures in Boston, Boston politics, an attempt to put a Mr. Ticknor in as president of Harvard College, the lighting of the streets of Boston with gas lamps, and advice to Nicholas to sell his share in the Charlottesville Virginia Advocate

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1829 January 12
Box: 2

writes more concerning Harvard College politics, his approval of Nicholas' plans to move to Washington, and the safe arrival of the violins in England to be sold

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1829 January 25
Box: 2

while on a visit to Carysbrook she writes of her plans to visit more during the winter to relieve Jeff of the burden of her large family as much as possible, the possibility that Nicholas may get rid of the paper without much loss, the hiring of a dining room servant from Virginia Randolph Cary (1786-1852) for a year by Nicholas, and the success of Cary's books, Letters on Female Character Addressed to a Young Lady on the Death of her Motherand Christian Parent's Assistant, or Tales, for the Moral and Religious Instruction of Youth

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1829 March 3
Box: 2

relates her difficulties in securing, keeping, and training good domestic staff which she refers to in Boston as "stiff-necked hard mouthed democrats," her conclusion that it is a wearisome thing to be a woman, and her fears that her own children will have no one to care for them since her family is so removed from Boston

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1829 April 26
Box: 2

sends news of her children's health, the failure of several Boston businessmen, Samuel Perkins, John Rogers, and Charles Toney, the welfare of George, Joseph's desire to own the Natural Bridge and an inquiry to Jeff as to its value

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1829 May 3
Box: 2

bemoans her lack of useful qualities, and says she has been "pawning my jewels to procure my linen," describes her own religious belief in detail and her own particular form of Unitarianism, and gives her advice on economy

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1829 May 12
Box: 2

writes concerning family sickness, Nicholas Trist's house at the second cross street west of the President's house with enough room for a garden, fruit trees, the intention of Browse Trist to live there as well, and the progress in the revision of Thomas Jefferson's papers for the publication of Memoir, Correspondence, and Miscellany

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge [1829] May 28
Box: 2

writes concerning their busy schedule in revising and correcting the copies of the manuscripts of Jefferson's papers, at ten hours work a day she estimates they will finish in July unless the three volumes of the Anas will be included, the weakness of Ben, the request of Burwell S. Randolph to be admitted to the family contributing the same amount to the general fund as Browse, and the details of her plan to raise the extra money needed to move and set up housekeeping in Washington

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1829 June 21
Box: 2

writes concerning the boarding of their children in the countryside for the summer to help their health, advice to her mother for economizing, and describes the trial involving the suit between the heirs of Tuttle Hubbard and Peter C. Brooks, with William Wirt and Webster opposing each other

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1829 July 21
Box: 2

describes the visit of one of Nicholas' roguish friends to Boston society at the Coolidge home, the hiring of a French cook for a special meal, the businesses failing in Boston, bankruptcy of Cornelius Coolidge, and her disapproval of Frances Wright (1795-1852) an early American feminist reformer and publisher of Free Enquirerand her lover Robert Dale Owen, when she arrived in Boston to give a course of lectures

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1829 August 12
Box: 2

writes concerning the completion of their work on Jefferson's papers for publication, news of the extended family, especially the Ashton family at Lynchburg, the plan to pack up their furniture at Monticello to go to Washington, and a long paragraph concerning her impressions of the charm that surrounds Monticello and the advantages of its high elevation

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1829 August 23
Box: 2

sends news of Jane's advancing pregnancy, Virginia's impatience at being separated from her husband, and her dislike of Ben Rice's sermon attacking the doctrine of the Unitarians, which was delivered as a result of the minister reading a copy of Jefferson's letter to John Adams concerning his views on religion in Memoir and Correspondence

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1829 August 31
Box: 2

writes concerning the birth of Thomas Jefferson Randolph to Jeff and Jane, the health of Jane, a mid-October date of departure for Washington, John Hemings help in preparing to leave Monticello, Dr. William Bankhead's marriage and offer to take Willie Bankhead, Anne's son, to live with him, Jeff's promise to send copies of each volume of Jefferson's papers as they are published to Joseph, Jeff's plan to run for the Virginia Assembly at which Jane is extremely angry, and Martha calls the Assembly "a paltry business"

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1829 October 25
Box: 2

describes her last visit to the University and its library, her farewell visits to friends, Benjamin's work as the subscription collection agent for the works of Thomas Jefferson to pay his fees at the University where he will study to become a doctor, the marriage of Dr. Johnson at the University to Susan Garrett, and Virginia and Cornelia's visit to Richmond

