A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Joseph Johnson, 1852-1855 Johnson, Joseph, Executive Papers of Governor, 1852-1855 44076

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Joseph Johnson, 1852-1855

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 44076


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Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
44076
Title
Executive Papers of Governor Joseph Johnson, 1852-1855
Extent
7.35 cubic feet (16 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1852-1856 : Johnson)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor Joseph Johnson, 1852-1855. Accession 44076. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

Joseph Johnson was born on 19 December 1785 in Orange County, New York. The second son of Joseph and Abigail Johnson, Johnson relocated to Harrison County, Virginia, now West Virginia, in 1801. He married Sarah (Sally) Smith, daughter of Ephraim Smith, on 16 May 1804. Johnson served as captain of the Harrison Riflemen during the War of 1812. Following the war, Johnson represented Harrison County in the House of Delegates for the sessions 1815-1816, 1818-1819, 1819-1820, and 1821-1822. Elected to the Eighteenth & Nineteenth Congresses, Johnson also served in the House of Representatives from 4 March 1823 to 3 March 1827. Subsequent to an unsuccessful reelection to the Twentieth Congress, Johnson was elected to fill the vacancy in the Twenty-second Congress occasioned by the death of Philip Doddridge in 1832. Johnson returned to Washington as a Jackson Democrat to serve in the Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth, Twenty-sixth, & Twenty-ninth Congresses from 4 March 1835 to 3 March 1841 and 4 March 1845 to 3 March 1847. At various times during his tenure in the House of Representatives, Johnson chaired several committees including the Committee on Expenditures on Public Buildings, the Committee on Accounts, and the Committee on Revolutionary Claims. Following his federal service, Johnson again represented Harrison County in the House of Delegates for the session of 1847-1848. In 1850, Johnson was elected as one of the delegates to the Convention of 1850-1851 which established universal white adult male suffrage and provided for the popular election of the governor. During the Convention, Johnson acted as chairman of the essential Committee on Suffrage. As a result of his work in the Convention of 1850-1851, Joseph Johnson became the first popularly elected governor of Virginia on 1 January 1852 defeating Whig candidate Judge George W. Summers. Johnson served one four-year term and retired from public office. Although opposed to secession, Johnson nevertheless supported Virginia & the Confederacy during the Civil War. He died in Bridgeport on 27 February 1877 and was buried in the Old Brick Church Cemetery.

Scope and Content

Joseph Johnson's Executive Papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his four-year term as governor from 1 January 1852 until 1 January 1856. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; improvements to Capitol Square; the construction of the Washington Equestrian Statue; the Virginia Penitentiary; slavery; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; banks and banking; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor Joseph Johnson, 1852-1855

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 14-16.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Contents List

Boxes 1-16
Executive Papers of Governor Joseph Johnson, 1852-1855.
Extent: 16 boxes.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include the following: Daniel Webster & William L. Marcy, Secretaries of State; William A. Graham, Acting Secretary of the Interior; Alexander H. H. Stuart & Robert McClelland, Secretaries of the Interior; William L. Hodge & P. G. Washington, Acting Secretaries of the Treasury; James Guthrie, Secretary of the Treasury; Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War; James C. Dobbin, Secretary of the Navy; and Linn Boyd, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Daniel Webster, Secretary of State, writes regarding the distribution of the "Synoptical Index to the Laws of the United States." Webster also transmits documents of the 2d Session of the 31st Congress and two sets of the Annals of Congress (1852 Apr. 3). William L. Marcy, Webster's successor, requests authentication of a document signed by W. C. Merchant (1853 Dec. 17). Marcy also writes regarding the French Universal Exhibition of 1855 (1854 Sept. 21). On 28 November 1854, Marcy requests information relative to the origin, history, statistics, & medical treatment of Asiatic cholera (1854 Nov. 28). Lastly, Marcy transmits a copy of the report of Col. Jebb on prison discipline in England (1855 Mar. 15).

Acting Secretary of the Interior, William A. Graham, encloses a letter from Marie Haas, Prefect of Haute-Marne, proposing an agency in Virginia for the cutlers of that department (1852 Apr. 20). Alexander H. H. Stuart, Secretary of the Interior, encloses his official certificate of the number of representatives apportioned to the state of Virginia under the seventh enumeration (1852 Aug. 10). Stuart also writes the governor of his receipt of the deed relinquishing all claim of the state of Virginia to the lands of the Virginia Military Land District in Ohio (1852 Dec. 14). Robert McClelland writes regarding coupons due on James River & Kanawha bonds guaranteed by the state of Virginia held in trust by the Department for the benefit of Indian tribes (1855 Jan. 11). Finally, McClelland writes regarding the U. S. Census (1855 Aug. 2).

William L. Hodge, Acting Secretary of the Treasury, writes regarding an appropriation of Congress to purchase a site and construct a suitable building for a Custom House, Post Office, Court Rooms, and other offices of the United States at Richmond (1853 Jan. 22). James Guthrie, Secretary of the Treasury, encloses a circular regarding the resolution of the Senate that the treasurer be required to procure the aggregate amount of federal, state, city, railroad, canal, & other corporation bonds, stocks, or other evidence of debt held in Europe (1853 Aug. 9). Guthrie also requests the names & addresses of chief officers of the railroad & canal companies in Virginia (1853 Aug. 9). On several occasions, Guthrie requests statements of Virginia banks (1854 Mar. 8, 25, 29, & Dec. 19). Acting Secretary of the Treasury, P. G. Washington, acknowledges receipt of bank documents sent from Virginia (1854 Apr. 22 & 26).

As Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis writes regarding the construction of the Washington Aqueduct and the need to purchase land in Virginia for an abutment & quarries for the construction of a dam across the Potomac River (incl. act of Congress) (1854 Jan. 19). James C. Dobbin, Secretary of the Navy, requests a copy of the act ceding jurisdiction to certain lands in the neighborhood of the Navy Hospital grounds at Portsmouth, Virginia (1854 Mar. 6). Lastly, Linn Boyd, Speaker of the House of Representatives, informs Governor Johnson of the death of John F. Snodgrass, member of the 13th Congressional District of Virginia (1854 June 10).

The majority of correspondence in Joseph Johnson's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor Joseph Johnson; William H. Richardson, Adjutant General; Charles Dimmock, Commandant of the Public Guard; Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; Sydney Smith Baxter & Willis P. Bocock, Attorneys General; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; and Robert Johnston & George W. Clutter, Auditors of Public Accounts.

Governor Joseph Johnson often writes from his home in Bridgeport, Virginia, to George W. Munford, Secretary of the Commonwealth, while away from office to take care of his ill wife. Governor Johnson writes concerning acts passed by the Maryland General Assembly for running & marking the boundary line between Virginia & Maryland (1852 Nov. 20). The governor also writes on the subject of the act of Congress making further provision for the satisfaction of Virginia land warrants including letters of Alexander H. H. Stuart, Secretary of the Interior, act of Congress, & Willis P. Bocock, Attorney General (1852 Nov. 23). In addition, Johnson writes regarding the following topics: the sale or lease of the public lot in the town of Petersburg on which the warehouse is erected (1852 Dec. 11); the decision of a judge in New York to deprive Jonathan Lemmon, a citizen of Virginia, of his slaves (1852 Dec. 17); authority of Thomas H. DeWitt, 1st Clerk, to perform the duties of 2nd Auditor in his absence (1853 Apr. 5); the death of treasurer Robert Butler and the close of all state officers (1853 July 22); his wife's ill health and his delay in returning to Richmond until after the meeting of the Legislature (1853 Nov. 25); and the death of his wife (1853 Dec. 12).

William H. Richardson, Adjutant General, writes regarding authority to construct a gun house on the court house lot in Alexandria (1852 May 29); deficiencies in the equipment at the Armory (1853 July 7); the application of Capt. Joseph V. Scott for tents, etc., for the Petersburg Grays (1854 May 26); the application of the Petersburg Artillery for aid in building a gun house (1854 Sept. 30); the proposal of Beverley Tucker & Robert Archer for the purchase of certain state arms (1854 Dec. 28); the resolution of the Council to sell the lot in Petersburg appropriated for the purpose of erecting a gun house when the house ceases to be used for military purposes (1855 Mar. 7); and arms & equipment issued to the Young Guard (1855 June 18).

Charles Dimmock, as Commandant of the Public & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol. Dimmock writes regarding the cutting off of the supply of gas for the Capitol, Capitol Square, & the Bell House (1852 Jan. 15); the disposition of the engine or hose reel for the Capitol (1852 Feb. 15); an improvement in privy arrangements of the hospital for the Public Guard (1852 July 7); the request for chairs for the Auditor's Office (1852 July 13); muskets for Capt. McCandlish's Williamsburg Company (1852 Oct. 13); bed clothing for the hospital of the Public Guard (1852 Oct. 27); water from the canal to Braggs Mill under the West Wing of the Armory (1852 Nov. 7); a leak in the culvert which conveys water from the canal to the Armory building (1853 Apr. 18); printed proceedings of the Legislature (1853 Oct. 22); B. & S. Jones's proposal to supply rations to the Public Guard (1853 Sept. 26); carpets for the basement offices at the Capitol (1853 Oct. 20); the claim of Hilary Mosby (1853 Oct. 24); a list of articles necessary for the legal clothing of the Public Guard (1853 Dec. 14); authority to use the old carpets taken from the Capitol (1854 Jan. 3); a list of items needed for the use of the Armory Hospital (1854 Jan. 16); the sale of old stones on Capitol Square to B. B. Minor (1853 Feb. 23); the proposal to send the Armory Band to the Virginia Military Institute (1854 Mar. 7); relief from the Public Guard's duty of striking & ringing the state bell (1854 Apr. 8); the proposed street along the Armory grounds (1854 May 29); provisions for the Public Guard (1854 Sept. 27); an application of John T. Ford requesting the use of the Armory grounds for a balloon ascension during the Agricultural Fair (1854 Oct. 27); the claim of James Yarrington (1854 Nov. 13); Robert Archer's proposal to purchase arms from the state (1854 Dec. 8); the quantity of water used by the Commonwealth at the Armory (1855 Feb. 3); a new flag staff (1855 Feb. 16); the proposal of Stebbins & Mill to put up & repair lightning rods on the public buildings (1855 Mar. 8); bonds as security of the amount of rent of the State Boring Mill (1855 Mar. 26); compensation of the orderly for his services about the Capitol (1855 Apr. 18); the application of Private Dickenson of the Public Guard to have pay restored (1855 Mar. 31); repairs to furnaces in the Capitol (1855 Apr. 25); new coats & caps for the Public Guard (1855 May 14); repair of the culvert at the Armory (1855 June 13); the condition of the State Boring Mill (1855 Aug. 4); permission for the Public Guard to encamp elsewhere to avoid the yellow fever (1855 Aug. 12); proposals for furnishing rations to the Public Guard (1855 Sept. 25 & Oct. 2); and repairs to the Governor's House (1855 Oct. 2). Dimmock's 2nd-in-command, Lt. E. S. Gay writes regarding the stoppage of blasting work in constructing the street across from the public grounds at the Armory (1854 July 11).

Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Johnson regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Morgan writes regarding the following topics: the number of transports remaining in the Penitentiary (1852 Feb. 28); Agnes, a pregnant convict in the Penitentiary (1852 June 16); a letter from Robert G. Scott, President of the Board of Directors, on behalf of Albert Burr who was sentenced to larceny in Richmond (1852 July 27); the record of Baker More, a free negro confined in the Penitentiary (1852 Dec. 2); the case of Norborne Crane, a free negro confined in the Penitentiary (1853 May 13); the price of tents made in the Penitentiary (1853 Aug. 18); an appropriation to appoint Simeon Grimsley as assistant keeper (1853 Sept. 8); the case of William H. Oney, a prisoner at the Penitentiary (1853 Dec. 23); the resolution regarding his recommendation for the pardon of S. A. Smith (1854 Feb. 11); the conduct of Alfred Dodd (1854 Feb. 23); transcripts of records in the cases of Wingfield Butcher & Robert Evans, free negroes in the Penitentiary (1854 Apr. 29); a case of small pox at the Penitentiary (1854 May 22); the removal of James Nesbitt as assistant keeper (1854 July 9); the appointment of John F. Meenly as assistant keeper of the Penitentiary (1854 Sept. 1); John McGalloway's bid for the purchase of four slaves confined in the Penitentiary (1854 Nov. 3); the conduct of William H. Scott, a free negro confined in the Penitentiary (1854 Nov. 24); the appointment of John Freeman as assistant keeper of the Penitentiary (1854 Nov. 27); records in the case of William B. Hooe (1854 Dec. 12); an estimate of the cost of repairing & rebuilding the Penitentiary shops destroyed by fire (incl. proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary) (1854 Dec. 13); the conduct of John Bacchus, a convict in the Penitentiary (1855 Feb. 23); the fire at the Penitentiary and the re-construction & repair of the shops, machinery, etc. (1855 Feb. 16); the conduct of O. D. Clark, a convict in the Penitentiary (1855 Mar. 5); the resignation of Charles D. Moss as assistant keeper of the Penitentiary & the appointment of John M. Butler (1855 Mar. 2); the appointment of a 7th assistant keeper of the Penitentiary (1855 Mar. 26); the state of repairs to the Penitentiary and the sums expended thereon (1855 May 4); the case of John Smith, alias John S. Dumount (1855 May 16); the conduct of J. H. Blake, a convict in the Penitentiary (1855 May 14); and the conduct of James Donnally, a prisoner in the Penitentiary (1855 Nov. 7).

Sidney Smith Baxter & Willis P. Bocock, Attorneys General, provided opinions regarding the following topics: a writ of election to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates caused by the death of William C. Carrington (1852 Jan. 9); the demand of the governor of Pennsylvania for the delivery of Myer A. Levy (1852 Jan. 31); the demand of the governor of Maryland for E. T. Winder, a fugitive from justice (1852 May 4); the question of whether a court must be unanimous as to the question of quilt in order to sentence a slave to sale & transportation instead of death (1852 May 15); the elections in Loudoun County complained of by Sanford J. Ramey (1852 June 9); whether sheriffs ought to be commissioned to fill the offices of those whose offices by the old Constitution expire in March (1852 Dec. 16); the case of Lemmon, a slave, & Henry D. Lapaugh asking for compensation to be paid for printing records (1853 Mar. 14); the right of property in the value of slave Margaret condemned to death by the County Court of Culpeper (1853 Aug. 29); the bond of the treasurer and the question whether one inspector of tobacco can act during a vacancy in the offices of inspectors (1853 Aug. 25); the deed from the state to the United states government for several sites for lighthouses, beacons, etc. (1853 Sept. 30); the case of escheated land of John P. Dumas (1853 Dec. 16); the act of the Assembly passed on 25 February 1854 "authorizing the construction of a statue of Jefferson" (1854 June 30); and the proceedings of the officers of the 105th Regiment (1855 Oct. 9). On 1 November 1854, Bocock transmits his annual report as attorney general.

