A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Thomas Jefferson, 1779-1781 Jefferson, Thomas, Executive Papers of, 1779-1781 44393

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Thomas Jefferson, 1779-1781

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 44393


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© 2009 By The Library of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
44393
Title
Executive Papers of Governor Thomas Jefferson, 1779-1781
Extent
2.00 cubic feet
Creator
Virginia Governor (1779-1781 : Jefferson)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

For preservation purposes, please use microfilm (Misc. Reels 2959-2964) or digital surrogates.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor Thomas Jefferson, 1779-1781. Accession 44393. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 2959-2965.

Also available as digital surrogates.


Biographical Information

Thomas Jefferson was born 13 April 1743 in Goochland County, Virginia (now part of Albemarle County, Virginia). He graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1762. A member of the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1769 to 1775, Jefferson represented Virginia in the Continental Congress in 1775 and 1776. He wrote the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Jefferson served as governor of Virginia from 1779 to 1781. After serving another term in Congress from 1783 to 1784, he was appointed minister to France and served from 1784 to 1788. Jefferson served as Secretary of State under President George Washington from 1789 to 1793, and as Vice President under President John Adams from 1797 to 1801. Jefferson succeeded Adams as president, serving from 1801 to 1809. Upon his retirement, Jefferson returned to his home, Monticello, in Albemarle County. He founded the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. Jefferson died 4 July 1826 and was buried at Monticello.

Scope and Content

Governor Thomas Jefferson's Executive papers are organized chronologically with undated items arranged at the rear of the collection. These papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during Jefferson's two one-year terms as governor of Virginia between 2 June 1779 and 3 June 1781. The correspondence primarily relates to the Revolutionary War, Indian affairs, the Articles of Confederation, the settlement of the boundary between Virginia & Pennsylvania, arms, ammunition, and the militia. In addition to correspondence, there are accounts, receipts, appointments, resolutions, acts, orders, depositions, petitions, recommendations, commissions, certificates, returns, instructions, and other sundry items. Resolutions from both the General Assembly and Congress are particularly common.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor Thomas Jefferson, 1779-1781

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Palmer, William P., ed., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, 1652-1781, VOL. I, Richmond: R. F. Walker, Printer, 1875.

Bibliography

Palmer, William P., ed., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, 1652-1781, VOL. I, Richmond: R. F. Walker, Printer, 1875.

Contents List

Boxes 1-5
Executive Papers of Governor Thomas Jefferson, 1779-1781.
Extent: 5 boxes.

Noteworthy correspondence originates from the United States government, Virginia state government, and miscellaneous sources. Prominent correspondents from the United States government include John Jay & Samuel Huntington, Presidents of the Continental Congress; Charles Thomson, Secretary of Congress; and James Madison, Theodorick Bland, Joseph Jones, Meriwether Smith, Virginia's delegates in the Continental Congress.

Correspondence from Virginia's delegates in the Continental Congress represents a significant portion of Thomas Jefferson's Executive Papers. James Madison, Jr., & Theodorick Bland, Philadelphia, write concerning Baron d'Arendt's plan for transporting cargo to Virginia and Gen. Washington's intelligence on enemy movements (1781 Jan. 1). James Madison encloses a letter from Gen. Washington on the subject of an account of the late British embarkation from New York, a general mutiny of the Pennsylvania line stationed near Morristown, a copy of a letter from John Witherspoon in Trenton, and a letter from Henry Clinton to the person appointed by Pennsylvania troops to lead them (1781 Jan. 9). Theodorick Bland informs the governor of the transport of arms to Virginia from a frigate in the French squadron at Rhode Island and the movements of the French fleet (1781 Feb. 9). Joseph Jones, Madison, & Bland correspond on 13 February 1781 regarding claims against the state by Baron d' Arendt, the plans of Britain to send reinforcements & occupy a post near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, and the blockade of Gibraltar (1781 Feb. 13). Joseph Jones & Theodorick Bland convey intelligence that the British vessel Colloden drove ashore, the British ship London dismasted during the late storm, and that the enemy received orders to retreat from Virginia (1781 Feb. 13). In February 1781, Jones & Madison write regarding the arrival of Capt. John Paul Jones from France along with thirty tons of powder and the sending of arms & stores to Virginia. Additionally, Madison & Bland remark on the recent naval engagements in the Chesapeake Bay (1781 Apr. 3). Lastly, Madison, Bland, & Meriwether Smith report on the acquisition of supplies & muskets (1781 May 1).

Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor Thomas Jefferson; George Muter & William Davies, War Office; Richard Claiborne, Quartermaster's Office; Benjamin Harrison, Speaker of the House of Delegates; Edmund Randolph, Clerk of the House of Delegates; and John Beckley, Clerk of the Senate.

There are very few outgoing letters from Governor Thomas Jefferson among the Executive Papers. Included is a letter to Governor Richard Caswell, North Carolina, regarding the Caswell Galley and a resolution of the Virginia General Assembly containing a proposition for quieting the minds & possessions of those settlers near the un-extended boundary (1779 June 30). In addition, there a few draft letters sent by Jefferson including a letter to William Phillips regarding the strict confinement of Lt. Governor Henry Hamilton due to the cruelty against American prisoners (1779 July 22). Another draft letter of Jefferson was sent to Governor John Rutledge, South Carolina, with regard to the purchase of goods by Maj. Martin in Charleston as agent with the Northern or Upper Cherokees and a proposal to divide the Cherokees into southern, middle, & northern settlements among the states of South Carolina, North Carolina, & Virginia (1779 Nov. 11). On 9 September 1780, Jefferson writes to Col. John Smith, Frederick, about the re-construction of Fort Randolph and a guard for the prisoners at Winchester. Also present is a copy of a letter from Jefferson, in Council, to David Ross enclosing his appointment as Commercial Agent (1781 Feb. 2). Jefferson composes a letter from Charlottesville to the County Lieutenant of Montgomery County regarding the movements of Lord Cornwallis from Carolina along with a reinforcement of two thousand men from New York (1781 May 28). Lastly, Jefferson writes President Joseph Reed, Pennsylvania, regarding the settlement of the boundary line between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1781 June 3).

George Muter served as commissioner of the Virginia War Office from its creation in 1780 until his resignation in March 1781. Muter wrote extensively to Governor Jefferson regarding such topics as arms, supplies, appointments, and others. In addition, Muter writes concerning the following matters: the removal of the Quarter Master General's Office to Richmond (1780 Dec. 1); the condition of the Tan Yard & Foundry (including Jefferson's instructions) (1780 Dec. 12); the conduct of Golden Ward (1780 Dec. 20); rum for the use of the officers at the Chesterfield Courthouse (1780 Dec. 20); the letter of Maj. Charles Magill regarding the State Garrison Regiment under Magill's command (1780 Dec. 28); the removal of arms & stores at Petersburg (1781 Jan. 2); the renewal of Mathew Anderson's shoe manufactory (1781 Jan. 20); the appointment of Capt. Nathaniel Irish as commissary of military stores (1781 Jan. 20); supplies for Capt. Read's troop (1781 Jan. 20); the hiring of carpenters for the works at the Forks of the James River (1781 Jan. 22); cannon needed for the Jefferson & Thetis (1781 Jan. 22); the building of the Boring Mill & Moulding House for the Foundry at Westham (1781 Jan. 24); the exemption of workmen in the Public Laboratory from military service (1781 Jan. 25); the construction of the Armory at the Foundry by Richard James (1781 Jan. 26); a letter from Capt. William Spiller resigning as commissary of military stores (1781 Jan. 19); the use of Col. Southall's house for Mr. Anderson's shop (1781 Jan. 23); supplies for the Western Department (1781 Jan. 21); the bounty due soldiers that are enlisted for the war (1781 Feb. 13); a letter from Windsor Brown accepting his appointment as commissary of military stores (1781 Feb. 15); provisions for prisoners (1781 Feb. 28); the accusation of Maj. Gen. Baron von Steuben for neglect of duty (1781 Mar. 2); and a resolution to dismiss him as commissioner of the War Office (1781 Mar. 22).

