A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Benjamin Harrison, 1781-1784 Harrison, Benjamin, Executive Papers of Governor 44660

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Benjamin Harrison, 1781-1784

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 44660


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Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
44660
Title
Executive Papers of Governor Benjamin Harrison, 1781-1784
Extent
7.75 cubic feet
Creator
Virginia Governor (1781-1784 : Harrison)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia Governor (1781-1784 : Harrison), Executive papers of Governor Benjamin Harrison : Letters received, 1781-1784. Accession 44660, State government records collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 23219.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 2970-2980.

Miscellaneous Reel 2970 - 1781 Nov. 30-1782 Jan. 23
Miscellaneous Reel 2971 - 1782 Jan. 24-Apr. 16
Miscellaneous Reel 2972 - 1782 Apr. 16-June 15
Miscellaneous Reel 2973 - 1782 June 16-Aug. 23
Miscellaneous Reel 2974 - 1782 Aug. 24-Oct. 29
Miscellaneous Reel 2975 - 1782 Oct. 29-Dec. 27
Miscellaneous Reel 2976 - 1782 Dec. 28-1783 Mar. 23
Miscellaneous Reel 2977 - 1783 Mar. 24-June 25
Miscellaneous Reel 2978 - 1783 June 26-Nov. 27
Miscellaneous Reel 2979 - 1783 Nov. 28-1784 June 7
Miscellaneous Reel 2980 - 1784 June 8-Nov. 30


Biographical Information

Benjamin Harrison was born on 5 April 1726 at Berkeley Plantation in Charles City County, Virginia. Harrison was the son of Benjamin Harrison and Anne Carter Harrison. He attended the College of William and Mary in 1745, but did not complete his studies. He entered the House of Burgesses in 1748 and served until 1775. He represented Charles City County in the First through Third Virginia Revolutionary Conventions. A delegate to the First & Second Continental Congress, Harrison was chairman of the Committee of the Whole House and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Harrison resigned his seat on the Continental Congress in 1778. He was also elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 1776 serving as speaker of that body from 1778 until his election as governor in 1781. Harrison served three one-year terms as governor from 1781 to 1784 and returned to the House of Delegates after his term ended. He was a member of the House of Delegates until his death 24 April 1791. Harrison married Elizabeth Bassett and had 7 children, including William Henry Harrison (1773-1841) who was the ninth president of the United States.

Scope and Content

Governor Benjamin Harrison's Executive papers are organized chronologically with undated items arranged at the rear of the collection. These papers consist of incoming correspondence and drafts of outgoing correspondence during Harrison's three one-year terms as governor of Virginia between 30 November 1781 and 30 November 1784. The correspondence primarily relates to the Revolutionary War, peace with Great Britain, relations with Native Americans, the boundary between Virginia & Pennsylvania, the cession of western lands, the Public Jail, arms, ammunition, and the militia. In addition to correspondence, there are accounts, bonds, certificates, commissions, reports, receipts, proclamations, appointments, resolutions of the Continental Congress & the Virginia House of Delegates, acts, orders, depositions, petitions, recommendations, returns, and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor Benjamin Harrison, 1781-1784

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Palmer, William P., ed., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, 1652-1781, Vol I, and 1782-1784, VOL. II, Richmond: R. F. Walker, Printer, 1875.

Bibliography

Palmer, William P., ed., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, 1652-1781, Vol I, and 1782-1784, VOL. II, Richmond: R. F. Walker, Printer, 1875.

Contents List

Boxes 1-19
Executive Papers of Governor Benjamin Harrison, 1781-1784.
Extent: 19 boxes.

Noteworthy correspondence originates from the United States government, Virginia state government, Governors from other states, and miscellaneous sources. Prominent correspondents from the United States government include John Hanson, Elias Boudinot, & Thomas Mifflin, Presidents of the Continental Congress; Charles Thomson, Secretary of Congress; Benjamin Lincoln, Secretary of War; Robert Morris, Superintendent of Finance; Robert R. Livingston, Secretary of Foreign Affairs; and James Madison, Jr., Edmund Randolph, Joseph Jones, Arthur Lee, James Innes, John F. Mercer, James Monroe, Samuel Hardy, Thomas Jefferson, & Theodorick Bland, Virginia's delegates in the Continental Congress.

John Hanson, President of the Continental Congress transmits several acts and ordinances of the Continental Congress. Notable are the following: ordinance for amending the ordinance ascertaining what captures on water shall be lawful (1782 Jan. 8); act recommending the several legislatures to establish a speedy mode of administering justice between French & U.S. citizens (1782 Jan. 27); ordinance for further amending the ordinance ascertaining what captures on water shall be lawful (1782 Feb. 26); resolution that the states immediately send delegates to Congress (1782 May 28); and a resolution that it be recommended to the several states to suppress all traffic between their respective citizens & the enemy (1782 June 24). Hanson was succeeded as President by Elias Boudinot in November 1782. Boudinot encloses proceedings of a meeting of the corporation of Annapolis regarding the proposition to Congress on the subject of the permanent residence of Congress in Maryland (1783 June 10). Boudinot also encloses a copy of a letter from George Washington regarding the pay of the Army and the settlement of accounts (incl. letter of William Heath to Washington) (1783 June 20). On 22 July 1783, Boudinot encloses a proposition of the New Jersey Assembly to provide a place for the permanent seat of government in their state. Boudinot's successor Thomas Mifflin writes from Annapolis on 20 December 1783 enclosing a copy of an act of Congress regarding the act of Virginia ceding territory in the west to the U.S. Mifflin also writes regarding problems with finances (1784 Apr. 1).

As Secretary to the Continental Congress, Charles Thomson often transmits resolutions of that body to the governor. Of note are the following: resolution that the legislature of each state raise a quota of men assigned to each state (1781 Dec. 10); resolution that the Superintendent of Finance provide a contract for supplying the recruits from the places of rendezvous until they join the army (1781 Dec. 19); resolution that the several legislators provide by law for the establishment of a speedy mode of administering justice between French citizens & U.S. citizens and for vesting persons on the sea coast with power to secure shipwrecked property (1782 Jan. 25); resolution that the legislatures of the respective states be recommended to authorize & empower the U.S. in Congress in the final settlement of the proportions by each state of the general expenses of the war (1781 Feb. 20); resolution recommending that the legislatures of the several states to make a suitable provision for staying all suits by individuals against officers & servants for debts contracted by them for supplies furnished or services rendered to the U.S. (1782 Mar. 19); resolution that it be recommended to the several states to take effectual measures to prevent any persons from harboring, secreting, etc., any prisoner of war taken from the enemy (1782 Mar. 30); resolution authorizing the executives of the several states in certain cases to suspend the commissions of captains of private armed vessels (1782 May 23); resolution that members of Congress who are deputed to repair to the Southern States be authorized to make such expenditures to the legislature of Virginia (1782 May 30); resolution directing an arrangement of the Virginia Line (1782 Aug. 7); resolution that Virginia continue a garrison at either Yorktown or Gloucester (1782 Aug. 27); resolution that the U.S. will not enter into the discussion of any overtures for pacification, but in confidence and in concert with his most Christian Majesty (1782 Oct. 4); resolution regarding the number of lieutenants assigned to each regiment of infantry, the reporting of sick & wounded soldiers by the Inspector General, the retirement of junior lieutenants, & commissions issued to all officers who were appointed by their respective states (1782 Oct. 16); resolution that the U.S. accept all right, title, interest, jurisdiction, & claim of the state of New York (1782 Oct. 30); resolution that the Superintendent of Finance be directed to instruct the commissioner appointed to settle the accounts of the State of Virginia with the U.S. to receive such proofs as shall be exhibited to him (1783 Feb. 10); resolution that the state legislature obtain a just & accurate account of the quantity of land in the state, granted or surveyed for any person (1783 Apr. 18); resolution re. the report of the committee on the Virginia cession of the lands north west of the Ohio River (1783 Sept. 13); resolution devising means for a full representation (1783 Nov. 1); resolution recommending to the several states measures looking to the restitution of all confiscated estates belonging to real British subjects, etc., and allowing persons of any other description to go to any parts of the U.S., and to remain one year to obtain restitution of such estates (1784 Jan. 14); resolution that the several states be requested to annually appoint their delegates to serve in Congress for one year (1784 Mar. 23); resolution recommending each state be represented by three members in Congress (1784 Apr. 19); resolution for states to issue a reward for the arrest of Longchamps for the accused assault & battery upon M. Mabois, Consul of France (1784 May 29); and a resolution that the several states be credited their accounts with the U.S. for the specie value of all sums paid to their officers & soldiers in the Continental army (1784 June 1). In addition, Thomas writes the various state legislatures recommending a census of white inhabitants to be transmitted to Congress (1781 Dec. 11). Finally, Thomson writes regarding the election of Elias Boudinot as president of Congress (1782 Nov. 4).