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, transmits the following certificates of election: Robert M. T. Hunter as senator (1852 Jan. 22); Robert Johnston as auditor, Robert Butler as Treasurer, George Munford as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian, William L. Jackson as 2nd Auditor, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary, James C. Spotts as General Agent & Storekeeper, & William F. Ritchie as Public Printer (1852 Dec. 20); Brig. Gen. Thomas W. White of the 2nd Brigade of Militia in place of Gen. William Lambert, deceased (1853 Apr. 4); Jonathan B. Stovall as treasurer of the Commonwealth (1853 Aug. 3); and William Ritchie as Public Printer (1854 Mar. 28).

In addition, Munford encloses several resolutions from the House of Delegates including a resolution of the House of Delegates that the Secretary of the Commonwealth be requested to report a list of all the slaves executed within each of the last five fiscal years, the owners, sum paid for each slave, etc. (1852 Feb. 6); a resolution of the House of Delegates that the governor be requested to inform the House what steps have been taken by him in pursuance to the resolution providing for causing casts of Houdon's Statue of Washington for colleges of the state (1852 Mar. 17); a resolution of the General Assembly that senators in Congress be instructed to procure the passage of a law making a further appropriation of scrip to satisfy Virginia military land bounty warrants (1852 Apr. 12); a resolution of the House that the executive furnish a tabular statement of the names & salaries of all the officers & agents of joint stock companies, of roads, bridges, & other institutions in which the state has an interest (1852 Mar. 27); and a resolution of the General Assembly accepting the act of Congress making further provision for the satisfaction of Virginia land warrants as a full & final adjustment of all bounty land claims to the officers & soldiers, seamen & marines of the state of Virginia for services in the war of the Revolution (1852 Dec. 9).

Lastly, Munford writes Governor Johnson regarding the requisition upon the Executive of California for the surrender of Henry Banks, a fugitive slave (1853 Oct. 13). On 23 December 1853, Munford writes John Ward regarding a draft of Thomas Crawford for the bronze statues of Patrick Henry and the bas relief of Virginia for the Washington Equestrian Monument cast by Ferdinand von Miller at the Royal Foundry in Munich. Munford writes on the topic of the proposals of Robert Archer & Beverley Tucker to purchase public arms (1854 Dec. 21). Finally, Munford writes to Charles Dimmock regarding the repair of the front wall of the Boring Mill (1855 Aug. 17).

Robert Johnston & George W. Clutter, Auditors of Public Accounts, correspond with Governor Johnson regarding various financial matters. Robert Johnston writes regarding the receipt of a bond of Garland P. Ware for the transportation of certain convict slaves & an agreement between the governor and R. Archer & Company for leasing a piece of ground belonging to the Armory (1852 Sept. 25); receipt for the bond of Robert Butler as treasurer (1853 Jan. 4); receipt for the bond of James C. Spotts as General Agent & Storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1853 Jan. 11); receipt for the bond of William Ritchie as Public Printer (1853 Jan. 20); an allowance for the claim of Samuel J. Repass for his services as drummer in the 86th Regiment (1853 Jan. 27); receipt for the bond of J. E. Shropshire & Edwin Walker for transporting a slave named Isaac (1853 Feb. 3); and money paid from the Literary Fund to the Virginia Military Institute library (1854 Jan. 20). As Johnston's replacement, George W. Clutter writes regarding his absence from office (1855 May 30); deficiencies in the Treasury (1855 June 13 & Nov. 22); and receipt of bonds for the sale of convict slaves sold from the Penitentiary (1855 July 9).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to the extradition of fugitives. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: Enoch L. Lowe & Thomas W. Ligon, Maryland; William Bigler & James Pollock, Pennsylvania; John Hubbard, Maine; Reuben Wood & William Medill, Ohio; Horatio Seymour, Elias W. Leavenworth, & Myron H. Clark, New York; William H. Ross, Delaware; David S. Reid, North Carolina; Howell Cobb, Georgia; Noah Martin, New Hampshire; John A. Winston, Alabama; Oliver H. Perry, Connecticut; Lazarus W. Powell, Kentucky; and John H. Clifford & Henry J. Gardner, Massachusetts.