William Davies replaced George Muter as commissioner of the War Office. William Davies writes regarding deer skins, deserters & enlistments, & a supply of clothing for Gen. Nathaniel Greene (1781 Mar. 18). Davies also writes concerning the need for wagons in the Quartermaster's Department, the scattered site of military stores, & the court martial of Hawkins (1781 Mar. 29). In addition, Davies gives details on the need for wagons for transportation of ammunition from Fredericksburg, the purchase of lead, & the establishment of a saddler's shop near Westham (1781 Apr. 12). Finally, Davies recommends the removal of artificers to the Point of Fork Arsenal in Fluvanna County (1781 Apr. 21).

Richard Claiborne, Deputy Quarter Master, writes regularly concerning such topics as the organization of the Quarter Master's Department in the Continental Line of Virginia by laying the state off into districts (1781 Jan. 29; the impressment of boats on the James River (1781 Feb. 17); the duty of the Field Quarter Master (1781 Feb. 25); abuses by express riders (1781 Mar. 6); the impressment of horses for the expedition against Portsmouth (1781 Mar. 7); Baron von Steuben's letter on the need for boats & horses (1781 Mar. 11); difficulties in procuring wagons to transport stores & resigning his appointment as quarter master for troops in Virginia (1781 Apr. 4); wagons to transport military stores from the Laboratory (includes an extract of a letter from Lafayette) (1781 Apr. 9); and a memorandum of articles required by the Marquis de Lafayette & Baron von Steuben (1781 May 18).

Benjamin Harrison, Speaker of the House of Delegates, writes from Philadelphia regarding his trip to acquire items for Virginia's war effort. Harrison writes on the procurement of powder, a request for a guard from Col. Clark, & speculators (1781 Feb. 12). On 19 February 1781, Harrison discusses powder for Fort Pitt, the loss of British ships, and the procurement of clothing. Harrison also submits a letter to Samuel Huntington, President of the Continental Congress, regarding the removal of the Saratoga prisoners from Virginia, and a request for the relief of Virginia's prisoners in New York (includes a letter from Harrison to Gen. Washington concerning his application to Congress for immediate assistance in men, arms, ammunition, & clothing, and a bill of the General Assembly of Virginia for raising three thousand troops).

As clerks of the House of Delegates and Senate, Edmund Randolph and John Beckley often transmitted resolutions to Governor Jefferson. Noteworthy resolutions include the following: a resolution that the Commonwealth has exclusive right of pre-emption from the Indians of all lands within the limits of its own chartered territory (1779 June 12); a remonstrance of the General Assembly against Congress on the subject of the Indiana & Vandalia claims (1779 Dec. 10); a resolution that Gen. Andrew Lewis, George Webb, & Jacquelin Ambler be appointed to the Council of State in place of John Page, Thomas Blackburne, & David Meade and the appointment of Leighton Wood & Harrison Randolph as auditors of public accounts in place of Thomas Everard & James Cocke (1780 May 24); a resolution to raise the sum of money required by Congress to be paid into the Continental Treasury (1780 June 1); a resolution that the agreement between the commissioners of Virginia & Pennsylvania made on 31 August 1779 be ratified & confirmed (1780 June 23); a resolution regarding the impressment of vessels for the transportation of troops, military stores, & baggage (1781 Mar. 5); a resolution that the soldiers returned by Gen. Baron von Steuben as unfit for service be employed in garrison duty or in the Laboratory (1781 Mar. 6); a resolution for the impressment of horses for mounting the 1st & 3rd Regiments of Dragoons (1781 Mar. 7); a resolution that the Accomack & Diligence galleys be sold (1781 Mar. 13); a resolution for the purchase of horses to mount the & 3rd Regiments of Cavalry (1781 Mar. 17); a resolution for the appointment of Alexander Spotswood as brigadier general to command the two legions to be raised for the defense of the state (1781 Mar. 20); a resolution for some speedy method for clearing & repairing the public arms & providing military stores & ammunition (1781 Mar. 20); a resolution for the appointments of Everard Meade & John Taylor as lieutenant colonels to the two legions to be raised for the defense of the state (also includes the appointment of majors) (1781 Mar. 22); and resolutions that the governor issue a warrant to Maj. Gen. Marquis de Lafayette empowering him to impress horses necessary for the use of the Army (1781 May 28).