Benjamin Lincoln, Secretary of War, transmits a resolution of Congress that the state of Pennsylvania & Virginia order 150 men to Fort Pitt (1782 Aug. 9). Lincoln also writes to Nathanael Greene regarding Gen. George Washington's letter concerning the removal of troops for the winter, the merger of Virginia cavalry regiments, & a request to form all continental troops into proper corps (1782 Sept. 30). Lincoln's assistant secretary, William Jackson encloses a copy of the agreement entered into by the commissioners appointed to settle an exchange of prisoners of war in the Southern Department (includes a list of officers captured who were not exchanged) (1783 Jan. 20). Jackson writes Robert Morris on 19 February 1783 regarding the continuance of recruits of the Virginia Line and a contact for Winchester. Later, Lincoln writes regarding the parole of Lt. George Dunlap, a British prisoner of war (1783 Mar. 12). Lincoln also writes concerning the following: authority for Lt. Lawson to continue in the service in place of Lt. Vandevall who is retiring (1783 Mar. 31); dispute in rank between Captains Hopkins & Swan (1783 Mar. 31); and the appointment of Col. Hawes as inspector to the Virginia Line (1783 July 26).

Superintendent of Finance, Robert Morris, corresponds often with Governor Harrison respecting various economic matters. On 21 Dec. 1781, Morris requests the laws of the state and minutes of the legislature. Morris also encloses a letter to the states of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, & Maryland regarding their non-compliance of the recommendation of Congress for an impost of five percent on goods imported, prizes, & prize goods (1782 Jan. 3). Later, Morris transmits an ordinance incorporating subscribers to the Bank of North America (1782 Jan. 8). Additionally, Morris writes regarding the following: copies of letters to David Ross, Commissioner of Trade, regarding goods purchased from traders at Yorktown & British traders at Yorktown (1782 Jan. 11); credit from France, Spain, & Holland and the assistance of state legislatures in continuing supplies to Continental forces (1782 Feb. 9); a specific tax on tobacco (1782 Feb. 26); an act of Congress that the state of Virginia furnish the men & beef required by Gen. Nathanael Greene (1782 Feb. 28); the acts of Congress for settling the finally adjusting all the public accounts (1782 Mar. 9); resolutions of Congress that that the state legislatures authorize & empower the U.S. in the final settlement of the proportions to be borne by each state of the general expenses of the war through 1 January 1782 (1782 Apr. 5); a contract entered into by him on behalf of the U.S. to produce a relief to the American prisoners in New York (1782 Apr. 10); supplies for the state of Virginia from the Minister Plenipotentiary of France (1782 Apr. 27); payments to officers who are to expend the public money in bank notes (1782 Apr. 30); nomination of Zephaniah Turner as commissioner to settle the accounts between the state of Virginia & the U.S. (1782 May 21); the approbation of Zephaniah Turner as the commissioner for settling the accounts of Virginia (1782 July 2); an act to authorize the U.S. in Congress in the final settlement of the proportion to be borne by the state of New Jersey (1782 July 9); the state's practice of making partial payments to their troops, as well as expending monies for the purchase of clothing (1782 July 29); the need for the states to support the war effort (1782 July 30); a resolution of Congress that Virginia continue a garrison at either Yorktown or Gloucester at the expense of the U.S. (1782 Aug. 30); a resolution of Congress that $1,200,000 be assessed on the states for payment of the interest of the public debt (incl. correspondence to President of Congress, Order of Congress, & resolution) (1782 Sept. 12); a resolution of Congress that the commissioners appointed to settle the accounts of the several states be directed to examine, receive, & destroy so much of the Continental money as may be in the state treasuries not exceeding the quota fixed by the Act of Congress (1782 Sept. 20); an act of Congress that the New Jersey Legislature be informed that Congress has adopted every means for securing payment of the arrears due to the Army prior to 1 January (1782 Oct. 5); delays in supplying the Public Treasury (1782 Oct. 21); resolutions of Congress regarding the requisition made from the several states of two million dollars (1782 Oct. 23); articles of clothing in France belonging to the state of Virginia (1782 Oct. 23); a request that the Pay Master be furnished with an account of the payments & advances which have been made by the states to any officers or soldiers if the American Army (1783 Mar. 20); a letter of Benjamin Franklin re. a loan from France, peace, & credit abroad (1783 Mar. 25); the order of Congress recalling all cruisers commissioned by them (1783 Mar. 25); a state of receipts & expenditures for the years 1781 & 1782 (1783 Apr. 7); acts of Congress re. his continuance in office until arrangements for the reduction of the Army can be made & that the respective states be called upon to forward the collection of taxes (1783 May 12); an act of Pennsylvania for the settlement of public accounts (1783 May 20); a report of a committee of Congress to examine into the conduct of the office of Finance (1783 June 21); a state of the receipt & expenditures of public monies from warrants between 1 January & 30 June 1783 (1783 July 11); the expenses of feeding the troops from Carolina (1783 July 15); copies of accounts of public officers (1783 July 16); a letter from Daniel Parker, N.Y., giving account of forgeries (1783 July 21); the operation of the Office of Finance and the financial future of the nation (incl. letter of Elias Boudinot) (1783 July 28); a extract of a letter from Joseph Pennell, Commissioner for Accounts of the Marine Department, re. the recommendation of Congress to empower the commissioners to recover from individuals debts due & effects belonging to the U.S. (1784 May 26); and the retirement of the present commissioner for settling the accounts of Virginia with the U.S. and nominating Andrew Dunscomb (1784 Oct. 19).

Robert R. Livingston, Secretary of Foreign Affairs, writes Governor Harrison to keep him informed of events in Europe. In his letter of 19 February 1782, Livingston writes regarding recent events affecting France, Spain, & Holland. Afterward, Livingston encloses a resolution of Congress to make a confidential communication to the several states in regard to the intelligence received through his office (1782 May 2). Livingston also writes concerning the following subjects: the birth of the dauphin of France (1782 May 14); a resolution of Congress that the Secretary of Foreign Affairs obtain authentic returns of the slaves & other property carried off or destroyed in the course of the war by the enemy for the Minister Plenipotentiary negotiating a peace (1782 Sept. 12); the appointment of John Adams as Minister Plenipotentiary of the U.S. (1782 Sept. 15); an abstract of the preliminary articles for a general peace signed on 20 January 1783 (1783 Mar. 24); and a proclamation of Congress declaring the cession of arms between the U.S. & Britain (1783 Apr. 12).

