A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor James McDowell, 1843-1845 McDowell, James, Executive Papers of Governor, 1843-1845 43559

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor James McDowell, 1843-1845

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 43559


[logo]

Library of Virginia

The Library of Virginia
800 East Broad Street
Richmond, Virginia 23219-8000
USA
Phone: (804) 692-3888 (Archives Reference)
Fax: (804) 692-3556 (Archives Reference)
Email: archdesk@lva.virginia.gov(Archives)
URL: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/

© 2008 By The Library of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
43559
Title
Executive Papers of Governor James McDowell, 1843-1845
Extent
4.1 cubic feet (9 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1843-1846 : McDowell)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor James McDowell, 1843-1845. Accession 43559. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

James McDowell was born at Cherry Grove in Rockbridge County on 11 October 1795. McDowell was the third child of Colonel James and Sarah Preston McDowell. He attended Washington College, Yale College, and was graduated at Princeton College in 1817. McDowell represented Rockbridge County in the House of Delegates from the Session of 1830-1831 to the Session of 1834-1835, and returned for the Session of 1838. McDowell supported both the gradual abolition of slavery after Nat Turner's Insurrection and President Andrew Jackson's proclamation against South Carolina during the Nullification Crisis. A renowned orator, McDowell was elected to a three-year term as governor of Virginia serving from 1 January 1843 to 1 January 1846. Following his governorship, McDowell was elected to the Twenty-Ninth Congress to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of William Taylor. McDowell was reelected to the Thirtieth & Thirty-First Congresses serving until 3 March 1851. McDowell died shortly thereafter at his estate of Col Alto in Lexington, Virginia, on 24 August 1854. McDowell married Susan Preston, daughter of General Francis Preston & Sarah B. Campbell, and had nine children. McDowell County, West Virginia, was named in his honor in 1858.

Scope and Content

James McDowell's Executive Papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his term as governor from 5 January 1843 until 1 January 1846. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Virginia Penitentiary; the Virginia Military Institute; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; banks and banking; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor James McDowell, 1843-1845

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 8-9.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Contents List

Boxes 1-9
Executive Papers of Governor James McDowell, 1843-1845.
Extent: 9 boxes.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include A.P. Upshur, Secretary of State ad interim; John C. Calhoun & James Buchanan, Secretaries of State; and R.J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury. A.P. Upshur writes regarding the distribution of the census & other documents as interim Secretary of State (1843 June 30). As Secretary of State, John C. Calhoun requests reports showing the number of white & black and male & female convicts between 1840 and 1844 (1844 July 17). Calhoun also writes acknowledging receipt of the 2nd volume of Robinson's Report of Cases in the Court of Appeals & General Court of Virginia (1844 Nov. 14). Later, James Buchanan writes submitting copies of acts of the 2nd Session of the 18th Congress (1845 Apr. 22 & Sept. 3). R.J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury, encloses blank forms on the subject of agriculture, manufactures, & domestic trade in order to collect statistical information on the condition of the several states & territories (1845 Apr. 16). Walker also writes requesting a list of the names of counties & seats of justice in Virginia (1845 May 12). Lastly, Walker writes requesting returns of the Bank of Virginia since 1841 (1845 June 11).

The majority of correspondence in James McDowell's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor James McDowell; Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; Robert G. Scott, President of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary; Charles Dimmock, Commandant of the Public Guard; Sydney Smith Baxter, Attorney General; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts; and Fabius M. Lawson, Treasurer.

Governor James McDowell writes John M. Patton, Lieutenant Governor, regarding his absence from office until October 1 (1843 June 29 & 1844 May 12). McDowell also writes William H. Richardson, Secretary of the Commonwealth, regarding the absence of Lieutenant Governor John M. Patton during his own absence from office (1843 June 29). Lastly, McDowell writes to Richardson regarding defective commissions (1844 Oct. 8).

Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor McDowell regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Morgan writes regarding the following topics: the conduct of R.S. Rondon, alias James Skaggs (1843 Jan. 19); the record of John Wine (1843 Feb. 7); a guard for the convict slaves laboring on the Public Square & Governor's House (1843 June 17); the escape of John Smith & George H. Williamson (1843 Sept. 25); the record of the case of A.B. Porter (1843 Oct. 10); the recommendation of Charles H. Hyde as clerk of the Penitentiary to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of Lewis G. Sewell (1844 Jan. 31); the case of Judy Harris (1844 July 24); the condition of a prisoner named Alpheus D. Gwaltney (1844 July 24); the conduct of Jasper Hunt (1845 Feb. 11); the cost of the construction of the culvert from the government house to the sewer near the Museum Building on Capitol Square (1845 Apr. 21); the recommendation of George P. Morgan as turnkey & sergeant of the Penitentiary (1845 Apr. 1); the 34th rule of the Penitentiary which closes the prison for breakfast for an hour (1845 Oct. 7); the appointment of Maj. Charles H Hyde to the office of the second assistant keeper (1845 Oct. 15); and the appointment of William W. McCleery as assistant keeper or turnkey (1845 Dec. 26).

As President of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary, Robert G. Scott encloses proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary regarding the escape of two prisoners (1843 Nov. 29). Scott & Thomas Lawson also enclose proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary regarding the attendance of the directors (1843 Dec. 29). In addition, Scott encloses proceedings regarding the vacancy occasioned by the death of Lewis G. Sewell, Clerk of the Penitentiary (1844 Jan. 31). Particularly noteworthy are statements transmitted by Scott exhibiting the fiscal operations of the Penitentiary, including accounts current and various statements of the number of prisoners confined in the Penitentiary (1844 Dec. 17 & 1845 Dec. 8).

Charles Dimmock, as Commandant of the Public & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol. Dimmock encloses an issue of the Boston Daily American printing a letter from a gentleman in Virginia to a friend in Boston concerning slavery & the South (1844 Jan. 12). Dimmock also writes regarding a military escort for the remains of the late Governor Thomas W. Gilmer (1844 Mar. 6). On 19 July 1844, Dimmock writes regarding the enclosure of the public ground next to the Armory buildings. Additionally, Dimmock writes concerning the following subjects: supplying the Public Guard with pantaloons from the Penitentiary (1844 Oct. 2); the construction of a new gun house for the Richmond Fayette Artillery (1845 Mar. 29); and repairs to the public warehouse (1845 Apr. 14).

Sidney Smith Baxter, Attorney General, provides opinions regarding the commissions of John Frame & Francis C. Boggs as justices of the peace for Braxton County (1843 Feb. 4); the case of Rutherford, a sheriff, concerning militia fines (1843 June 2); public printing (1843 Dec. 19); the case of P.B. Jones (1845 Apr. 9); the vacancy in the office of sheriff of Doddridge County (1845 Apr. 14); and the case of Mr. Mayo, alias Dennis, a free negro in the Penitentiary (1845 Oct. 30).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, transmits the following certificates of election: John F. Wiley as Councilor of State (1843 Feb. 25); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Fabius M. Lawson as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, & William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian (1843 Mar. 4); James C. Spotts as Store Keeper or General Agent of the Penitentiary & Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary (1843 Mar. 6); David McComas as judge of the General Court for the 19th Judicial Circuit to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of Judge Lewis Summers (1844 Jan. 8); Col. William T. Bellow as brigadier general for the 11th Brigade to supply the vacancy occasioned by the promotion of Gen. Benjamin W.S. Cabell (1844 Jan. 19); Norborne M. Taliaferro as judge of the General Court, 10th Judicial Circuit, James E. Heath as Auditor, James Brown Jr. as 2nd Auditor, Fabius M. Lawson as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian, James C. Spotts as General Agent of the Penitentiary, & Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary (1844 Jan. 27); Samuel Shepherd as public printer (1844 Dec. 5); George P. Scarburgh as judge of the General Court for the 3rd Circuit (1845 Jan. 15); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Fabius M. Lawson as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, & William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth (1845 Jan. 30); Raleigh T. Daniel as Councilor of State (1845 Jan. 30); and Isaac S. Pennybacker as U.S. Senator (1845 Dec. 3).