Governor Enoch L. Lowe, Maryland, asks for the delivery of various fugitives from justice in Virginia including Albert A. Bass charged with obtaining goods & merchandise under false pretences (1852 June 16); Jesse Coleman charged with larceny (1853 July 4); Henry Lehne charge with willful, malicious, & corrupt perjury (1853 Sept. 27); and Octavius McPherson Lyles charged with murder (1853 Dec. 14). Lowe also writes regarding the act of the Virginia General Assembly in relation to the North & South Railroad Company (1853 Mar. 5). Lastly, Lowe writes about the Virginia law concerning the holding of real estate by aliens, resident & non-resident (1853 Dec. 1). Governor Thomas W. Ligon, Lowe's successor, writes on 29 March 1854 regarding the running of the boundary line between Maryland & Virginia. On 20 April 1854, Ligon announces the appointment of George W. Hughes as commissioner on the part of Maryland to run the boundary line between Virginia & Maryland. Additionally, Ligon submits demands for fugitives including Jacob Grove & Thomas Kernan charged with larceny (1854 Mar. 27) and John H. Rhodes charged with horse stealing (1854 July 15). Governor William Bigler, Pennsylvania, also writes regarding the delivery of escaped convicts. Bigler requests the delivery of several fugitives including John H. Carroll charged with bastardy & fornication (1852 June 19); Dick O. Connell alias Keenan, a fugitive charged with larceny (1853 May 2); A. P. Hancer charged with obtaining goods under false pretences (1853 Aug. 3); William R. Cotton, Moses Roberts, charged with obtaining goods under false pretenses (1853 Sept. 23); Jacob Baker, charged with obtaining goods under false pretences (1853 Oct. 17, 1853 Nov. 7, & 1854 Jan. 19); Harrison Conley charged with obtaining goods under false pretenses (1854 Jan. 10); Leonard Wolf charged with fornication & bastardy (1854 Dec. 18); and Frank May charged with burglary (1855 May 3). In addition, Bigler writes as president of a convention of delegates appointed by the legislatures or governors of nine of the original thirteen states which assembled in Philadelphia for the purpose of considering the propriety of erecting some appropriate & durable memorial of the Declaration of Independence on the public grounds surrounding Independence Hall (1853 Mar. 1). Finally, Bigler transmits resolutions of the Pennsylvania Legislature relative to old soldiers (1854 Feb. 25). Bigler's successor, James Pollock, submits demands for Max Weigart charged with conspiracy to defraud (1855 Apr. 30); Henry Blauser, a fugitive accused of seduction, fornication, & bastardy (1855 Sept. 15); and Charles Redding charged with forgery & counterfeiting (1855 Dec. 21). Governor John Hubbard, Maine, issues his proclamation for a day of thanksgiving (1852 Sept. 3). Governor Reuben Wood, Ohio, issues a similar proclamation (1852 Oct. 18). Wood also writes demanding the delivery of George Roby charged with the crime of shooting with intent to kill (1852 Dec. 31) and the delivery of Thomas O. Jones who was charged with bigamy (1853 July 12). Wood's successor William Medill writes to request a day of thanksgiving (1853 Oct. 19) and to demand Briggs Martin, a fugitive from justice charged with feloniously assaulting & wounding with intent to ravish Barbarq Nettenger (1854 Sept. 12). Governor Horatio Seymour, New York, submits his demand for James H. Palmer, a fugitive from justice convicted of forgery (1853 Jan. 25). Seymour also demands James B. Dickerson who was charged with seduction (1853 Mar. 10). Secretary of State Elias W. Leavenworth, New York, requests information regarding the boundaries & county seats of Virginia for Messrs. Morse & Company of New York to publish a map of Virginia (1854 July 18). Leavenworth also writes regarding the support of humane institutions including asylums for the blind, insane, deaf, & dumb (1854 Aug. 23). Later, Governor Myron H. Clark, New York, demands Isaiah Broomfield, a free negro from New York imprisoned in a Goochland County jail (1855 July 4). William H. Ross, Delaware, writes regarding the Atlantic Railroad through Virginia, Maryland, & Delaware (1853 Mar. 16). Governor David S. Reid, North Carolina, encloses a requisition for Mack Wosborne who is confined in jail in Danville for stealing a horse (1853 Apr. 9). Governor Howell Cobb, Georgia, writes respecting the tax laws of Virginia appropriations to education, & state debt (1853 June 15). Governor Noah Martin, New Hampshire, writes regarding the delivery of John W. Rand, a fugitive charged with robbery & larceny (1853 Dec. 28). Governor John A. Winston, Alabama, writes regarding aid to the state to private railroad corporations (1854 Feb. 1). Oliver H. Perry, Secretary of State of Connecticut, encloses resolutions regarding the bill in Congress for the organization of the territories of Kansas & Nebraska (1854 May 18); Governor Lazarus W. Powell, Kentucky, requests the delivery of Thomas R. Robertson who stands charged with passing counterfeit money (1854 Oct. 30) and Hopson Binford, a fugitive charged with shooting Thomas James (1855 Aug. 28). Governor John H. Clifford, Massachusetts, writes regarding his refusal to submit to the demand of Governor Joseph Johnson for Richard H. Johnson, an alleged fugitive charged with feloniously, maliciously, & unlawfully beating & wounding John Gillis. Finally, Governor Henry J. Gardner, Massachusetts, asks for the arrest of Charles C. Toothaker charged with larceny (1855 Sept. 4).