Virginia's delegates in the Continental Congress including James Madison, Jr., Edmund Randolph, Joseph Jones, Arthur Lee, James Innes, John F. Mercer, James Monroe, Samuel Hardy, Thomas Jefferson, & Theodorick Bland, communicated frequently with the governor concerning supplies, military intelligence, news from abroad, and peace with Great Britain. Significant correspondence includes the following: complaints of the performance of David Ross in providing supplies and recommending John Cowper as his replacement (1781 Dec. 4); intelligence from New York regarding the embarkation of troops (1782 Jan. 1); the memorial of Daniel Murray asking for pay for his services in the Illinois country (1782 Jan. 8); Gov. Alexander Martin, North Carolina, encl. a proclamation making provision for the arrest of certain plunderers who carried off slaves & other property belonging to citizens of North Carolina & Virginia (1782 Feb. 6); support for Gen. Nathanael Greene, the success of Count de Grasse in the West Indies, & the movements of Adm. Hood (1782 Feb. 15); the settlement of public accounts from the commencement of the war through 1 January 1782 (1782 Feb. 25); intelligence from the West Indies (1782 Mar. 5); a supply of beef required from Virginia for the Southern Army (1782 Mar. 12); advice of Europe of the determination of the British Cabinet to continue the war and France & Spain's reinforcements to the West Indies (1782 Mar. 26); resolutions of Congress recommending to the states to pass laws giving a reward of eight dollars to any person who shall apprehend & safely secure any prisoner of war taken from the enemy (1782 Apr. 2); cipher prepared for the correspondence between the executive & delegates in Virginia (1782 Apr. 22); payments made by the states in the new Continental bills, stores belonging to Virginia, & preliminary articles of peace (in French) (1782 Apr. 23); the thinness of the military ranks & intelligence from Europe & the West Indies (1782 Apr. 30); commissions for armed vessels, the lack of agreement between opposing parties of the enemy for peace, the capture of the garrison at Minorca by the Spanish, & the renewal of the siege of Gibraltar (1782 May 7); actions of the French & English fleets in the West Indies (1782 May 28); naval operations in the West Indies, transport of supplies from the French, Count Beniousky's proposals to furnish three legions of foreign troops, & intelligence of enemy movements in New York (incl. copies of letters of Gen. George Washington, Count Beniousky, etc.) (1782 June 4); rejection of Count Beniousky's proposal (1782 June 18); establishing connections between the U.S. & various European nations and illicit trade between New York & the enemy (1782 June 25); intelligence from Europe & New York (1782 July 2); lack of intelligence regarding the fleets in the West Indies (1782 July 9); supplies requested by the French, the seizure of British goods, & a report from New York that the enemy have evacuated & burnt Charleston and sent the garrison to the West Indies (1782 July 16); the superintendent's contract for the main army (1782 July 23); the arrival of French ships in the Chesapeake (1782 July 30); the letter of Benjamin Lincoln, War Office, re. the removal of Continental stores from Yorktown to the head of Elk (1782 Aug. 13); negotiations for a general peace at Paris, the proposition of British commanders for an exchange of their seamen for their soldiers, and the embarkation of the enemy from New York & Charleston (1782 Aug. 19); the arrival of prisoners from England including forty from Virginia (1782 Aug. 31); confiscations, restitution of slaves by the British commander, & Washington's movements in New York (1782 Sept. 10); intelligence transmitted by Gen. Washington & an extract from the proceedings of Congress concerning cession of western lands (1782 Oct. 1); the plenipotentiary commission issued to Mr. Fitzherbert by George III & a memorial of Simon Nathan asking for relief for large amounts advanced to Col. Clark & Todd (1782 Oct. 22); William Hay encl. an inventory of goods on hand belonging to the state (1782 Nov. 6); Jaquelin Ambler, Treasury Office, transmitting a general list of the commutable articles received at the Treasury under the revenue law (1782 Nov. 9); acts of Congress re. the reduction of the Army and news from Gen. Washington of the evacuation of Charleston (1782 Nov. 26); the sale of powder from the magazines of the U.S., lead mines, & arms from France (1782 Dec. 3); a resolution of Congress that the Superintendent of Finance be directed to represent to the state legislatures of the several states the necessity for their complying with the requisitions of Congress for raising $1,200,000 (1782 Dec. 6); relief of prisoners from Canada on their way to Virginia (1782 Dec. 17); Virginia's repeal of her law imposing a duty of five percent on imported articles & prize goods (1782 Dec. 31); the settlement of Simon Nathan's claim (1783 Jan. 21 & 28); arbitration with Simon Nathan (1783 Feb. 4); the King's speech to Parliament & resolutions that the Superintendent of Finance be directed to instruct the commissioner appointed to settle the accounts of Virginia with the U.S. to receive such proofs (1783 Feb. 18); peace with Great Britain (1783 Mar. 11); preliminary articles of peace, including independence, boundaries, fisheries, confiscated property, commercial privileges, & evacuation of military posts (1783 Mar. 12); the results of negotiations in Europe (1783 Mar. 24); rejection of propositions for a cessation of hostilities to Sir Guy Carleton & Adm. Robert Digby on account of a lack of authority from their court (1783 Apr. 1); New York's offer of a tract of land in Kingston for the use of Congress & their suggestion of a tract in Georgetown on the Potomac River (incl. broadside with preliminary articles of peace between Britain, France, & Spain) (1783 Apr. 10); Congress's recommendation to the states for vesting in them the power to create a revenue adequate to the funding of the public debt & the arrangement with Sir Guy Carleton for getting possession of posts occupied by the British in the U.S. (1783 Apr. 22); the acceptance of a cession of territory to the U.S. by Virginia (1783 Apr. 29); John Wormeley's request for permission to return to his wife & family (1783 Apr. 29); mutiny among troops in Philadelphia (1783 June 24); resolutions of Congress that the Secretary of War dispatch a force to suppress the mutinous soldiers (1783 July 5); forgers of treasury notes in New York (1783 Aug. 1); the commission to settle the accounts of the state with the U.S. & the refusal of the Empress of Russia to receive the American minister (1783 Aug. 14); orders to Sir Guy Carleton to evacuate New York & the delay in the signing of the definitive treaty with Great Britain (1783 Aug. 23); a settlement on the Muskingum, the return of Baron von Steuben from the Northwestern frontier, & the evacuation of New York (1783 Sept. 8); resolutions of Congress that Virginia keep up two armed vessels for the defense of trade & twenty-five privates with proper officers to guard the public prisons & stores (1783 Oct. 4); resolutions of Congress respecting their permanent & temporary residence (incl. report on Indian affairs) (1783 Nov. 1); credentials of Peter John Van Berkel, Minister Plenipotentiary (1783 Nov. 1); the claim of Oliver Pollock (1784 Jan. 23); petition of the inhabitants of Kentucky to be erected into a separate state & taken into the Union (1784 Feb. 20); the act for Western cession, payments made & arrears still due by the states on the requisition of 1781 October 30, & the ratification of the definitive treaty (1784 Mar. 3); claims of the Indiana Company and the jurisdiction of Virginia courts over the western lands (1784 Mar. 12); Benjamin Franklin's letter re. the British court (1784 Mar. 18); an exemplification of the deed of cession (1784 Mar. 22); the running of the boundary line between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1784 Apr. 10); a report of the grand committee on the requisition for the current year and objections to the plan for paying interest on the national debt (1784 Apr. 10); sending Jefferson to Philadelphia or Ft. Pitt (1784 Apr. 23); the possibility of Jefferson accepting the appointment as a commissioner for extending the boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania and the cession of the western territory by Virginia (1784 Apr. 30); the act of Congress on the subject of the western territory and the estimate & requisitions of Congress (1784 Apr. 30); the removal of Congress to New Jersey & Maryland, commercial treaties with the maritime powers of Europe & Africa, & the plan for the purchase of the western territory (1784 May 13); the negotiation of commerce treaties abroad, the appointment of John Jay as Minister of Foreign Affairs, & the requisitions on the states (1784 May 14); a letter of Mr. Ellicott of Maryland accepting an appointment to run the boundary between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1784 June 11); a letter from the ministers in Europe re. orders to exchange the ratification of the definitive treaty (1784 July 17); news of the ratification of the definitive treaty (1784 July 20); the state of Indian affairs in the Western frontier, the appointment of commissioners to treat with the Indians, & the settlement of lands westward of the Ohio before the treaty is complete (1784 Aug. 3); progress in collection members of Congress after their removal to Philadelphia (1784 Sept. 16); a new commission & the evacuation of the posts on the North West frontier (1784 Oct. 20); the lack of a quorum in Congress, speculation on who will be appointed president, & war between the Emperor & the United Netherlands (1784 Nov. 7); and the formation of a Congress, the election of a president, & the act of Connecticut authorizing Congress to carry the impost into effect when twelve states have adopted it (1784 Nov. 29).

Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor Benjamin Harrison; William Davies, War Office; Edmond Randolph, Attorney General; William Rose, Keeper of the Public Jail; John Beckley, Clerk of the House of Delegates; and William Drew, Clerk of the Senate.

Drafts of Governor Benjamin Harrison's correspondence can often be found among his Executive Papers. Harrison writes to William Davies regarding provisions to be supplied by Wills Cowper to the post at Portsmouth (1782 Mar. 22). Harrison also writes Joseph Holmes appointing him as district commissioner for the counties of Shenandoah, Frederick, Berkeley, and Hampshire (1782 Mar. 27). Finally, Harrison writes to the Chiefs, Headmen, & Warriors of the Cherokees regarding peace (1782 [N.D.]).

