A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor John Buchanan Floyd, 1849-1851 Floyd, John Buchanan, Executive Papers of Governor, 1849-1851 43924

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor John Buchanan Floyd, 1849-1851

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 43924


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© 2008 By The Library of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
43924
Title
Executive Papers of Governor John Buchanan Floyd, 1849-1851
Extent
5.0 cubic feet (11 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1849-1852 : Floyd)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor John Buchanan Floyd, 1849-1851. Accession 43924. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

John Buchanan Floyd was the son of former governor John Floyd and Letitia Preston Floyd. Born at his family's estate of Smithfield in Blacksburg, Virginia, on 1 June 1806, Floyd was graduated from South Carolina College in 1826 and practiced law in Wytheville, Virginia, & Helena, Arkansas. Following ill health and a failed business venture as a cotton planter in Arkansas, Floyd returned to his native state to practice law in Abingdon, Washington County. A Democrat, Floyd represented Washington County in the House of Delegates for two terms between 6 December 1847 and 17 August 1849. While in the House, Floyd was elected governor of Virginia for a three-year term beginning on 1 January 1849. While governor, Floyd was instrumental in managing the completion of the Washington Equestrian Statue on Capitol Square. Another significant achievement during Floyd's tenure was the adoption of the Constitution of 1851 by a Constitutional Convention that met from 14 October 1850 to 1 August 1851. The Constitution of 1851 expended suffrage to all white, adult-males in Virginia and allowed for the popular election of governor.

Governor John B. Floyd returned to represent Washington County in the House of Delegates for the term beginning on 3 December 1855. Floyd campaigned for presidential hopeful James Buchanan in 1856 and was named to Buchanan's cabinet as Secretary of War. Floyd resigned his position on 29 December 1860 when President Buchanan refused to order Maj. Robert Anderson to evacuate Ft. Sumter. Floyd was later exonerated by the House Committee on Military Affairs on charges of aiding secession efforts by forwarding large quantities of arms and ammunition to the South. During the Civil War, Floyd was appointed brigadier general of forces raised in western Virginia in Confederate service on 23 May 1861. After several small engagements in southwestern Virginia, Floyd was transferred to Tennessee and placed in command of Ft. Donelson before its fall to Brigadier General U.S. Grant in February 1862. His defeat prompted Jefferson Davis to relieve him from command. Governor John Letcher, however, appointed Floyd major general of the Virginia State Line to project the salt mines near Saltville.

Floyd's health deteriorated and he died at his adopted daughter's home near Abingdon, Virginia, on 26 August 1863. He was buried in Sinking Spring Cemetery. He was survived by his wife Sarah Buchanan Preston, daughter of General Francis Preston, whom he married in 1830.

Scope and Content

John Buchanan Floyd's Executive Papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three-year term as governor from 1 January 1849 until 1 January 1852. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Constitutional Convention of 1851, improvements to Capitol Square; the construction of the Washington Equestrian Statue; the Virginia Penitentiary; slavery; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; banks and banking; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor John Buchanan Floyd, 1849-1851

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 10-11.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Contents List

Boxes 1-11
Executive Papers of Governor John Buchanan Floyd, 1849-1851.
Extent: 11 boxes.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include William M. Meredith, Secretary of the Treasury; John M. Clayton & Daniel Webster, Secretaries of State; and Charles M. Conrad, Secretary of War. William M. Meredith, Secretary of the Treasury, requests copies of returns respecting the conditions of banks (1849 Mar. 30). John M. Clayton, Secretary of State, writes regarding the forwarding of copies of the Biennial Register of officers in the service of the United States (1849 Aug. 13), documents of the 1st Session of the 30th Congress (1849 Aug. 14), and a resolution of Congress to forward the 8th volume of the series of publications connected with the United States' Exploring Expedition (1849 Aug. 22). As Acting Secretary of State, W.L. Daniel encloses a copy of a letter from Abbott Lawrence, Legation of the United States, London, transmitting a copy of a letter from Viscount Palmerston regarding records missing from the archives of Virginia including a list of minutes of the Council & Assembly between 1660 & 1769 now in Her Majesty's State Paper Office (1850 Oct. 26). Clayton's successor, Daniel Webster, transmits acts of the 1st Session of the 31st Congress (1851 Jan. 18). Webster also writes regarding the exchange of Congressional documents (1851 Dec. 5). Charles M. Conrad, Secretary of War, writes regarding copies of muster rolls of the Virginia troops in United States service during the Mexican War & War of 1812 (1851 Oct. 15). Conrad also writes concerning the request that a public highway be laid out through the tract of land ceded by the state of Virginia as a site for a fortification at Old Point Comfort (1851 Dec. 8 & 12).