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1829 November 1
Box: 2

warns against the indulgence of regret, melancholy feelings, and the sentimentality of the past, encourages her to look to future opportunities and new experiences, and to enjoy the present, describes her move to a new house formerly occupied by John Rogers and his wife and its rooms and advantages

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge [1829?]
Box: 2

describes her regret at the death of old Mrs. Coolidge, her social life in Washington, visits from the President's ladies, a Cabinet dinner at Martin Van Buren's home, the goodness of Burwell Randolph to the family, details of their economy, near neighbors, and supplies news concerning Ben at the University and Lewis working with Judge Carr

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1830 January 10
Box: 2

warns her not to allow the girls to attend too many parties as "they will render themselves cheap by so doing, exhaust their popularity and diminish their respectability," suggests ways of saving family time while forced to entertain visitors, mentions the marriage of Mrs. Humphrey and a Polish adventurer, Count Walewsky, and the somberness of Boston due to the failure of business

Joseph Coolidge to Jefferson Randolph 1830 February 10
Box: 2

writes concerning his business interests, having dissolved his partnership with [Thomas] Bulfinch and striking out on his own, he asks Jeff if he could direct consignments of Southern produce to his business, such as flour, cotton and other products, because he plans to extend his business to include more than manufactured goods

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1830 March 14
Box: 2

discusses the surprising remarriage of Charles Lewis Bankhead, and the son of Dr. Warren who was shipped off to France after he stabbed an associate in a drunken brawl

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1830] April 2
Box: 2

sends a brief notification of her impending visit accompanying Susan and Thomas Coolidge

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1830 May 30
Box: 2

furnishes details of the death of their old nurse, Mammy Priscilla, her confusion over politics in Washington, and the lack of enough stages and steamboats to serve the needs of Congressmen leaving Washington

Martha Randolph to Mrs. Coolidge, Sr. 1830 June 1
Box: 2

(Typescript Copy) expresses her enjoyment of the visit of Susan Coolidge and invites her to come as often as she likes

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1830 June 6
Box: 2

writes concerning the absence of her nursemaid Mrs. Cox, the increased load of work, her illness from pregnancy, the unpleasantness of Washington in the summer months, her scorn for Frances Wright who is again troubling Boston "where she divides public attention with a rhinoceros the first ever brought to the United States," a personal acquaintance of Ellen's, Wright's doctrine is said to be "for the happiness of both parties a preliminary step to the civil contract of marriage should be to live a year or two together without the contract"

Joseph Coolidge to Jefferson Randolph 1830 August 26
Box: 2

discusses business matters, the birth of twin boys, Algernon and Sydney, the presence of Martha as a great comfort, and praises George for his many good qualities

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1830 October 15
Box: 2

writes concerning the plan of Martha to return to Washington in November, her suffering with the birth of the twins, George's intention of returning with Martha, indecision over the naming of the infants, securing a wet-nurse from the countryside, how to make do with fewer servants, "where there are slaves it is no matter how much work you make there are always plenty of people all the better for having something to do."

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1830 December 5
Box: 2

describes how much the whole household and other friends miss her presence, especially little Ellen, who dictated a letter to her mother to be included in this letter

Martha Coolidge to Ellen Coolidge 1830 December 5
Box: 2

notifies her of her safe arrival in Washington, and of news that Dabney [Overton?] was killed in the battle for Algiers

Joseph and Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1830] December 9
Box: 2

writes concerning Jared Sparks, his history of the United States and proposed biography of General George Washington and asks Martha to write a letter of introduction to Mrs. Gouverneur Morris to allow Sparks to use her husband's papers in his research

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1830 December 15
Box: 2

informs him that she has written a letter of introduction for Mr. Sparks and sent it to New York, by placing Gouverneur Morris in the ranks of America's great patriots she hopes to appeal to Mrs. Morris pride in her husband's accomplishments and convince her to allow Sparks access to her papers, Nicholas is in high favor with the President, and her worries about little Jefferson's hearing problems

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 February 22
Box: 3

reports that little Jefferson is dangerously ill, describes the routine of the house, the inconvenience of being without closets or furniture, the crowded condition of the house with eight grown-ups, two sickly children, and few servants, the receipt of a letter from Mrs. [Gouverneur] Morris concerning Jared Spark's request, plans for George's future include attending the University and entering a naval career, refers to a paragraph in the Telegraph about a bill for the financial relief of Martha proposed by [Senator George ?] Poindexter and the uproar it caused, describes [Henry ?] Middleton of South Carolina who had just returned from Russia, and mentions a thermometer and an Oliver Cromwell [portrait?]