William Davies served as commissioner of the War Office. William Davies writes regarding directions for the issuing of clothing to the artificers (1781 Dec. 8); canoes at Point of Fork & Westham (1781 Dec. 12); the sale of corn to the French (1781 Dec. 14); the refusal of 18-month men in Rockingham County to leave the county unless they receive their bounty (1781 Dec. 17); forage in the adjoining counties to the Albemarle Barracks (1781 Dec. 17); the contract of [Edward] Simpson of Fredericksburg with David Ross for making cartridge boxes (1781 Dec. 19); food for the troops at Cumberland Old Courthouse (1782 Jan. 11); the reorganization of several units and rations needed at several posts (1782 Jan. 15); the need for saddles & other equipment for the state cavalry (1782 Jan. 19); letter of Col. Simmonds of Charleston regarding the settlement of his claim against the state for supplies furnished the prisoners of war (1782 Jan. 23); the allowance made for the Commissary General of Stores (1782 Jan. 23); cannon in the Pamunkey River brought up from York & Cumberland (1782 Feb. 25); subscription papers for the relief of officers & soldiers (1782 Feb. 28); Gen. Clark's letter requesting to be joined by Col. Charles Dabney's Legion and the need for cannon (1782 Mar. 23); cannon at Manchester for Gen. Clark (1782 Mar. 25); boats to be supplied by Maj. Harding on the Ohio for Gen. Clark (1782 Apr. 22); Arthur Campbell's letter proposing that the commanding officers of Montgomery & Washington order out their militia to protect against the Northern Indians (1782 June 6); artificers at the Point of Fork & the appointment of a person to take charge (1782 July 17); a list of staff within the War Dept., their pay, rank, rations, etc. (1782 July 30); and collecting clothing, payment for his servant acting as doorkeeper, the delivery of his papers of the War Office, & the settling of his accounts as he leaves office (1782 Dec. 9).

Edmund Randolph, Virginia's first Attorney General, provides the governor with several opinions on issues affecting the Commonwealth. On 4 April 1782, Randolph states that an examination & acquittal before a single magistrate is not a bar to a second prosecution (1782 Apr. 4). In addition, Randolph provides his opinion based on the petition of Mace Freeland for the division of the escheated estate of his nephew, Robert Williams (1782 Apr. 8). His letter of 12 May 1782 relates to criminals convicted of horse stealing. Additional opinions were provided by Randolph on the following subjects: the governor's power to grant reprieves or pardons (1782 June 15); the transport of enemies as passengers on board vessels sent with a flag to New York (1782 Aug. 5); five suits in which La Croix, a French subject, is plaintiff and some of the justices of Accomack County, defendants, in the General Court (1782 Aug. 9); attacks on flags of truce (1782 Aug. 13); the suit in the General Court on behalf of Thomas Brown against Robert McLanahan (1782 Aug. 27); recommending the pardon of Elkanah Hudson in order to become a witness against two men accused of horse stealing (1782 Dec. 10); the claim of Simon Nathan arbitrated by him with the Commonwealth at Baltimore (1783 Aug. 20); the demand on Virginia by South Carolina for George Hancock, a citizen of Virginia, charged with high misdemeanor (1784 Jan. 21); the recovery of damages by civil suit, or the offenders by indictment for the persons aggrieved by the outrage of the Irish vessel (1784 Oct. 13); the filling of vacancies in the Court of Kentucky (1784 Oct. 19); and the case of the will of Maj. Gen. Charles Lee who made his sister Sidney Lee his legatee (1784 Nov. 23).

Keeper of the Public Jail, William Rose, provides the governor with information on the jail. On 31 December 1781, Rose encloses a narrative by Jackson, a prisoner in the Public Jail, regarding the escape of a company of bandits in North Carolina composed of horse thieves, counterfeiters, and others. Rose also encloses a list of criminals tried, convicted, & condemned at December General Court. Additionally, Rose writes requesting clemency on behalf of one Robert Hudgins (1782 Nov. 20). Rose encloses a descriptive list of the criminals conditionally pardoned on 26 November 1782. In April 1783, Rose submits a calendar of prisoners in the Public Jail. Rose applies to the judges of the General Court for proper regulations for the government of the Public Jail and requests a tolerable habitation for himself and his family where the old prison stands (1783 Apr. 24). Additional correspondence from Rose relate to the following: the deplorable condition of the Public Jail, the use of slaves for the jail, & the need for a pump & oven in the jail (1783 July 2); the resolution of the Assembly empowering the Executive to direct the building of a brick wall around the new prison (1783 July 6); the state of the Public Jail (1783 Oct. 28); and his necessity for new housing & the removal of the guards at the Public Jail (1784 Apr. 30).

As clerks of the House of Delegates and Senate, John Beckley and William Drew often transmitted various resolutions & acts to Governor Harrison. Noteworthy legislation include the following: resolution that the proposed expedition against Detroit not be attempted and that some plan of defense be adopted for the security of the inhabitants residing in the western frontier (1781 Dec. 11); resolution in favor of the memorial of Daniel Clarke praying that the conditional acceptance of David Ross, Commercial Agent, of a bill of exchange drawn by Oliver Pollock at New Orleans (1781 Dec. 25); resolution that the governor & council lay before the General Assembly a state of the Illinois Department (1782 June 14); resolution that the governor give necessary assistance for carrying the views of Congress & their financier into due effect respecting the loading & clearing the vessels with tobacco (1782 June 15); resolution that the governor & Council be empowered to appoint one or more persons to provide quarters, boats, & other necessaries for the use of the French Army (1782 July 1); act to repeal the several acts of Assembly respecting the Commissioner of the War Office & Commercial Agent (1782 Oct. 21); resolution that all officers & soldiers who have been taken by the enemy have their accounts of pay settled & adjusted (1782 Nov. 30); resolution that the Executive be authorized to restore to the respective proprietors any slaves now at the lead mines (1782 Dec. 6); resolution that the governor be requested to lay before the House a state of the monies received agreeable to an act entitled an act to recruit the state's quota of troops to serve in the Continental Army (1783 May 19); resolution for a statue to be erected as a monument of affection & gratitude to George Washington (1784 June 22); resolution for a return of all officers of the State Line & Navy be made to the next General Assembly (1784 June 29); resolution for the free navigation of the Mississippi River (1784 Nov. 3); resolution for the encouragement of treating with the Indians with commissioners of Congress (1784 Nov. 5); and a resolution that the Executive be requested to cause copies of the Articles of Confederation, Declaration of Rights, & Virginia Constitution to be distributed to the counties (1784 Nov. 27).

John Beckley & William Drew also provide the governor with extracts of the journal and certificates of election of the Senate & House of Delegates regarding the election various individuals to public office. Included are the following: John Marshall to the Privy Council (1782 Nov. 20), Benjamin Harrison as governor (1782 Nov. 20 & 1783 Nov. 27); William Short to the Privy Council (1783 June 10); William Christian & William Nelson, Jr., to the Privy Council (1783 Nov. 27); John Francis Mercer as a delegate in Congress (1784 June 28); James Wood & James McClurg to the Privy Council (1784 June 22); George Savage as naval officer for the Northampton District (1784 June 26); Joseph Jones to the Privy Council (1784 Nov. 19); and Spencer Roane & Miles Selden, Jr., to the Privy Council (1784 Nov. 19).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the governor. This correspondence mostly relates to fugitives, boundary lines, Indian affairs, mutineers, and other subjects. Included are letters from the following governors: Thomas Lee, Maryland; John Mathews & Benjamin Guerard, South Carolina; Alexander Martin, North Carolina; John Dickinson, President of Pennsylvania; and George Clinton, New York.

