A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor John Floyd, 1830-1834 Floyd, John, Executive Papers of Governor, 1830-1834 42665

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor John Floyd, 1830-1834

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 42665


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Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
42665
Title
Executive Papers of Governor John Floyd, 1830-1834
Extent
6.35 cubic feet (14 boxes)
Creator
Virginia Governor (1830-1834 : Floyd)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Executive Papers of Governor John Floyd, 1830-1834 (bulk 1830-1833). Accession 42665. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

John Floyd was born at Floyds Station in Jefferson County, Kentucky, on 24 April 1783 to John Floyd and Jane Buchanan. Educated at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Floyd was graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1806 while under the care of Dr. Benjamin Rush in Philadelphia. Floyd settled in Christiansburg, Montgomery County, Virginia, where he practiced medicine. Serving as a surgeon in the Virginia Militia from 1807 to 1812, Floyd was later appointed surgeon of Lt. Col. James McDowell's Flying Camp during the War of 1812. Floyd received a commission of major, and was appointed brigadier general of the 17th Brigade.

John Floyd's political career began when he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates to represent Montgomery County in 1814. While only serving one term in the state legislature, Floyd had a long and distinguished tenure in the U.S. House of Representatives where he served from 1817 until 1829. During his time in Congress, Floyd supported President Andrew Jackson's actions in the Great Seminole Debate of 1818-1819, Missouri statehood, and the settling of the Oregon Territory. Following his time in Congress, Floyd was elected as governor of Virginia on 4 March 1830. Floyd served a one-year term and was re-elected to a three-year term as the first governor under the Virginia Constitution of 1829-1830. Floyd's term as governor was noted for its prosperity, but also for the Southampton Insurrection led by the slave Nat Turner on 21 August 1831. During his term as governor, Floyd received all of South Carolina's eleven electoral votes in the Presidential election of 1832 as a result of the Nullification Crisis and that state's discontent with the Tariff of 1828. Floyd suffered a stroke in office, but completed his term of office on 31 March 1834.

John Floyd married Letitia Preston, the daughter of William Preston & Susannah Smith, in 1804. Floyd and his wife had twelve children including John Buchanan Floyd, governor of Virginia from 1849 to 1852 and Secretary of War under President James Buchanan. Floyd died on 17 August 1837 and is buried near Sweetsprings in Monroe County, Virginia. Floyd County, Virginia, was named after John Floyd when the county was created out of Montgomery County on 15 January 1831.

Scope and Content

John Floyd's Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his four years as governor between 4 March 1830 and 31 March 1834. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; Nat Turner's Rebellion; the Virginia Penitentiary; arms and ammunition; the militia; Revolutionary War bounty land claims; slavery; public improvements; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

Arrangement

This collection is arranged into the following series:

I. Executive Papers of Governor John Floyd, 1830-1834

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated to boxes 13-14.


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

Boxes 1-14
Executive Papers of Governor John Floyd, 1830-1834.
Extent: 14 boxes.

Nat Turner's Rebellion was the most significant historical event during John Floyd's time in office. There is not a great amount of documents related to Nat Turner's Rebellion within John Floyd's Executive Papers, but notable documents include the following: an anonymous letter regarding a reward for the capture of Nat Turner, leader of the insurrection (1831 Aug. 28); a proclamation by Governor Floyd offering a reward for the apprehension of Nat Turner (1831 Sept. 17); a letter from W. C. Parker regarding a physical description of Nat Turner (1831 Sept. 31); a letter from Brig. Gen. Benjamin W. S. Cabell, & other officers of the 11th Brigade, requesting arms & accoutrements necessary for arming two companies of cavalry and two companies of light infantry (1831 Sept. 20); and a resolution of inhabitants of Chesterfield County requesting arms & a patrol to protect against insurrection of slaves (undated).

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include President Andrew Jackson; Martin Van Buren & Edward Livingston, Secretaries of State; Lewis Cass, Secretary of War; Louis McLane, Secretary of the Treasury; & Virginia's senators & representatives in Congress.

President Andrew Jackson encloses a letter from Samuel D. Ingham, Secretary of the Treasury, regarding debts contracted by Virginia during the Revolutionary War (1831 Mar. 18). Martin Van Buren, Secretary of State, forwards eight sets of the 1st session of the 21st Congress (1831 Mar. 23). Later, Edward Livingston writes to request copies of the Statute Laws of Virginia (1831 July 12). Livingston also writes regarding a resolution of the Senate respecting the militia (1833 Mar. 25) and papers relative to Virginia's northern boundary from the Colonial Office in Great Britain (1833 May 18). As Acting Secretary of State, Daniel Brent transmits three copies of the returns of the Fifth Census (1832 Sept. 10). Louis McLane, Secretary of the Treasury, requests vouchers which bounty land was granted to Joshua McQueen for his service in the Continental Line (1832 Apr. 27). McLane also writes enclosing a copy of the evidence upon which bounty land was granted to the heirs of James Halloway (1832 May 17). On 12 July 1832, McLane encloses a resolution of the House of Representatives to lay before the House copies of statements or returns showing the capital, etc., of the different state banks. In addition, McLane writes requesting the name of the present governor, the date of appointment, & the great seal of the state (1833 July 15). Lastly, McLane requests the numerical strength of the militia (1833 Nov. 30). Lewis Cass, Secretary of War, encloses a letter from Peter Hagner, 3rd Auditor's Office, regarding a book containing settlements made by Andrew Dunscomb as Assistant Commissioner of Army Accounts with the Virginia Continental Line (1833 Nov. 30). Cass later encloses a report of William Gordon, Bounty Land Office, containing a list of persons entitled to land warrants (1833 Nov. 23).