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1831 March 7
Box: 3

sends news of her growing family, especially the progress of Ellen, and mentions Mr. Sparks thanks for Martha's letter of introduction to Mrs. Morris

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 March 8
Box: 3

informs her that Mr. Bailey will bring Joseph the thermometer and Oliver Cromwell [painting?], and notes that Poindexter's bill proposes a grant of land to Martha which may be easier for Congress to pass than a grant of money

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1831?] March 11
Box: 3

mentions the visit of Mrs. S.P. Gardner who will carry her letter to Washington, and songs that interest her

Martha Randolph 1831 April 1
Box: 3

writes that George has secured a position in the navy on the John Adamsfor a three year voyage, due to a suggestion by John Nicholas, and that Ben had almost completed his coursework, and was urged to apply for a position of surgeon in the navy

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 April 23
Box: 3

describes their hasty preparations for George's departure on his three year naval voyage to the Mediterranean and Constantinople, and plans for Ben to get a surgeon position

Cornelia Randolph 1831 May 10
Box: 3

informs her of their receipt of letters from George, his progress in the navy, their plans to leave for Edgehill on the 25th, news of President Jackson's appointment of Nicholas Trist as his private secretary, and the reconstruction of his Cabinet especially the unwilling resignations of Samuel D. Ingham and John Branch

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 May 18
Box: 3

warns her not to speak about Nicholas' appointment, shares the family's opinion of Andrew Jackson as "no common man, he has character and decision enough to do anything however great; his talents the war proved; etc." and also shares two anecdotes concerning Jackson's affection for his wife and his loyalty to his physician

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1831 June 19
Box: 3

tells her that her girls are now in school, that she has not heard from her mother or sisters for a month, and describes her enjoyment of [Ebenezer] Henderson's (1784-1858) Tour Through Iceland

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 June 21
Box: 3

apologizes for her delay in writing, mentions George's receipt of Ellen's letter, her thankfulness for President Jackson help in securing George's berth on the John Adams,reveals that [George] Poindexter's has told Jefferson of his plan to secure a township of 50,000 acres of land from Congress for Martha with the President locating the grant in several different localities to make the tracts easier to sell, describes her plans of dividing the land (if the bill is passed) in twelve shares with two for herself and one apiece for her children, and her plans for Monticello, describes her visit to the University and Albemarle County, and the condition of Monticello

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 June 29
Box: 3

furnishes a summary of the financial status of the family, and writes concerning the chance to sell Monticello to Dr. [James T.] Barclay, a Charlottesville druggist, the $30,000 of Thomas Jefferson's debts remaining to be paid, no income as yet from the publication of Thomas Jefferson's manuscripts, her dream of returning to Monticello to live, the hope of Congress donating land to Martha, the hostility in Virginia towards anything Jeffersonian where Jefferson's "principles are considered as having gone out of fashion," their dissatifaction with their house in Washington, her attitude toward the system of slavery, the prospects of her brothers Ben, Lewis, and James, Nicholas with the President at Old Point, and Browse Trist's appointment as Surveyor General of Louisiana

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 July 22
Box: 3

describes the meeting of the Board of Visitors at the University, the procedure of the public day which closes the session at the University of Virginia, its events, the graduation of Ben as a doctor, the outstanding University student of the year was Edwin Randolph, her enjoyment of the Virginia mountain scenery, mentions a person interested in purchasing Monticello, and Jefferson's accident when a horse kicked him in the knee

George W. Randolph to Ellen Coolidge [1831] July 26
Box: 3

describes his visit to the ruins of Pompeii and Herculaneum near Naples while on his naval tour of duty, which Ellen sends on to her mother [October 3]

Ellen Coolidge 1831 August 7
Box: 3

writes concerning a week at the summer resort of Nahant, Massachusetts and describes its inhabitants, her vacation, and acquaintainces, wishes that Monticello might be sold so that her mother would no longer hope to live there, and expresses her bitterness towards Virginia for its treatment of her grandfather and his family

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge [1831?] August 15
Box: 3

mentions her visit to the Dunglisons and the University for ten days during the meeting of the Board of Visitors, the graduation of Ben and his first successful operation, his desire to attend the medical lectures in Philadelphia, Lewis' disgust with his profession of law and his mother's hope of securing for him a clerkship, the sale of Monticello and 500 acres of land to Dr. Barclay, retaining family rights to the graveyard, and Edwin Randolph's success at the University