Gov. Thomas Lee, Maryland, writes re. a line of posts from Alexandria through Maryland (1782 Jan. 2). Gov. Lee also encloses resolutions re. the conduct of the assessor of Baltimore in assessing two ships of war belonging to Virginia (1782 May 24). Gov. John Mathews, South Carolina, recommends an expedition against the Indians along the western frontiers of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, & Virginia (1782 June 12). Mathews's successor, Benjamin Guerard, writes to demand George Hancock, guilty of high misdemeanor on the assault against Jonas Beard, a justice of the peace (1783 Dec. 16). Guerard also writes re. fugitives from justice (1784 Feb. 3). Finally, Guerard requests a list of persons who were banished from their perspective states (1783 Aug. 13). Gov. Alexander Martin, North Carolina, writes re. peace with the Chickasaw & Cherokee Indians (1782 Nov. 21). Martin also writes re. a treaty with the Cherokees & a commercial treaty between Great Britain & the U.S. (1783 July 12). Lastly, Martin writes re. a person in the Richmond Jail who is supposed to be one of the mutineers who murdered some of the officers of the privateer Gen. Gregory (1783 Aug. 20). John Dickinson, President of Pennsylvania, writes re. the defense of Pennsylvania against the complaints of Monongalia (1783 July 3). Dickinson encloses a resolution of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania re. the appointment of commissioners for running a line between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1783 Sept. 20). Dickinson also writes re. John Campbell's memorial respecting his claim to lands lying within the limits of Pennsylvania ceded by Virginia (1784 Feb. 4). Gov. George Clinton, N.Y., acknowledges receipt of acts of the Virginia legislature (1784 Apr. 20). Clinton also writes regarding the uneasiness expressed by Indian tribes as a result of the people of Virginia surveying & taking possession of lands west of the Ohio claimed by the Indians (1784 July 13).

Miscellaneous correspondents to Governor Harrison include the Count de Rochambeau, Arthur Campbell, Joseph Martin, George Rogers Clark, and Nathanael Greene.

Count de Rochambeau served as commander-in-chief of the French Expeditionary Force that came to the aid of America during the Revolution. Rochambeau writes to congratulate the governor on his election, his offer to receive Dudley Digges as agent for the state, & news of Admiral Robert Digby's fleet in New York (1781 Dec. 7); a chain of communication with Richmond & Maryland (1781 Dec. 21); his answer to the resolve of the Council of State accepting gratitude of the state for the role played by French forces in its defense (1782 Jan. 10); the march of the Legion de Lauzon once they receive provisions, the rumored arrival of additional English troops from Ireland, & the birth of the Dauphin (1782 Jan. 26); intelligence of privateers entering the Chesapeake Bay & communications with Gen. Greene (1782 Mar. 1); runaway slaves in the French Army belonging to Americans (1782 Mar. 10); the complaint from Charlotte Courthouse about the taking of a public granary for a hospital for the legion (1782 May 9); peace proposals from England, naval engagements at St. Thomas, & refugees in New York (1782 May 12); the enforcement of the trade terms of the Yorktown capitulation (1782 May 20); and the establishment of the militia in York & its environs under Gen. Edward Stevens & negroes belonging to French officers (1782 June 28).

Arthur Campbell, a prominent frontiersman during the Revolutionary War, maintains regular correspondence with the governor from Washington County. Campbell writes regarding intelligence that a body of Indians & Tories are preparing to attack the frontier (1782 Jan. 3); the employment of part of the force of the Carolinas & Georgia against the unfriendly Southern Indians & Tories (1782 Mar. 13); attacks by the Indians (1782 Apr. 25); intelligence respecting the temper of the seceding Cherokees & the measures adopted in North Carolina to subdue them (incl. a letter from Joseph Martin, Agent of Indian Affairs) (1782 July 31); intelligence of the peaceable disposition of the seceding part of the Cherokee Indians (1782 Aug. 5); peace with the Cherokees (1782 Aug. 26); supplies sent to the Indians through Joseph Martin, negotiations with the Cherokees, & an attack near Abingdon (incl. letter of Joseph Martin) (1782 Sept. 20); war in the Kentucky country & the expedition of the Carolinas against the Cherokees (1782 Oct. 3); Indian attacks on Christmas Day and recommendations for a fort on Sandy River (1783 Jan. 29); the repulse of Indian attacks on the fort at Clinch Settlement (1783 Apr. 1); and a letter of Daniel Smith re. an account of an Indian incursion at the fort at Hamlin's Mill (1783 June 1)

Col. Joseph Martin as Indian Agent for Virginia & North Carolina corresponds with Governor Harrison regarding Indian affairs, peace talks, & supplies. Some of this correspondence was sent to the governor in conjunction with Col. John Donelson as joint commissioners to treat with the Chickasaw Indians. Included are letters concerning the following subjects: assistance of clothing & ammunition for the Cherokees (1782 May 3); talks with the Cherokees, Chickasaws, Creeks, & Choctaws and a planned campaign with British forces against Ft. Pitt (1783 Feb. 2); a place for holding a treaty with the Chickasaw Nation, Indian attacks on the Clinch settlements, settlement incursions on Indian territory by North Carolina, & an expedition to raid Spanish boats on the Mississippi (1783 Apr. 14); treating with the Chickasaws, ammunition for the Cherokees, treaty with the Shawnee, & an attack upon the Spanish settlement at Ozark (1783 July 20); Indian affairs and a proposed place of meeting to form a treaty with the Chickasaws (1783 Aug. 30); Indian affairs and the encouragement of the Spaniards for the Indians to war against the states (1783 Sept. 27); propositions for peace with the Shawnee (1783 Oct. 18); negotiations with the Indians, the hostility of the Creeks, Spanish traders, & an express sent to the Shawnee (1783 Dec. 16); the purchase of land on the Tennessee River from the Cherokees, the expedition against the Chickamauga, & the condition of the Henry County (1784 Feb. 16); the condition of settlers, stolen horses, the death of the king of the Chickasaws, & Indian outrages (1784 July 22); and a letter from the Chickasaw Nation re. a council between the Chickasaws & Choctaws with the Spaniards (1784 Sept. 2).

George Rogers Clark, distinguished Revolutionary War general, maintained a regular communication with Governor Harrison. Clark writes from Ft. Nelson regarding the enemy at Detroit, Indian attacks, & requests for reinforcements (1782 Mar. 7). Clark later writes from Lincoln County regarding the establishment of the post at Licking, the commencement of hostilities, & the need for flour (1782 Feb. 18). On 2 May 1782, he encloses a copy of his letter to Col. William Davies regarding alarming accounts from the enemy at Detroit. Additional correspondence from Clark relates to the following topics: the arrival of supplies, Col. Slaughter's Corps, the care of stores, the settlement of accounts, & plans for an expedition against the Shawnee (1782 Oct. 19 & 22); the expedition against the Shawnee (1782 Nov. 27); the construction of outlying posts & the slaughter at Blue Licks (1782 Nov. 30); the settlement of western accounts (1782 Dec. 15); the condition of his troops & forts in Kentucky (1783 Jan. 1); state of the garrison at Ft. Nelson, general return of the strength of the Illinois regiment, & proceedings of the Board of Officers of the Illinois Regiment at Ft. Nelson (1783 Feb. 25); state of the frontier & plan for its defense (1783 Feb. 25); contact with the Chickasaw Chiefs & the situation of the frontier (1783 Mar. 8); peace with the Indians, the establishment of a post at the mouth of Kentucky, & ammunition to be conveyed to Kentucky (1783 Apr. 30); the speech of the chiefs of the Oubash Indians, peace treaties with the Oubash & Chickasaws (incl. instructions to the county lieutenants of Jefferson & Lincoln) (1783 Apr. 30); a plan of offensive measures against the Indians (1783 May 22); and high prices in the western country (1783 June 26).

Nathanael Greene, Major General of the Continental Army, writes concerning the state's plan to raise three thousand men, his disappointment that Virginia has departed from Congress's plan for obtaining a revenue tax for the support of the war, the Virginia Assembly's opposition to the plans of the Financier, and the maintaining of a garrison at York & Gloucester (1782 July 25). Greene later writes regarding Virginia's proposal to complete the Virginia State Line and a possibility that the enemy will evacuate the country (1782 Aug. 12). Greene writes regarding Virginia's cavalry, calling up troops for internal protection, appointments by Col. White, & the sending of troops back to Virginia (1782 Oct. 24). Greene also writes concerning the following subjects: the evacuation of Charleston (1782 Dec. 20); goods for the army purchased by Hunter, Banks & Co. (1782 Dec. 20); clothing for the army (1783 Feb. 3); and mutiny by the 1st Regiment of Virginia Cavalry and steps to bring them to punishment, especially their ringleader, Sgt. Dangerfield (1783 May 20 & 27).

