A Guide to the Thomas Henry Bayly Papers, 1837-1854 Bayly, Thomas Henry, Papers, 1837-1854 23830b

A Guide to the Thomas Henry Bayly Papers, 1837-1854

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 23830b


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Processed by: Trenton Hizer

Repository
The Library of Virginia
Accession Number
23830b
Title
Thomas Henry Bayly Papers, 1837-1854
Physical Description
15 pages
Creator
Thomas Henry Bayly
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Thomas Henry Bayly Papers, 1837-1854. Accession 23830b. Personal Papers Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Purchased, 20 May 1952, from Aldine Book Company, Brooklyn, New York.


Biographical Information

Thomas Henry Bayly was born 11 December 1809 in Accomack County, Virginia, to Thomas Monteagle Bayly (1775-1834) and Margaret Pettit Cropper Bayly. He attended private schools, then attended the University of Virginia where he studied law. Bayly was admitted to the bar in 1831. In 1836 he was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates and represented Accomack County there until 1842. In 1837 he was appointed a general in the Virginia militia. In 1842, Bayly was elected a judge on the circuit court, but resigned in 1844. That same year he was elected to the United States House of Representatives where he served until his death. Bayly held several important committee chairs and supported the Compromise of 1850 while in Congress. He married Evelyn Harrison May (1819-1897) of Petersburg, Virginia, 11 May 1837 and they had 2 daughters. Bayly died 22 June 1856.

Scope and Content

Papers, 1837-1854, of Thomas Henry Bayly (1809-1856) of Accomack County, Virginia, consisting of letters, 1837-1852, concerning Bayly's subscription to the Washington Globe; Bayly's forwarding of letters; Bayly asking for a correction of a speech published in the Congressional Globe; a controversy between Bayly and New York Congressman James Brooks; a request to Bayly to arrange an interview for William Birkus with the United States Navy; and legislation concerning the army. Papers also contain an note, 3 June 1854, to Riggs and Company for payment of $450; note, no date, regarding the French Spoilation Claims Commission; and a subscription, no date, for Bayly's speech on the revenue bill.

Contents List

Letter, 26 December 1837, to Francis Preston Blair of Washington D.C. asking Blair to reroute his subscription of the Washington Globe to Richmond, Virginia, during the term of the Virginia general assembly.
Letter, 31 August 1846, to J. H. Caster forwarding a letter from A. Billups.
Letter, 18 July 1848, to Henry A. Wise, forwarding a letter.
Letter, 5 December 1849 [or 1844], to John C. Rives of the Congressional Globe asking Rives to substitute corrected remarks of a speech of his which it incorrectly printed.
Letter, 31 January 1850, to the editors of the Intelligencer concerning a controversy between Bayly and Congressman James Brooks of New York over remarks in the United States House of Representatives.
Letter, 11 February 1852, from A. W. Downing requesting Bayly's aid in setting up an interview with the navy for his medical partner William E. Birkus, includes a note from Bayly to the Secretary of the Navy William A. Graham asking for the interview.
Letter, 23 March 1852, to an unknown correspondent about legislation concerning the army.
Note, 3 June 1854, to Riggs and Company for payment of $450 to F. Doyle.
Letter, no date, to Mr. Holyday concerning the publication of one of his speeches.
Subscription, no date, for Bayly's speech on the revenue bill.
Note, no date, concerning returning a member to the French Spoilation Claims.