Joseph Coolidge to Virginia Trist [1831] August 26
Box: 3

announces the birth of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge

Cornelia Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 August 28
Box: 3

writes concerning the plans for the family to return to Washington in mid-October, the need for a larger house there, her regret over the sale of Monticello, Dr. Barclay's plans for Monticello, a final visit to Monticello when Virginia comes to [Edgehill?], the desire of the family to leave the slave states, her own feelings re slavery, her reaction to news of Nat Turner's Rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia, the disappointment with the work of Lewis at the University, and their hopes of getting him a clerkship

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1831] August 28 & 30
Box: 3

announces the birth of Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, reflects upon the rapid growth of his family, asks Ben to attend the medical lectures at Boston, and to stay with them, and refers to the Nat Turner Rebellion

Mary Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1831 September 25
Box: 3

expresses her sympathy with her sister over her rapid production of so large a family in so short a time, sends news of Ben who is presently living with Dr. Gilmer and assisting him with his patients in order to familiarize himself with the medicines necessary in an active practice, mentions James's attempts to continue to farm on a small scale and the necessity of building himself a new log house since his old home was located on the 500 acres purchased by Barclay, describes the fear generated by the "Southampton tragedy," and her hopes that the event will spur Virginia on to eradicate the evil of slavery

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1831 September 25
Box: 3

writes concerning the dangerous illness of her newborn baby, his recovery, Hannah Stearns arrival in Boston, her regret over the harsh measures enacted against Virginia slaves due to the Southampton insurrections, her confidence in the fidelity of Albemarle slaves, her gladness that her children will be raised far from that moral evil, the visit of two Frenchmen to Boston, the Counts [Alexis de] Toqueville and Beaumont [de la Bonniniere], and other visitors

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1831 October 27
Box: 3

discusses the drowning of Nat Turner, her fear that the editor [William Lloyd Garrison] of the Liberatorand Walker's pamphlet were trying to repeat the scenes of St. Domingo in Virginia by their support of the rebellion, her belief they would accomplish more good by raising subscriptions throughout the Union for the purchase and emancipation of slaves, refers to the laws passed removing privileges formerly extended to slaves and making their lives harsher and more restricted, describes her new residence in Washington at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue, I Street, and 20th Street, and mentions that Lewis now has a position in the State Department

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1831 November 20
Box: 3

sends news of little Ellen's delicate state of health, her other children, Boston, fashions, and the memoirs of Gouverneur Morris

Martha Randolph and Virginia Trist to Ellen Coolidge [1832?] February 7
Box: 3

describes the busy routine and the crowded condition of their new house, excuses their sloth in answering her letters, describes Ben's practice in Halifax County, near Danville, reports on George, describes a fancy ball they plan to attend in Washington with details of costumes they were planning to wear, and mentions the birth of Browse Trist to Virginia and Nicholas

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph [1832?] March 7
Box: 3

assures her of how much they look forward to a visit from her in the summer, and sends news of the community

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1832 March 18
Box: 3

replies that she could not justify a visit to Boston this summer unless it would be to return little Nell after a visit with them in Washington, describes the fancy ball they attended at Commodore [Daniel Todd?] Patterson's, noting that the President did not approve of the ball and none of his family attended, and mentions their late loss, the death of Aunt Jane

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1832 April 4
Box: 3

writes concerning the plan of Frank Gray and Stuart Newton to visit Washington, and the news of her children and friends

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1832 June 5
Box: 3

discusses an exhibition in the Boston Athenaeum and her enthusiasm for the poetry of William Cullen Bryant whose book Poems(1832) she could not get a copy

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1832 June 11
Box: 3

writes concerning the death of little Bessie [Elizabeth Bulfinch Coolidge (1827-1832)], and his plans to go to Canton, China for 18 months for business purposes

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1832 June 21
Box: 3

urges Ellen to come and visit with her whole family to escape the epidemic of cholera at Quebec and Montreal carried to Boston by people fleeing the disease, and includes a sketch of the location of her residence in Washington

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1832 June 25
Box: 3

urges a visit to Edgehill and Virginia for their health, and sends news of Elizabeth Eppes

Joseph Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1832 June 29
Box: 3

begs Martha to come to Boston to comfort Ellen especially because he will be away in China, mentions that his family is at the seashore, and assures her that he has not made his decision to travel to China hurriedly without careful thought

Martha Randolph to Joseph Coolidge 1832 November 2
Box: 3

writing from Boston, she informs him about his family, Martha's meeting of the Audubons on the steamboat and their visit to Boston