In addition, Munford encloses several resolutions from the House of Delegates including a resolution by the Committee on Banks that the Executive communicate a certified list of the Directors appointed by the governor & elected by the stockholders for the year 1842 (1843 Jan. 24); a resolution that the governor appoint a commissioner to prosecute the claim of Virginia against the United states for the amount due on account of money paid to the officers of the Virginia State Line since 1832 (1843 Mar. 24); a resolution that the Executive be authorized to receive from Henry Tanner of Philadelphia the plates from which the maps of Virginia have been struck (1843 Mar. 27); a resolution that the Librarian of the Commonwealth deliver to each of the present senators & delegates a copy of the Sixth Census (1844 Jan. 5); a resolution to furnish new arms to Capt. Thomas Poindexter's Company of Cavalry attached to the 117th Regiment of Virginia Militia (1844 Feb. 13); and a resolution that the arms & accoutrements in possession of the Richmond Light Infantry Blues be returned to the Superintendent of the Public Armory (1844 Feb. 14). Especially noteworthy is a resolution accepting the original draft of the Bill of Rights of Virginia authored by George Mason and offered to the state by John Mason, the only surviving some of George Mason (includes three letters from John Mason to Governor McDowell) (1844 Feb. 15).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, and Fabius M. Lawson, Treasurer, correspond with Governor McDowell regarding various financial matters. Heath writes to notify the governor of his absence from office to examine the Dismal Swamp Canal (1844 May 24); land in Brooke County advertised to be sold by him as surviving trustee (1844 July 11); other absences from office (1844 July 20 & 1845 Nov. 1); the interest of Richard Hardesty's loan (1845 May 26); and the employment of an additional clerk in preparing the delinquent land lists (1845 June 16). As Treasurer of the Commonwealth, Lawson writes requesting permission to borrow sums of money for the use of the Commonwealth (1843 Mar. 16, Apr. 5, June 26, 1844 Mar. 1 & 30, Sept. 20).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to extraditions. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: Samuel W. King, Rhode Island; John Fairfield & Edward Kavanaugh, Maine; John M. Morehead, North Carolina; Thomas Reynolds, Missouri; Wilson Shannon, Thomas W. Bartley, & Mordecai Bartley, Ohio; David R. Porter & Francis R. Shunk, Pennsylvania; William C. Bouck & Silas Wright, New York; Francis Thomas & Thomas G. Pratt, Maryland; Richard K. Call, Territory of Florida; Roger S. Baldwin, Connecticut; William Owsley, Kentucky; and William Slade, Vermont.

Governor Samuel Ward King, Rhode Island, encloses resolutions of the General Assembly for the repayment to Gen. Andrew Jackson of a fine imposed on him by the District Court of the United States for the District of Louisiana (1843 Jan. 16). Governor John Fairfield, Maine, also encloses resolutions of Maine in favor of a refund to General Andrew Jackson (1843 Jan. 23). Later, Governor Edward Kavanaugh encloses a copy of the resolves relating to the imprisonment of citizens of Maine in other states (1843 Mar. 22). Governor John Motley Morehead, North Carolina, writes regarding a demand for Edwin Davis, a fugitive from justice charged with murder (1843 Jan. 31). Governor Thomas Reynolds, Missouri, writes regarding the demand for Amos E. Kendall, a fugitive in confinement at Wheeling (1842 Feb. 20). Governor Wilson Shannon, Ohio, writes regarding his demand for Henry Spongenberg, alias Brown, charged with grand larceny (1843 Apr. 23). Later, Governor Thomas W. Bartley writes regarding the demand for T.B. Johnson (1844 June 20). Still later, Governor Mordecai Bartley writes regarding a demand for Francis Lewis, Wyatt Lewis, James & Nimrod Coe, & Calvert Rockinbaugh (1845 Oct. 5 & Nov. 3). Bartley also writes regarding the arrest & delivery to the authorities of Ohio of Francis Lewis, et al., who were indicted in Washington County, Ohio, for the crime of kidnapping three white citizens (1845 Oct. 13). Governor David R. Porter, Pennsylvania, writes regarding a demand for William Dawson charged with horse stealing (1843 Aug. 17). Later, Francis R. Shunk writes regarding a demand for Reuben Green (1845 May 7). Governor William C. Bouck, New York, writes regarding a demand for Adolphus F. Smith charged with forgery (1843 Oct. 18). Later, Governor Silas Wright writes regarding a demand for John Wright, a fugitive from justice charged with obtaining goods by false pretences (1845 Jan. 29). Governor Francis Thomas, Maryland, writes regarding the demand for Benjamin C. Dixon & Bowen H. Vail, fugitives from justice (1844 Jan. 17). Later Governor Thomas G. Pratt writes regarding the demand for Isaac Wamsley, a fugitive from justice charged with obtaining goods by false pretenses (1845 Jan. 25). Governor Richard K. Call, Territory of Florida, writes regarding the demand for Edwin G. Booth & James George Graham (1844 May 30). Governor Roger S. Baldwin, Connecticut, encloses a report & resolutions relating to differences existing between the states of Massachusetts & South Carolina (1845 June 25). Governor William Owsley, Kentucky, encloses a letter from Mordecai Bartley, Governor of Ohio, regarding the requisition for the apprehension & delivery of John Kindsman charged with decoying & enticing a slave from a Mr. Thurston, his owner, of Jefferson County, Kentucky (1845 Oct. 26). Lastly, Governor William Slade, Vermont, transmits resolutions regarding opposition to the proposed union of Texas with the United States (1845 Dec. 18). Governor Slade also submits a message regarding education, criminal law, the Vermont Asylum for the Insane, and other topics.

