A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor William Smith, 1846-1848 Smith, William, Executive Papers of Governor, 1846-1848 43708

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor William Smith, 1846-1848

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 43708


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Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
43708
Title
Executive Papers of Governor William Smith, 1846-1848
Extent
5.23 cubic feet (12 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1846-1849 : Smith)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor William Smith, 1846-1848. Accession 43708. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

Governor William Smith was the third son of Colonel Caleb Smith and was born in King George County on 7 September 1797. Smith studied at the English and Classical School of Thomas Nelson in Hanover County, Virginia, and continued to study law under Thomas L. Moore in Warrenton, Virginia. Following his training and education, Smith practiced law in Culpeper County beginning in 1818. A supporter of the Democratic-Republican party in the 1820s, Smith was later elected in 1836 to two terms in the Senate of Virginia then as a representative in Congress as a democrat. In December 1845, the Virginia Legislature nominated Smith as governor for a three-year term. Following this first term as governor, Smith again served in Congress for four more terms between 1853 and 1860. At the outset of the Civil War, at age 64, Smith raised a regiment of volunteers and received a commission. As colonel of the 49th Virginia Volunteers, Smith commanded his regiment with distinction at the battles of Manassas, Seven Pines, and Sharpsburg. Smith was severely wounded in the shoulder at Sharpsburg and was later promoted to Brigadier-General of the Fourth Brigade. In February 1862, he was elected to the Congress of the Confederate States serving until the Congress adjourned, then rejoined his regiment. Despite the certainty of winning his election to a second term as governor in 1863, Smith still participated in the Gettysburg Campaign.

Smith took office on 1 January 1864. During his short term, Smith raised two regiments of Home Guard from exempt soldiers and fought to gain appropriations from the General Assembly for the purpose of supplying the army and people of Virginia with food and clothing. On 2 April 1865, President Davis evacuated from Richmond to Danville and encouraged Smith to do the same. Smith followed Davis to Danville then surrendered himself and returned home to Warrenton, Va. Following the war, he again entered political life being elected to the Virginia legislature in 1877 and was narrowly defeated for a seat in the United States' Senate. Smith died on 18 May 1887.

Scope and Content

William Smith's Executive Papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his term as governor from 1 January 1846 until 1 January 1849. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Retrocession of Alexandria; the Mexican War; the Virginia Penitentiary; the Virginia Military Institute; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; banks and banking; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor William Smith, 1846-1848

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 11-12.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Contents List

Boxes 1-12
Executive Papers of Governor William Smith, 1846-1848.
Extent: 12 boxes.

One of the most significant events during William Smith's tenure as governor of Virginia was the Retrocession of Alexandria County in the District of Columbia to the state of Virginia. Records related to the Retrocession have been separated and can be found at the end of 1846. Included are the following: an act to retrocede Alexandria County (1846 Sept. 7); a letter for President James K. Polk informing the governor of the appointment of commissioners to take the vote within the town of Alexandria to retrocede Alexandria County to the state of Virginia (1846 Sept. 7); and a letter from President Polk enclosing an authenticated copy of the act of Congress, the commission of the President to Robert Brockett & others, oaths of office, public notices, a letter from Robert Brockett, resolution of the commissioners, poll & proceedings held by the commissioners, and a proclamation of President Polk.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include James Buchanan, Secretary of State; Robert Walker, Secretary of the Treasury; William Selden, Treasurer of the United States; & Vice President George M. Dallas. James Buchanan, Secretary of State, writes regarding the receipt of a letter from William H. Richardson, Secretary of the Commonwealth (1846 Feb. 18). Buchanan often also writes to transmit copies of acts of Congress (1847 Apr. 29). Robert Walker, Secretary of the Treasury, requests statements of banks of Virginia (1846 Apr. 22). Walker also writes requesting & acknowledging receipt of the statement of the condition of the Merchants & Mechanics Bank of Wheeling (1846 May 16 & 23). In addition, Walker requests statistical information in relation to the agriculture & manufactures of Virginia (1846 May 7). On 30 December 1846, Walker writes regarding the resolution that the Secretary lay before the House copies of statements showing the capital, circulation, discounts, specie, deposits, & condition of the different state banks & banking companies (1846 Dec. 30). Finally, Walker writes requesting statements of Virginia banks (1847 Feb. 5). As Treasurer of the United States, William Selden encloses treasury drafts for advances made by the state to the Virginia Volunteers and refunded by the General Government (1848 Jan. 7 & 19). Vice President George M. Dallas writes to notify the governor of the death of Isaac S. Pennybacker, senator from Virginia (1847 Jan. 19).