The majority of correspondence in John Buchanan Floyd's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor John Buchanan Floyd; Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; Charles Dimmock, Commandant of the Public Guard; Sydney Smith Baxter, Attorney General; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; James E. Heath & Robert Johnston, Auditors of Public Accounts; and Robert Butler, Treasurer.

Governor John Buchanan Floyd writes to the executive Council regarding the choice of the model for the Washington Monument to be erected on Capitol Square designed by Thomas Crawford (includes advice of Council) (1850 Feb. 8). Governor Floyd also writes suggesting to the Council the mode of constructing the Washington Monument on Capitol Square (1850 Mar. 13). Additionally, Floyd writes regarding the appointment of a state committee to prepare for representation of Virginia in an exhibition of industry, etc., in London in May 1851 (1850 Nov. 7). Finally, Governor Floyd encloses a letter regarding counsel in the case of Green vs. officers of the Public Guard (1851 July 18).

Charles Dimmock, as Commandant of the Public & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol. Dimmock writes regarding an increase in the salary of John H. Knowles as armorer at the Armory (1849 Jan. 5), a six-pound iron cannon (1849 Feb. 15), a report of Lt. E. Brown on the condition of the Westham Magazine lot (1849 Mar. 14), the Armory Iron Company's construction of an additional furnace close to the Armory buildings (1849 May 10), B.B. Minor's plan to construct a small building near Capitol Square (1849 May 10), permission to order a new flag at the Armory (1849 May 20), the issue of two six-pound iron cannon & sixty swords (1849 May 31), permission to have blinds for the windows at the Armory (1849 June 25), authority to enlist men in the Public Guard without inspection by the physician (1849 July 5), new carpet for the House of Delegates and a water closet for the Public Guard (1849 Sept. 24), a request for a convict force to construct a culvert from the Bell House to the main sewer (1849 Sept. 25), permission to procure new uniform caps & knapsacks for the Public Guard (1849 Oct. 15), provisions for the Public Guard (1849 Oct. 1), a new grate for the fireplace in his quarters (1849 Oct. 8), a bid to furnish rations for the Public Guard (1849 Oct. 9), the bill of James Evans for furniture & repairs to the Governor's House (1850 Mar. 9), the claim of Samuel N. Price for the loss of his cow on Capitol Square by a member of the Public Guard (1850 May 23), an advance of $200 from the auditor (1850 July 24), the construction of a street through the Armory grounds along the James River (1850 Sept. 5), the proposal of Burwell Jones for furnishing rations to the Public Guard (1850 Sept. 30), new carpet for the House of Delegates (1850 Sept. 30), authority to procure coal for his office at the Armory (1850 Oct. 9), repairs or new furniture for the Governor's House (1850 Oct. 27), a leave of absence (1850 Nov. 29), browning on muskets to protect them from rust (1851 Oct. 10), an order for the issue in future cases of only one pistol to each member of a cavalry company (1851 Oct. 21), authority to procure great coats for the Public Guard (1851 Oct. 18), expenditures at the Armory (1851 Nov. 25), and arms for Col. Strange's cadets at the Norfolk Academy (1851 Dec. 20).

As Dimmock's 2nd-in-command, Lieutenant E.S. Gay writes from the Armory asking for authority to complete the alteration of the water closet at his quarters (1849 June 26). In addition, Gay served as acting superintendent of the Public Guard in Dimmock's absence and requests that the officer's offices in the basement of the Capitol be whitewashed (1851 Aug. 13).

Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Floyd regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Morgan writes regarding the following topics: the conduct of William Coghill (1849 Feb. 2); an allowance of tobacco to prisoners (1849 Apr. 9); the case of Augustus Bartles (1849 Apr. 23); the case of Washpon Ashby (1849 May 15); the case of Dick Wilson (1849 June 20); the health of John Turner (1849 July 11); the construction of gun carriages at the Penitentiary (1849 July 13); the purchase of Jennetta, a convict slave in the Penitentiary (1849 July 18); the case of William Dobyns (1849 Sept. 27); the mounting of cannon by prisoners (1849 Oct. 5); the pardon of Thomas Clevenger (1850 Jan. 15); the case of Alfred Dodd (1850 Feb. 2); the conduct of Thomas B. Mahone & Tom Reed (1850 Feb. 12); the record of Tom Jackson (1850 Feb. 18); the case of Berry Jackson (1850 Feb. 19); the record of William Robinson (1850 Mar. 14); the case of Thomas F. Marks (1850 Mar. 18); the case of John Perry & Henry Sullivan (1850 Mar. 22); the case of Woodson Marks (1850 May 16); the opinion of J.N. Brooks, Surgeon of the Penitentiary, on the sanity of Henry Sullivan (1850 May 20); the conduct of Joseph King (1850 Nov. 8); the case of German Mann (1850 Nov. 22); the case of Waller Quarles (1851 Jan. 27); the conduct of Washington Watkins (1851 Mar. 20); the appointment of assistant keepers at the Penitentiary (1851 Mar. 27); the conduct of Robert Pugh (1851 May 30); a controversy between Private Joseph Thomas of the Public Guard & John Moss at the Penitentiary (1851 July 23); approval to appoint Charles D. Moss as 6th Assistant Keeper of the Penitentiary (1851 Aug. 28); the case of James C. Randolph (1851 Nov. 1); and the case of William Lewis (1851 Nov. 29).

Sidney Smith Baxter, Attorney General, provides opinions regarding the appointment of a quarantine officer at Wheeling (1849 Jan. 4), the construction of an additional furnace close to the Armory buildings by the Armory Iron Company (1849 May 14), the appointment of a chairman of the Exchange Bank of Petersburg (1849 May 21), the allowance for the sheriff of Westmoreland for bringing to Richmond a slave named Baker for sale & transportation (1850 Nov. 1), the power of the governor to provide a seal to any court without one (1850 Nov. 16), the bond of J.C. Spotts as storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1851 Mar. 31), the right to vote under the existing Constitution (1851 Sept. 30), the claim of James S. French to certain lands around Ft. Monroe (includes letter of Winfield Scott as acting Secretary of War), and qualification for the right of suffrage in certain places (1851 Dec. 3).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, transmits the following certificates of election: William F. Ritchie as public printer (1849 Feb. 13); John W. Tyler as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 6th Circuit (1850 Jan. 29); Mathew Dunbar as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 18th Circuit (1850 Feb. 27); John Robertson as judge of the judge of the General Court of the Circuit Court of Chancery for the 21st Circuit & John S. Caskie as judge for the same circuit (1850 Mar. 14); Green B. Samuel as judge of the Circuit Court for the 14th Circuit & William Ritchie as public printer (1850 Dec. 6); James M. Mason as senator in Congress (1850 Dec. 7); Richard Parker as judge of the Circuit Court of the 13th Circuit (1851 Jan. 15); Robert Johnston as 1st Auditor, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Robert Butler as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian, Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary, and James C. Spotts as General Agent of the Penitentiary (1851 Feb. 27); and Richard C.L. Moncure as judge of the Court of Appeals (1851 Mar. 12).

In addition, Munford encloses several resolutions from the House of Delegates including a resolution that the governor be requested to communicate to the House the proceedings of the Council in reference to the late recommendations of the County Court of Taylor proposing an increase in the number of justices (1849 Jan. 11), a resolution that the governor inform the House whether the returns of votes for electors of president & vice president were in any case informal, whether those informal returns were counted in the estimate, and by what authority, and to transmit the informal returns or copies to the House (1849 Jan. 19), a resolution that the governor be requested to communicate the names & residence of persons appointed by him to act as commissioners (1849 Dec. 15), a resolution for the transfer of Judge George H. Lee from the 18th Judicial Circuit to the 22nd Circuit (1850 Feb. 25), resolution that the governor be authorized to cause ten pieces of artillery to be mounted & distributed (1850 Mar.11), a resolution that the Secretary of Commonwealth furnish the number of allowances of land bounty for Revolutionary services made by the Executive since 1830 (1850 Dec. 5) a resolution that the Secretary of the Commonwealth be required to distribute amongst the members of the House one volume of the Revised Code of Virginia (1850 Dec. 9), and a resolution of the General Assembly that the governor be authorized & requested to cause two pieces of artillery to be mounted for the use of the 97th Regiment (1851 Jan. 3).