Miscellaneous correspondents to Governor Jefferson include Philip Mazzei, Baron von Steuben, Arthur Campbell, George Rogers Clark, John Christian Senf, Marquis de Lafayette, and Charles Magill. Philip Mazzei served as agent in Europe to purchase arms for Virginia during the Revolutionary War. Mazzei writes Governor Jefferson from Nantes & Paris, respecting naval operations against the British by the Spanish & French fleets (1780 Jan. 8); his efforts in purchasing goods in Europe (1780 Mar. 4), Russian neutrality, European politics, & naval movements (1780 Apr. 4); trade with Italy (1780 May 3); naval movements, military strength, & the reply of the King of France to the Empress of Russia (1780 May 12); and reported movements of Gen. Clinton & Cornwallis, his plan to capture New York & Long Island, and the departure of the fleet from Brest (1780 May 20).

Baron von Steuben often corresponded with Governor Jefferson in his role as major general of the Revolutionary Army. Baron von Steuben writes regarding the following subjects: the memorial of Col. Christian Senf relative to the necessary fortifications on the York & James Rivers (1780 Dec. 15); a law to prevent illegal discharges & desertion from the Army (1780 Dec. 18); a bill of the House of Delegates for completing the regiments limiting the number to three thousand (1780 Dec. 28); the movements of the enemy from Richmond to their vessels to possibly attack Petersburg (1781 Jan. 7); arms to Petersburg and his order that the militia of Chesterfield, Powhatan, & Amelia to march to Petersburg (1781 Jan. 7); the need for two sergeants and twenty-four men from troops under his command for the artillery (1781 Jan. 28); reinforcements to Gen. Nathaniel Greene and a lack of arms to call out more militia (1781 Feb. 15); the removal of prisoners at the Albemarle Barracks (1781 Feb. 18); Nathaniel Greene's letter regarding troop movements, Cornwallis's intentions, Green's fortification of Halifax County, and the need for six hundred arms (1781 Feb. 19); the return of the English fleet to Lynhaven Bay (1781 Mar. 26); and the expiration of terms of service for the riflemen & other troops under Gen. Muhlenburg (1781 Apr. 1). Arthur Campbell, Washington County, writes regarding a successful expedition against the Cherokees and enclosing a message to the Cherokee chiefs proposing to treat for peace (1781 Jan. 15). Campbell also writes regarding the establishment of a post on the Tennessee River (1781 Jan. 16). On 27 January 781, Campbell remarks on the depredations by the Indians in Powell's Valley. Lastly, Campbell reports on the hostilities by the Cherokees and the need for a garrison on the banks of the Tennessee (1781 Mar. 12).

George Rogers Clark, writes regarding payment of the expenses of the garrison of Detroit and the ill treatment of the Virginia delegates in Congress in denying him an appointment (1781 Jan. 18). Clark also reports on provisions, arms, & the need for troops (1781 Feb. 10). In addition, Clark corresponds concerning bills countersigned by Maj. Slaughter, the trial for Col. Montgomery, and the exclusion of the Frederick, Berkeley, & Hampshire militia from Western service (1781 Mar. 27). Finally, Clark writes from the Yohogania Courthouse regarding supplies, the expedition against the Indians, & intelligence from Gen. Washington (1781 May 23).

John Christian Senf, Colonel of Engineers, corresponds regarding the construction of a battery at Fort Powhatan upon the plan of Baron von Steuben (1781 Jan. 29). Senf also declines his appointment as colonel of engineers on account of his similar appointment in South Carolina (1781 Feb. 26). On 26 March 1781, Senf requests entrenching tools and a supply of sand bags.