Additional significant correspondence includes: Col. Joseph Holmes, Richmond, re. his plan for providing a guard for the British prisoners at Winchester (1781 Dec. 13); Col. James Wood, Winchester, re. his appointment as Superintendent of the Prisoners of War in Virginia and the need for more provisions (1781 Dec. 27); Nathanael Greene, Headquarters, re. reinforcements from Virginia (1781 Dec. 28); Edward Carrington, Richmond, re. orders to keep a significant number of boats in readiness at Westham to remove the public stores at Manchester up the James River in case of the approach of the enemy (1782 Jan. 3); James Barron, Hampton, encl. dimensions of a galley to be built (1782 Mar. 1); Robert Andrews re. his compensation for a commission on the part of Virginia to run the boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1782 Mar. 9); Richard Kello resigning as judge of the Court of Admiralty (1782 Mar. 25); John Tyler, Charles City, re. recruiting soldiers for the Continental Army using part of the land tax collection (1782 Apr. 15); David Sprout, New York, Commissary General for Naval Prisoners, re. the exchange of naval prisoners at Philadelphia (1782 Apr. 22); William Hay, Commercial Agent, encl. an account of sundry goods delivered to Col. Joseph Martin, the Cherokee Indians, & their interpreter (1782 May 7); Thomas Meriwether requesting an appointment as second clerk to the executive (1782 May 7); James Barron, Hampton, encl. a resolution of the House of Commons re. the impracticality of the war against the colonies and that a bill for establishing a peace or truce with America (1782 May 15); William Hay accepting his appointment as Commercial Agent (1782 May 24); Guy Carleton, New York, re. the sloop William & John captured in Hampton (1782 July 7 & 26); Le Chevalier de Lavalette re. taking command of the French troops at York & West Point from Count de Rochambeau (1782 July 9); Chiefs of the Chickasaw Nation to the commanders of stations between the nation & the Falls of the Ohio re. their desire for peace (1782 July 9); Leighton Wood, Jr., Solicitor, re. his duty to prepare the accounts of the Commonwealth for a settlement (1782 July 18); Le Chevalier de Lavalette re. his orders from Count de Rochambeau to embark for Baltimore all the French artillery at West Point (1782 July 28); Capt. John Peyton accepting his appointment as superintendent of the Point of Fork (1782 Aug. 4); Guy Carleton, New York, re. conferences in Paris for a general peace (1782 Aug. 5); Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, encl. letters from Col. Thomas Turpin re. payment for the rent of his tenement in Richmond to the governor (1782 Aug. 7); Guy Carleton, New York, enclosing a copy of a pass given to Charles Godfrey, master of the sloop Dove, to proceed to the Chesapeake and an account of work done to the sloop (1782 Aug. 21); William Foushee, Mayor of Richmond, re. the establishment of a city watch, the expulsion of disorderly persons of a suspicious character, and the removal & change of the present guard at the Public Jail (1782 Aug. 29); Daniel Boone, Fayette County, re. an attack by Indians & white men on Bryan's station (includes list of casualties) (1782 Aug. 30); John Bowman, Lincoln, County, enclosing a talk from the Chickasaw Chiefs re. their willingness to treat with Virginia for peace (1782 Aug. 30); Col. Benjamin Logan, Lincoln County, providing an account of the disaster at Blue Lick (includes rough drawing of battlefield) (1782 Aug. 31); John Donelson, Lincoln County, encl. a talk from the Chickasaw Chiefs soliciting peace (1782 Sept. 1); Capt. John Peyton, Point of Fork, re. the exchange of certain articles suitable for soldiers' clothing & the removal of arms from Westham (1782 Sept. 3); Charles Dick, Fredericksburg, re. the return of arms repaired in August and requesting pay for the artificers (1782 Sept. 4); Jaquelin Ambler, Treasurer, encl. a list of tobacco & flour received by virtue of the act for ascertaining certain taxes & duties and for establishing a permanent revenue (1782 Sept. 6); Richard Henry Lee, Chantilly, re. recruiting the army in Westmoreland County (1782 Sept. 6); Harry Innes declining an appointment as assistant judge in the Kentucky District (1782 Sept. 9); Daniel Boone, Levi Todd, & others requesting 200 men and artillery for protection against further attacks by Indians (1782 Sept. 11); Charles Dick, Fredericksburg, re. the state of the Gun Factory in Fredericksburg (1782 Sept. 12); Guy Carleton re. suspension of hostilities (extract of letter) (1782 Sept. 12); George III to Richard Oswald, London, giving him power to negotiate peace with the U.S. (1782 Sept. 25); talk delivered by Old Tassell, a Cherokee Chief, to Col. Joseph Martin requesting supplies (1782 Sept. 25); William Hay, Commercial Agent, re. the purchasing of stores for the State Legion (1782 Oct. 9); Jaquelin Ambler, Treasurer, encl. a return of specifics received at the Treasury by virtue of the revenue law (1782 Oct. 16); S. Clark, Lincoln County, re. peace with the Chickasaws, the purchase of territory on the Tennessee River, & the hostile disposition of the Northwestern Indians (1782 Oct. 18); Chevalier D'Anmours, Consul General of France, Baltimore, re. the arrest of French deserters in Virginia (1782 Oct. 21); William Hay resigning as Commercial Agent (1782 Oct. 21); Leighton Wood, Solicitor, re. the enforcement of the act calling for the suspension of naval officers who do not submit accounts of monies received (1782 Oct. 21); Charles Dick, Fredericksburg, enclosing an estimate of the expenses of the Gun Factory for one year (1782 Oct. 24); Paul Carrington, B. Dandridge, Peter Lyons, & James Mercer encl. a list of criminals condemned at the last session of the General Court (1782 Nov. 1); Thomas Barclay, L'Orient, re. receipt of his appointment as agent at the Court of France for the State of Virginia (1782 Dec. 6); John Cropper, Jr. Accomack County, re. an engagement at Cagey's Straits (incl. list of wounded) (1782 Dec. 6); William Christian, Ft. Nelson, re. the deplorable condition of the Cherokees & measures for their relief (1782 Dec. 16); George Walls, Ft. Nelson, encl. a general return of the garrison at Ft. Nelson & an inventory of ordnance & military stores (1782 Dec. 16); William Fleming, Samuel McDowell, & Caleb Wallace, Lincoln Co., approving the erection of a fort at the mouth of Kentucky (1782 Dec. 23); William Christian, Mahanaim, requesting Sampson Matthews to remove Col. Joseph Martin, Virginia's Indian Agent, from his present location at "The Island" in North Carolina to the Cumberland Gap (inc. sketch of a map of Washington