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: Edmund Ruffin resigning as a member of the State Board of Agriculture to conduct the agricultural survey of South Carolina (1843 Jan. 16); Jabez Johnson re. the publication of the abolitionist publication Old Dominion (1843 Feb. 6); Francis H. Smith, Superintendent of the Virginia Military Institute, re. the rebuilding of the wall around the Arsenal and an efficient guard at the Armory (1843 Feb. 11); Carey L. Hart, Philadelphia, re. the plates of the map of Virginia (1843 June 6); Henry S. Tanner, Philadelphia, re. copper plates in his possession belonging to the state of Virginia (1843 Feb. 14, Mar. 3 & 9); anonymous letter, Washington, re. abolitionists in Boston who have declared war against slaveholders & free negroes (1843 Apr. 14); Jabez Smith, Washington, re. an abolitionist paper in Portsmouth (1843 Apr. 5); J. Brown, Jr., 2nd Auditor, requesting a stove in his office in the basement story of the Capitol (1843 Nov. 29); B.W.S. Cabell accepting a commission as major general of the 1st Division of Virginia Militia (1843 Dec. 21); Elijah Brown, Edwin S. Gay, & others applying for the vacancy in the captaincy of the Public Guard occasioned by the death of John B. Richardson (1844 Jan.); Anson G. Phelps, President of the New York Institution for the Blind, advertising their services as a school for the blind (1844 Jan. 1); Thomas H. Bayly resigning as judge of the General Court (1844 Mar. 31); Alpha Kingsley encl. a letter from the late President Andrew Jackson recommending him as commissioner for the state of Tennessee (1844 Apr. 29); John Rutherfoord, Lieutenant Governor, re. the purchase of convict slaves from the Penitentiary (1844 Sept. 13); N. P. Howard, clerk of the General Court, asking for a stove for his office in the Capitol until the chimney can be fixed (1844 Dec. 28); Maj. Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines, U.S. Army commending the Western Division, New Orleans, re. the exposed condition of the principal seaport towns, especially New Orleans & New York (1845 Jan. 14); William H. Richardson, Adjutant General, requesting four-pound guns for the military school (1845 Apr. 12); Isaac S. Pennybacker re. his election to the U.S. Senate (1845 Dec. 8); and Clement White, Superintendent of Quarantine, re. a case of small pox on board the Schooner Dorcus from Baltimore (1845 Dec. 10).