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: John Hayward, Boston, requesting information of Virginia counties & towns for the use of his Gazetteer of the United States (1852 Feb. 18); an anonymous letter, Washington, complaining about the block of stone presented by the state of Virginia for the Washington Monument (1852 Mar. 3); Joseph C. Cabell accepting his reappointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1852 Apr. 12); John Ward, New York, encl. certificates of the United States Charge d' Affairs & Consul at Rome proving the completion by Thomas Crawford of two statues for the Washington Monument (1852 Oct. 15); G. R. P. James, British Consulate, Norfolk, re. promotion of commercial intercourse between Great Britain & Virginia (1853 Jan. 18); John M. Botts encl. a letter from a committee of citizens of New York presenting a bronze medal of Henry Clay (1853 Feb. 18); G. A. Myers, Thomas Giles, & W. H. Haxall, Committee of the Capitol Square, re. the failure of the Legislature to provide by law the completion of the improvement of Capitol Square in accordance with the plan of John Notman (1853 Apr. 22); Claudius Crozet re. the strike for higher wages by the hands employed in the tunnel for the Blue Ridge Railroad (1853 Apr. 19); Francis H. Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute, transmitting a letter of a Committee of Cadets requesting the Armory Band for the commencement (1853 Apr. 19); Edward C. Marshall, President of the Manassas Gap Railroad Company, requesting arms to quell riots by Irish laborers (1853 June 27); William Whetten, Secretary of the Office of the Association for the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations, N.Y., inviting the governor to the inaugural opening of the exhibition (1853 June 28); Theodore Sedgwick, President of the Office of the Association for the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in New York asking to be furnished with a state banner (1853 July 6); B. B. Minor re. the use of a small slip of ground between the Law Building & State Courthouse (incl. diagram) (1853 July 14); W. C. Horstmann & Sons, Philadelphia, re. a banner for the state of Virginia (incl. drawing) (1853 July 18); Henry A. Wise declining an appointment as treasurer (1853 July 27); Thomas J. Randolph resigning as visitor of the University of Virginia (1853 Sept. 29); J. Y. Mason resigning as visitor of the University of Virginia (1853 Nov. 8); members of the Legislature re. casts of Washington's Statue by Houdon to be deposited in the several collegiate institutions of the state (1854 Feb. 3); William J. Hubbard re. the cost of making & transporting casts of Houdon's statue in plaster (1854 Feb. 9); H. K. Ellyson, House of Delegates, re. the street proposed to be made by the City of Richmond through the Armory property (incl. minority report of the Armory Committee) (1854 Feb. 10); John Ward, N.Y. encl. certificates of the Directory of the Royal Academy of Plastic Arts at Munich re. the successful casting of the statue of Thomas Jefferson and the second bas relief for the Washington Monument at the request of Thomas Crawford (1854 Mar. 24); John Ward encl. a draft of Thomas Crawford on the state of Virginia for $15,000 and a certificate from the U.S. Consul at Rome of the completion of the Equestrian Statue of Washington (1854 June 23); Alexandre Vattemare, Paris, Agent of Virginia for International Exchange, encl. general regulations for the Universal Exhibition to be held in Paris in 1855 (1854 July 26); Alexandre Vattemare, re. a letter from Governor William Smith concerning payment for his expenses (1854 July 31); Alexandre Vattemare, Paris, re. exchanges of books (1854 Sept. 6); Francis T. Stribling re. directors for the Western Lunatic Asylum in Staunton (1854 Sept. 12); Charles Mason, Commissioner, U.S. Patent Office, requesting information relative to the drought (1854 Sept. 20); Robert E. Coxe, Charles L. Fleischmann, & Alexandre Vattemare, Committee appointed by the states of Alabama & New York as representatives at the Universal Exhibition to take place in Paris on 1 May 1855, re. regulations (1854 Oct. 9); Charles Dorwin, U.S. Consul at Montreal, encl. his business card & tendering his services in making collections in Canada (1854 Oct. 13); Henry S. Tanner, N.Y., complaining of the creation of a new map of Virginia which renders the copper plates in his possession worthless (1854 Nov. 13); Henry S. Tanner encl. an account for the storage, insurance, & transportation of thirteen copper plates used to make the map of Virginia (1854 Nov. 21); R. Archer proposing to purchase arms belonging to the state (1854 Nov. 29); Henry S. Tanner re. a new edition of the maps of Virginia he created twenty-five years ago (1854 Nov. 30); Powhatan Ellis, Jr., N.Y., encl. Tanner's receipt for four packages containing copper plates received from him (1854 Dec. 1); Robert King, Agent for T. B. Welch's portrait of Washington, transmitting an engraved copy of the portrait painted during the second term of the presidency of George Washington by Gilbert Charles Stuart for the Executive Mansion (1854 Dec. 6); Alexandre Vattemare, Paris, re. contributions by citizens of Virginia to the World's Fair of 1855 (1855 Jan. 13); Alfred Paul, French Consul, re. a set of maps to be presented to the state of Virginia (1855 Mar. 8); W. B. Davis, Wilmington, N.C., encl. a circular to the fifteen southern governors re. southern rights (1855 Apr. 14); Thomas Wallace, Petersburg, encl. the contract of R. A. Machen for building a gun house for the Petersburg Artillery (1855 June 20); John A. Washington proposing the sale of Mount Vernon to the state of Virginia (1855 June 18); Henry A. Wise resigning as visitor of the University of Virginia (1855 June 18); H. W. Herbert requesting stone from Capitol Square lying in the site of the old work shed (1855 Sept. 2); and Thomas Crawford, Rome, re. the bas relief for the Washington Equestrian Statue and the construction of the statue (1855 Oct. 29).

