A Guide to the Lyndon LaRouche Collection, 1979-1986 Lyndon LaRouche Collection SC 0075

A Guide to the Lyndon LaRouche Collection, 1979-1986

A Collection in the
Thomas Balch Library
Collection Number SC 0075


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Thomas Balch Library

Thomas Balch Library
208 West Market Street
Leesburg, Virginia 20176
USA
Phone: (703) 737-7195
Fax: (703) 737-7195
Email: balchlib@leesburgva.gov
URL: http://www.leesburgva.gov/government/departments/thomas-balch-library/

© 2006 By Thomas Balch Library. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Moises Yanez

Repository
Thomas Balch Library
Collection number
SC 0075
Title
Lyndon LaRouche Collection 1979-1986
Physical Characteristics
Creator
Unknown
Language
English
Abstract
This collection includes a wide variety of newspaper articles that range from 1976 to 1986. These describe LaRouche's political movements, campaigns, court hearings, allegations of illegal conduct, finances, brief biographies, speeches, personal interviews, and members from his various organizations and their behavior. Also in the collection detailed accounts of the LaRouche movement and how it started and progressed.

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection open for research .

Use Restrictions

No physical characteristics affect use of this material.

Preferred Citation

Lyndon LaRouche Collection, 1979-1986 (SC 0075) Thomas Balch Library, Leesburg, VA.

Acquisition Information

Unknown

Alternative Form Available

None

Accruals

2011.0174X

Processing Information

Moises Yanez, 26 May 2011


Biographical Information

Lyndon LaRouche, Jr. was born 8 September 1922 in Rochester, New Hampshire where he was raised Quaker by his father Lyndon Hermyle LaRouche Sr. (1896-1983) and mother Jessie Lenore Weir (1893-1978). After attending North Eastern University in 1942, LaRouche served in the U.S. Army in Burma and India, where he became intrigued by Communist ideology. He based his ideas on Trotskyism, Marxist economic theory, and ancient philosophy. Years later, in 1948, he became an active member of the Socialist Workers Party. In 1953, he adopted the pseudonym Lyn Marcus for his political work. In1968, he founded the National Caucus of Labor Committees (NCLC). By 1973, the NCLC had attracted more than a hundred members in the United States and western Europe. Due to the organization's fast expansion a paper, New Solidarity, was established. LaRouche, along with NCLC followers, created "Operation Mop-Up" in which they tried to take full control of the U.S. Communist Party by physically attacking new left group members in the Socialist Workers Party and the Progressive Labor Party. At the same time, in 1973, LaRouche formed a new organization called U.S. Labor Party to serve as a political support for the NCLC. In August of 1983, Lyndon LaRouche moved to Loudoun County from his headquarters in New York.

Lyndon LaRouche, a perennial presidential candidate, campaigned once for his own U.S. Labor Party (1976) and seven times for the Democratic Party (1980-2004). His extreme political views were targeted against U.S. economy leadership, international organizations, and foreign governments. LaRouche's organization raised millions of dollars through loans and donations. Yet, under FBI investigation, LaRouche was accused of illegally taking funds from donor's credit cards without their consent. On 16 December 1988, LaRouche was convicted and sentenced to serve 15 years. He was released on parole in 26 January 1994.

Despite his negative image and aggressive political propaganda, he gained followers from around the country ranging from volunteers to political candidates beginning in the 1960s until the formation of LaRouche Youth Movement in 2000. LaRouche married Janice Neuberger in 1954 and had his first son Daniel in August 1956. Following his divorce in 1963 from Neuberger he married, German activist Helga Zepp, (25 August 1948) in 1977.

Scope and Content

This collection includes a wide variety of newspaper articles that range from 1976 to 1986. These describe LaRouche's political movements, campaigns, court hearings, allegations of illegal conduct, finances, brief biographies, speeches, personal interviews, and members from his various organizations and their behavior. Also in the collection detailed accounts of the LaRouche movement and how it started and progressed.

Arrangement

Folder

Related Material

Leesburg Garden Club, (M 044), Thomas Balch Library, Leesburg, VA.

Separated Material


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

"Helga Zepp LaRouche Bio." Schiller Institute and Fidelio Online Home Page. Lyndon LaRouche Collection, 1979-1986 (SC 0075), Thomas Balch Library, Leesburg, VA "Lyndon LaRouche." NNDB: Tracking the Entire World. Soylent Communications. Web. 26 May 2011. http://www.nndb.com/people/916/000022850/. "Lyndon LaRouche Biography." Executive Intelligence Review - LaRouche Publications. 28 July 1995. Web. 26 May 2011. http://www.larouchepub.com/resume.html. Reitwiesner, William A. "Ancestry of Lyndon LaRouche." WARGS.COM Home Page. Web. 26 May 2011. http://www.wargs.com/political/larouche.html.

Other Finding Aid

None


Technical Requirements

None

Other Finding Aid

None


Bibliography

"Helga Zepp LaRouche Bio." Schiller Institute and Fidelio Online Home Page. Lyndon LaRouche Collection, 1979-1986 (SC 0075), Thomas Balch Library, Leesburg, VA "Lyndon LaRouche." NNDB: Tracking the Entire World. Soylent Communications. Web. 26 May 2011. http://www.nndb.com/people/916/000022850/. "Lyndon LaRouche Biography." Executive Intelligence Review - LaRouche Publications. 28 July 1995. Web. 26 May 2011. http://www.larouchepub.com/resume.html. Reitwiesner, William A. "Ancestry of Lyndon LaRouche." WARGS.COM Home Page. Web. 26 May 2011. http://www.wargs.com/political/larouche.html.

Contents List

Folder 1: News Media Articles
Folder 2: Accounts on the LaRouche Network