A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor David Campbell, 1837-1840 Campbell, David, Executive Papers of Governor, 1837-1840 43151

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor David Campbell, 1837-1840

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 43151


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© 2007 By The Library of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
43151
Title
Executive Papers of Governor David Campbell, 1837-1840
Extent
4.61 cubic feet (10 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1837-1840 : Campbell)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor David Campbell, 1837-1840 (bulk 1837-1839). Accession 43151. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

David Campbell was born in Washington County on 7 August 1779 to John Campbell and Elizabeth McDonald. Campbell studied law in 1800 and returned to Abingdon to marry his cousin Maria Hamilton and serve as deputy clerk of Washington County under his father. During the War of 1812, Campbell obtained a commission as major of the 12th Infantry Regiment in the United States Army. Campbell was later commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 20th Infantry Regiment, but resigned on 28 January 1814. Although unsuccessful in his bid for election to the state senate in 1816, Campbell won the election for the same office in 1820. In 1824, Campbell succeeded his father as clerk of Washington County. Campbell was elected major general of militia on 31 January 1834 and governor of Virginia on 31 March 1837. As governor, Campbell strived for improvements to transportation & education. Both the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington and the Virginia Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb and Blind in Staunton, Virginia, were established during his governorship. On 15 May 1837, Campbell issued a proclamation to reconvene the General Assembly in order to address the financial panic of 1837. Campbell returned to his estate of Montcalm in Abingdon where he served in a variety of positions including justice of the peace and school commissioner until his death on 19 March 1859. He is buried in the cemetery of Sinking Spring Presbyterian Church near Abingdon.

Scope and Content

David Campbell's Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three-year term as governor between 31 March 1837 and 31 March 1840. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Virginia Penitentiary; the Virginia Military Institute; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; banks and banking; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor David Campbell, 1837-1840

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 9-10.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Contents List

Boxes 1-10
Executive Papers of Governor David Campbell, 1837-1840.
Extent: 10 boxes.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include John Forsyth, Secretary of State; William Gordon, Bounty Land Office; Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Treasury; & Walter S. Franklin, Clerk of the House of Representatives. John Forsyth, Secretary of State, periodically transmits acts of Congress (1837 Apr. 21, Nov. 7, Dec. 12; 1838 Jan. 3, Oct. 6; 1839 June 8, & July 16). On 26 July 1838, Forsyth requests a copy of the act of the Virginia Legislature establishing the great seal of the State. William Gordon, Bounty Land Office, writes regarding the comparative rank of officers of the Continental line and U.S. Navy during the Revolutionary War (1837 Apr. 29). Gordon also writes requesting a roll for Lee's Legion (1838 Apr. 23). Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Treasury, requests copies of bank statements in accordance with the resolution of the House of Representatives (1837 June 30 & Dec. 2; 1839 Jan. 31, Feb. 9 & 15). Woodbury also writes regarding a resolution for a complete set of weights & measures adopted as standards (incl. report) (1838 July 17). On 2 August 1838, Woodbury encloses a bill of lading for a box containing the set of standard weights designed for the State of Virginia (1838 Aug. 2). On 20 February 1839, Woodbury encloses a resolution of the U.S. Senate regarding a report from the states on the amount of money deposited with each state. Walter S. Franklin, Clerk of the House of Representatives, writes regarding the procurement of printed acts of the Legislature of the several states (1837 Sept. 16). Franklin also transmits copies of the journal of the proceedings of Congress (1837 Sept. 29).

The majority of correspondence in David Campbell's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Governor David Campbell; Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; Charles Ellis, President of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary; Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General; Blair Bolling, Commandant of the Public Guard; Sydney Smith Baxter, Attorney General; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; and James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts.

Governor David Campbell corresponded with William H. Richardson, Secretary of the Commonwealth, from his home in Abingdon during his absence from office in 1837. On 8 August 1837, Campbell writes regarding his absence and the impending absence of the lieutenant governor. He later writes regarding the executive powers of the governor & lieutenant governor (1837 Aug. 11). Campbell also writes concerning the education of the blind & the opinion of the Attorney General on the clause of the Constitution which directs how the executive part of the government is to be administered in the absence of the governor (1837 Aug. 21). In addition, Campbell discusses his decision not to perform any official act while absent from the seal of government until he has examined the Constitutional question and the case of Robert E. Hooe (1837 Aug. 26). Lastly, David Campbell requests Capt. Blair Bolling to employ some person to put the Government House in order before his return in the middle of October (1837 Oct. 22).