Philip P. Barbour, writes resigning his seat as a member of the House of Representatives to become District Judge of the United States for the Eastern District (1830 Oct. 15). Littleton W. Tazewell & John Tyler, U.S. Senators, enclose a letter from Samuel D. Ingham, Secretary of the Treasury, transmitting a communication from the Register's Office of the Treasury Department including an abstract of balances due to & from the several states on the adjustment of their accounts with the U.S. by the General Board of Commissioners (1831 Feb. 11). On 1832 October 22, Littleton Tazewell writes resigning his seat as senator. John Tyler also writes Governor Floyd respecting his election to the Senate (1833 Feb. 28). Finally, there are several letters from Virginia's representatives in Congress including Andrew Stevenson, John M. Patton, George Loyall, Joseph W. Chinn, John Y. Mason, & Charles F. Mercer, regarding the unconstitutionality of the Bank of the United States and resolutions of Virginia disapproving the act of the President in withdrawing & withholding the public deposits from the Bank where they have been placed by law (1834 Feb. 24, 25, 26, 28, & Mar. 6).

The majority of correspondence in John Floyd's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Samuel P. Parsons & Charles S. Morgan, Superintendents of the Penitentiary; James Robertson, Attorney General; Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General; Blair Bolling, Commandant of the Public Guard; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts; and John H. Smith, Agent for Virginia to examine Revolutionary Claims.

Samuel P. Parsons, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Floyd regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Parsons writes regarding the pardon of Sampson Lawrence (1830 Nov. 4), the release of John Wilcox from solitude (1830 Mar. 18), the manufacture of clothing for the Public Guard (1830 June 1), the removal of Daniel Tolly as 3rd Assistant Keeper (1830 July 18), the release of Henry Hoffman from solitude (1830 Sept. 17), the nomination of William Simpson as 3rd Assistant Keeper & John Duff as 5th Assistant Keeper (1830 Oct. 1), the petition for the pardon of Nathaniel Snelson (1830 Oct. 21), the valuation of transport slaves confined in the Penitentiary (1830 Oct. 30), the case of Sampson Lawrence convicted of 2nd degree murder (1830 Nov. 4), the attendance of Directors of the Penitentiary to meetings of the Board (1831 Apr. 15), permission to use the bricks from the old Powder Magazine near the Penitentiary for other improvements (1831 May 6); the trial of Wyatt King, the only free transport remaining in the Penitentiary (1831 May 10); a house proposed to be erected for John Jacob, an officer of the Penitentiary (1831 May 19); the recommendation of James Shephard as 1st Assistant Keeper, Felix Ferguson as 3rd Assistant Keeper, & Croxton Lumpkin as 4th Assistant Keeper (1831 Sept. 22); and the recommendation of James Nisbett as 5th Assistant Keeper (1832 Feb. 2).

Charles S. Morgan replaced Parsons as superintendent in March 1832. Morgan wrote Governor Floyd regarding similar issues including the conduct of Frederick Fleming (1832 May 14), the death of Croxton Lampkin, late assistant keeper, & the appointment of Michael Schisler (1832 May 15), the conduct of John T. Owen (1832 June 2), the pardon & immediate discharge of each convict whose term of imprisonment exceeds three months as a result of a cholera outbreak at the Penitentiary (1832 Sept. 29), a report of the deaths at the Penitentiary in the last six months (1832 Sept. 30), the conduct of Thomas Bentley (1832 Dec. 5), the employment of Capt. John Balthrope as inventor of a new plan for gun carriages (1833 Jan. 25), the price of transports from the Penitentiary (1833 Mar. 6), improvements to the Penitentiary including the erection of a hospital, etc. (1833 Apr. 4 & Aug. 9), contracts for repairs at the Penitentiary (1833 July 17), transports at the Penitentiary including their names & ages (1834 Jan. 3), the recommendation of Minus Ward as 5th Assistant Keeper (1834 Mar. 5), the petition for the pardon of Spencer Webb (1834 Mar. 22), and pardons for various convicts at the Penitentiary (1834 Mar. 26). Particularly significant is Morgan's letter enclosing various reports including accounts, the superintendent's report, a table showing the number of prisoners received into the Penitentiary, a table showing the number of prisoners confined in the Penitentiary with their crimes & sentences, a table showing the number of admittances into the hospital, a report of deaths in the Penitentiary, etc. (1833 Nov. 29).

John Robertson, Attorney General, provides opinions on a slave named Amos condemned by Rockingham County who escaped and was jailed in Ohio (1830 Oct. 23), the publication of the act concerning a convention passed 31 Jan. 1828 & of the new Constitution (1831 July 8), and the commission of James Given as sheriff of Nicholas County (1832 Apr. 8). In addition, Robertson encloses letters of John T. Austin, Attorney General of Massachusetts, & Edward Everett regarding the dissemination of publications of a character to excite insubordination among the slaves of Virginia (1833 May 31).

Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General, mainly writes regarding arms, ammunition, and the militia. Peyton encloses a letter from Blair Bolling regarding the preparation of four hundred muskets for deliver (1830 May 14), arms to be delivered to the Lexington Arsenal by the Commandant of the 77th Regiment (1830 June 12), powder still remaining at the U.S. Bellona Arsenal in Chesterfield County (1833 Dec. 19), military equipment purchased for Capt. Myers' Troop of Norfolk (1834 Feb. 10), the claim of Byrd Chamberlayne (1834 Mar. 1), and the resignation of Col. Robert W. Carter, 41st Regiment (1834 Mar. 7).

Blair Bolling, as Commandant of the Public Guard & Superintendent of Public Edifices, writes regarding numerous issues concerning the Public Guard, the Armory, and the Virginia State Capitol. Bolling writes requesting a copy of the proceedings of the Court of Enquiry against him by Ensign Joseph R. Bentley (1830 Mar. 19), the claim of A. Bargamin for the erection of scaffold to clean out the pipe running through the Court of Appeals room (1830 Nov. 29), carpeting for the Senate Chamber & clothing for the Public Guard (1831 Oct. 14), a recommendation of the surgeon of the Public Guard for the discharge of invalids from the corps (1834 Jan. 22), new timber to mount cannon at the Armory (1834 Feb. 3), the proposal of Robert R. Robinson to lease the Boring Mill (1834 Mar. 5); the request of Charles Boze to be discharged from the Public Guard (1834 Mar. 17), repairs to the Treasury Office (1834 Mar. 18), and the agreement between Bragg & Bootwright for the lease of the Boring Mill (1834 Mar. 26).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, often submits legislation to the governor. Noteworthy is an act concerning the Executive Department under the amended Constitution passed 8 February 1831 which defined the role of lieutenant governor & salaries of executive officers (1831 Feb. 8).

Additionally, Munford transmits the following certificates of election: Wyndham Robertson as a member of the Council (1830 May 29), Lawson Burfoot as Treasurer (1831 Feb. 11, 1833 Mar. 7, & 1834 Mar. 7), Henry St. George Tucker as president and Francis T. Brooke, William H. Cabell, John W. Green, & Dabney Carr as judges of the Court of Appeals (1831 Apr. 11), William C. Rives as senator in Congress (1832 Dec. 10), James E. Heath as Auditor, James Brown as 2nd Auditor, & William Selden as Register of the Land Office (1833 Mar. 7), Benjamin Watkins Leigh as senator in Congress in place of William C. Rives (1834 Feb. 26), and John B. Clopton as judge of the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 7th Judicial Circuit (1834 Feb. 27).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Floyd regarding the debt due by Clement Townsend of New Orleans (1830 May 15), further allowance to Josiah Leake as agent for the Commonwealth in Goochland County (1830 June 30); flooring for the Treasury Office (1831 Apr. 23), an appropriation for compiling & publishing delinquent land lists (1831 Sept. 19), an advance for B. Smoot to convey a convict from Mason County (1831 Oct. 3), Boykin's claim for his service as brigade inspector (1832 Mar. 16), the publication of the revenue laws anterior to 1821 for distribution (1832 May 19), a letter from J. M. Patton transmitting an account for his services as counsel in the Superior Court of Orange (1832 Oct. 26), a certificate of public debt from L. C. Cantilon (1833 May 14), John H. Smith's letter requesting permission to use Revolutionary Land Bounty Warrants in the Capitol (1833 July 9), a new copy of the revised code (1832 Nov. 19), and receipt of the contract between Blair Bolling, J. B. Bragg, & William Bootwright to lease the Boring Mill, the bond of J. Bootwright as contractor to supply provisions for the Public Guard, and the bond of Thomas G. Moncure as agent & storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1834 Mar. 28).

John H. Smith was initially appointed under an order of 24 May 1832 to examine & arrange the books & papers in the upper story of the Capitol. John H. Smith encloses a report of his proceedings in which he provides a description of the records found in the Capitol which includes Revolutionary War records, Henrico County Court records, & Auditor of Public Account's records (1832 July [N.D.]). Smith later writes regarding books & papers in his possession which may be useful to the members of the Council in deciding on claims for Revolutionary services (1832 Aug. 22). The General Assembly passed a resolution on 21 February 1833 that the Governor employ an individual to examine revolutionary documents and to report a list of the names of all such persons entitled to unsatisfied claims on the Commonwealth of Virginia for bounty land. John H. Smith was appointed as Commissioner of Revolutionary Claims to provide for the appointment of a commissioner to continue to examine and report upon these claims. Smith writes regarding Revolutionary claims (1833 July 25), his progress in the execution of the joint resolution concerning claims to military bounty land (1833 Oct. 14), his duties as agent for the state of Virginia to examine the claims of officers & soldiers of the Virginia Continental & State lines to military bounty lands (1833 Oct. 26), a report made to the U.S. Senate respecting officers & soldiers of the Revolutionary Army to bounty land (1833 Nov. 18), the claims of the heirs of Capt. William Gregory & Lt. John Gregory and the heirs of Brigadier General Hugh Mercer & Lt. Samuel Campbell (1834 Jan. 31), and petitions referred to him for bounty lands (1834 Feb. 10).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to amendments to the U.S. Constitution, the militia, extraditions, the Tariff of 1828, and the Nullification Crisis. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: David Hazzard & Caleb Prew Bennett, Delaware; Jacques Dupre & Andre B. Roman, Louisiana; Edward Russell, Maine; Gideon Tomlinson & John S. Peters, Connecticut; Gabriel Moore, Alabama; Norman Williams, Vermont; Thomas Metcalfe, Kentucky; Daniel Martin & George Howard, Maryland; Duncan McArthur, Ohio; Levi Lincoln, Massachusetts; John Reynolds, Illinois; Montfort Stokes & David L. Swain, North Carolina; Samuel G. Smith, Tennessee; George Wolf, Pennsylvania; Robert Young Hayne, South Carolina; and Wilson Lumpkin, Georgia.

Governors David Hazzard, Delaware, & Jacques Dupre, Louisiana, transmit resolutions in favor of the Tariff of 1828 (1830 Mar. 16 & Apr. 20). Governor Caleb Prew Bennett, Delaware, transmits a resolution against the resolution of South Carolina calling for a convention of the states to propose amendments to the Constitution (1833 Jan. 31). Bennett also transmits resolutions recommending a law by Congress providing for a more perfect & uniform organization of the militia of the several states (1833 Feb. 14). Governor Andre B. Roman, Louisiana, encloses resolutions regarding the survey of a contemplated railroad from the Mississippi River through the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Virginia, Alabama, & North Carolina to Washington (1832 Apr. 30). Edward Russell, Secretary of State of Maine, transmits maps and statistical view of the State of Maine (1830 May 24). Governor Gideon Tomlinson, Connecticut, transmits a resolution concurring with the resolution of Missouri to amend the Constitution to provide a uniform mode of electing the president & vice president without the intervention of electors (1830 Aug. 28). Later, Governor John S. Peters transmits a report & resolutions as relates to the Constitution & judiciary of the U.S. (1831 June 30). Governor Gabriel Moore, Alabama, encloses a resolution recommending the re-election of Andrew Jackson as president (1830 Dec. 11). Norman Williams, Secretary of State of Vermont, transmits resolutions against the proposal of the state of Louisiana to amend the Constitution to extend the term of the office of the president & vice president to six years (1830 Dec. 10). Governor Thomas Metcalfe, Kentucky, transmits resolutions to open a road from Jonesborough, Tennessee, to the mouth of Shelly's Creek on the Big Sandy River (1830 Dec. 31). Governor Daniel Martin, Maryland, encloses a resolution for the opening of a safe & direct navigation through the sounds which run parallel with the coast (1831 Jan. 28). Afterward, Governor George Howard transmits resolutions against the re-election of Andrew Jackson and recommending Henry Clay as president (1832 June [N.D.]). Howard also writes respecting the boundary line between Virginia & Maryland (1832 June [N.D.]). Governor Duncan McArthur, Ohio, writes regarding the demand for a fugitive named Elton Conner (1831 Jan. 14). McArthur also writes regarding surveys of military lands by the Principal Surveyor of the Army Lands in the Virginia Military District (1831 July 1 & Nov. 15). Levi Lincoln, Massachusetts, transmits resolutions for a more perfect organization of the militia of the several states (1831 Mar. 9). Lincoln also transmits resolutions regarding the Constitution, judicial power, & laws of the U.S. (1831 Mar. 17). John Reynolds, Illinois, writes acknowledging receipt of a map of Virginia (1831 Mar. 14) and transmits resolutions for a law for the more perfect organization of the militia of the several states (1832 Dec. 22). Governor Montfort Stokes, North Carolina, writes regarding their publication of a declaration of independence by citizens of Mecklenburg County in May 1775 and other documents (1831 July 1). Stokes also writes regarding the demand for John Hickson, a fugitive from justice in Virginia (1831 Aug. 10). Subsequently, Governor David L. Swain, North Carolina, writes regarding the extradition of Washington Taborn, a fugitive from justice in Virginia (1833 Feb. 6), and a demand for Mark W. Jones confined in the jail of Norfolk County (1833 Nov. 18). Samuel G. Smith, Secretary of State of Tennessee, encloses a resolution relative to the public lands of the U.S. and a resolution in relation to the exercise of certain powers by the General Government (1832 Jan. 31). Governor George Wolf, Pennsylvania, transmits an act to open & improve part of the state road from Samuel Hills in Greene County, Pennsylvania, to Middlebourne, Virginia (1832 Jan. 24). Governor Robert Young Hayne, South Carolina, transmits resolutions for a convention of the states to consider & determine questions of disputed power between the states & general government (1833 Jan. 5). Hayne also transmits a copy of the reports & ordnances of the Convention of the people of South Carolina (enclosures not included) (1833 May 25). Lastly, Governor Wilson Lumpkin, Georgia, encloses a resolution against the resolutions of Tennessee in relation to the sale & disposition of the public lands of the United States (1834 Jan. 1).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: John Tyler to James M. Selden re. his estate in New Kent County called Woodsey's (1830 Sept. 16); Gustavus A. Myers, Chairman of the Committee of the Common Council, encl. a resolution re. conveying the waste water from the pump in the enclosure around the Governor's house to the gutter on 13th Street (1830 Nov. 29); Robert Triplett re. unsatisfied claims of the officers, soldiers, & seamen of the Virginia State Line during the Revolution to military bounty land in Kentucky (1830 Dec. 28); David E. Moore re. proposals for supplying the guard at the Lexington Arsenal (1830 Dec. 23); John H. Peyton, President of the Court of Directors of the Western Lunatic Hospital, encl. a report and list of patients (1831 Jan. 8); John Coulter resigning as judge of the Court of Appeals (1831 Mar. 23); Robert B. Taylor resigning as major general and encl. a letter accepting an appointment as judge of the General Court (1831 Apr. 25); John Y. Mason resigning his seat in the Virginia Senate (1831 Apr. 22); William Daniel accepting his commission as judge of the General Court and of the Superior Courts of Law & Chancery (1831 May 3); James Monroe resigning as a visitor of the University of Virginia due to poor health (1831 May 14); Thomas W. Gilmer accepting his appointment as agent under the act of the General Assembly concerning certain claims of the state of Virginia against the U.S. (1831 June 28); Dabney Carr accepting an appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1831 June 15); Dabney Carr resigning as visitor of the University of Virginia (1831 July 1); William DuVal re. claims of Virginia against the U.S. during the Revolutionary War (1830 Nov. 1 & 15, & 1831 Mar. 19); various county clerks re. the furnishing of seals of the Superior Court of Law for the county (1831 July); William Broadnax accepting his appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1831 Aug. 17); William Cave, Indiana, re. the whereabouts of Boxley, a fugitive from justice (1831 Sept. 5); Benjamin F. Brown proposing to rent the Boring Mill (1831 Oct. 1); R. M. Patterson, Chairman of the Faculty of the University of Virginia, re. a volunteer association for the purpose of receiving military tactics (1831 Oct. 24); R. M. Patterson re. arms for the use of the students of the University of Virginia (1831 Nov. 3); Anonymous re. the dangers of the assembly of negroes at the market in Richmond (undated); Clement White, Superintendent of Quarantine at the Port of Richmond, re. the quarantine of vessels (1831 Dec. 19 & 28; 1832 Jan. 8, 16, & 27, Feb. 12 & 29, Apr. 25, July 16 & 23, Sept. 18; 1834 Jan. 14, 17, & 27); John H. Peyton encl. the annual report of the Western Lunatic Asylum (report not included) (1832 Jan. 7); A. P. Hill recommending Map Green as colonel of cavalry for Culpeper County (1832 Jan. 16); John M. Patton re. proceedings of a convention of free negroes of the United States at Philadelphia from 6 to 11 June 1831 (1832 Jan. 21); letters of application for vaccine agent (1832 Feb. 15); John A. Washington, Mt. Vernon, re. the resolutions of the General Assembly for the removal of the remains of General Washington (incl. letter of John Marshall declining to cooperate) (1832 Mar. 5); William H. Richardson re. papers & books in the roof of the Capitol, their removal, & the employment of someone to examine & arrange them (1832 May 8); S. M. Stillwell encl. a copy of a report to inquire into the expediency of a total abolition of capital punishment (1832 June 3); Henry Gibson requesting an order for salutes to be fired on the anniversary of the American Independence (1832 June 19); Thomas W. Gilmer re. receipt & transmission to the Treasury of Virginia the money which will be paid from the U.S. for adjusting the claims of Virginia against the General Government (1832 June 26); Conway Whittle, Collector's Office, re. the act of the General Assembly to cede to the U.S. a certain piece or parcel of land on Assateague Island in the county of Accomack for the purpose of erecting a lighthouse (1832 June 27); James Cabaniss re. the propriety of disposing of the remains of the Old Capitol including the walls, stone steps, & stone floor (1832 Sept. 20); James Semple accepting an appointment as judge of the General Court & Superior Court of Law & Chancery for the 4th Judicial Circuit (1832 Sept. 11); William Brockenbrough re. the resignation of William Browne as judge of the General Court (1832 Aug. 27); A. P. Upshur re. a demand from the Executive of New York for the surrender of slaves who stole a large boat from Peter Bowdain and absconded to New York (1832 Oct. 4); Charles James Faulkner re. his commission for the settlement of the western boundary of Maryland (1832 Nov. 6); George Tucker, Chairman of the faculty of the University of Virginia, encl. a resolution of the faculty requesting an annual grant for the use of the Library (1832 Nov. 19); James Cabaniss encl. a valuation of the remains of the former Capitol in Williamsburg (1832 Nov. 26); Richard Coke, Jr., re. commissioners appointed by the states Delaware & Maryland to superintend a survey of the sounds on the Atlantic Coast between Capes Charles & Henlopen (1833 Dec. 14); Thomas B. Randolph resigning as brigadier general of the 4th Brigade to become sergeant at arms to the House of Representatives (1833 Jan. 1); R. A. McPherson, Indianapolis, re. the presence of George Boxley who was the leader of an insurrection in Spotsylvania County(1833 Feb. 7); B. W. Leigh, Charleston, re. the States Rights Party & the preservation of the Union as Commissioner of Virginia to South Carolina (1833 Feb. 22); B. W. Leigh, Columbia, re. the Convention of South Carolina on the recent act of Congress modifying the tariff, the mediation of Virginia, & the coercion law (1833 Mar. 13); John S. Gallagher re. his appointment as one of the commissioners to settle the western limits of the state and the boundary line between Virginia & Maryland (1833 May 9); John McGee, Indianapolis, requesting an appointment as an agent to Virginia to apprehend George Boxley (1833 May 9); J. M. Mason accepting a commission as a visitor of the University of Virginia (1833 July 1); G. Millan re. a suspicious charlatan who is endeavoring to cause the slaves in Fairfax to make insurrection (1833 Sept. 9); J. L. Edwards, War Dept. Pension Office, re. claims founded on service in the Public Armory at Fredericksburg during the Revolutionary War (1833 Sept. 10); Peter A. Browne, Philadelphia, re. the expediency of a topographical, geological, mineralogical, & oryctological survey of Virginia (1833 Sept. 30); James Barron, U.S. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, re. his service during the Revolutionary War (1833 Sept. 30); Committee of students at the University of Virginia requesting sixty new muskets, cartouche boxes, & belts (1833 Oct. 7); Thomas P. Culbreth, Clerk of the Executive Council of Maryland, re. engineers for the survey of the coast & sounds between Cape Charles & Lewistown (1833 Oct. 30); Robert C. Nicholas, U.S. Attorney General, encl. a letter from Levi Woodbury, Navy Dept., re. the ceding of jurisdiction from the governor to the U.S. over certain lands near Norfolk (1834 Feb. 12); Robert C. Nicholas resigning as Director of the Penitentiary (1834 Jan. 9), and David E. Moore, Captain of the Lexington Arsenal, re. defects in the laws for the government of the Arsenal (1834 Feb. 24).

Other noteworthy items include: proclamations by the governor & lieutenant governor offering rewards for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1830 Apr. 10, May 8, June 24, Nov. 20, Dec. 27; 1831 Mar. 22, Oct. 27; 1832 Mar. 2, May 28, Sept. 28, Nov. 13 & 23, Dec. 10; 1833 Apr. 16, June 11, July 9, Aug. 23, Sept. 23, Dec. 11; 1834 Jan. 20, & Feb. 14); proclamation that a majority of qualified voters is in favor of the ratification of the Constitution (1830 July 1); proclamation for an election to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Philip P. Barbour from the House of Representatives (1830 Oct. 23); memorial of the American Convention for promoting the abolition of slavery and improving the condition of the African race (1831 Jan. 10); certificate of qualification of John Floyd as governor (1831 Mar. 31); certificates of qualification of Peter V. Daniel, Daniel A. Wilson, & Wyndham Robertson as members of the Privy Council (1831 Mar. 31); proclamation that elections for Congress not be held in the month of April for the present year (1831 Mar. 8); proclamation re. an election to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John Y. Mason in the Virginia Senate (1831 May 25); proclamation for an election to supply the vacancy in the Virginia Senate by the resignation of Joseph W. Chinn (1831 June 11); advice of the Council re. the death of James Monroe (1831 July 8); certificate of oath of Lawson Burfoot as treasurer (1832 Feb. 1); proclamation for an election to supply the vacancy in the Virginia Senate occasioned by the resignation of William Armistead (1832 Mar. 22); proclamation for an election to supply the vacancy in the Virginia Senate occasioned by the resignation of Charles S. Morgan (1832 Mar. 26); proclamation that the Circuit Superior Court of Law & Chancery in Williamsburg be held at the courthouse of James City County on account of the fire in Williamsburg (1832 Apr. 11); bond of William S. Scott as vaccine agent (1832 Apr. 19); circular of a proceeding of a meeting of the Pennsylvania Society for the promotion of manufacturers & the mechanic arts (1832 May 17); act for the apportionment of representatives among the several states according to the Fifth Census (1832 May 22); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Wyndham Robertson requesting the sheriffs of the several counties to delay bringing any convicts to the Penitentiary on account of a cholera outbreak (1832 Sept. 28); list of persons who have qualified as citizens of Virginia between 1 October 1831 & 1 October 1832 in Henrico County (1832 Oct. 1); list of aliens who have taken the oath of naturalization for the year ending 1 October 1832 in Logan County (1832 Oct. 1); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Wyndham Robertson for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Representatives caused by the death of Charles C. Johnston (1832 Oct. 2); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary containing resolutions to employ an additional assistant keeper & nurses (includes cholera reports & correspondence) (1832 Oct. 12); proclamation for the election of electors for each county to choose a president & vice president of the U.S. (1832 Nov. 21); proclamation requiring the sheriff of Norfolk County, etc., to cause an election to be held for a suitable person to replace William C. Holt in the Virginia Senate (1832 Dec. 1); proclamation for an election to replace Philip Doddridge as a member of the House of Representatives (1832 Dec. 10); resolution of New Hampshire approving of the proclamation of the President on 10 December 1832 regarding his exercise of veto (1833 Jan. 1); resolution of the Court of Directors for the Lunatic Hospital in Williamsburg that William W. Vest be commissioned as director in the room of James Semple, Jr. (1833 Jan. 7); order of Governor Floyd for improvements to the Penitentiary (includes correspondence from C. S. Morgan, Lewis W. Chamberlayne, & Lewis G. Sewell) (1833 Apr. 9); proclamation for an election to supply the vacancy in the Virginia Senate occasioned by the resignation of William McComas (1833 May 20); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Robertson directing the sheriffs of the counties in the 5th Congressional District to cause an election to be held to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of John Randolph (1833 June 22); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary (1833 Aug. 26); proclamation for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Delegates for Louisa County occasioned by the death of Charles Dabney (1833 Sept. 25); proceedings of the Court of Directors of the Western State Lunatic Hospital recommending the appointment of Edward Valentine (1833 Nov. 2) & Thomas J. Michie (1833 Nov. 14); proceedings of the Directors of the Lunatic Hospital in Williamsburg recommending Thomas O. Cogbill as director to fill the vacancy left by the death of George Morrison (1834 Feb. 7); proclamation for an election to supply the vacancy in the House of Representatives occasioned by the death of Thomas T. Bouldin (1834 Feb. 20); and the certificate of qualification of Littleton W. Tazewell as governor of Virginia (1834 Mar. 31).