Maj. Charles Magill writes regarding his expedition to the headquarters of the Southern Army, Lord Cornwallis, & Gen. Nathaniel Greene (1781 Mar. 2). Magill also comments on the action of Lee's Corps, Tarleton's firing on a party of Tories, cruelty by a group of Tories, & Lord Cornwallis (1781 Mar. 5). Moreover, Magill contacts the governor concerning a requisition of livestock from Virginia, skirmishes with the enemy, and the supposed strategy of Lord Cornwallis (1781 Mar. 8). On 10 March 1781, Magill informs Governor Jefferson of the movements of the American & British troops, a new arrangement of the light infantry, & the arrival of regular troops under Col. Campbell & Gen. Lawson's Brigade of Militia. Magill details the action against the British at Guilford Courthouse (1781 Mar. 16). Finally, Magill informs Jefferson of enemy losses at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse and the bad conduct of some of the Virginia militia (1781 Mar. 19).

As a general in the Continental Army, the Marquis de Lafayette communicates with Governor Jefferson regarding the management of the war. Lafayette informs the governor of his arrival to Virginia with a Continental detachment to command an expedition against Portsmouth, his movements, the taking of the British ship Romulus, a request for militia, artillery, ammunition, maps of Virginia, & boats (1781 Mar. 3); his plans to join Gen. Peter Muhlenburg & reconnoiter the works of the enemy at Portsmouth (1781 Mar. 16); the need for horses for the transportation of heavy artillery (1781 Mar. 17); the lack of ammunition in camp (1781 Mar. 20); the action between the fleets, postponing the attack of Portsmouth, ammunition sent to Gen. Greene, & the blockade of Annapolis (1781 Apr. 4); his detachment of troops traveling to Richmond (1781 Apr. 17); and enemy movements, Col. White's dragoons, & the impressment of horses (1781 May 29).