Other noteworthy items include the following: proclamations by the governor & lieutenant governor offering rewards for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1843 Apr. 5, June 22, Sept. 25, Nov. 18, Dec. 26, 1844 Mar. 7, May 24, June 15, Dec. 14, 1845 Jan. 22, Mar. 6, May 3, June 16, Sept. 20, & Oct. 15); certificate of qualification of James McDowell as governor (1843 Jan. 5); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the Senate occasioned by the resignation of Lewis Bouldin (1843 Apr. 1); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the Senate occasioned by the resignation of Archibald Atkinson (1843 Apr. 4); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary regarding the case of Shadrack Brown (1843 May 19 & June 9); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of William C. Worthington (1843 Oct. 16); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the Senate occasioned by the resignation of James H. Langhorne (1843 Oct. 24); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Thomas W. Gilmer (1844 Feb. 19) (includes letter of resignation); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Henry A. Wise (1844 Feb. 19); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Hill Carter (1844 Mar. 18); William H. Richardson, Adjutant General, re. the mounting of the guns from the Virginia Military Institute at the Armory by Capt. Dimmock (1845 Apr. 22); W.H. Ramsey, President of a meeting of citizens of Cincinnati, Ohio, encl. proceedings re. the forcible seizure & detention of certain inhabitants of Ohio by residents of Virginia (1845 Aug. 15); proclamation of Lieutenant Governor John Rutherfoord for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of Joel Holleman (1844 Sept. 4); a proclamation of Lieutenant Governor John Rutherfoord directing that the superior & inferior courts of Morgan County be held at the house of William Hunter in Bath known as the Gault House (1844 Oct. 12); bond of Francis H. Deane as vaccine agent (1844 Nov. 18); proclamation of Governor McDowell naming electors on behalf of the state of Virginia to vote for a President & Vice President (1844 Nov. 21); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the Senate occasioned by the resignation of John H. Peyton (1845 Oct. 10); proclamation of Governor McDowell for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Ebenezer M. Hepburn (1845 Nov. 21); contract & agreement with Francis H. Deane as vaccine agent (1843 Nov. 29, 1844 Nov. 18, & 1845 Nov. 18); qualification of Governor George N. Briggs, Massachusetts, regarding Charles S. Newell as justice of the peace (1844 May 8); articles of agreement of John Goddin for scales & weights for weighing cattle & hogs brought to Richmond (1844 Apr. 5); list of persons who have taken the oath of fidelity to Virginia & who have been declared citizens of the U.S. (1844 Oct. 1); recommendations for commissioners to superintend the presidential election in various counties (1844); bond of Henry Van Buren as weigh master of livestock in Richmond (1945 Feb. 13); bonds, letters, plan, etc., re. the construction of a gun house in Petersburg for the Petersburg Artillery Company (1845 Mar. 13); and appointments & recommendations of various state commissioners of deeds (various dates).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1843
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      January
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      February
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      March
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        1-14
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        15-29
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        16-30
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      July
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      August
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        4-14
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        17-29
    • October
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        2-21
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        22-31
    • November
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        1-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        21-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      December
  • 1844
    • January
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-29
    • March
      • Box 3
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        16-30
    • April
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 10
        16-30
    • June
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        17-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        21-29
    • July
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        1-24
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        25-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      August
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      September
    • October
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        1-13
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        14-19
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        20-30
    • December
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        16-30
  • 1845
    • January
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        1-10
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        11-20
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        21-31
    • February
      • Box 5
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 10
        17-28
    • March
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        17-31
    • April
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        1-18
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        19-30
    • May
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        17-31
    • June
      • Box 6
        Folder 7
        2-14
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • July
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 10
        16-31
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      August
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      September
    • October
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        2-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        1-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        11-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        21-30
    • December
      • Box 7
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 9
        16-31
  • Box 7
    Folder 10
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1843
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      Feb. 7
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      Apr. 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      Aug. 7
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      Aug. 18
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      Sept. 8
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      Nov. 25
  • 1844
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      Apr. 29
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      May 8
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      June 25
  • 1845
    • Box 8
      Folder 10
      Apr. 5
    • Box 8
      Folder 11
      May 12
    • Box 8
      Folder 12
      Sept. 16
    • Box 8
      Folder 13
      Oct. 2
    • Box 8
      Folder 14
      Oct. 14
    • Box 8
      Folder 15
      Oct. 18
    • Box 8
      Folder 16
      Nov. 1
    • Box 8
      Folder 17
      Nov. 3
    • Box 8
      Folder 18
      Nov. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 19
      Nov. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 20
      Nov. 24
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1843
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      July 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      Aug. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      Sept. 12
  • 1844
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Jan. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Feb. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      Apr. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      Apr. 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Apr. 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      Apr. 26
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      May 13
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      June 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      June 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      July 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      Sept. 9
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      Oct. 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Dec. 17
  • 1845
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Feb. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Mar. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      Apr. 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      Apr. 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      Apr. 7
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      May 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      May 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      June 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 25
      Oct. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 26
      Nov. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 27
      Nov. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 28
      Dec. 8