Governor Campbell also submits his annual messages to the General Assembly at the beginning of their session. In his message on 1 January 1838, Campbell writes regarding banks, the Literary Fund, internal improvements, revenue, militia, the military school at Lexington, the Penitentiary, and abolition societies. On 7 January 1839, Campbell writes regarding banks, education, the Literary Fund, public improvements, the death of Judge William Brockenbrough, public lands, and other topics. Campbell's last message to the General Assembly on 2 December 1839 relates to banks, common schools, the Western Lunatic Asylum, public lands, vacancies in state government, the Virginia Military Institute, a demand for three persons by the Governor of New York, and other issues.

Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Campbell regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Morgan writes regarding the following topics: a pardon for Samuel D. Spencer (1837 Apr. 4), an order for a pattern cannon at the Armory for the Penitentiary to serve as a model (1837 Apr. 12), permission to use the bricks from the walls of the old magazine erected on the public ground near the Penitentiary (1837 Apr. 14), arms for the guard in the interior of the Penitentiary (1837 May 16), the duties of the guard for the interior of the Penitentiary (1837 May 17), compensation for the interior guard of the Penitentiary (1837 July 29), the health of Richard Price, a convict in the Penitentiary (1837 Oct. 24), the transfer of four cannons from the Penitentiary to the Armory (1838 Jan. 5), his bond (1838 Mar. 12), the price for mounting the cannons in the Penitentiary (1838 Apr. 26), the account of Lewis Ludlum for drayage & forwarding eight boxes of arms (1838 May 17), permits to persons to see & converse with prisoners in the Penitentiary (1838 Nov. 23), the health of William Martin & Moses Hall, convicts in the Penitentiary (1839 Feb. 6 & Mar. 1), the case of Thomas Wasley who was convicted of forgery (1839 June 4), discharges of Ohle Strop, John Green & Almon Flower (1839 June 17), the laying of iron pipes from the spring to the Penitentiary (1839 Sept. 7 & Oct. 4; & 1840 Feb. 28), the discharge of Coleman D. Muse (1839 Dec. 15), and the record of Henry F. Clinton (1840 Jan. 28).

Charles Ellis, President of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary submits annual statements to the governor on the operations of the Penitentiary. These statements include various accounts of the General Agent; reports of the Superintendent & Physician of the Penitentiary; accounts of the manufacturing operations in the Penitentiary; tables showing the number of convicts received into the Penitentiary with their crimes, sentences, nativity, & ages; a table showing admittances into the hospital; a table showing the number of convicts received in the Penitentiary from 1800 to 1837 with pardons, deaths, escapes, & discharges; and a report of the condition & employments of the persons in the Penitentiary. Ellis submitted these statements on 1838 Jan. 1, 1839 Jan. 8, & 1839 December 12.

Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General, mainly writes regarding arms, ammunition, and the militia. Peyton writes regarding the poor condition of arms belonging to the 102nd Regiment (1837 June 26), the certificate of Col. John Prince, 15th Regiment, regarding Capt. James M. Rogers' Company of Light Dragoons (1837 Oct. 23), arms of the 65th Regiment (1837 Nov. 11), the letter of Capt. Taylor of the 54th Regiment regarding arms returned to the Armory (1838 Mar. 10), the claim of John P. Stoakes, Quartermaster for the 61st Regiment (1838 Nov. 21), the aggregate strength of the 18th Regiment, Patrick County, and the division of the regiment (1839 Feb. 12), arms for three regiments in Loudoun County (1839 June 14), the commission of Samuel L. Lewis as captain of a company of riflemen attached to the 60th Regiment (1839 Dec. 23), arms belonging to the 65th Regiment in Southampton County (1840 Jan. 25), returns of the strength of the 121st Regiment (1839 Dec. 30), and the return of the 6th Infantry Regiment in Essex County (1840 Feb. 26).

Blair Bolling, as Commandant of the Public Guard & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol until his death in 1839. Bolling's correspondence relates to the sale of gun carriages (1837 Sept. 16), the roofing of the Foundry & Boring Mill & his proposal to lease the Foundry (1838 May 1), ammunition for the Public Guard (1838 June 9), the lease of the Foundry & Boring Mill to Jonathan Leslie (1838 May 22), and the resignation of Joseph Selden as 2nd lieutenant of the Public Guard (1838 July 16). John B. Richardson succeeded Bolling as Commandant of the Public Guard in October 1839 and writes regarding the repair of several fire places in the Capitol (1839 Oct. 5).

Sidney Smith Baxter, Attorney General, provides numerous opinions for the governor on the question of who composes the present General Assembly (1837 May 15), the case of Jim who is accused of burglary (1837 June 14), the effects of the acts on the charter of the North Western Bank (1837 Dec. 26), the petition of William Bennett who was found guilty of murder (1838 Jan. 4), the right of the James River & Kanawha Company to condemn lands belonging to the state (1838 Jan. 6), the letter of J. S. Skinner regarding the procurement of a certificate of the Governor & Secretary of State to be sent to London to be employed in the prosecution of a case involving the rights of citizens of Virginia (1838 Feb. 5), a presentment against James Bryan for forging the name of John M. Clarks (1838 Feb. 8), the case of Parsons Turner, a convict in the Penitentiary (1838 Mar. 29), the duty of the sheriff, deputy sheriff, or constable to suppress riots (1838 June 9), the case of James Hoge, sheriff of Montgomery County (1839 June 13), and the issuing of proclamations required by the 8th section of the general banking law (1839 Oct. 22).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, transmits the following certificates of election: John M. Patton as member of the House of Representatives in Congress (1837 Aug. 29); Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary & James G. Watson as General Agent & Storekeeper (1838 Feb. 23); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Lawson Burfoot as Treasurer, William Selden as Register of the Land Office & William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian (1838 Mar. 21); John M. Patton as a member of the Council in place of William H. Macfarland (1838 Apr. 3); Samuel Shepherd as public printer (1839 Jan. 12); Robert Stanard as judge of the Court of Appeals to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of William Brockenbrough (1839 Jan. 18); Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office to supply the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of William Selden (1839 Apr. 4); Samuel Shepherd as Public Printer (1839 Dec. 9); Daniel A. Wilson as judge of the General Court for the 8th Judicial Circuit (1840 Jan. 27); James E. Heath as Auditor, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Lawson Burfoot as Treasurer, Stafford H. Parker as Register of the Land Office, & William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth (1840 Feb. 15); Henry L. Hopkins as a member of the Council of State (1840 Feb. 19); and Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent & James G. Watson as General Agent & Storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1840 Feb. 28).

In addition, Munford writes regarding the act appropriating a sum for the purpose of altering & improving the Hall of the House of Delegates upon the plan of Joseph Boyd, Jr. (1839 May 28). Finally, Munford writes regarding the purchase of chairs for the House of Delegates & repairs to the Capitol (1839 Nov. 6).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Campbell regarding an additional desk for the 2nd Clerk in the Auditor's Office (1837 May 8), fixed presses for his office (1837 Nov. 8), the payment of judgments by Thomas T. Giles, agent of Samuel Jones (1838 Dec. 8 & 17), authority to employ as many clerks as necessary (1839 May 30), the accounts of the Board of Principal Assessors (1840 Jan. 28), the employment of clerks to copy the tables of assessment (1840 Mar. 16), and the distribution of the reassessment tables (1840 Mar. 24).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mainly relates to extraditions. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: William Schley & George R. Gilmer, Georgia; Edward B. Dudley, North Carolina; Silas H. Jennison, Vermont; Joseph Vance & Wilson Shannon, Ohio; David Wallace, Indiana; William Pennington, New Jersey; William H. Seward, New York; Alexander G. McNutt, Mississippi; Edward Everett, Massachusetts; William Grason, Maryland; and Patrick Noble, South Carolina.

Governor William Schley, Georgia, writes regarding a demand for Robert E. Hooe, a fugitive from justice accused of the murder of Dr. George W. Palmer (1837 Apr. 1). Later, Governor George R. Gilmer writes regarding the cost of erecting a lunatic asylum in Georgia (1838 Jan.18). Governor Edward B. Dudley, North Carolina, writes regarding the inquisition of murder of a slave named Moses by another slave named Joe (1837 Apr. 11). Governor Silas H. Jennison, Vermont, forwards decisions of the Supreme Court (1837 Aug. 28). Governor Joseph Vance, Ohio, encloses a resolution against the annexation of Texas to the United States (1838 Feb. 24). Later, Governor Wilson Shannon encloses a resolution approving the course of the General Government and the authorities of Maine, in relation to the northern boundary (1839 Apr. 15). Governor David Wallace, Indiana, encloses a resolution regarding interference in the domestic institutions of the slave holding states (1839 Feb. 20). Governor William Pennington, New Jersey, writes regarding a demand for Joseph L. Rodgers, a fugitive from justice in Virginia (1839 Apr. 16). Governor William H. Seward, New York, transmits an act to authorize the arrest & detention of fugitives from justice from other states & territories of the U.S. (1839 May 20). Seward also writes with a demand for Elisha Egbert, a fugitive charged with stealing diverse goods & chattel (1839 July 25). Lastly, there are proceedings of the governor regarding his demand for the delivery of Peter Johnson, Edward Smith, & Isaac Gansey (1839 Oct. 24). Governor Alexander G. McNutt, Mississippi, writes regarding a demand for William Saffer, a fugitive from justice (1839 May 28). Governor Edward Everett writes regarding his demand for the surrender of Francis L. Wilkinson & Dickinson Shearer charged with kidnapping (1839 Oct. 11). Governor Everett also writes on 2 December enclosing two letters regarding the capture of James Shearer. Governor William Grason, Maryland writes regarding a demand for Juliann Harman, a fugitive from justice (1839 Sept. 24). Grason writes again on 19 October for the delivery of Michael Smullens & William D. Larkins. Governor Patrick Noble, S.C., writes regarding his demand for the fugitives John Diomelot & Ezaquel Joaquin (1839 Oct. 16).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: Joseph Tate, Chairman of the Watering Committee of the City of Richmond, encl. an architectural drawing for the office of the Superintendent of the City Water Works on the vacant ground next to the Junior Fire Engine House (1837 Apr. 3); John H. Smith resigning as director of the Penitentiary (1837 Apr. 3); Robert E. Hooe, U.S. Navy, re. the demand on him by the governor of Georgia for the murder of Dr. Palmer in self defense (1837 Apr. 12); Charles L. Wingfield re. his property condemned in the City of Richmond for supplying the Penitentiary with water (1837 Apr. 19); M. Dickerson, Navy Dept., re. the relative rank of the U.S. Navy & Army officers of the Revolutionary War (1837 Apr. 27); A. P. Upshur encl. a deed, will, & certificate re. the lots condemned to supply water for the use of the Penitentiary (1837 May 18); Peter C. Johnston re. his appointment as one of the visitors of the military school to be established at Lexington (1837 May 29); George Rust accepting an appointment on the Board of Visitors of the Military School in Lexington (1837 June 2); Clement White, Superintendent of Quarantine, re. smallpox onboard the Perry Spencer (1837 June 7); Clement White requesting an allowance for contingent expenses in attending the Schooner Perry Spencer infected with smallpox (1837 June 15); John B. Richardson proposing to borrow a portion of the Washington Monument Fund (1837 July 21); Robert E. Hooe, U.S. Navy, requesting the demand by the Executive of Georgia on the Executive of Virginia for his apprehension (1837 Oct. 8); M. C. Lackland, Superintendent of the Public Warehouse, requesting a crane at the warehouse for unloading wagons bringing tobacco to the warehouse (1837 Nov. 3); Capt. John Richardson, Richmond Fayette Artillery, requesting the construction of gun carriages (1837 Nov. 8); Thomas Mann Randolph re. the value & importance of encouraging by state bounty the culture of silk in Virginia (1837 Dec. 12); M. M. Robinson re. the sale of books from David B. Warden, former Consul General of France, to the Legislature on the history of France (1837 Dec. 17); Edward P. Roberts & Samuel Sands, Baltimore, re. silk culture (1837 Dec. 30); Charles Faulkner & other requesting an order for the use of the 77th Regiment in Hampshire County & the 89th Regiment in Morgan County to meet the Irish laborers along the line of the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal who quit their work and marched toward Old town from Hancock committing outrageous acts of violence (1838 Jan. 11); Anthony Ruelle, Acting Consulate of France in Richmond, re. the refusal of the Custom House of Norfolk to admit a French ship (1838 Feb. 18); William H. Macfarland resigning from the Council of State (1838 Feb. 23); James K. Polk re. the memorial of James Kincaid claiming to be entitled to bounty lands from the State of Virginia for Revolutionary war service (1838 Mar. 14, Apr. 26 & 29); G. Bromfield, Colonel of Ordnance, re. the balance of arms due to the State of Virginia (1838 Mar. 15); Robert Keyworth, N. P. Ames, & others re. presentation swords voted by the Legislature (incl. drawing of sword hilt) (1838 Apr. 25); Arthur P. Hayne, Chairman of the Convention of Merchants Proceedings on the subject of establishing a direct trade with foreign countries, Charleston, S.C. (incl. Brief Sketch of the Life & Military Services of Arthur P. Hayne & copy of The Southern Patriot newspaper) (1838 June 7); Charles Ellet, Chief Engineer, re. disorder among the Irish laborers on the James River & Kanawha Canal (1838 June 9); Capt. John B. Richardson, Richmond Fayette Artillery, requesting ammunition to protect against rumors of an insubordinate spirit amongst the laborers on the James River Canal (1838 June 9); Capt. Robert W. Bowden, Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, encl. the deed for the land upon which the gun house is to be erected (1838 June 20); Capt. William A. Eliason, U.S. Engineers, requesting a copy of the opinion of the attorney general on the cession of Old Point Comfort & the Rip Raps (1838 July 13); Robert Mayo, Washington City, requesting access to the archives for the original charter of Virginia, the original constitution, & local declarations of independence for his prospectus on the "Fundamental Laws or Primitive Charters of the Original British Colonies" (1838 July 18); Edward S. Gay resigning as captain of a troop of cavalry in the 38th Regiment to accept his appointment as 2nd lieutenant of the Public Guard (1838 July 21); C. Hubbard, Acting Surveyor for Elizabeth City County, re. the surveys of the Commonwealth's lands on Old Point Comfort & the shoal at the Rip Raps (incl. letters of William A. Eliason, U.S. Corps of Engineers, maps of Fort Calhoun, opinion of S. S. Baxter, executive order, & letter of S. Cooper, Acting Secretary of War (1838 July 30); Ebenezer Watson encl. a "Protection Against the Alteration of Bank Notes, Bills of Credit, Circulating Notes, Certificates of Stock, & Other Instruments of Writing" (includes specimens) (1838 Aug. 15); Thomas & Cary Fentress re. payment for building the gun house for the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues (1839 Jan. 14); Robert Stanard accepting his commission as judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals (1839 Jan. 28); Heiland Hall, Chairman of the Committee of the House of Representatives, encl. a resolution on Revolutionary claims (1839 Feb. 16); C. P. Dorman, Lexington, submitting a list of persons as visitors to the military school at Lexington (1839 Apr. 13); D. E. Moore, Commandant of the Lexington Arsenal, re. the condition of the military school in Lexington (incl. petition of Visitors of the Virginia Military Institute, letter of Bernard Peyton, & proceedings of the Board of Visitors) (1839 June 8); C. P. Dorman, Lexington, re. contracts for additional buildings & applications of admission for the Virginia Military Institute (1839 June 25); various individuals applying for the position of Commandant of the Public Guard upon the death of Capt. Blair Bolling (incl. Joseph R. Anderson) (1839 Sept.-Oct.); Lawson Burfoot, Treasurer, encl. the opinion of S. S. Baxter re. the removal of public monies in the banks (1839 Oct. 26), James Gadsden, President of the Commercial Convention of Augusta, Georgia, encl. resolutions of the Convention (1839 Nov. 8); William H. Richardson re. leaks in the skylight of the Capitol over the Library (1839 Dec. 10); Isaac L. Varian, Mayor of New York, encl. proceedings of a meeting of citizens re. the National Bankrupt Law (1840 Mar. 4); and various individuals applying to examine & arrange the papers in the attic story of the Capitol (1840 Mar.).

Other noteworthy items include: proclamations by the governor & lieutenant governor offering rewards for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1837 Apr. 18, June 10, July 7, Dec. 12; 1838 Apr. 2, June 16, Sept. 6, Dec. 12; 1839 Jan. 5, Mar. 14, Apr. 25, May 1 & 7, Sept. 30, Nov. 15, Dec. 12; 1840 Jan. 20 & 24, & Mar. 4); certificates of election for members of Congress (1837 May 6-9); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary (1837 May 12, Dec. 8); proclamation of Governor Campbell requiring the members of the Senate & House of Delegates to meet at the Capitol on 12 June (1837 May 15); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in Buckingham County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Archibald Austin (1837 May 25); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in Jefferson County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of John Davenport (1837 May 26); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in Essex County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Robert M. T. Hunter (1837 May 27); patent of Uri Emmons & Company for a single rail railroad (1837 May 30); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in Campbell County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Robert W. Withers (1837 June 5); proclamation of Governor Campbell directing that the County & Circuit Superior Court of Nansemond be held in the Methodist Episcopal Church due to the destruction of the courthouse by fire (1837 June 8); message of Governor Campbell to the General Assembly re. the suspension of specie payments by the banks & the convening of the Assembly (1837 June 12); bonds of Francis H. Deane as vaccine agent (1837 Nov. 18, 1838 Nov. 22, & 1839 Nov. 20); list of persons received into the Penitentiary & pardoned by the Executive (1838 Jan. 25); report of M. C. Lackland, Superintendent of the Public Warehouse, & S. S. Baxter re. a proposed improvement of the James River Company in front of the Public Warehouse (1838 Jan. 29); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election to replace John M. Patton in the House of Representatives (1838 Apr. 9); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in King George County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of John Hooe (1838 May 14); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in Buckingham County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of Samuel Jones (1838 May 19); advice of the Council to build a gun house in Norfolk suitable to hold four pieces of mounted artillery & four caissons (1838 June 1); advice of the Council re. the application of Capt. Robert W. Bowden, Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, to allow one thousand dollars to build a gun house in Norfolk (1838 June 1); proclamation of Lt. Governor John Rutherfoord for an election in Northampton County to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of William S. Savage (1838 July 21); proclamation of Lt. Governor John Rutherfoord declaring that the return of the Exchange Bank of Virginia has been made (1838 Aug. 3); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election to fill the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Vespasian Ellis (1838 Dec. 7); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election in Fauquier County to fill the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the resignation of Edward C. Marshall (1838 Dec. 17); proclamation of Gov. Campbell requiring the principal assessors to assemble & proceed to the execution of the duties required them by law (1839 Mar. 12); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election to fill the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Jacquelin B. Harvie (1839 Apr. 16); proclamation of Lt. Governor Henry L. Hopkins for an election to fill the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Benjamin H. Smith (1839 Aug. 26); proclamation of Governor Campbell requiring all principal assessors to assemble in Richmond (1839 Oct. 23); proclamation of Governor David Campbell for an election in Essex County to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of George T. Lorimer (1839 Nov. 8); proclamation of Governor Campbell for an election to replace Charles F. Mercer in the House of Representatives (1840 Jan. 1); a resolution of the General Assembly that the Superintendent of Public Edifices be required to examine the chimneys & stoves in the Capitol and examine the papers in the attic story of the Capitol (1840 Mar. 17); and a certificate of qualification of Thomas W. Gilmer as governor (1840 Mar. 31).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1837
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • June
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        1-10
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        11-20
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        21-30
    • July
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        17-29
    • August
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        1-10
      • Box 1
        Folder 11
        11-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      September
    • October
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        1-16
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        17-31
    • November
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        16-29
    • December
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        16-30
  • 1838
    • January
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      February
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      March
    • April
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        2-13
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 3
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        1-11
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        12-24
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        25-30
    • July
      • Box 3
        Folder 10
        2-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        21-31
    • August
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      September
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      October
    • November
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        16-25
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        26-29
    • December
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        2-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        16-31
  • 1839
    • January
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        1-11
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        12-31
    • February
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        16-30
    • April
      • Box 5
        Folder 9
        3-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 10
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        11-30
    • June
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        3-14
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        17-30
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      July
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      August
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      September
    • October
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        16-30
    • November
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        1-12
      • Box 7
        Folder 2
        13-23
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        25-30
    • December
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        16-30
  • 1840
    • January
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      February
    • March
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        2-12
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        16-31
  • Box 8
    Folder 3
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1837
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Apr. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      Apr. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      Aug. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Sept. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Oct. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      Oct. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      Oct. 12
  • 1838
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Mar. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      Oct. 9
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      Oct. 17
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      Nov. 12
  • 1839
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      Mar. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      May 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      Sept. 4
  • Box 9
    Folder 15
    Undated
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1837
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Apr. 11
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      May 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      June 4
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      June 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      June 13
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      June 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      July 12
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      July 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      Aug. 25
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      Sept. 14
    • Box 10
      Folder 10a
      Oct. 7
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Dec. 18
  • 1838
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Jan. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Jan. 29
    • Box 10
      Folder 14
      Feb. 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 15
      May 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 16
      June 7
    • Box 10
      Folder 17
      June 25
    • Box 10
      Folder 18
      July 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 19
      Aug. 27
  • 1839
    • Box 10
      Folder 20
      Jan. 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 21
      Feb. 13
    • Box 10
      Folder 22
      Feb. 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 23
      Oct. 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 24
      Dec. 12