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1833 January 22
Box: 3

describes the effect of the deaths of Clementine Vail and Harriet [Randolph?] upon her mother, mentions the lack of communication from Joseph that may last until April, tells of another family, the Forbes, whose youngest brother and son was in Canton

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1833 May 31
Box: 3

relates the forlorn emotions experienced since her mother left Boston a week ago, the receipt of a long letter from Joseph who described his voyage to Canton, his meeting with a traveler who resided in Borneo for two years, the receipt of his journal of about 100 pages describing his journey, and her hatred of the cold weather

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1833 June 10
Box: 3

describes the tonsillectomy procedure used on Martha [Trist], sends news of Lewis' intention to marry [Margaret G.] Meade, mentions her original opposition to the marriage of Jefferson Randolph to Jane Hollins Nicholas and how mistaken she was, the financial condition of the family since Nicholas received an appointment of a consulship and his salary as a clerk has stopped, sends her regards to friends in Boston, and mentions the death of Senator [Josiah] S. Johnston (1784-1833), who perished in the explosion aboard the steamship Lionesson the Red River, near Alexandria, Louisiana, and his poor wife Eliza Sibley

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1833 June 17
Box: 3

writes concerning her disappointment with the house in Newton and her intention of moving as soon as possible, the rambunctious activities of her children, a report of Joseph in good spirits and health while busy at Canton, and news of her friends in Boston and their children

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1833 June 24
Box: 3

describes the financial worries of her family, Nicholas' appointment as Consul to Havana (April 1833), the presence of sixteen or seventeen grown persons in the household, the family's disappointment with the financial terms of the consulship given to Nicholas, how her debts forced her to sell two slaves, the death of Charles Bankhead, the engagement of Lewis and Margaret G. Meade of Philadelphia

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1833 July 15
Box: 3

describes her visit with Martin Van Buren who related the details of the President's visit to Boston and Ellen's opportunity to meet him while he was there, the good impression made by the Yankees upon the President, her household servants and tribulations, the cost of running the household, and rumors of what life will be like in Cuba for Nicholas and his family

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1833 July 21
Box: 3

informs her mother that the sale of the paintings brought about $450.00, urges her to use the proceedings for her personal needs as the amount would hardly matter to Thomas Jefferson's creditors, asks for instructions about the money, lists the works of art that she kept back from the sale including the Ariadne, the [Napoleon ?] Bonaparte, the Holy Family, the Crucifixion, the Andromache, and the soap- stone Indian, with prices listed for the sale of some of the paintings, declares that the success of the sale was due mostly to the hard work of Thomas Bulfinch, and reveals her plans to move from Newton to Cohasset

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1833 September 15
Box: 3

writes concerning George who has received his sailing orders to report to Norfolk on the fifteenth to sail to the West Indies on the USS Vandaliaflagship, Jefferson's determination to leave Virginia and go to Missouri due to the hostility of many in the state against him and his family, the huge debt remaining from his grandfather's estate, which he would pay by selling his farm, and the prejudice of the Methodist and Presbyterian ministers against him, about which Martha says "I think with him [Jefferson] Virginia is no longer a home for the family of Thomas Jefferson - the days of her glory are gone by, with Mr. Madison the last of her sons worthy the name will have passed away," notes that the monument to be erected over the grave of Thomas Jefferson is finished and the money from the sale of the paintings from Monticello will pay for it, that Monticello is again on the market, its environs totally altered, with the trees cut down, and the yard planted in corn, that Jefferson's concern for his slaves led him to consider Missouri as a new home because he could take them with him instead of selling them, and that Jeff's children have a new governess

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1833 October 27
Box: 3

expresses her disappointment over Ellen's decision not to spend the winter with them, describes the family's plans to stay with Jefferson until April or May when Nicholas returns home, to save on expenses, Mary's preparations to join Ellen in Boston, the purchase of "Carlton" by Alexander Rives, the visit of Mr. Hart of New York who claimed to represent a group of gentlemen determined to purchase Monticello for Martha Randoloph, the price Dr. Barclay is asking for Monticello and 230 acres of land, the utter ruin of Monticello under his ownership, the claim by Hart that Barclay showed him the original manuscript of Notes on Virginiawhich was missing from Jefferson's papers

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge [1833] December 2
Box: 3

writes concerning the increase of Ben's medical practice, who has assumed a great deal of Dr. Bramham's patients, George Carr's injury from being thrown from his horse, the details concernng the break up of Lewis and Margaret Meade's engagement and other related affairs, one involving Ben who had to flee the attentions of a girl already engaged in Halifax County where he first practiced medicine