The majority of correspondence in William Smith's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor William Smith; Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; Charles Dimmock, Commandant of the Public Guard; William H. Richardson, Adjutant General & Secretary of the Commonwealth; Francis H. Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute; Sydney Smith Baxter, Attorney General; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts; and Fabius M. Lawson, Treasurer.

Governor William Smith writes from Washington, Virginia, to Lt. Gov. John F. Wiley requesting an appointment for his son James C. Smith as notary (1846 Apr. 21). The Governor also writes enclosing resolutions of thanks to the President for the manner in which the war against Mexico has been conducted (1847 Feb. 17).

Charles Dimmock, as Commandant of the Public & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol. Dimmock writes regarding the account of R.H. Russell for stuccoing the Capitol (1847 Jan. 7); repairs to the framework around the Bell House (1846 Jan. 10); an appropriation for repairs or improvements of the Governor's House & furniture (1846 Jan. 13), funds for firework displays on February 22 & July 4 (1846 Jan. 13), an abstract of bids for furnishing the Public Guard with rations (1846 Mar. 10); the estimate of R.J. Conway for repairs to the windows of the Capitol (1846 May 30); a drawing of the proposed courthouse by Mr. Graveley (1846 June 24); the sale of arms & accoutrements in the Armory which are not worth repairing (1846 July 6); the governor's plans to have fountains erected on Capitol Square (1846 July 7); Rev. William Duval's letter re. the use of the new gun house near the Armory as a chapel (1846 Sept. 11); accounts of the Armory (1847 Jan. 21); the account of I.A. Goddin for his work on the new courthouse (1847 Feb. 17); the surgeon of the Public Guard (1847 Mar. 3); repairs to the Capitol (1847 Mar. 8); bids for furnishing the Public Guard with provisions (1847 Mar. 19 & Sept. 10); the accounts of John M. Seeley for painting the Capitol (1847 Mar. 27); a request for a part of convicts to work on Capitol Square (1847 Mar. 31); the examination of stuccoing at the Capitol (1847 May 7); a request for convict labor to grade down & brick the two walks still unfinished on Capitol Square (1847 May 14 & 27); the account of John M. Seeley for painting the Capitol (1847 May 29); the bronzing of the doors to the Capitol by J.M. Seeley (1847 June 22); repairs to the fire engine at the Armory (1847 Oct. 18); the use of the old carpet in the House of Delegates for the Armory chapel (1847 Oct. 18); the completion of work at the entrances of the work at the entrances of the Capitol (1847 Oct. 18); a requisition for a bathing tub for the hospital (1847 July 4); application of the Armory Iron Company to raise the water gate so as to raise it on the outside of the Armory building (1848 Feb. 21); the cost of gilding the framed portrait of Chief Justice John Marshall (1848 Mar. 18); a request for a furlough (1848 June 14); new carpet & curtains for the Senate Hall (1848 Oct. 21); repairs to the upper deck of the Bell House (1848 Oct. 21); and a list of discharged soldiers of the Public Guard during the year ending September 1848 (1848 [N.D.]).

Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Smith regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Morgan writes regarding the following topics: the pardon of Elijah Corder (1846 Apr. 13); the pardon of James Step (1846 May 30); the case of Avery, a prisoner in the Penitentiary (1846 June 18); hands engaged in digging a foundation in the Penitentiary for an addition to the shops to be used to remove earth below the Bell House (1846 June 29); the pardon of Landy Evans (1846 July 29); paving to be done at the Governor's House (1846 Sept. 17); the sale of a slave named Walter (1846 Sept. 21); the transfer of seven prisoners from the U.S. Court of Norfolk (1846 Nov. 13); the record of the case of Franklin (1846 Nov. 10); the conduct of Parks D. Leonard (1847 Feb. 17); surgeon of the Public Guard & Penitentiary (1847 Mar. 3); a pardon for John W. North who detected & reported a dangerous conspiracy at the Penitentiary (1847 May 27); the discharge & allowance for prisoners from the U.S. Court at Norfolk (1847 May 8); the case of James Phillips who escaped from the guard while detailed to work on Capitol Square (1847 May 10); the employment of convicts by the Superintendent of Public Edifices to work on Capitol Square (1847 May 27); the case of G. Winston (1847 June 25); furnishing hands to work (1847 June 24); hands for painting the new fence around the public courthouse (1847 July 13); an order from the governor for two separate jobs to be done on Capitol Square (1847 July 12); the conduct of Franklin Powell (1847 Aug. 17); the record of John Jackson (1847 Sept. 6); the age of John Parker, a convict in the Penitentiary (1848 Jan. 11); the conduct of William Reines (1848 Mar. 28); the price of a transport slave named Jim (1848 May 10); the conduct of R. Taylor (1848 May 30); the condition of the roof of the Bell House (1848 Nov. 20); the conduct of Page Garrit (1848 Dec. 23); the slave named Patrick who escaped from the Penitentiary and is believed to be in the Augusta County jail as a runaway (1848 Dec. 20); and the pardon of a transport slave named Jim (1848 Dec. 28).

