A Guide to the Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1816-1821 Gilmer, Francis Walker, Letters, 1816-1821 18783

A Guide to the Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1816-1821

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 18783


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Trenton Hizer

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
18783
Title
Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1816-1821
Physical Characteristics
1 leaf and 32 pages
Creator
Francis Walker Gilmer
Physical Location
Personal Papers Collection, Acc. 18783
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Francis Walker Gilmer. Letters, 1816-1821. Accession 18783. Personal papers collection. The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Lyon G. Tyler, 5 February 1924.


Biographical Information

Francis Walker Gilmer was born 9 October 1790 at "Pen Park" in Albemarle County, Virginia, to George Gilmer (1742-1795) and Lucy Walker Gilmer (1751-1800). He received some of his education at Monticello from Martha Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836) and at a school run by James Ogilvie (1760-1820). Gilmer attended the College of William and Mary in 1809-1810, then studied law under William Wirt (1772-1834) in Richmond, Virginia. Upon the completion of his legal studies, he travelled extensively along the eastern seaboard with the Abbe Joseph Francisco Correa de Serra (1750-1823) before beginning the practice of law in Winchester, Virginia, in 1816. A year later, Gilmer returned to Richmond to continue practicing law. In 1824, he was chosen by Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) to travel to Europe to hire professors for the newly established University of Virginia. Gilmer himself was appointed professor of law, but he died before he could assume his position on 25 February 1826 at "Farmington" in Albemarle County.

Scope and Content Information

Letters, 1816-1821, from Francis Walker Gilmer (1790-1826) of Winchester and Richmond, Virginia, to Thomas Walker Gilmer (1802-1844) of Albemarle County, Virginia, in which Francis Walker Gilmer offers his nephew Thomas Walker Gilmer advice on his education and critiques his literary style and penmanship. Gilmer encourages his nephew to read certain works and to study hard in mathmatics, languages, literature, and oration. He comments on deportment and character and on what is necessary to make a name for one's self. Francis Gilmer encourages Thomas Gilmer to undertake the study of law. Also a letter from Francis Walker Gilmer to George Gilmer (1778-1836), Francis' brother and Thomas' father, on familial and brotherly relations.

Arrangement

Chronological


Contents List

Letter, 18 February 1816, Francis Walker Gilmer, Winchester, [Virginia], to George Gilmer, Albemarle County, [Virginia], describing his move to Winchester and social and business prospects. Also comments on his relationship with George Gilmer and his other brothers, and how Francis Gilmer hopes to help with his nephews' education.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 4 May 1816, Francis Walker Gilmer, Winchester, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Charlottesville, Albemarle County, expressing the value of education, health, diet and exercise, personal behavior, conversation, and reading. Gilmer makes recommendations for Thomas' studies and thinks that Thomas should help his cousin William.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 8 April 1817, Francis Walker Gilmer, Winchester, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Albemarle County, commenting on the value of hard study at an early age, and the difficulty of achieving greatness. Gilmer makes recommendations for reading and study.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 1817, Francis Walker Gilmer, Winchester, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Albemarle County, giving advice on studying Greek and mathmatics. Comments on patience, general behavior, and observation. Gilmer adds that Thomas should sign his full name to letters.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 28 October 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, commenting on the death of Thomas' instructor, Mr. Robertson. Francis Gilmer comments on colleges for Thomas to attend.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 2 January 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Charlottesville, Albemarle County, commenting on the necessity for hard work. He offers points for personal improvement and remarks on handwriting, literary style, and debating societies. He encourages Thomas to study the classics.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 3 December 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer suggesting that he consult with Peachy Ridgway Gilmer about studying law in Bedford County, [Virginia]. Francis Gilmer warns against studying law in Richmond because of expenses. Gilmer recommends mode and course of study.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 5 March 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Liberty, Bedford County, offering criticism of Thomas' literary style. He encourages Thomas to pursue the law as a career.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 24 March 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Liberty, Bedford County, congratulating Thomas on the improvement in his literary style. Gilmer remarks on the need for study, and encourages Thomas to practice speaking and reading aloud.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 27 May 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Liberty, Bedford County, discussing the study of foreign and ancient languages and arithmetic. Gilmer comments on the need for personal accounts, and advises on the establishment of a law practice. Gilmer adds a note to Peachy Ridgway Gilmer regarding Hancock v Watts, and sending greetings.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 15 December 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Thomas Walker Gilmer, Milton, Albemarle County, stating that he will be sending Thomas a copy of Henings' Justice for him. Gilmer hopes Thomas will practice as soon as he is able. Gilmer asks about Thomas' father George, as Gilmer has not heard from him. Gilmer may ride up to Albemarle County from Richmond. Gilmer advises continued study.
2 p., ALS.