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1834 January 7
Box: 3

writes concerning Ben doing well, his treatment of Septimia, James not doing well (died the 23rd), the sickness of two of Jane's slaves, Harriet and Sarah, and notes that they are still at Edgehill

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1834 January 23
Box: 3

sends news of the sickness of her children, Joseph's trip to Bombay, difficulties in the Coolidge family, and of Mary in good spirits and health

Ellen Coolidge to Martha Randolph 1834 March 19
Box: 3

writes about Joseph's admission as a partner in the firm of Russell and Company as of January 1, which was promised to him when he was sent out to Bombay by Captain Augustine Heard and Mr. Lowe, the panic of the businessmen of Boston, the problems of the Coolidge family, the sickness of her children, and describes some of the gifts Joseph has sent to her from the Orient

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1834 April 15
Box: 3

writes of New England politics, mentions that Mr. Hart came by while in Boston trying to raise a subscription to purchase Monticello, refers to the trying conditions of the past winter, her expectation of a visit by Joseph in the summer of 1835, and speaks disparagingly of Walker Gilmer who will share duties with Jefferson in the next session of the Virginia Legislature

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1834 June 20
Box: 3

expresses her joy that Ellen has agreed to come and stay with Jane and Jefferson for a visit, assuring her that her family would not place too great a burden on Jefferson's family, makes arrangements for her to travel to Washington and stay at their home before she continues on to Edgehill, and mentions Ben's intention of marrying in the fall if Sally's [Sally Champe Carter] delicate health will allow it

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1835 May 6
Box: 3

describes her journey back to Boston as far as New York after her visit to Virginia and Washington, including her companions on the journey, her Aunt Hackley, comparing New York unfavorably with Philadelphia, and her shopping experiences, Ellen was apparently accompanied by her husband Joseph on a visit home from China (Joseph is mentioned several times in the letter)

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1835 May 24
Box: 3

informs her that they are on their way back to Washington but that Joseph must sail for Canton by the end of June, and that she will not accompany him but must remain in the United States to care for the children, expresses her dread at being separated from her husband, and reveals Joseph's plans to rent his father's house on Bowdoin Street for the family during his absence

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1835 September 27
Box: 3

discusses Virginia's decision to stay in Philadelphia where her children attend school while Nicholas travels to Havana, gives her advice about what clothes they will need for the winter, and mentions that Martha, Septimia, and Mary are visiting with her

"Song from the Maid of the Mill" copied by Martha Jefferson Randolph [ante 1835]
Box: 3
Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1836 April 26
Box: 3

furnishes details concerning her mother's health which make it difficult for her to travel yet, notes that Martha will probably travel with Mr. Heard to Philadelphia where Virginia is living, describes her summer plans to go to Newport, asks Virginia to stay with her at Newport, discusses Mrs. G. Lyman's family life, mentions the request of Nicholas for rocking chairs, supplies news of Joseph presently in Calcutta and Bengal where he must remain until June, mentions Septimia visiting at New Orleans, George in Lisbon in March, Lewis sick in Nashville and his recovery, and the birth of a son to Elizabeth Martin and Meriwether Lewis Randolph named Andrew Jackson Randolph Andrew born while Lewis was in Washington to report on Arkansan progress towards statehood

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1836 May 10
Box: 3

gives her the results of her trip to Newport, Rhode Island, where she ran into their kinsman Richard Kidder Randolph an inhabitant of Newport for twenty-six years, describes the lodgings he helped her find, asks Virginia to share them with her, mentions a letter from Septimia at Pensacola, Florida, the death of Lewis' mother-in-law Mrs. Martin just as he was to leave with his family for Little Rock, Arkansas, leaving behind several small children, Martha's plans to leave Boston by the middle of the month, and her disappointment in her matchmaking attempts between Mary and Mr. Heard

Martha Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1836 August 22
Box: 3

complains about the constant rain and flooding at Edgehill, mentions the birth of Isaetta Carter Randolph to Ben and Sarah, describes the fate of the three servants that gave them so much trouble when Ellen visited Edgehill, Critty, Harriet and Mary Ann, who were sent west for their misconduct, the relationship of deep affection and trust between Mary Ann and her new master, Cornelia's plans to stay at Edgehill for the winter, and Martha's concern for her, the letter of William [Randolph?] to Jefferson urging him to join him in a suit to set aside his father's cousin John Randolph's will of 1821 which emancipated his slaves, her disapproval of the idea because if the will were set aside the emancipation clause would be overturned, her disgust that they would bring in Mrs. Morris private correspondence with him and her past indiscretions, mentions that George is at the naval school in Norfolk preparing for his exam, talk of running Jefferson for Governor, and relates an untrue and unfavorable story printed about Jefferson last winter about the lengths to which he would go to secure a vote

George Wythe Randolph to Ellen Coolidge 1836 August 23
Box: 3

mentions his arrival from the Mediterranean on a merchant ship to sit for his examination, and asks for Lewis' address and his occupation now that Arkansas is a state, his letter was sent by Ellen to her mother with a note notifying Martha of their plans to leave Newport and to return to Boston and Philadelphia, and mentions the death of Mary Stearnes

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1836 September 6
Box: 3

mentions her plans to return to Boston, problems in securing servants, her receipt of letters from Joseph, missing Virginia's company, and news of their associates

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 February 8
Box: 3

expresses worry over their lack of correspondence since her departure for Havana with Cornelia and Septimia, Mary being with Ellen, mentions the death of Joseph's mother, trouble keeping their spirits up, and a letter of Joseph's from Singapore

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 February 22
Box: 3

reproves her sister for not writing to her, sends a letter and several gifts by Mr. Gorham, mentions [William Henry?] Furness' (1802-1896) remarks on the Gospels, asks about the health of Septimia, and her son Joseph who was also in Havana

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 March 23
Box: 3

mentions her receipt of several letters from Havana, Mary's health, the departure of Joseph's partner [John Murray] Forbes from the East for home, having to be satisfied with a fortune of $100,000, and retaining an interest in the firm, her uncertainty of when Joseph might return home, and Mr. Heard's popularity in Boston

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 April 6
Box: 3

voices her concern for her son in Cuba, mentions the horrible weather in Boston which was still in the grip of winter, and a letter from Joseph in which he has just commenced a term of a new partnership (with nearly the same partners) and bemoaning their long separation

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 May 13
Box: 3

writes concerning her poor health which is aggravated by the climate, her thankfulness that Virginia will keep her son Joseph longer, refers to the "Panic of 1837," her fear of Joseph losing this year's earnings, because no ship has sailed for the Canton trade from Boston, and mentions her household expenses in Boston

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 June 14
Box: 3

thanks her for the offer of letting her and her family live with them in Cuba but fears the trouble and expense of traveling there would be too much, mentions her search for a smaller, more reasonable house by next winter, relates an attempt of a group of arsonists to burn her house, resulting in the institution of a private neighborhood watch, describes a riot in Boston between the Irish and Americans, refers to Boston's suffering from the previous rage of speculation, and mentions the bankruptcy of Israel Thorndike

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 July 17
Box: 3

writes that she is unable to leave Boston for Havana as her father-in-law has just suffered a stroke

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 September 25
Box: 3

mentions her attempts to write to everyone before she sails for Canton, the health of her father-in-law, and her difficulties in heating her house

Joseph Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1837 November 17
Box: 3

begs Virginia to visit them at Boston for her health in the spring, describes his plans to return to China to stay for an unknown period and mentions that Ellen might go with him

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist 1838 January 19
Box: 3

writes concerning her preparations to leave Boston, her poor health, her confusion over their plans and her dread of going to China

Ellen Coolidge to Jane Randolph 1841 August 22
Box: 3

writes from Boston where she is leaving her country for the third time in four years, refers to her stay in Macao, mentions her anxiety concerning Virginia, rejoices in Ben's prosperity and the marriage of Jane's daughter Cary Anne [Randolph] to Francis Gildart Ruffin, who plan to reside at Shadwell, mentions George's success as a lawyer, relates the perils of her sea voyage, opportunities in the "celestial Empire," their share of the estate of Joseph's father, her intense longing to see her children at Monsieur Briquet's boarding school at Plainpalais, near Geneva, and the loss of Nicholas' place in Havana and his plans to live on a plantation in Cuba

Ellen Coolidge to Thomas Jefferson Randolph 1841 August 30
Box: 3

refers to Joseph and her sailing for China in July 1839, their idea of involving George in a merchant career with the house of Augustine Heard and Company, relates in detail their plans for him if he is interested, even to the route to China via Geneva and Egypt, and mentions the opportunities and the risks of George trying his future in China, leaving it to Jeff's discretion

Ellen Coolidge to Jane Randolph 1841 September 20
Box: 3

writes concerning their plans to sail from New York for the Havre on the Duchess of Orleans, her sympathy for Septimia, who has an infirm husband, two children and slender means, her plans for schooling her boys in Europe, and her desire not to influence George's decision over whether to join the Coolidges in China