Additional significant correspondence includes: William Phillips, Major-General of the British Army captured at Saratoga, re. Continental dollars and the relief of prisoners of war (1779 Aug. 10); Arthur Lee, Paris, re. the declaration of war by Spain against Great Britain and his awaiting of orders of Congress (1779 Sept. 4); William Lee, Frankfort, Germany, re. the purchase of arms and military stores in Europe (1779 Sept. 24); Horatio Gates, Hillsborough, re. an order for the remains of Buford's, Gibson's, & Brent's Regiments to join the army under his command (1780 July 21); an extract of a letter from George Washington, Orange Town, re. the appointment of officers for the levies (1780 Aug. 14); Peter Muhlenburg re. intelligence from Portsmouth that the British fleet intends to set sail from Hampton (1780 Nov. 18); Nathaniel Greene, Camp Charlotte, re. the condition of Maj. Nelson's Corps of Horse (1780 Dec. 14); James Wood, Charlottesville, re. the Convention troops in Maryland, their supplies, & complaints of Maryland in receiving them (1780 Dec. 31); Daniel St. Thomas Jenifer, Maryland, re. the establishment of a French post within the Chesapeake Bay to serve as a bulwark against the enemy (1781 Jan. 5); Alex Martin, War Office, North Carolina, re. a British force landing in Virginia & the need for the militia of North Carolina to cooperate with Virginia to repel them (1781 Jan. 8); Dr. Mathew Pope enclosing proposals for the better regulating & establishing of a Medical Department in Virginia (1781 Jan. 22); Gen. Edward Stevens re. the success of the Battle of Cowpens, casualties, the conduct of the Virginia troops, & wounds received by Tarleton (1781 Jan. 24); Edmund Randolph, Attorney General, re. the right of soldiers to booty (1781 Feb. 9); Col. James Wood, Charlottesville, re. the expiration of the term of the troops & the threat of mutiny (1781 Feb. 9); Nathaniel Green, Guilford Courthouse, re. enemy movements and requesting assistance from Virginia (1781 Feb. 10); Archibald Cary, Ampthill, re. his conversation with Baron von Steuben re. the defense of the river through a fort at Hood's, the proposal of Col. Senf to construct the works, & the procurement of workers (1781 Feb. 13); Alex Martin & Thomas Benbury, on the part of the General Assembly of North Carolina, re. affairs in North Carolina including the aims of Lord Cornwallis, the capture of Wilmington, & the request of aid from Virginia (1781 Feb. 14); Gen. Robert Lawson, Prince Edward, re. Gen. Nathaniel Greene's retreat to the Dan River, Gen. Greene's request for militia, & Lawson's request to command the militia (1781 Feb. 16); Edmund Randolph re. John Dean, a supposed fugitive from the lead mines, in violation of his pardon (1781 Feb. 23); Maj. Charles Dick re. his appointment as director of the Gun Factory in Fredericksburg (1781 Feb. 26); Joseph Reed, President of Pennsylvania, enclosing the appointment of commissioners on the part of Pennsylvania to complete the boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1781 Feb. 26); Governor Thomas S. Lee, Maryland, in Council, re. an arrangement for supplying the Southern Army with provisions from Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, & North Carolina (1781 Feb. 27); Col. James Wood re. the removal of the Saratoga prisoners to Winchester under militia guards (1781 Feb. 27); John Ballandine proposing the use of his grist mills during the war including his furnace in Buckingham (includes estimate of the profits of the grist mill) (1781 Feb. 27); Capt. Richard Barron, Hampton, re. the arrival of an additional fifteen or sixteen more vessels in the Lynhaven Bay (1781 Mar. 26); Joseph Reed, President of the Council of Pennsylvania, re. the scarcity of provisions at Fort Pitt (1781 Mar. 27); Nathaniel Greene re. the need for more militia since the time of service of the militia under Gen. Lawson & Gen. Stevens has expired (1781 Mar. 31); Joseph Martin re. Col. Savier's operations against the Middle Settlements of the Cherokee Indians (1781 Mar. 31); Robert Andrews re. the commission for settling the Pennsylvania & Virginia boundary line (1781 Apr. 4); J. Prentis resigning his seat in the Council (1781 Apr. 8); Brig. Gen. G. Weedon, Williamsburg, re. troop movements, exchanges with the British General at Portsmouth, & enemy preparations to move (includes correspondence from Weedon to Maj. Gen. Philips re. exchanges & a copy of a letter from Philips) (1781 Apr. 8); Henry Lee, Prince William County, re. the capture of a British privateer, depredations by the privateers, and their intention to burn Mount Vernon & Gunston Hall (1781 Apr. 9); Garret Van Meter, Hampshire County, re. insurrections against the late acts of the assembly for recruiting the state's quota of troops to serve in the Continental Army (1781 Apr. 11); Col. John Todd, Jr., Lexington, KY., re. the strength of the militia in Kentucky, the exposure of their forts, & the need for more men to defend them (1781 Apr. 15); Col. John Todd, Jr., re. the construction of a new fort at Lexington (includes an account of expenses for work done at the fort and a drawing of the fort) (1781 Apr. 15); Brig. Gen. G. Weedon enclosing a letter sent by him to Maj. Gen. Philips re. the exchange of prisoners (1781 Apr. 14); William Hay, Richmond, re. intelligence he received of the arrival of the second division of the French fleet off the capes of Delaware consisting of nine sail & seven frigates (1781 Apr. 21); Joseph Reed, President of the Council of Pennsylvania, re. the running of the boundary line between Pennsylvania & Virginia (1781 May 6); Dudley Digges, Richmond, resigning from the Council (1781 May 14); Joseph Reed re. the method of the settlement of the boundary line between Virginia & Pennsylvania (1781 May 14); and William Constable, aid-de-camp to Lafayette, re. the repair of damaged arms, impressment of horses, & the arrival of Lord Cornwallis & Col. Tarleton at Petersburg (1781 May 26).