James E. Heath & Robert Johnston, Auditors of Public Accounts, and Robert Butler, Treasurer, correspond with Governor Floyd regarding various financial matters. Heath writes regarding the appointment of a military accountant as dispersing officer in execution of the act concerning the Virginia Regiment of Volunteers passes on 10 March 1849 (1849 Apr. 14). Heath also writes regarding three loans to the late Capt. John B. Richardson by the Washington Monument Fund (1849 July 16). Robert Johnston replaced James E. Heath as auditor on 1 March 1850. Johnston's letters to the governor relate to a request for an additional clerk for making out the delinquent lists of lands (1850 Apr. 17 & Oct. 18), absences from office (1850 May 20, Aug. 5, & 1851 Oct. 18), the name of Col. David Rogers on the Revolutionary rolls (1850 Dec. 28), and the receipt of the bond of Ransom Gent for the transportation of convict slaves sold to him by the Executive (1851 Jan. 7). Robert Butler, Treasurer, writes requesting a safe for the Treasury Office (1851 Oct. 22).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to extraditions and the Compromise of 1850. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: Seabury Ford & Reuben Wood, Ohio; Whitemarsh B. Seabrook, South Carolina; William Tharp & William H. Ross, Delaware; Daniel Haines, New Jersey; John A. Quitman, Mississippi; Hamilton Fish & Washington Hunt, New York; William F. Johnston, Pennsylvania; John L. Helm, Kentucky; Philip Francis Thomas & Enoch L. Lowe, Maryland; Charles K. Williams, Vermont; David S. Reid, North Carolina; Samuel Dinsmoor, New Hampshire; and Henry W. Collier, Alabama.