William H. Richardson, Adjutant General & Secretary of the Commonwealth, writes regarding clothing for the companies to constitute the requisition of the two Richmond companies & the Petersburg company (1846 Dec. 3); arms for the Lynchburg Rifle Guards (1847 Apr. 23); a request for authority to provide quarters & contract for subsistence for two additional companies of infantry volunteers requisitioned by the U.S. (1847 June 22); proposed repairs to the pipes on the roof of the Capitol (1847 June 1); a supply of pistols in the Armory without holsters (1848 Mar. 24); and the necessity of examining the arms in the Lexington Arsenal (1848 June 13).

Francis H. Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute, writes Governor Smith concerning a variety of matters. Smith writes regarding a substitute visitor of the institution to replace Col. William H. Caruthers (1846 Jan. 27); the resignation of A. Leyburn as a member of the Board of Visitors of VMI (1846 Mar. 10); a letter from W.L. Marcy, War Dept., re. the resignation of Lt. William Gilham (1846 Oct. 15); and a request for the governor to present diplomas at the graduation exercises (1848 Feb. 26).

Sidney Smith Baxter, Attorney General, provides opinions regarding the appointment of John N. Tazewell as a director of the Exchange Bank of Virginia (1846 Nov. 3); the case of James Phalen against the Commonwealth (1846 Dec. 4); the right of justices to take oaths of office before a single justice of the peace (1847 Apr. 20); and commissioners to conduct the Presidential election in Ohio County (1848 Sept. 23). Baxter also writes Governor Smith enclosing a letter & proceedings of the Directors of the Exchange Bank of Alexandria protesting against the practice of the mother bank to continue without re-election (1848 May 22).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, transmits the following certificates of election: John F. Wiley as councilor of state (1846 Jan. 7); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Fabius M. Lawson as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian, Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary, & James C. Spotts as General Agent or Storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1846 Feb. 3); William Daniel as judge of the Court of Appeals to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of Robert Stanard (1846 Dec. 15); Robert M.T. Hunter as senator of the United States (1847 Jan. 15); James M. Mason as senator of the United States to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of Isaac S. Pennybacker (1847 Jan. 21); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Fabius M. Lawson as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian, Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary, & James C. Spotts as General Agent or Storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1847 Feb. 26); Samuel Shepherd as public printer (1847 Dec. 9); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Fabius M. Lawson as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian (1848 Mar. 3); Raleigh T. Daniel as councilor of state to supply the vacancy occasioned by the expiration of term (1848 Mar. 11); George H. Lee as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 9th Circuit (1848 Dec. 11); John W. Nash as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 2nd Circuit (1848 Dec. 12); and John B. Floyd as governor, John W. Nash as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery, & Samuel Shepherd as public printer (includes certificate of oath) (1848 Dec. 12).

In addition, Munford encloses several resolutions from the House of Delegates including a resolution of the House of Delegates that the Secretary of the Commonwealth be requested to furnish a copy of the correspondence between himself, as Adjutant General, and Capt. Carrington in relation to the expenses incurred by Carrington's Company of Volunteers (1846 Dec. 46), a resolution of the General Assembly that the Public Printer be instructed to cause to be delivered a copy of the Revision of the Criminal Code by Robert G. Scott (1846 Dec. 10), a resolution of the General Assembly that the governor be requested to present to each of the company officers of the Virginia Regiment of Volunteers a suitable sword from the Armory (1847 Feb. 12), a resolution of the House of Delegates that the governor be requested to furnish the House with a statement exhibiting the amount allowed & paid to the officers of the Volunteer Companies of the 1st Regiment for expenses incurred in organizing & transporting the companies (1847 Feb. 27), and a resolution that the governor be requested to furnish a full & detailed statement setting forth the amount paid to each company of the 1st Virginia Regiment of Volunteers for Mexico (1848 Jan. 26).