County) (1782 Dec. 30); Thomas Barclay, Commercial Agent for Virginia in France, re. France's unwillingness to make loans to individual states (1783 Jan. 5); Thomas Prosser & William Hay re. the pay of Col. Turpin for the rent of his house & garden for the governor (1783 Jan. 8); Oconostota, Kenitita, & the Old Tassell to Col. Joseph Martin re. goods & ammunition for the Cherokees (1783 Jan. 25); Thomas Barclay, L'Oreint, re. a letter of Dr. [Benjamin] Franklin concerning preliminary articles of peace between France, Spain, & Great Britain (incl. copies of the 1st & 22nd articles re. the restoration of prizes taken on the seas) (1783 Jan. 27); William Christian, Mahanaim, re. the removal of Col. Joseph Martin to Cumberland Gap, a post at the mouth of Licking River, & the vulnerability of Fayette County (1783 Jan. 29); Col. John Donelson, Long Island, re. his appointment to act as joint commissioner with Col. Joseph Martin to treat with the Southern Indians for peace (1783 Feb. 2); Paul Loyall, Thomas Brown, & Thomas Newton, Jr., Commissioners of the Navy, re. the defense of the Chesapeake Bay and encl. speech of the King of Great Britain (1783 Feb. 17); William Fleming, Samuel McDowell, & Caleb Wallace re. the settlement of Western accounts (1783 Feb. 17); Turner Southall re. his appointment as builder & superintendent of the Foundry (1783 Feb. 21); Guy Carleton, New York, re. the quantity & value of wine on board the sloop William & John taken off Hampton roads (1783 Mar. 9); Paul Loyall, Thomas Brown, & Thomas Newton, Jr., Naval Commissioners, Norfolk, re. armed vessels to protect trade (1783 Mar. 12); Joseph Nevill, Hampshire, encl. an account of expenses for running the temporary boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1783 Mar. 19); Leighton Wood, Treasurer, encl. a list of judgments against delinquent sheriffs obtained by him at the last General Court (1783 Apr. 28); John Beckley, clerk of the Court of Appeals, re. the law books collection & care at public expense (incl. letter of Edmund Randolph re. the state of the books) (1783 Apr. 30); John Peyton, Commissary of Public Stores, encl. an estimate of expenses per annum of the Commissary of Military Stores Department (1783 May 17); John Dodge, Kaskaskia, to the King of the Chickasaw Nation re. the capture of Detroit & the withdrawal of the British (1783 June 23); Thomas Jefferson to Edmund Randolph re. the case of Simon Nathan for bills drawn by Gen. Clark & others (1783 July 18); James Colbert, Chickasaw Nation, re. relations between the Americans & Chickasaws (incl. letter of the Chickasaws) (1783 July 25); Edmund Pendleton, Caroline, re. the collecting & preserving of the laws (1783 July 29); Caleb Wallace, Botetourt County, resigning as one of the assistant judges of the Supreme Court for the District of Kentucky (1783 Aug. 14); Maj. George Walls re. incursions by the Shawnee, the return of prisoners, & problems with the Cherokees (1783 Sept. 11); Zephaniah Turner encl. his qualification as commissioner of accounts of the State of Virginia (1783 Sept. 24); Robert Andrews, Williamsburg, accepting his appointment as one of the commissioners to run the line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1783 Oct. 20); George Walls re. peace with the Shawnee (1783 Oct. 26); John Page, Roswell, accepting an appointment to run the line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1783 Oct. 27); Caburrus, Vice Consul of France, re. a difficulty between a French captain & two American sailors (1783 Nov. 12); Thomas Lewis, Rockingham County, acknowledging his declining the appointment as one of the commissioners to run the boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1783 Nov. 29); Col. Isaac Shelby, Lincoln co., re. the treaty with the Chickasaws (1783 Dec. 1); James Madison, Robert Andrews, & John Page re. expenses in running the boundary line between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1783 Dec. 2); John Page, Williamsburg, providing further particulars in the expenses of the commissioners for running the boundary line between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1783 Dec. 2); Dudley Digges, President of the Board of Directors, encl. proceedings of the Court of Directors of the Public Hospital for Lunatics, re. an order on the Auditor in favor of James Galt, later keeper (1784 Feb. 3); Chiefs & Brothers of the Shawnee Nation re. peace between the Shawnee & Americans (1784 Feb. 7); Samuel Patteson resigning as assistant clerk of the Council (1784 Apr. 5); Levi Todd, Fayette County, re. hostilities with the Indians in Kentucky and a lack of authority to call out troops (1784 Apr. 15); David McClure, Clerk of Ohio County, re. the destitute situation of Yohogania County within Virginia (1784 May 2); Walker Daniel, Lincoln, Kentucky, re. the state of Indian affairs and actions against Pomeroy & others for sedition (1784 May 21); B. Johnston, Yohogania County Surveyor's Office, encl. a list of entries for lands within the bounds of the cession to Pennsylvania (1784 June 29); Samuel Hawes & Thomas Meriwether accepting the appointment as commissioners to examine into all impositions in the settlement of the officers & soldiers accounts (1784 July 2); Jaquelin Ambler, Treasurer, informing the governor that there is no money in the Treasury and encl. a resolution that the treasurer pay out of the money arising under the law for recruiting the state's quota of men to serve in the Continental Army for the purpose of procuring a statue of Gen. Washington (1784 July 7); Raven of Chickamauga to Col. Joseph Martin requesting powder (1784 July 10); Thomas William Ballendine re. the sale of the Buckingham Furnace for taxes due (1784 July 19); Robert Andrews & John Page, Wilmington, re. the running of the boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1784 Aug. 17); Robert Mitchell, Mayor of Richmond, encl. proceedings respecting the escape of two prisoners condemned for highway robbery (1784 Aug. 4); John Page, Rosewell, re. his assistance with Rev. Andrews in making the necessary astronomical observations for ascertaining the boundary between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1784 Oct. 4); John Tyler, Greenway, re. an outrage committed by the crew of an Irish vessel in Charles City County (1784 Oct. 12); Daniel Boone, County Lieutenant of Fayette County, re. a list of militia for Fayette County (1784 Oct. 30); James Barron, Hampton, re. the condition of the crews of the Patriot & Liberty (1784 Nov. 6); and Chiefs & Warriors of the Chickamauga re. peace and a request for intelligence on the movements of the Creeks (1784 Nov. 15).