Governor Seabury Ford, Ohio, writes regarding the demand for Samuel B. Brown (1849 Jan. 31). Governor Ford also writes returning the demand of Governor Floyd for the arrest of Joseph Venable, slave of Samuel B. Brown (1849 Feb. 13). In addition, Ford requests the delivery of Jacob Bragg, a fugitive from justice charged with horse stealing (1849 Oct. 4). Lastly, Ford writes regarding the requisition of Governor Floyd for Buck alias Oliver, a free man of color charged with advising a slave to abscond from his master (1850 Feb. 21). Ford's successor Governor Reuben Wood writes demanding Abraham Daniels charged with the crime of stabbing with intent to wound (1850 Dec. 17). Wood also transmits a resolution for a day of Thanksgiving & prayer (1851 May 20). Lastly, Wood submits a demand for H. Hubell who was charged with the crime of willful perjury (1851 Oct. 25). Governor Whitemarsh B. Seabrook, South Carolina, demands the delivery of James Brown charged with robbery (1849 Mar. 9). Governor Seabrook also writes requesting statistical information in relation to Virginia (1849 May 26). Governor William Tharp, Delaware, requests the surrender a William C. Parkhurst (1849 Sept. 24). Tharp's successor, William H. Ross, transmits resolutions regarding the compromise measures of the 31st Congress (1851 May 14). Governor Daniel Haines, New Jersey, demands Jacob Whisner, Jr., a fugitive from justice charged with murder (1850 Jan. 5 & 16). Governor John A. Quitman, Mississippi, transmits a copy of resolutions of the Mississippi Legislature to Congress regarding a law extending the provisions of the Act of 1848 granting land or script to the volunteer soldiers of the late war with Mexico to the officers & soldiers of the War of 1812 (1850 Mar. 16). Quitman also transmits a resolution regarding a Convention of Delegates of the Southern States (1850 Mar. 14). Governor Hamilton Fish, New York, writes regarding a demand for John Hays (1850 Aug. 5). Later, Governor Washington Hunt writes demanding the delivery of Daniel Ryan, Patrick Lavin, & Martin Flannery charged with murder (1851 Mar. 6). Governor William F. Johnston, Pennsylvania, demands the delivery of Thomas N. Green charged with obtaining goods under false pretences (1850 Aug. 16). Governor Johnston also writes to demand John Long & Charles Dinkle charged with fornication & bastardy (1851 Mar. 17). Additionally, Johnston writes regarding the delivery of Frederick Stouffer charges with burglary & larceny (1851 Nov. 24). Finally, Johnston asks for the delivery of Cadwalader Evans charged with forgery (1851 Nov. 3). Governor John L. Helm, Kentucky, writes to demand Henry Nusum charged with the murder of Simeon Alley (1850 Aug. 19). Helm also requests the delivery of Charles Wheeler charged with passing counterfeit bank notes (1851 Jan. 28). Governor Philip Francis Thomas, Maryland, demands Thomas McLaughlin who was charged with murder (1850 Sept. 23). Thomas also submits a demand for Folger P. Lovegrove charged with forgery (1850 Nov. 25). Thomas's successor, Enoch L. Lowe, writes for the delivery of Patrick Kaafer charged with stealing bank notes & gold coin (1851 Oct. 15). Governor Charles K. Williams, Vermont, writes refusing to communicate the Virginia resolutions to the Legislature of Vermont (1851 Feb. 14). Governor David S. Reid, North Carolina, writes regarding the character of Joseph H. Cardwell, Rufus H. Smith, Daniel Perry, & John P. Grogan (1851 May 14). Reid also demands James R. Lewis who was charged with stealing a slave (1851 Sept. 9). Governor Samuel Dinsmoor, New Hampshire, encloses resolutions approving the adoption of the measures of Congress (1850 July 5). In addition, Governor Dinsmoor writes recommending the establishment of a Bureau of Agriculture in Washington (1851 July 5). Finally, Governor Henry W. Collier, Alabama, requests the extradition of Henry R. Paige charged with murder (1851 Oct. 15).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: John M. Seely re. his claim against the Commonwealth for painting & glazing the Capitol (1849 Jan. 15); John D. Scott, Commandant of the Gosport Navy Yard, re. the transfer of a brass gun formerly belonging to the Centipede (1849 Mar. 10); William H. Richardson re. the removal of the Office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth to the former court room of the Court of Appeals (1849 Mar. 24); H. Rhodes, President of the Belvidere Manufacturing Company, asks for permission to conduct waste water from Capitol Square to the Franklin Paper Mill (1849 Apr. 24); E. Brown resigning as first lieutenant of the Public Guard (1849 Aug. 7); Robertson Topp & others, Memphis, re. a convention to be held in Memphis for the purpose of constructing a central railway from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean (1849 Sept. 15); B.B. Minor asking for the privilege of erecting a one-story tenement for the accommodation of a reading room for his newly established law building on Franklin Street near the Courthouse (includes map) (1849 Apr. 30); Gessner Harrison, Chairman of the faculty of the University of Virginia, re. the transfer of state documents intended for the University Library (1850 Jan. 21); Indiana Colonization Society re. the removal of free persons of color to Africa (1850 Mar. 22); James A. Seddon, House of Representatives, re. the removal of the remains of John C. Calhoun to South Carolina (1850 Apr. 16), C.C. Wright, New York, re. a medal for General Scott (1850 Apr. 29); Robert Mills, Washington, re. his plans for the extension of the Capitol at Richmond (1850 May 20); William St. Clair Clarke, Washington, encl. a memorial of Joseph Bryan to Congress proposing a line of steamships between the U.S. & Africa to suppress the slave trade & convey free people of color to Africa (1850 May 10); Archibald Graham, Lexington, re. a request for a block of marble (1850 June 1); letters of application for director of the Eastern Lunatic Asylum (1850 June); John Notman, Philadelphia, encl. a report on the public grounds of the Capitol in Richmond (1850 July 22); Lewis E. Harvie re. the opening of a street on the line of the Armory property (1850 July 5); Robert Mills, Washington, re. specimens of granite for use in Crawford's statue of Washington on Capitol Square (1850 July 22); William J. McAlpin & Robert Mills re. the proper salary for O.H. Rand, Superintendent of the Virginia Washington Monument (1850 Aug. 27); Samuel Clarke, Sr., proposing to furnish trees for Capitol Square (1850 Sept. 17); Jacob Barby re. furnishing a block of marble for the National Washington Monument (1850 May 27 & Oct. 23); D.H. Mahan, Chairman of the Board of Engineers, U.S. Military Academy, re. a claim against the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company (1850 Oct. 2); A.A. Chapman, Staunton, recommending John F.J. White as director of the Deaf & Dumb Institute (1850 Nov. 8); Samuel G. Daniel, Fredericksburg, re. the establishment of the Fredericksburg Female Institute (1850 Oct. 25); D.H. Mahan, U.S. Military Academy, encl. various papers from Meriwether Lewis Clark, Secretary of the Board of Engineers of the U.S. Military Academy, & others re. the dispute between the City of Wheeling and the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company (1850 Nov. 18); S.G.M. Merrillat re. the appointment of a Board of Visitors for the Institution for the Deaf, Dumb, & the Blind at Staunton (1850 Dec. 18); Franklin Peale, Mint of the United States, Chief Coiners Office, Philadelphia, re. a medal to commemorate the gallant services of General Scott (1850 Dec. 27); Francis H. Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Academy, re. an insurrectionary letter planning an attack on the academy & requesting fixed ammunition (1851 Jan. 2); Richard Parker acknowledging receipt of his commission as judge of the 13th Judicial Circuit (1851 Jan. 29); James E. Heath, Commissioner of Pensions, encl. a printed copy of the act granting bounty land to certain officers & soldiers who have been engaged in the military service of the United States (1851 Feb. 4); George P. Putnam, N.Y., re. Mr. Turner's refusal to deliver plates of the map of Virginia (1851 Feb. 28); Samuel Jackson, Baltimore, re. the sword voted by the Legislature to Capt. Otway Byrd (1851 Mar. 10); James E. Heath, Commissioner of Pensions, re. the Bounty Land Act of Sept. 28, 1850 (1851 Mar. 20); E.S. Gay, Superintendent of the Washington Monument, encl. a letter from Robert Mills, Architect, re. the bill of G.T. Rodgers for stone cutter's work on the monument (1851 Apr. 18); J.Y. Mason, President of the Convention, encl. a certified copy of the Bill of Rights, Constitution, & Schedule (1851 Aug. 1); Fredrich von Gerolt, Prussian Legation at Washington, requesting information in regard to the financial organization & the revenue system of the state of Virginia (1851 Oct. 30); N.W. Pollard re. the cost of deporting the whole free colored population of Virginia (1851 Oct. 2); George P. Scarburgh resigning as judge of the General Court (1851 Nov. 26); P.T. Howard, Assistant Secretary of the Commonwealth, re. the deed of cession for the lot on Hog Island in Northampton County to the United States for a lighthouse to be erected on the south end of the island (1851 Oct. 17); C.A. Alexander, Alexandria, encl. a proposal & plans for building a gun house in Alexandria (1851 Nov. 24); E.S. Gay re. the discharge of slaves employed on the Washington Monument (1851 Dec. 10); and James S. French re. his claim to a public highway through United State land at Old Point Comfort (1851 Dec. 12).