Other noteworthy items include the following: a qualification of Joseph Johnson as governor (1852 Jan. 1); qualification of Willis P. Bocock as attorney general (1852 Jan. 22); proclamations of Governor Joseph Johnson offering rewards for the arrest of fugitives from justice (1852 Jan. 6, Feb. 2, 7, & 24, Mar. 20, June 12 16, & 28, Sept. 9, Nov. 27, Dec. 15; 1853 June 22, July 25, Aug. 17, 20, & 24, Dec. 3, 8, & 28; 1854 Jan. 9, 18, May 27, July 11 & 27; 1855 Mar. 8, Apr. 17, May 11, July 23, & Aug. 21), resolution of the General Assembly of Alabama for a ship canal across the peninsula of Florida (1852 Feb. 6); a joint resolution of the General Assembly of Indiana on the subject of the slave trade and colonization (1852 Mar. 8); report of the Committee of Claims on the appropriation of lands by Congress for Virginia land bounty claims (1852 Apr. 14); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for elections for circuit judges & judges of the Supreme Court of Appeals (1852 May 22); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for an election to supply the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the resignation of George W. Thompson (1852 Sept. 22); a proclamation for elections to supply the vacancies occasioned by the resignations of John Caddall as delegate to Pulaski County, Robert E. Scott as delegate to Fauquier County, & John A. Meredith as senator, & Conway Robinson as delegate of Richmond (1852 Sept. 22); a memorandum of agreement between the governor and R. Archer & Company (1852 Nov. 13); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates to supply the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of James W. Gray (1852 Nov. 18); a proclamation of Governor Johnson regarding the appointment of electors to choose a president & vice president of the United States (1852 Nov. 22); qualification of Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary (1852 Dec. 24); bond of Robert Johnston as auditor of public accounts (1852 Dec. 24); qualification of Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office (1852 Dec. 30); qualification of Robert Johnston as Auditor of Public Accounts (1852 Dec. 31); a map of ground attached to the Navy Hospital at Norfolk proposed to be ceded to the United States government (1853 Jan. 31); a qualification of George W. Munford as Secretary of the Commonwealth (1853 Jan. 1); petition of William Hubard asking for the privilege of casting in plaster of Paris the entire Houdon Statue of Washington in the Capitol (1853 Feb. 17); a proclamation of Governor Joseph Johnson for an election in the General Assembly occasioned by the resignation of Charles Mason (1853 Apr. 15); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for the election of senators of the 1st class as required by the Constitution (1853 Apr. 22); a report of the Committee on the Capitol Square encl. a plan of the walks near the Capitol (1853 May 30); a proclamation of Governor Johnson designating the basement of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Warrenton as the place at which the circuit & county courts of Fauquier County be held until a new building is erected (1853 May 3); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for an election to supply the vacancy in the 14th Circuit occasioned by the death of Edward Johnston (1853 May 11); an agreement between E. S. Gay, paymaster of the Washington Monument, & Azel French for the rent of a parcel of land in Westham owned by the state (1853 June 18); a proclamation of Governor Johnson re. the election of commissioners of public works (1853 June 22); recommendations for the office of treasurer in place of Robert Butler, deceased (1853 July); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for an election to supply the vacancy in the 4th Circuit occasioned by the death of N. M. Taliaferro (1853 July 11); memorandum of agreement between Governor Johnson & Robert Edmond of Richmond for the lease of Union Warehouse in the town of Buchanan (1853 July 8); a proclamation of Governor Johnson for an election in Pittsylvania County to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of George H. Gilmer (1853 Sept. 8); a deed between Governor Johnson & the United States for four parcels of land on the James River containing three acres each to be used for lighthouses, beacons, etc. (1853 Oct. 21); Governor's message & annual reports of the public officers of the state (1853 Dec. 5); petitions & correspondence for the pardon of John S. Mosby, a student at the University of Virginia, who was tried for maliciously & unlawfully shooting George R. Turpin (1853 Dec. 16); a report of the Directors of the Penitentiary regarding the escape of sundry convicts (1853 Dec. 30); petition of citizens of the United States in Paris asking that Congress will provide for the incorporation of the metrical decimal system into legislation of the U.S. (1854 Jan. 30); articles of agreement between Alexander Galt, Jr., & Governor Johnson for the completion of a statue of Thomas Jefferson (1854 Feb. 21); bond of George W. Clutter as auditor of Public Accounts (1854 Feb. 21); proceedings of the Rhode Island General Assembly reversing the decision of the courts in the case of Thomas W. Dorr charged with treason (1854 May 6); resolutions of Massachusetts re. officers, soldiers, & others who served in the War of 1812 (1854 May 8); bond of Alexander Galt for the execution of a marble statue of Thomas Jefferson (1854 July 10); proceedings of a courts martial held at the Armory for Peter Jackson, a private in the Public Guard charged with desertion (1854 Nov. 6); receipt of Henry S. Tanner for the storage of thirteen copper plates (1854 Nov. 21); payroll of officers & men of the 1st Virginia Volunteers ordered to protect property and guard prisoners at the Penitentiary on the occasion of the fire on the night of 7 December 1854 (1854 Dec. 16); qualification of J. B. Stovall as treasurer of the state (1854 Dec. 30); qualification of Stafford H. Parker as register of the Land Office (1854 Dec. 30); a contract between Charles Dimmock & George F. Maynard for leasing the Boring Mill (1855 Mar. 30); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary re. the appointment of Henry R. Jones as clerk (1855 June 19); and the Governor's Message & Reports of the Public Officers of the State of the Board of Directors and of the Visitors, Superintendents, & Other Agents of Public Institutions or Interests of Virginia (1855 Dec. 3).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1852
    • January
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        16-29
    • February
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        2-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        16-30