Other noteworthy items include the following: bail bonds for individuals for their appearance at a trial for disaffection to the Commonwealth (1781 Nov. 30 & Dec. 1); certificate of qualification of Benjamin Harrison as governor & Thomas Lomax as privy councilor (1781 Dec. 1); list of persons in the care of William Rose, Keeper of the Public Jail, by whom committed, from whence, & offences (1781 Dec. 2); certificate of qualification of Sampson Mathews as a privy councilor (1781 Dec. 3); commission of Oyer & Terminer to Paul Carrington, Peter Lyon, & William Fleming authorizing them to hear and determine all criminal measures which the General Court could have heard & determined (1781 Dec. 4); ordinance of Congress ascertaining what captures on water shall be lawful in pursuance of the powers delegated by the Confederation (1781 Dec. 4); report of the situation of the Public Jail (1781 Dec. 15); certificate of qualification of Beverley Randolph as privy councilor (1781 Dec. 14); petition of inhabitants of Frederick County asking that the prisoners of war not be removed (1782 Jan. 8); order of the Council to reduce the regular troops under the command of Gen. George Rogers Clarke in the western country (1782 Jan. 18); certificate of qualification of St. George Tucker as privy councilor (1782 Jan. 22); certificates of qualification of Henry Tazewell & John Tyler for Benjamin Dabney to practice law in Virginia (1782 Mar. 12); return of artificers in the service of Virginia under Capt. James Anderson (1782 Mar. 29); articles of agreement between Robert Morris & George Eddy for the shipment of tobacco (1782 Mar. 30); proclamation of Gov. Harrison authorizing the Brig Mentor to transport tobacco to Charleston under a flag of truce in payment for advances made by Maurice Simmons to American prisoners (1782 Apr. 2); list of criminals tried by the General Court & sentenced to be hanged (1782 Apr. 5); intelligence respecting the murder of Indians on the Muskingum River (1782 Apr. 8); list of claims against the French army & Continental Army examined by Dudley Digges (1782 Apr. 16); articles of agreement between M. de Villemanzy & Dudley Digges for the settlement of claims of citizens of Virginia for damages done by the French Army between Sept. & Nov. 1781 (1782 Apr. 19); general return of all the damages sustained from the French Army at & about the time of the siege of Yorktown (1782 Apr. 19); bond of Jaquelin Ambler as treasurer of the Commonwealth (1782 Apr. 29); receipts for sundry claims against the French Army paid off by Dudley Digges (1782 May 4); return of officers, soldiers, sailors, & others of the state of Virginia taken & paroled by the enemy (includes name, rank, regiment, when taken, by whom, when paroled, by whom paroled, when exchanges, & remarks) (1782 May 7); act of the Maryland Legislature for the defense of the Chesapeake Bay (1782 May 23); certificate of qualification of James Monroe as privy councilor (1782 June 7); proceedings of the General Court providing a list of men sentenced to be hanged for various offenses (1782 June 15); certificate of oath of J. Banister as a member of the Privy Council (1782 July 3); orders of the Secretary of War to Capt. Guion for the withdrawal of French troops from Yorktown (1782 July 20); certificate regarding the appointment of William Tatham as assistant clerk to the Council (1782 Sept. 14); certificate of oath of General Robert Lawson as Privy councilor (1782 Sept. 20); extract of the journal of the House of Delegates re. the election of Benjamin Harrison as governor (1782 Nov. 20); report of commissioners, Joseph Nevill of Virginia & Alexander McClean of Pennsylvania, re. the extension of the Mason-Dixon line (1782 Nov. 28); certificate of qualification of Benjamin Harrison as governor (1782 Nov. 30); certificate of qualification of John Marshall as privy councilor (1782 Nov. 30); act of the state of Pennsylvania to prevent the erecting of any new & independent state within the limits of the Commonwealth (1782 Dec. 3); account of losses sustained by the inhabitants of Isle of Wight County by the British Army (1782 Dec. 5); a report of persons employed in the Quarter Master's Department (1782 Dec. 7); calendar of prisoners at December General Court (1782 Dec. 12); return of persons & their pay belonging to the State Laboratory (1782 Dec. 12); order of the Council re. the appointment of Thomas Meriwether as third clerk to the Council (1782 Dec. 17); proclamation of Benjamin Harrison for arresting British subjects in Virginia (1782 Dec. 20); articles to serve as a basis for a negotiation for the reestablishment of peace with Britain (1782 [N.D.]); proclamation of Gov. Harrison re. the return of public arms & other equipment to the county lieutenants by private citizens (1783 Jan. 13); proclamation of Gov. Benjamin Harrison for apprehending deserters (1783 Jan. 13); treaty of amity & commerce between the United Netherlands & U.S. (1783 Jan. 23); bond of William Goodwin as a privateer to operate against the commerce & trade of Great Britain (1783 Jan. 24); a bond of John Barrett as a privateer (1783 Jan. 29); list of soldiers who deserted from Winchester (1783 Feb. 7); a bond of John Cunningham as a privateer (1783 Feb. 21); broadside of articles agreed upon by & between Richard Oswald, Commissioner of His Britannic Majesty, for treating peace with the commissioners of the U.S. (1783 Mar. 19); proclamation of Gov. Harrison commanding civil & military officers of the state to obey the proclamation of Congress announcing peace with Great Britain (1783 Apr. 21); proceedings of a meeting of the officers of the State Line held at Richmond (1783 May 27); proclamation of Gov. Harrison prohibiting persons who have voluntarily left the country & adhere to the enemy or who have been expelled from the same from returning or remaining in the Commonwealth (1783 July 2); orders for the erection of three buildings at the Point of Fork on the ground where the state magazines were built & burnt by the enemy (1783 July 4); list of persons on the bill of attainder, banishment, & confiscation passed by the State of Georgia (1783 Aug. 19); treaty of amity & commerce between the U.S. & Sweden (1783 Sept. 25); proclamation of Congress recommending a day of thanksgiving (1783 Oct. 18); act of Massachusetts for granting to the U.S. certain imports & duties upon foreign goods imported into the state for the purpose of paying the principal & interest of the debt contracted in the prosecution of the late war (1783 Oct. 20); report of criminals convicted at the last session of the General Court (1783 Oct. 31); proclamation of Gov. Harrison disbanding the two state legions (1783 Nov. 4); return of men belonging to the State of Virginia who served in the 1st Partizan Legion (1783 Nov. 15); oath of qualification of Benjamin Harrison as governor (1783 Dec. 2); proceedings of the Board of Officers at Richmond (1783 Dec. 16); bond of George Rogers Clark & William Croghan authorizing them to receive amounts of land as the officers & soldiers may be entitled (1783 Dec. 20); speeches from the Shawnee & Wyandots re. peace and requesting a stop to the transport of liquor to their lands (1784 Mar. 2); certificate of qualification of William Nelson, Jr., as privy councilor (1784 Mar. 6); report of the grand committee appointed to prepare & report to Congress the arrears of interest on the national debt with the expenses for the year 1784 (1784 Apr. 27); quarterly return of ordnance & military stores from 1 February to 1 May (1784 May 1); proceedings of the Board of State Officers re. their claim for half pay (1784 May 11); proclamation of Gov. John Houston, Georgia, re. encroachments on the land of his state (1784 June 18); bond of George Savage as naval officer for the Northampton District (1784 June 26); certificate of oath of James Wood as privy councilor (1784 June 26); advice of Council that Col. Samuel Hawes & Col. Thomas Meriwether be appointed as commissioners to examine into all impositions in the settlement of the officers & soldiers accounts (1784 July 1); oath of qualification of James McClurg as privy councilor (1784 July 16); bond of Nathaniel Wilkinson, Miles Selden, John Harvie, Thomas Prosser, & William Foushee as commissioners for the better execution of the act of Assembly entitled "an act directing the sale of the public lands and other purposes in & around the city of Richmond" (1784 July 23); proceedings of the Board of Field Officers at Richmond (1784 Nov. 13); and an account of furniture purchased for the governor (1784 Nov. 25).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1781
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      November 30-December 4
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      December 5-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      December 11-16
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      December 17-24
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      December 25-31
  • 1782
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      January 1-6
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      January 7-12
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      January 13-19
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      January 20-31
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      February 1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      February 11-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      February 16-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      February 22-28
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      March 1-8
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      March 9-12
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      March 13-22
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      March 23-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      April 1-9
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      April 10-17
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      April 18-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      May 1-4
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      May 5-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      May 11-16
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      May 17-24
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      May 25-June 3
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      June 4-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      June 16-30
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      July 1-8
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      July 9-18
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      July 19-26
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      July 27-August 3
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      August 4-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      August 11-19
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      August 20-26
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      August 27-September 2
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      September 3-12
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      September 13-20
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      September 21-25
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      September 26-30
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      October 1-9
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      October 10-17
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      October 18-21
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      October 22-27
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      October 28-31
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      November 1-6
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      November 7-12
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      November 13-16
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      November 17-20
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      November 21-25
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      November 26-30
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      December 1-6
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      December 7-14
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      December 15-22
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      December 23-27
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      December 28-31
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      Undated
  • 1783
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      January 1-4
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      January 5-9
    • Box 11
      Folder 3
      January 10-17
    • Box 11
      Folder 4
      January 18-26
    • Box 11
      Folder 5
      January 27
    • Box 11
      Folder 6
      January 28-31
    • Box 11
      Folder 7
      February 1-5
    • Box 11
      Folder 8
      February 6-11
    • Box 11
      Folder 9
      February 12-21
    • Box 11
      Folder 10
      February 22-28
    • Box 12
      Folder 1
      March 1-7
    • Box 12
      Folder 2
      March 8-12
    • Box 12
      Folder 3
      March 13-22
    • Box 12
      Folder 4
      March 24-31
    • Box 12
      Folder 5
      April 1-4
    • Box 12
      Folder 6
      April 5-11
    • Box 12
      Folder 7
      April 12-22
    • Box 12
      Folder 5
      April 23-30
    • Box 13
      Folder 1
      May 2-12
    • Box 13
      Folder 2
      May 13-16
    • Box 13
      Folder 3
      May 17-23
    • Box 13
      Folder 4
      May 26-31
    • Box 13
      Folder 5
      June 1-9
    • Box 13
      Folder 6
      June 10-13
    • Box 13
      Folder 7
      June 16-23
    • Box 13
      Folder 8
      June 24-30
    • Box 13
      Folder 9
      July 1-5
    • Box 13
      Folder 10
      July 6-20
    • Box 13
      Folder 11
      July 21-31
    • Box 14
      Folder 1
      August 1-17
    • Box 14
      Folder 2
      August 18-31
    • Box 14
      Folder 3
      September 2-20
    • Box 14
      Folder 4
      September 21-30
    • Box 14
      Folder 5
      October 1-7
    • Box 14
      Folder 6
      October 8-14
    • Box 14
      Folder 7
      October 15-26
    • Box 14
      Folder 8
      October 27-31
    • Box 15
      Folder 1
      November 1-8
    • Box 15
      Folder 2
      November 12-20
    • Box 15
      Folder 3
      November 21-29
    • Box 15
      Folder 4
      December 1-12
    • Box 15
      Folder 5
      December 16-31
  • 1784
    • Box 16
      Folder 1
      January
    • Box 16
      Folder 2
      February 1-4
    • Box 16
      Folder 3
      February 7-27
    • Box 16
      Folder 4
      March
    • Box 16
      Folder 5
      April 1-14
    • Box 16
      Folder 6
      April 15-30
    • Box 16
      Folder 7
      May 1-15
    • Box 16
      Folder 8
      May 17-29
    • Box 17
      Folder 1
      June 1-15
    • Box 17
      Folder 2
      June 17-30
    • Box 17
      Folder 3
      July 1-10
    • Box 17
      Folder 4
      July 13-31
    • Box 17
      Folder 5
      August 1-17
    • Box 17
      Folder 6
      August 19-30
    • Box 18
      Folder 1
      September 2-15
    • Box 18
      Folder 2
      September 16-30
    • Box 18
      Folder 3
      October 4-15
    • Box 18
      Folder 4
      October 17-30
    • Box 18
      Folder 5
      November 1-10
    • Box 18
      Folder 6
      November 11-20
    • Box 18
      Folder 7
      November 21-30
    • Box 18
      Folder 8
      Undated
  • Oversized
    • Box 19
      Folder 1
      1782
    • Box 19
      Folder 2
      1783
    • Box 19
      Folder 3
      1784
    • Box 19
      Folder 4
      Undated