Other noteworthy items include the following: a proclamation of Governor Floyd for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Thomas H. Averett (1849 Mar. 29); a proclamation of Governor Floyd for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Lewis Beard (1849 Apr. 17); a report of the commissioners to examine the construction of an additional furnace by the Armory Iron Company close to the Armory (1849 May 19); resolutions of New Hampshire re. slavery (1849 July 7); proclamations of Governor Floyd & Lt. Governors John M. Patton & Raleigh T. Daniel offering rewards for the arrest of escaped convicts (1849 Aug. 9, Sept. 11, Dec. 26 & 28, 1850 Jan. 28 & 31, Feb. 1, 14 & 16, June 21, July 19, Oct. 1 & 31, Dec. 23 & 28, 1851 Jan. 3, Mar. 3 & 29, May 9 & 31, July 8, Sept. 12, Oct. 11, 20, & 24, Nov. 28); a proclamation of Lt. Governor John M. Patton for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Representatives occasioned by the death of Alexander Newman (1849 Sept. 12); a proclamation of Lt. Governor John M. Patton for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Edward P. Scott (1849 Sept. 28); recommendations of Robert G. Scott as lieutenant of the Public Guard (1849 Oct. 30); recommendations for Elliott M. Braxton as lieutenant of the Public Guard (1849 Oct. 16); a proclamation of Governor Floyd appointing Henry Van Buren weighmaster of livestock at Richmond (1850 Dec. 19); petition of James Barron re. the Revolutionary service of his father Commodore James Barron of the Virginia Navy (1850 Mar. 25); proceedings of the City Council appointing committees to make arrangements for the reception of John C. Calhoun's remains (1850 Apr. 18); a proclamation of Governor Floyd for a general election for delegates to a convention (1850 June 4); articles of agreement between Thomas Crawford & Governor Floyd to model & complete in bronze the Virginia Washington Monument on Capitol Square (1850 June 27); proceedings of a meeting of the President & Director of the James River & Kanawha Canal Company re. the remittance of tolls for the transportation of stone used in the construction of the Washington Monument from the quarry to the basin (1850 Oct. 12); a proclamation of Governor Floyd for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of John Akers of Patrick County (1850 Oct. 25); a proclamation of Governor Floyd for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of N.C. Claiborne of Franklin County (1850 Nov. 2); Westham Magazine surveys from 1814 (1851 Mar. 25); joint resolutions of the state of Illinois re. slavery & the system of adjustment or compromise for the admission of California, the establishment of territorial governments for Utah & New Mexico, etc. (1851 Jan. 6); proclamation of Lt. Gov. John F. Wiley re. the adjournment of the convention assembled to consider, discuss, & propose a new constitution (includes copy of bill of rights, constitution, & schedule) (1851 Aug. 2); a proclamation of Governor Floyd to the sheriffs, constables, & other peace officers of the state for the arrest of Henry R. Page to be delivered to William H. Jarman to be taken back to Alabama (1851 Nov. 6); a proclamation of Governor Floyd declaring that a large majority of votes were cast in favor of ratifying the Constitution as amended (1851 Nov. 17); articles of agreement between Governor Floyd & John A. Temple & Company to rent the granite quarries upon the state property known as the Old Magazine tract for two years on the condition that they furnish all stone necessary for the completion of the Washington Monument on Capitol Square (1851 Dec. 22); and recommendations for George W. Dixon as lieutenant of the Public Guard (undated).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1849
    • January
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        1-19
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        21-30
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        2-19
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        20-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        16-29
    • July
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        2-16
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        17-30
    • August
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        4-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        16-30
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 10
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        17-30
    • December
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      Undated .
  • 1850
    • January
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        16-23
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        24-31
    • February
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 10
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        16-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        21-30
    • April
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        21-31
    • June
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 10
        17-25
      • Box 4
        Folder 11
        26-30
    • July
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        21-31
    • August
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        16-29
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        30-31
    • September
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        1-14
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        1-17
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        18-31
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      Undated .
  • 1851
    • January
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        16-26
      • Box 6
        Folder 10
        27-31
    • February
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        3-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 2
        17-27
    • March
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        17-31
    • April
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        2-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        16-29
    • May
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 8
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        1-14
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        16-30
      • Box 8
        Folder 3
        Undated
    • July
      • Box 8
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 5
        16-31
    • August
      • Box 8
        Folder 6
        1-9
      • Box 8
        Folder 7
        11-30
    • September
      • Box 8
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 9
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 9
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 9
        Folder 2
        11-22
      • Box 9
        Folder 3
        23-31
    • November
      • Box 9
        Folder 4
        1-10
      • Box 9
        Folder 5
        11-20
      • Box 9
        Folder 6
        21-30
    • December
      • Box 9
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      Undated
  • Box 9
    Folder 10
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1849
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Mar. 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      Dec. 1
  • 1850
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      Feb. 2
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      May 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      [N.D.]
  • 1851
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      Feb. 4
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      May 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      June 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      June 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      Oct. 15
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Oct. 18
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Oct. 28
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Nov. 24
  • Box 10
    Folder 14
    Undated .
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1849
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      Apr. 2
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      Apr. 16
  • 1850
    • Box 11
      Folder 3
      Apr. 1
    • Box 11
      Folder 4
      May 1
    • Box 11
      Folder 5
      June 11
    • Box 11
      Folder 6
      Nov. 12
  • 1851
    • Box 11
      Folder 7
      Mar. 31
    • Box 11
      Folder 8
      Apr. 5
    • Box 11
      Folder 9
      Apr. 12
    • Box 11
      Folder 10
      Apr. 18
    • Box 11
      Folder 11
      Apr. 23
    • Box 11
      Folder 12
      May 5
    • Box 11
      Folder 13
      June 2
    • Box 11
      Folder 14
      June 9
    • Box 11
      Folder 15
      June 10
    • Box 11
      Folder 16
      June 30
    • Box 11
      Folder 17
      July 22
    • Box 11
      Folder 18
      Aug. 16
    • Box 11
      Folder 19
      Aug. 21
    • Box 11
      Folder 20
      Aug. 27
    • Box 11
      Folder 21
      Oct. 1
    • Box 11
      Folder 22
      Oct. 11
    • Box 11
      Folder 23
      Oct. 18
    • Box 11
      Folder 24
      Nov. 3