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        1-10
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        11-20
      • Box 1
        Folder 11
        21-31
    • June
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        21-30
    • July
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        16-31
    • August
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        2-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 3
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      Undated .
  • 1853
    • January
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        17-31
    • February
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        1-12
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        13-30
    • May
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        16-25
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        26-31
    • June
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • July
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        1-12
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        13-23
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        25-31
    • August
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        17-31
    • November
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 6
        Folder 7
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        11-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        21-31
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      Undated .
  • 1854
    • January
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        2-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        11-17
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        18-31
    • February
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        16-22
      • Box 7
        Folder 8
        23-28
    • March
      • Box 7
        Folder 9
        1-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 10
        11-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 11
        21-31
    • April
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        17-29
    • May
      • Box 8
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 8
        Folder 4
        11-20
      • Box 8
        Folder 5
        22-31
    • June
      • Box 8
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 7
        16-30
    • July
      • Box 8
        Folder 8
        1-10
      • Box 8
        Folder 9
        11-21
      • Box 8
        Folder 10
        22-31
    • August
      • Box 9
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 9
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 9
        Folder 5
        1-14
      • Box 9
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 9
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 10
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 10
        Folder 2
        16-30
  • 1855
    • January
      • Box 10
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 10
        Folder 4
        11-20
      • Box 10
        Folder 5
        21-31
    • February
      • Box 10
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 10
        Folder 7
        16-26
    • March
      • Box 10
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 10
        Folder 9
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 10
        Folder 10
        2-15
      • Box 10
        Folder 11
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 11
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 11
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 11
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 11
        Folder 4
        11-20
      • Box 11
        Folder 5
        21-30
    • July
      • Box 11
        Folder 6
        1-10
      • Box 11
        Folder 7
        11-20
      • Box 12
        Folder 1
        21-31
    • August
      • Box 12
        Folder 2
        1-15
      • Box 12
        Folder 3
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 12
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 12
        Folder 5
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 12
        Folder 6
        1-10
      • Box 12
        Folder 7
        11-31
    • November
      • Box 13
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 13
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 13
        Folder 3
        2-15
      • Box 13
        Folder 4
        17-31
    • Pardons
      • Box 13
        Folder 5
        Dilworth, John
      • Box 13
        Folder 6
        Miscellaneous
  • Box 13
    Folder 7
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1852
    • Box 14
      Folder 1
      Jan. 22
    • Box 14
      Folder 2
      Jan. 26
    • Box 14
      Folder 3
      May 31
    • Box 14
      Folder 4
      Aug. 10
    • Box 14
      Folder 5
      Aug. 25
  • 1853
    • Box 14
      Folder 6
      May 30
    • Box 14
      Folder 7
      July 18
    • Box 14
      Folder 8
      Aug. 29
    • Box 14
      Folder 9
      Dec. 28
    • Box 14
      Folder 10
      Dec. 30
  • 1854
    • Box 14
      Folder 11
      Jan. 7
    • Box 14
      Folder 12
      Jan. 10
    • Box 14
      Folder 13
      May 18
    • Box 14
      Folder 14
      July 15
    • Box 14
      Folder 15
      Dec. 13
  • 1855
    • Box 14
      Folder 16
      Oct. 11
    • Box 14
      Folder 17
      Nov. 1
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1852
    • Box 15
      Folder 1
      May 31
    • Box 15
      Folder 2
      Sept. 3
    • Box 15
      Folder 3
      Nov. 17
    • Box 15
      Folder 4
      Dec. 4
  • 1853
    • Box 15
      Folder 5
      May 2
    • Box 15
      Folder 6
      May 6
    • Box 15
      Folder 7
      May 26
    • Box 15
      Folder 8
      May 26
    • Box 15
      Folder 9
      May 26
    • Box 15
      Folder 10
      Aug. 8
    • Box 15
      Folder 11
      Aug. 17
    • Box 15
      Folder 12
      Nov. 19
    • Box 15
      Folder 13
      Nov. 19
    • Box 15
      Folder 14
      Dec. 28
  • 1854
    • Box 15
      Folder 15
      Jan. 7
    • Box 15
      Folder 16
      Jan. 19
    • Box 15
      Folder 17
      Jan. 30
    • Box 15
      Folder 18
      Feb. 17
    • Box 15
      Folder 19
      Mar. 6
    • Box 15
      Folder 20
      Apr. 26
    • Box 15
      Folder 21
      Aug. 22
    • Box 15
      Folder 22
      Sept. 30
    • Box 15
      Folder 23
      Oct. 16
    • Box 15
      Folder 24
      Nov. 2
  • 1855
    • Box 16
      Folder 1
      Jan. 25
    • Box 16
      Folder 2
      Mar. 13
    • Box 16
      Folder 3
      Apr. 11
    • Box 16
      Folder 4
      Apr. 14
    • Box 16
      Folder 5
      May 24
    • Box 16
      Folder 6
      May 24
    • Box 16
      Folder 7
      June 29
  • Undated