Munford also writes asking for a new grate for the fireplace in his office (1846 Sept. 29). On 12 February 1847, Munford writes regarding resolutions voting thanks to General Taylor and officers & soldiers under his command and voting swords to Gen. Taylor, Lt. Col. Mathew M. Payne, & J. Garland. Munford also writes enclosing resolutions regarding the prohibition by Congress of slavery in any territory to be acquired by conquest or treaty (1847 Mar. 10). Finally, Munford writes regarding carpeting for the Hall of the House of Delegates (1847 Oct. 15).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, and Fabius M. Lawson, Treasurer, correspond with Governor Smith regarding various financial matters. Heath writes regarding a letter from J.H. Smith concerning the settlement of the Virginia claim against the United States for expenses incurred in fitting out the Regiment of Volunteers to Mexico (1847 Mar. 28); a recommendation of James H. Castle as commissioner of deeds for Philadelphia (1847 July 29); the sale of John McMillan's land & deed of trust (1848 Mar. 15); his absence from office (1848 Aug. 14); the value of condemned slaves (1848 Oct. 25); and the law allowing a fee of fifty cents to the Auditor for each certificate of redemption (1848 Dec. 13). Lawson writes regarding the deposit of bonds of the Washington Monument Fund in the Farmer's Bank of Virginia (1847 Apr. 13). Later, Lawson writes requesting a resolution sanctioning his actions with regard to the bonds of the Washington Monument Fund (1847 Mar. 27).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to extraditions, the expansion of slavery, the Mexican War, and Asa Whitney's plan for a railroad from Lake Michigan to the Pacific Ocean. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: Mordecai Bartley & William Bebb, Ohio; Thomas G. Pratt & Philip Francis Thomas, Maryland; Francis R. Shunk & William F. Johnston, Pennsylvania; William A. Graham, North Carolina; John Young, New York; David Johnson, South Carolina; William Owlsey, Kentucky; A.G. Brown & Samuel Stamps, Mississippi; Elisha Harris, Rhode Island; Neill S. Brown, Tennessee; George W.B. Towns, Georgia; James McM. Shafter, Vermont; George T. Wood, Texas; and Reuben Chapman, Alabama.

