A Guide to the Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1818-1824 Gilmer, Francis Walker, Letters, 1818-1824 18765

A Guide to the Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1818-1824

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 18765


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Trenton Hizer

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
18765
Title
Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1818-1824
Physical Characteristics
72 letters (9 leaves and 206 pages)
Creator
Francis Walker Gilmer
Physical Location
Personal Papers Collection, Acc. 18765
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Francis Walker, Gilmer. Letters, 1818-1824. Accession 18765. Personal papers collection. The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Purchased from the Anderson Galleries, New York, New York, 11 December 1923.


Biographical Information

Francis Walker Gilmer was born 9 October 1790 at "Pen Park" in Albemarle County, Virginia, to George Gilmer (1742-1795) and Lucy Walker Gilmer (1751-1800). He received some of his education at Monticello from Martha Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836) and at a school run by James Ogilvie (1760-1820). Gilmer attended the College of William and Mary in 1809-1810, then studied law under William Wirt (1772-1834) in Richmond, Virginia. Upon the completion of his legal studies, he travelled extensively along the eastern seaboard with the Abbe Joseph Francisco Correa de Serra (1750-1823) before beginning the practice of law in Winchester, Virginia, in 1816. A year later, Gilmer returned to Richmond to continue practicing law. In 1824, he was chosen by Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) to travel to Europe to hire professors for the newly established University of Virginia. Gilmer himself was appointed professor of law, but he died before he could assume his position on 25 February 1826 at "Farmington" in Albemarle County.

Scope and Content Information

Letters, 1818-1824, from Francis Walker Gilmer (1790-1826) of Richmond, Virginia, to Dabney Carr (1773-1837) of Winchester, Virginia, discussing state and national politics; Gilmer's personal life and legal career; and news of friends and acquaintances. Gilmer discusses his legal career in Richmond; Carr's career as chancellor and his appointment to the Court of Appeals; and William Wirt's (1772-1834) career as United States Attorney General. He also discusses the processes of selecting judges for the chancery courts and the Court of Appeals. Gilmer offers information regarding his trip to Europe to hire professors for the new University of Virginia. