A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Littleton W. Tazewell, 1834-1836 Tazewell, Littleton W., Executive Papers of Governor, 1834-1836 42998

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Littleton W. Tazewell, 1834-1836

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 42998


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© 2007 By The Library of Virginia. All Rights Reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
42998
Title
Executive Papers of Governor Littleton W. Tazewell, 1834-1836
Extent
3.2 cubic feet (7 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1834-1836 : Tazewell)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor Littleton W. Tazewell, 1834-1836 (bulk 1834-1835). Accession 42998. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

Littleton Waller Tazewell was born on 17 December 1774 in Williamsburg, Virginia, to Henry Tazewell and Dorothea Elizabeth Waller. Following the death of his mother in 1777, Tazewell was raised by his maternal grandfather Judge Benjamin Waller. Tazewell graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1791. He studied law under John Wickham (1763-1839) of Richmond, Virginia, and was admitted to the bar in 1796. Tazewell represented James City County in the House of Delegates from 1798 to 1800. That year, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of John Marshall and served until 1801. In 1802, Tazewell relocated to Norfolk, Virginia, to continue his law practice. He represented Norfolk in the House of Delegates from 1804 to 1806 and in 1816. President James Monroe appointed Tazewell a commissioner to settle claims under the treaty in which Spain ceded Florida to the United States. In 1824, Tazewell was appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of John Taylor, and he served eight years before resigning 16 July 1832. While in the Senate, Tazewell served as President pro tempore in the Twenty-second Congress and opposed President Andrew Jackson's Nullification Proclamation. He served as a member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830 where he voted in favor of the new Constitution. Tazewell was elected governor of Virginia in 1834 and served until 30 March 1836. He resigned in a disagreement with the Legislature to expunge the resolution of the Senate in 1834 to censure President Jackson. Tazewell returned to Norfolk where he spent most of his time running his plantations in Northampton County, Virginia. He married Ann Stratton Nivison (1785-1859) 15 July 1802, and they had nine children. Tazewell died 6 May 1860 in Norfolk, and was buried at King's Creek plantation in Northampton County. He was reinterred at Elmwood Cemetery in Norfolk, Virginia.

Scope and Content

Littleton Waller Tazewell's Executive Papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his two years as governor between 31 March 1834 and 30 March 1836. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; slavery & abolition; the Virginia Penitentiary; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; public improvements; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor Littleton W. Tazewell, 1834-1836

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 6-7.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1836-April 15, 1869, VOL. XI, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1893.

Contents List

Boxes 1-7
Executive Papers of Governor Littleton W. Tazewell, 1834-1836.
Extent: 7 boxes.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include John Forsyth, Secretary of State, and Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary of the Navy.

Secretary of State, John Forsyth, writes regarding a list of laws wanting for Virginia at the Department of State (1834 Sept. 16). Forsyth also forwards documents of the 1st session of the 23rd Congress (1835 Oct. 22). Mahlon Dickerson, Secretary of the Navy, writes concerning the prevention of an arrest by Commodore Dallas on board the U.S. Frigate Constellation by the sheriff of Norfolk County (1835 Oct. 15).

The majority of correspondence in Littleton Waller Tazewell's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General; Blair Bolling, Commandant of the Public Guard; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts; and John H. Smith, Agent for Virginia to examine Revolutionary Claims.

Charles S. Morgan, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Tazewell regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Morgan writes regarding the withdrawal of papers filed in the case of John Nail, an ensign in the Continental Line of Virginia, for bounty land (1834 Apr. 4); grated windows in convenient parts of the new wall of the Penitentiary (1834 May 2); a list of slaves in the Penitentiary for sale & transportation from the state (1834 July 2); the discharge of John F. Harris from the Penitentiary (1834 Nov. 22); the discharge of Richard Harrington (1834 Dec. 14); the building of a shed to hold cannon timber at the Penitentiary (1835 Mar. 27); the act making provisions for procuring a supply of water for the Penitentiary (1835 Mar. 24); requests for the pardon of William Walker (1835 Apr. 21); the claim of James W. Ford for cotton cloth to paint the state flag (1835 July 10); and the death of Thomas S. Moncure, late Storekeeper & General Agent of the Penitentiary (1836 Mar. 24). Particularly noteworthy is a letter from Morgan enclosing statements of expenditures money & labor expended in building the new Hospital, front building, removing the north wall, a large shed for holding timbers, and other tasks (1834 Dec. 22).

Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General, mainly writes regarding arms, ammunition, and the militia. Peyton writes regarding the application of Capt. Duff Green, 45th Regiment, to surrender sixty rifles & accoutrements (1834 Apr. 28); proceedings of a regimental court of enquiry for the 61st Regiment regarding arms (1834 Oct. 28); rates for hiring teams (1834 Oct. 31); and the bond of Capt. Taylor of the Norfolk Artillery Company for arms (1835 July 1).