Other noteworthy items include the following: proceedings of the commissioners of the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island & Providence plantation, Connecticut, and New York re. the depreciation of currency, the prices of merchandise & produce, & embargoes (1779 Oct. 28); parole of Henry Hamilton, Lieutenant Governor & Superintendent of Detroit, acknowledging himself as a prisoner of war (1780 Oct. 10); parole of John May, Major of the Detroit Militia (1780 Oct. 10); a proclamation of Governor Jefferson laying an embargo on provisions such as beef, pork, bacon, wheat, Indian corn, peas, grain, flour, & meal (1781 Jan. 19); a proclamation of Governor Jefferson re. the practice of requiring citizens seized by the British to give parole (1781 Jan. 19); a proclamation of Governor Jefferson for calling the General Assembly into session (1781 Jan. 23); a proclamation of Governor Jefferson carrying out the policy of Congress in granting certain privileges to foreigners in the enemy's service who will become citizens of Virginia (1781 Feb. 2); a list of vessels taken in the service & lying at Turkey Island by Robert Mitchell (1781 Mar. 22); a list of armed vessels at Coxes Dale with their force & present complement of men from James Maxwell (1781 Apr. 26); and a contract between Ebenezer Cowell of Philadelphia & James Madison, Jr., Theodorick Bland, & Meriwether Smith to furnish two thousand rampart muskets (1781 Apr. 27).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • Box 1
    Folder 1
    1779 June-October.
  • Box 1
    Folder 2
    1779 November-December.
  • Box 1
    Folder 3
    1780 January-April.
  • Box 1
    Folder 4
    1780 May.
  • Box 1
    Folder 5
    1780 June-July.
  • Box 1
    Folder 6
    1780 August-September 15.
  • Box 1
    Folder 7
    1780 September 18-October.
  • Box 1
    Folder 8
    1780 November.
  • Box 1
    Folder 9
    1780 December 1-14.
  • Box 1
    Folder 10
    1780 December 15-23.
  • Box 1
    Folder 11
    1780 December 27-31.
  • Box 1
    Folder 12
    1780.
  • Box 1
    Folder 13
    1781 January 1-7.
  • Box 2
    Folder 1
    1781 January 8-12.
  • Box 2
    Folder 2
    1781 January 13-17.
  • Box 2
    Folder 3
    1781 January 18-22.
  • Box 2
    Folder 4
    1781 January 23-27.
  • Box 2
    Folder 5
    1781 January 28-31.
  • Box 2
    Folder 6
    1781 February 1-5.
  • Box 2
    Folder 7
    1781 February 6-10.
  • Box 2
    Folder 8
    1781 February 11-14.
  • Box 2
    Folder 9
    1781 February 15-20.
  • Box 2
    Folder 10
    1781 February 21-25.
  • Box 2
    Folder 11
    1781 February 26-28.
  • Box 2
    Folder 12
    1781 March 1-6.
  • Box 3
    Folder 1
    1781 March 7-11.
  • Box 3
    Folder 2
    1781 March 12-16.
  • Box 3
    Folder 3
    1781 March 17-21.
  • Box 3
    Folder 4
    1781 March 22-26.
  • Box 3
    Folder 5
    1781 March 27-31.
  • Box 3
    Folder 6
    1781 April 1-4.
  • Box 3
    Folder 7
    1781 April 5-9.
  • Box 3
    Folder 8
    1781 April 10-13.
  • Box 3
    Folder 9
    1781 April 14-15.
  • Box 3
    Folder 10
    1781 April 16-20.
  • Box 4
    Folder 1
    1781 April 21-24.
  • Box 4
    Folder 2
    1781 April 25-30.
  • Box 4
    Folder 3
    1781 May 1-9.
  • Box 4
    Folder 4
    1781 May 11-17.
  • Box 4
    Folder 5
    1781 May 18-25.
  • Box 4
    Folder 6
    1781 May 26-31.
  • Box 4
    Folder 7
    1781.
  • Box 4
    Folder 8
    Undated.
  • Box 5
    Folder 1
    1779-1780 June.
  • Box 5
    Folder 2
    1780 August-1781 January.
  • Box 5
    Folder 3
    1781 February-1781 June.