Governor Mordecai Bartley, Ohio, transmits a copy of a joint resolution regarding the southern boundary of the state of Ohio (1846 Mar. 2). Bartley also writes regarding demands for James Morrison alias James Morris charged with the crime of burglary & larceny (1846 Nov. 14) and James Braxton alias Morehouse charged with horse stealing (1846 Dec. 7). Bartley's successor, Governor William Bebb, writes regarding the appointment of commissioners on behalf of the state of Ohio in relation to the boundary between Virginia & Ohio (1847 Apr. 5 & July 19). Bebb also transmits resolutions relative to the acquisition & control of foreign territory by the United States (1848 Apr. 29). Moreover, Bebb writes to demand Daniel L. Kemp, a fugitive charges with 2nd degree murder (1848 June 17). Lastly, Bebb encloses a proclamation for a day of thanksgiving (1848 Oct. 17). Governor Thomas G. Pratt, Maryland, writes regarding a demand for Daniel Koonce charged with obtaining goods on false pretences (1846 Oct. 3). Pratt's successor Philip Francis Thomas writes regarding the demand for the arrest & delivery of William J. McBride (1848 Mar. 13), and later the arrest & delivery of Frederick Weigold (1848 Apr. 18). Governor Francis H. Shunk, Pennsylvania, writes regarding a demand for Samuel Madox, John Smith, Peter Glasscock, Thomas Finegan, & Charles McGuire, fugitives from justice indicted for kidnapping (1846 Sept. 5); William Patterson, a fugitive from justice accused of fornication (1847 Sept. 10); and Jesse Frost, a convict convicted of fornication & bastardy (1847 Sept. 21). Later, Governor William F. Johnston writes regarding his demand for Tillman Custis charges with larceny in Pittsburgh (1848 Aug. 31). Governor William A. Graham, North Carolina, encloses a demand for the surrender of Garland A. Smothers charged with grand larceny (1846 Dec. 12), a slave named Anthony, a fugitive from justice (1847 Apr. 14), and Thomas Fortune & Furney Moore, free black mariners, charged with concealing a male slave named Edward (1847 Sept. 1). Governor John Young, New York, writes to demand Joseph A. Cone (1847 Jan. 30) and William Jones (1848 May 30). Governor David Johnson, South Carolina, writes to acknowledge receipt of the resolutions of Virginia on the subject of slavery in any territory that may be acquired from Mexico (1847 Mar. 25). Governor William Owsley, Kentucky, writes regarding a demand for David Jacques, a fugitive charged with forgery (1847 June 30). Governor A.G. Brown, Mississippi, writes acknowledging receipt of resolutions of Virginia on the subject of slavery (1847 Apr. 15). Samuel Stamps, Secretary of State of Mississippi, transmits resolutions concerning the Mexican War (1848 Mar. 17). Governor Elisha Harris, Rhode Island, encloses resolutions regarding the War with Mexico (1848 Feb. [N.D.]). In addition, Governor Harris encloses resolutions regarding Asa Whitney's plan for a railroad from Lake Michigan to the Pacific Coast (1847 Nov. 30). Governor Neill S. Brown, Tennessee, too encloses resolutions approving of A. Whitney's plan (1847 Dec. 25). Governor George W.B. Towns, Georgia, too writes enclosing resolutions approving of Whitney's plan (1848 Feb. 29). Additionally, Towns encloses resolutions to transmit copies of Hotchkiss' State Law of Georgia, Kelly's Reports of the Supreme Court of Georgia, & Stevens' History of Georgia (1848 Mar. 1). As Secretary of State of Vermont, James McM. Shafter encloses resolutions in favor of Whitney's plan (1848 Apr. 14). Governor George T. Wood, Texas, transmits a joint resolution on the "Proviso," slavery, tariff, & Mexican War (1848 Mar. 20). Governor Reuben Chapman, Alabama, transmits the following resolutions: resolutions approving Whitney's plan of constructing a railroad to the Pacific Ocean (1848 Jan. 15), a resolution regarding the preamble & resolutions of the state of Vermont on the subject of slavery & the War with Mexico (1848 Mar. 8), a resolution in response to the Legislature of Rhode Island on the subject of the tariff & the War with Mexico (1848 Mar. 8), and resolutions in reference to the Wilmot Proviso & certain acts of non-slave holding states (1848 Mar. 11).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: Robert G. Scott re. his support of Charles Dimmock as captain of the Public Guard (1846 Jan. 14); A. Stevenson encl. a letter from Jared Sparks, Cambridge, Massachusetts, requesting permission to have a mold taken from Houdon's Statue of Washington for the purpose of having suitable casts executed from it (1846 Feb. 2); Lyman Draper, Baltimore, re. papers connected with Gen. George Rogers Clark's Illinois Campaign in the attic story of the Capitol (incl. printed circular) (1846 Feb. 23); Samuel Houston recommending Augustus Fischer as commissioner for the state of Texas (1846 Apr. 3); B.B. Minor re. his purchase of a lot & buildings on Franklin St. which runs into the public grounds and asks for permission to pull down the wall to the rear of the lot (incl. letter from Charles Dimmock & drawing) (1846 Apr. 22); I.A. Goddin proposing to take the slates off the old Museum Building, remove the woodwork, etc., for the courthouse contemplated to be erected on the Public Square (1846 May 18); Goddin re. his proposal for the erection of a courthouse (1846 May 21); William O. Yeatman proposing to serve as superintendent of the work at the Capitol & Courthouse (1846 May 23); Goddin proposing modifications to the plan for the new courthouse (1846 June 12); Goddin proposing to make panel shutters or venetian blinds for the windows to be placed in the principal story of the courthouse (1846 July 9); William N. Mills re. the act of retrocession of Alexandria (1846 Aug. 3); Duval & Purcell re. the manufacture of glass for the Capitol (1846 Aug. 28); Thomas H. Ellis proposing to improve rather than remove the gun house at the Armory (1846 Sept. 23); Samuel D. Denoon's proposal to furnish grates for the Capitol (1846 Oct. 5); John M. Seeley re. grass at the Capitol & the whitewashing of the basement story (1846 Oct. 28); William Duvall asking for the erection of a building to be used for religious & other purposes on the public ground in front of the Armory (1846 Oct. 30); James E. Heath, S.H. Parker, J. Brown, Jr., & F.M. Lawson asking for permission to purchase new carpets for their offices in the Capitol (1846 Nov. 3); S.H. Parker & F.M. Lawson requesting that the furnaces & pipes which have been provided for warming the chamber of the House of Delegates (1846 Nov. 3); William D. Pemberton, Secretary of the Virginia Literary Association, requesting donations of books & papers of a literary or historical character (1846 Nov. 13); Thomas Vannerson, Clerk of the Committee of Propositions & Grievances, requesting a new stove & pipe for the Committee Room (1846 Dec. 2); John M. Seeley re. the completion of the painting & glazing of the Capitol (1846 Dec. 17); P.H. Russell re. his work stuccoing & plastering the Capitol (1847 Jan. 7); Lyman C. Draper re. the Illinois papers, Gen. George Rogers Clark, & Daniel Boone (1847 Jan. 25); Col. John F. Hamtramck responding to the Governor's address to the volunteers (1847 Feb. 16); J.A. Early, Maj. Virginia Volunteers, Ft. Monroe, re. the delay in the embarkation of the remaining companies of Virginia Volunteers (1847 Feb. 24); G.A. Portfield, Carmago, re. the defeat of Santa Anna & the arrival of the 1st Battalion of Virginia Volunteers (1847 Mar. 7); John M. Seeley requesting an advance to enable him to finish his contract to paint the Capitol (1847 Mar. 8); H. Meigs, Secretary of the Farmer's Club, encl. a circular from the Secretary of the Royal Society of Agriculture in Paris (1847 May 7); John Latourrette asking if his map of Mississippi was received by the governor (includes a correct map of the seat of the war & adjacent country in Mexico) (1847 May 7); a "Virginian" encl. a notice protesting against a boxing match to be held in Virginia between Young Caunt & Yankee Sullivan (1847 Apr. 20); an anonymous letter from Mount Pleasant, Ohio, regarding the question of slavery in the territories (1847 June 13); Committee of the Common Hall of Richmond re. the erection of a building on Capitol Square on the southwestern corner (1847 Sept. 30); John Hamtramck encl. a letter from Capt. Smith P. Bankhead, 1st Virginia Regiment, re. recruitment problems (1848 Jan. 10); W.C. Rives, William Green, & George W. Thompson, commissioners on behalf of the state of Virginia, regarding the result of their conferences with the commissioners of Ohio for the settlement of the boundary between the states (1848 Jan. 27); J.R. Anderson, President of the Armory Iron Company, encl. letters sent to him from Charles Dimmock as Superintendent of the Armory regarding the dispute between them (1848 Feb. 1); Maj. J.A. Early, Virginia Volunteers, re. a report of his death & his leave of absence (1848 Feb. 1); W.S. Goodwyn re. the petition of Southampton Indians asking for the appointment of trustees to take charge of their property in Southampton County (1848 Feb. 15); U.S. National Medical Association advocating a system of registration of births, marriages, & deaths (1848 Mar. 1); James M. Mason, U.S. Senate, re. his appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (includes opinion of S.S. Baxter) (1848 Mar. 3); Lt. E.S. Gay, Public Guard, requesting new quarters for himself & his family (1848 Apr. 15); C. Crozet encl. a resolution of the General Assembly that the Board of Public Works cause to be prepared by C. Crozet a lithographic map of the state of Virginia exhibiting all railroads, canals, & turnpike roads (1848 Apr. 16); E.S. Duncan resigning as judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit (1848 Apr. 18); James T. Ames re. his proposal to make three presentation swords (1848 Apr. 21); Alexandre Vattemare re. his system of cultural exchanges (1848 Apr. 26); James H. Mason, Washington, recommending George H. Lee as judge of the General court to supply the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Judge Duncan (1848 Apr. 28); George H. Lee accepting an appointment as judge of the General Court occasioned by the resignation of E.S. Duncan (1848 May 20); James Roy Micou re. a burglary committed by one of his servants (includes "Runaway" broadside) (1848 June 7); John W. Nash accepting a commission as judge of the General Court & Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 2nd Judicial District (1848 Sept. 2); R.H. Wood, Superintendent of Quarantine at City Point, re. cases of small pox on board the Ship Alexander (1848 Sept. 13); James A. Scott, Chairman of the Whig Vigilance Committee, requesting the Armory to fire a salute on the occasion of the election of Gen. Taylor (1848 Nov. 20); F.B. Vionis, lawyer & doctor, proposing to organize a phalanstere for the free negroes of Virginia (1848 Dec. 1); J.M. Mason encl. a letter of Elisha Whittlesey & a resolution of the Board of Managers of the Washington National Monument Office that the piece of cornerstone of the Washington National Monument be presented to the delegation of each state in Congress (1848 Dec. 4); and Joseph C. Cabell accepting an appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1848 Apr. 13).