Arranged in chronological order.

  • 1830
    • March
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        4-16
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        17-31
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        2-19
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        20-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        1-18
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        19-29
    • June
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        1-19
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        20-30
    • July
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        1-13
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        14-30
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      August
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      September
    • October
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        17-30
    • November
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        11-24
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        25-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      December
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      Pardons
  • 1831
    • January
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        3-21
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        22-31
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      February
    • March
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 3
        Folder 5
        1-17
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        18-30
    • June
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        1-13
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        14-20
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        21-30
    • July
      • Box 3
        Folder 10
        1-4
      • Box 3
        Folder 11
        5-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        11-14
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        15-30
    • August
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        22-30
    • September
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        11-19
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        20-25
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        26-30
    • October
      • Box 4
        Folder 10
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 11
        11-22
      • Box 4
        Folder 12
        23-31
    • November
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        11-22
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        23-30
    • December
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        16-31
    • Pardons
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        October
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        November
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        December
  • 1832
    • January
      • Box 5
        Folder 9
        2-8
      • Box 5
        Folder 10
        9-21
      • Box 5
        Folder 11
        22-31
    • February
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-12
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        13-17
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        20-29
    • March
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        12-20
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        21-30
    • April
      • Box 6
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        16-31
    • May
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 10
        11-20
      • Box 6
        Folder 11
        21-30
    • June
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        1-11
      • Box 7
        Folder 2
        12-21
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        22-30
    • July
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        2-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        12-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        21-31
    • August
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        2-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 8
        11-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 9
        21-31
    • September
      • Box 7
        Folder 10
        1-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 11
        11-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 12
        21-30
    • October
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 8
        Folder 3
        21-31
    • November
      • Box 8
        Folder 4
        1-9
      • Box 8
        Folder 5
        10-19
      • Box 8
        Folder 6
        20-30
    • December
      • Box 8
        Folder 7
        1-8
      • Box 8
        Folder 8
        10-19
      • Box 8
        Folder 9
        22-31
  • 1833
    • January
      • Box 9
        Folder 1
        1-11
      • Box 9
        Folder 2
        12-31
    • February
      • Box 9
        Folder 3
        1-14
      • Box 9
        Folder 4
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 9
        Folder 5
        1-9
      • Box 9
        Folder 6
        11-20
      • Box 9
        Folder 7
        21-31
    • April
      • Box 9
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 9
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 9
        Folder 10
        1-10
      • Box 9
        Folder 11
        13-20
      • Box 9
        Folder 12
        22-31
    • July
      • Box 10
        Folder 5
        1-11
      • Box 10
        Folder 6
        12-19
      • Box 10
        Folder 7
        22-31
    • August
      • Box 10
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 10
        Folder 9
        16-23
      • Box 10
        Folder 7
        25-31
    • September
      • Box 10
        Folder 11
        1-10
      • Box 10
        Folder 12
        11-30
    • October
      • Box 11
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 11
        Folder 2
        19-31
    • November
      • Box 11
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 11
        Folder 4
        11-18
      • Box 11
        Folder 5
        19-24
      • Box 11
        Folder 6
        25-28
      • Box 11
        Folder 7
        29-30
    • December
      • Box 11
        Folder 8
        1-10
      • Box 11
        Folder 9
        11-31
      • Box 11
        Folder 10
        Undated
  • 1834
    • January
      • Box 12
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 12
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 12
        Folder 3
        22-31
    • February
      • Box 12
        Folder 4
        3-15
      • Box 12
        Folder 5
        16-25
      • Box 12
        Folder 6
        26-28
    • March
      • Box 12
        Folder 7
        1-14
      • Box 12
        Folder 8
        16-31
  • Box 12
    Folder 9
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1830
    • Box 13
      Folder 1
      May 22
    • Box 13
      Folder 2
      June 19
    • Box 13
      Folder 3
      July 1
    • Box 13
      Folder 4
      July 2
    • Box 13
      Folder 5
      July 21
    • Box 13
      Folder 6
      Oct. 9
    • Box 13
      Folder 7
      Nov. 20
    • Box 13
      Folder 8
      Dec. 10
  • 1831
    • Box 13
      Folder 9
      Feb. 4
    • Box 13
      Folder 10
      Mar. 18
    • Box 13
      Folder 11
      Mar. 22
    • Box 13
      Folder 12
      June 29
    • Box 13
      Folder 13
      July [N.D.]
    • Box 13
      Folder 14
      Aug. [N.D.]
    • Box 13
      Folder 15
      Sept. 19
    • Box 13
      Folder 16
      Nov. 28
    • Pardons - October
      • Box 13
        Folder 17
        Amos (slave)
      • Box 13
        Folder 18
        Jarrell, Simon
  • 1832
    • Box 13
      Folder 19
      Feb. 15
    • Box 13
      Folder 20
      Nov. [N.D.]
    • Box 13
      Folder 21
      Dec. 26
  • 1833
    • Box 13
      Folder 22
      Jan. 16
    • Box 13
      Folder 23
      Mar. 1
    • Box 13
      Folder 24
      Mar. 7
    • Box 13
      Folder 25
      Mar. 11
    • Box 13
      Folder 26
      Oct. 11
    • Box 13
      Folder 27
      Oct. 29
    • Box 13
      Folder 28
      Nov. [N.D.]
    • Box 13
      Folder 29
      Dec. 2
    • Box 13
      Folder 30
      Dec. 7
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1830
    • Box 14
      Folder 1
      Apr. 7
    • Box 14
      Folder 2
      May 19
    • Box 14
      Folder 3
      Nov. 27
    • Box 14
      Folder 4
      Dec. 11
    • Box 14
      Folder 5
      Dec. 21
  • 1831
    • Box 14
      Folder 6
      Jan. 8
    • Box 14
      Folder 7
      Feb. 11
    • Box 14
      Folder 8
      Feb. 24
    • Box 14
      Folder 9
      July 8
    • Box 14
      Folder 10
      Sept. 9
    • Box 14
      Folder 11
      Sept. 26
    • Box 14
      Folder 12
      Nov. 9
  • 1832
    • Box 14
      Folder 13
      May 7
    • Box 14
      Folder 14
      May 20
    • Box 14
      Folder 15
      Sept. 24
  • 1833
    • Box 14
      Folder 16
      Feb. 14
    • Box 14
      Folder 17
      June 21
    • Box 14
      Folder 18
      Sept. 6
    • Box 14
      Folder 19
      Nov. 29
  • 1834
    • Box 14
      Folder 20
      Mar. 7