Blair Bolling, as Commandant of the Public Guard & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol. Bolling writes regarding the order of Governor John Floyd requiring him to hoist a new flag (1834 Apr. 13); the repair of the gates, hydrant, & roof of the Armory (1834 May 6); William Walker's account of clothing (1834 May 6); the Public Privy (1834 May 28); the culvert of the Armory between the main building & the Boring Mill (1834 June 3); the repair of the gate on Capitol Square (1834 July 19); recommendations for the discharge of Aylet Buckner & others from the Public Guard (1834 July 31); a leak in the skylights of the Capitol & other necessary repairs (1834 Sept. 24); recommendations for the discharge of three soldiers from the Public Guard (1834 Sept. 28); a communication from Ensign Joseph R. Bentley regarding repairs to his quarters (1834 Oct. 4); authority to draw the usual supply of winter clothing for the Public Guard (1834 Oct. 7); the bell, clock, & carpeting for the Delegates Hall & Committee of Claims Room in the Capitol (1834 Oct. 15); payment for uniform caps for the Public Guard (1834 Dec. 18); problems with the fireplace in the Court of Appeals Office (1835 Jan. 10); the purchase of a new clock (1835 Feb. 17); requests for more knapsacks (1835 Feb. 27); the health of Fleming Hughes, a private in the Public Guard (1835 Mar. 5); the condition of the Capitol (1835 Apr. 14); the lease of the Boring Mill near the Armory (1835 Apr. 13); the whitewashing of offices in the Capitol & repairs (1835 May 30); repairs of the culvert at the Armory (1835 May 14); the mental state of Robert Waugh, a private in the Public Guard (1835 May 2); vouchers for contingent expenses in the repair of arms at the Armory (1835 July 9); repairs to the windows of the Capitol (1835 Aug. 2); preparations for the reception of the Legislature at the Capitol including repairing Venetian blinds, cleaning the stoves & pipes, etc. (1835 Oct. 9); repairs to the skylight on the roof of the Capitol (1835 Nov. 30); and repairs to stone buttresses, etc., at the Armory (1835 Nov. 30).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, often submits legislation to the governor. Noteworthy is a resolution requesting the governor to report a list of claims for bounty land for Revolutionary War services (1835 Feb. 19). Additionally, Munford transmits the following certificates of election: William H. Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth (1834 Apr. 9); Richard H. Baker as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 1st Circuit (1834 Dec. 4); Sydney S. Baxter as attorney general (1834 Dec. 11); Benjamin W. Leigh as senator in Congress (1835 Jan. 29); James E. Heath as Auditor of Public Accounts, James Brown, Jr., as 2nd Auditor, Lawson Burfoot as Treasurer, William Selden as Register of the Land Office, & William Richardson as Secretary of the Commonwealth & Librarian (1835 Jan. 27); Charles B. Shaw as Principal Engineer of the Commonwealth, Charles S. Morgan as Superintendent of the Penitentiary & Thomas G. Moncure as General Agent or Storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1836 Feb. 27); and William C. Rives as senator to supply the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of John Tyler (1836 Mar. 3).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Tazewell regarding the appointment of Thomas Jones as agent to superintend the collection of debt due in Pendleton County (1835 Mar. 4); books in the Auditor's Office containing evidence of various payments made to widows & orphans of Revolutionary officers dying in service (includes a letter from Lewis Cass, Secretary of War) (1835 May 28); and a suit instituted against the Commonwealth by the administrator of George Rogers Clarke (1835 Dec. 4).

John H. Smith as Commissioner of Revolutionary Claims writes Governor Tazewell regarding claims of the Commonwealth against the United States. Smith encloses an estimated amount of the account of Virginia against the United States, a copy of correspondence from William Davies to Governor Henry Lee, & a copy of a letter from Alexander Hamilton (1834 Sept. 1). In addition, Smith writes regarding the claims of the heirs of Capt. William Gregory, Lt. John Gregory, Brig. Gen. Hugh Mercer, & Lt. Samuel Campbell (1834 Sept. 19); claims for supplies to the Illinois Regiment (1834 Aug. 20); his duties as Commissioner of Revolutionary Claims (1834 Oct. 9); and a request for a copy of the journal of the House of Delegates (1835 June 21).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to extraditions. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: Stevens T. Mason, Michigan; David L. Swain, North Carolina; James Thomas, Maryland; George Wolf, Pennsylvania; and Robert Lucas, Ohio.

Governor Stevens T. Mason, Michigan, transmits resolutions regarding the formation of a permanent constitution & state government whenever there is sixty thousand free inhabitants within the territory according to the Act of Cession by Virginia (1834 Sept. 10). Governor David L. Swain writes regarding the extradition of William Mowberry & Isaac Albright, fugitives from justice in Petersburg (1835 Jan. 20). Governor James Thomas, Maryland, writes on the subject of a demand for James G. Jones, a fugitive from justice in Jefferson County, Virginia (1835 Feb. 12). Governor George Wolf, Pennsylvania, writes regarding the extradition of Abraham Levy & Joseph Cassel from Monongalia County, Virginia (1835 June 2). Lastly, Governor Robert Lucas, Ohio, encloses proceedings of an internal improvement meeting in relation to a railroad from Cincinnati to Charleston (1836 Mar. 24).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: James Trimble, Deputy Secretary of Pennsylvania, enclosing a copy of the law of Pennsylvania incorporating & endowing the Institution for the Deaf & Dumb (1834 May 7); James Madison resigning as visitor of the University of Virginia (1834 May 17); William C. Rives accepting his appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1834 June 14); William H. Bell, Capt. Of Ordnance, Ordnance Office, re. a balance due to the State of Virginia (1835 May 11); H. Anderson, President of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary, enclosing General Agent's report, Superintendent's report, & Physician's report (1835 Dec.4); James Stubblefield, gunsmith & former Superintendent of the National Armory at Harpers Ferry, re. a proposition for the general examination & repair of the public arms in the Armory (1835 Dec. 22); Charles H. Hyde, Principal Engineer, re. the most prompt & efficient mode of operating upon the Capitol if it should take fire (1836 Jan. 30); M. C. Lackland, Superintendent of the Public Warehouse in Richmond, re. the purchase of Brown Lumber House adjoining the public warehouse (1836 Jan. 13); William C. Rives re. his election as senator of the United States (1836 Mar. 8); Joseph C. Cabell accepting his reappointment as a visitor of the University of Virginia (1836 Mar. 15); G. Bomford, Colonel of Ordnance, offering aid of the U.S. Ordnance Office in the inspection of arms, etc. (1836 Mar. 22); and Littleton W. Tazewell resigning as governor (1836 Mar. 30).

Other noteworthy items include: proclamations by the governor & lieutenant governor offering rewards for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1834 Apr. 28, May 2, Sept. 20 & 23, Nov. 19; 1835 May 29, July 11, Aug. 12, Sept. 4, Nov. 2; 1836 Feb. 9 & 23); bond of J. B. Bragg & W. Bootwright to lease the Boring Mill from the Commonwealth (1834 Apr. 3); report of the Directors of the Penitentiary (1834 Apr. 23); bond of William S. Scott as vaccine agent (1834 May 17); proclamation of Governor Tazewell for an election to supply the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the resignation of Andrew Stevenson (1834 June 6); proclamation of Governor Tazewell declaring that the completion of the return of the Merchants' & Mechanics' Bank in Wheeling (1834 Nov. 28); report of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary (1834 Dec. 1); certificate of qualification for Sydney S. Baxter as attorney general (1835 Jan. 6); report of the Ohio Medical Convention regarding the establishment of Commercial Hospitals at suitable points in the valleys of the Mississippi & coast of the Lakes (1835 Apr. 7); certificates of election of members of the House of Representatives in Congress by various county sheriffs (1835 May); proclamation of Governor Tazewell for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of George C. Dromgoole (1835 May 29); proclamation of Governor Tazewell for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates occasioned by the death of Thomas Marshall (1835 July 11); proceedings of a meeting of citizens of Wilmington, N.C., regarding anti-slavery societies (1835 Aug. 22); proceedings of a public meeting of citizens of Charleston re. slavery & anti-slavery societies (1835 Aug. 12); proceedings of a public meeting of citizens of Augusta, Maine, re. slavery (1835 Aug. 21); proceedings of a meeting of citizens of Bangor, Maine, re. northern interference with the domestic relations of master & slave in the South (1835 Sept. 4); proceedings of citizens of Shell Point, Florida, re. slavery (1835 Sept. 30); proclamation of Governor Tazewell for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the death of John McCoy (1835 Sept. 9); report of Blair Bolling & Samuel P. Parsons, Commissioners, re. supplying water to the Penitentiary (1835 Oct. 19); proclamation of Governor Tazewell for an election to supply the vacancy in the State Senate occasioned by the resignation of Henry E. Watkins (1835 Oct. 6); proceedings of a town meeting in Cincinnati re. abolition & anti-slavery societies (1836 Jan. 26); petition of the Pamunkey Indians against the petition for the sale of their town (1836 Feb. 18); and a report of Blair Bolling & Samuel P. Parsons re. water for the Penitentiary (1836 Feb. 15).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1834
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        1-5
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        6-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        11-20
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        21-30
    • June
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        2-19
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        21-30
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      July
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      August
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • October
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        1-16
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        20-31
    • November
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        11-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        21-30
    • December
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        11-31
  • 1835
    • January
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      February
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      March
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      April
    • May
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        1-14
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        16-30
    • June
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        16-29
    • July
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        22-31
    • August
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        1-14
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        1-14
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        16-29
    • October
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        19-31
    • November
      • Box 4
        Folder 10
        2-12
      • Box 4
        Folder 11
        16-23
      • Box 4
        Folder 12
        24-30
    • December
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        2-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        16-31
  • 1836
    • January
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        1-13
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        18-31
    • February
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        1-20
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        23-29
    • March
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        17-30
  • Box 12
    Folder 9
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1834
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      Apr. 26
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      June [N.D.]
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      Aug. 18
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      Sept. 1
  • 1835
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      Feb. 12
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      Apr. 15
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      June 2
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      June 9
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      June 17
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      Aug. 18
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      Oct. 26
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      Nov. 2
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1834
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      May 14
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      Aug. 25
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      Dec. 1
  • 1835
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      Sept. 11
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      Sept. 26
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      Sept. 30
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      Dec. 4
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      Dec. 24