Other noteworthy items include the following: qualification of William Smith as governor of Virginia (1846 Jan. 1); proclamation of Lt. Gov. John F. Wiley for an election in the House of Representatives occasioned by the death of William Taylor (incl. letter of John W. Davis, Speaker of the House of Representatives) (1846 Jan. 24); bond of Henry Van Buren as weigh master of livestock for the city of Richmond (1846 Feb. 27); proclamation of Lt. Gov. John F. Wiley for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of James H. Piper (1846 Mar. 30); N.P. Clerk of the General Court, re. more space for the room used for the Clerk's Office & courtroom of the Superior Court of Chancery (1846 Apr. 7); proclamations by the governor & lieutenant governor offering rewards for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1846 May 5 & 9, June 17, July 29, Aug. 7 & 19, Sept. 4, Nov. 7 & 9; 1847 Jan. 1 & 23, Feb. 6, Apr. 24, June 9, July 15, Aug. 16, Sept. 2, Nov. 15, 17, & 25, Dec. 8, 14, & 18; 1848 Jan. 21, Mar. 2, 8, 9, 17, & 20, May 3 & 6, July 11, Aug. 16 & 26); proposals to superintend the repairs of the Capitol (1846 May 16); proposals for painting & glazing the courthouse to be erected in Richmond (1846 May 18); estimates & proposals of John S. Jones & others for warming the new courthouse (1846 May 18); proposal of John M. Seeley to paint all the woodwork of the Capitol (1846 May 18); proposal of John Freeman & John H. Freeman for building the woodwork & slating the roof of the new courthouse (1846 May 18); proposals for painting the Capitol & Courthouse (1846 May 18); proposals for stuccoing the exterior of the Capitol (1846 May 18); proposals & estimates for building the new courthouse on Capitol Square (1846 May 18); proposal of Beazley & Quarles to do the brickwork & slating the roof of the new courthouse (1846 May 22); proclamation of Gov. William Smith for the formation of thirty companies of volunteers to be formed into regiments when mustered into service of the United States as a result of the act of Congress declaring war on the Republic of Mexico (incl. letter of William L. Marcy, Secretary of War, and act of Congress) (1846 May 23); specifications for building a new courthouse on the site of the old Museum Building on Capitol Square (1846 May [N.D.]); recommendations for judgeship of the Court of Appeals to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Judge R.C. Stanard (1846 June 15); agreement between the President & Directors of the Board of Public Works & Charles F. Osborne for the lease of the water power from the James River Canal for the use of the Armory (1846 June 17); order of Governor Smith that the buildings on the western corner of Capitol Square be removed (1846 Oct. 2); proclamation of Governor Smith for an election in Lunenburg County to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of John T. Street (1846 Oct. 13); resolutions of the Chamber of Commerce of St. Louis for a convention to consider the powers & duties of the General Government to assist, protect, & advance the inland commerce of the country by the removal of dangerous obstructions from the Mississippi, Ohio, Missouri, & other rivers & highways of trade (1846 Oct. 13); proclamation of Governor Smith for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the death of John Guerrant (1846 Oct. 30); proclamation of Gov. Smith for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the death of David Campbell (1846 Nov. 3); proclamation of Gov. Smith calling for a regiment for immediate service during the War with Mexico (includes letter of William L. Marcy, Secretary of War, general orders of the Adjutant General's Office, & an act providing for the prosecution of the existing war between the United States & Mexico) (1846 Nov. 18); agreement, bond, & contract of Francis H. Deane as vaccine agent (1846 Nov. 18 & 1847 Oct. 1); account of John M. Seeley for painting & glazing of the Capitol (1846 Dec. 17); proceedings of the Board of Commissioners re. the appointment of field officers to the regiment of volunteers called from Virginia by the General Government (1846 Dec. 21); bond of Isaac A. Goddin for building the new courthouse (1847 Mar. 13); proceedings of the Select Committee to consider the joint resolution of the General Assembly of Ohio re. the boundary controversy between Ohio & Virginia (1847 Mar. 25); proclamation of Raleigh T. Daniel for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of William A. Spark (1847 Apr. 7); recommendation of Francis H. Pierpont to be appointed on behalf of Virginia to settle the jurisdiction between Virginia & the state of Ohio on the Ohio river (1847 Apr. 15); proclamation of Lt. Gov. R.T. Daniel for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates for Morgan County occasioned by the contested election between Andrew Michael, Jr., & William Thompson (1847 May 10); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Daniel for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Fayette McMullen (1847 May 10); proclamation of Gov. Smith for an election to supply the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the death of George C. Dromgoole (1847 June 22); proclamation of Gov. Smith for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of Lewis Neal (1847 July 15); proclamation of Lt. Gov. R.T. Daniel for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the death of Carter M. Braxton (1847 July 30); proceedings of the New York Prison Association calling for a convention for the purpose of taking into consideration the criminal laws of the different states (1847 July 27); proclamation of Gov. Smith for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of M.B. Nowlin (1847 Nov. 13); preamble & resolution of the Ohio Legislature approving the plan of Asa Whitney for a railroad to the Pacific (1848 Feb. 18); recommendations for commissioners to superintend the presidential elections (1848 July & Aug.); recommendations for David May, Robert R. Collier, & John W. Nash to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Judge James H. Gholson (1848 July); inscriptions of swords voted by the General Assembly to Gen. Zachary Taylor, Lt. Col. Mathew M. Payne, & Lt. Col. John Garland for their conduct during the Mexican War (1848 Aug. 31); proclamation of Lt. Gov. John F. Wiley for an election in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of John W. Nash (includes letter of resignation) (1848 Sept. 18); proclamation of Gov. Smith for an election in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of James H. Cox (1848 Nov. 14); proclamation of Gov. Smith announcing the election of electors for President & Vice President (1848 Nov. 27); drawings of fountains for Capitol Square (1848 [N.D.]); and an estimate of the cost of the woodwork, slating, copper, gutters, tin water spouts, hinges, bolts, locks, etc., about the Courthouse to be built on the Public Square (Undated).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1846