Ellen Coolidge to Jane Randolph 1843 May 17
Box: 3

writes from Geneva, plans to take Randolph to the Baths of [Lasey?] on the Rhone above the Lake of Geneva for his health, outlines the ineffective treatment for his increasing deafness, indicates her uncertainty about when she will return to America, notes that Joseph is detained in Canton, and makes an observation that women are treated better in the United States than anywhere abroad, especially after they are married, both under the law and by custom

Ellen Coolidge to Jane Randolph 1844 August 1
Box: 3

writes concerning the arrival of Joseph in Geneva on May 29th, their departure for London, mentions that Randolph and Jefferson were sent with Browse Trist to a gymnasium in Dresden, Germany, kept by Dr. Blochman, Algernon and Sidney at school in Switzerland, their proposal to travel to the Continent, descend the Rhine, and go to Dresden to see their sons, her uncertainty about whether Joseph can help Jefferson Smith get into the China business as he has closed his concerns in China, gave up his business connections there, and left his former American partners, mentions that in Paris she was visited by the heirs of Lafayette who oppose the present French ruler, Louis Philippe, and describes the U.S. Minister to London, [Edward] Everett (1794-1865), and her dim view of the state of American politics

Ellen Coolidge to Jefferson Randolph 1845 February 24
Box: 3

attributes the degradation of American politics to the leadership of the "unprincipled state of New York and the wicked city of New York" and the "unwise naturalization laws" which allow the lower classes of European immigrants to vote in political elections in the United States, mentions her horror at the proposal of non-payment of state debts and the justification of slavery in principle and its defence on any other terms than dire necessity, she relates that the United States has fallen into disrepute abroad, and suggests that her interest money be paid to Septimia

Ellen Coolidge to Virginia Trist [1848?] May 29
Box: 3

arrives in New York and relates complaints from several gentlemen that American ladies are notorious for not expressing thanks for favors done for them such as escorting them on long journeys, and notes people she has visited in New York

Ellen Coolidge to Henry S. Randall and others, 1845, 1856-1858
Box: 3

a 102 page volume (also on microfilm M-1238) containing handwritten copies of her letters to Randall and others concerning the life of Thomas Jefferson, especially his financial problems (pp. 3-8); his religious ideas (pp. 9-19); his presidency and character (pp. 21-27) from a letter to the German historian Maumur in 1845; blanks in his correspondence (pp. 28-30); the Carr family (pp. 31-35); corrections to Randall's book (pp. 36-37); Monticello (pp. 38-39); Aunt Mary Eppes (p. 41); the finances of Jefferson and Col. Thomas Mann Randolph (pp. 42-50); Poplar Forest (pp. 51-56); the slave Wormley (p. 57); the relationship between Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Mann Randolph (pp. 58-61); the wife of Thomas Jefferson, Martha Wayles Skelton (pp. 66-67); the missing letters of Thomas Jefferson to Martha Jefferson Randolph (pp. 68-72); the death of Thomas Jefferson (pp. 74-75); Martha Randolph's death (pp. 81-87); the grave of Thomas Jefferson (pp. 88-90); and rumors of slave children born to Thomas Jefferson (pp. 98-102).

Ellen Coolidge to [?] [post 1836]
Box: 3

a single leaf from a letter containing her melancholy memories of her mother and grandfather and other dead friends written while on a voyage, she reflects upon the sterling quality of their characters, her mother's love and talent for music, and concludes that the only defect in the character of her grandfather was religion or consistent piety, that was choked out by "the sceptical spirit of the age" and "miscalled professors of religion"

Ellen Coolidge to Elizabeth [?] [post 1861] July 13
Box: 3

Expresses her sorrow over being separated from her relatives by the Civil War, tells about the bitter hatred in Boston for the South, reveals her disapproval of secession and the attack on Fort Sumter, but still feels like a daughter of the South and Virginia where "state feeling is strongest"

envelope leaf with a postscript of a letter to Martha Randolph n.d.
Box: 3
two covers for letters to Ellen and Joseph Coolidge with no content n.d.
Box: 3
9090-c
Thomas Jefferson, Ballad and Songs ante 1826
Physical Location: Filed in undated section of Thomas Jefferson Papers

Poetry copied by Thomas Jefferson:
"Last Valentines day when bright Phoebus shone clear"
"La Primavera" (in Italian)
"La Par[t]enza" (in Italian)