    • January
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • February
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        2-14
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        2-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        1-13
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        1-11
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        13-18
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        19-30
    • June
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        11-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        23-29
    • July
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • August
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        17-29
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 10
        11-30
    • October
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        2-14
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 3
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      Retrocession of Alexandria .
  • 1847
    • January
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        21-30
    • February
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        1-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        21-27
    • March
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        21-31
    • April
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        12-29
    • May
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        11-31
    • June
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        17-30
    • July
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • August
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-14
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • September
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        11-30
    • October
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        17-29
    • November
      • Box 6
        Folder 7
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        11-20
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        22-30
    • December
      • Box 6
        Folder 10
        2-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 11
        16-31
  • 1848
    • January
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        16-29
    • March
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        1-22
      • Box 7
        Folder 8
        23-30
    • May
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        1-7
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        8-18
      • Box 8
        Folder 3
        19-30
    • June
      • Box 8
        Folder 4
        1-14
      • Box 8
        Folder 5
        16-29
    • July
      • Box 8
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 7
        17-31
    • August
      • Box 8
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 9
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 9
        Folder 1
        2-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      October
    • November
      • Box 9
        Folder 4
        1-20
      • Box 9
        Folder 5
        21-30
    • December
      • Box 9
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Undated
    • Pardons
      • Box 10
        Folder 1
        Hill, Hunter
      • Box 10
        Folder 2
        Johnston, John J.
  • Box 10
    Folder 3
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1846
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      Feb. 28
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      Mar. 11
    • Box 11
      Folder 3
      June 15
    • Box 11
      Folder 4
      Oct. 30
    • Box 11
      Folder 5
      Nov. 14
  • 1847
    • Box 11
      Folder 6
      Jan. 13
    • Box 11
      Folder 7
      Feb. 6
    • Box 11
      Folder 8
      May 27
    • Box 11
      Folder 9
      June 25
    • Box 11
      Folder 10
      July 12
    • Box 11
      Folder 11
      Sept. [N.D.]
  • 1848
    • Box 11
      Folder 12
      Jan. 27
    • Box 11
      Folder 13
      Feb. 17
    • Box 11
      Folder 14
      Feb. 23
    • Box 11
      Folder 15
      July 25
    • Box 11
      Folder 16
      July 29
    • Box 11
      Folder 17
      Nov. 1
    • Box 11
      Folder 18
      Nov. 11
    • Box 11
      Folder 19
      Nov. 14
    • Box 11
      Folder 20
      Nov. 20
    • Box 11
      Folder 21
      Dec. 4
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1846
    • Box 12
      Folder 1
      Jan. 1
    • Box 12
      Folder 2
      Jan. 14
    • Box 12
      Folder 3
      May 18
    • Box 12
      Folder 4
      May 18
    • Box 12
      Folder 5
      June 2
    • Box 12
      Folder 6
      June 15
    • Box 12
      Folder 7
      Oct. 1
    • Box 12
      Folder 8
      Nov. 17
    • Box 12
      Folder 9
      Nov. 22
  • 1847
    • Box 12
      Folder 10
      Mar. 30
    • Box 12
      Folder 11
      May 31
    • Box 12
      Folder 12
      June 25
    • Box 12
      Folder 13
      July 29
    • Box 12
      Folder 14
      July 30
    • Box 12
      Folder 15
      Sept. 10
    • Box 12
      Folder 16
      Nov. 13
  • 1848
    • Box 12
      Folder 17
      Oct. 31
    • Box 12
      Folder 18
      Dec. 27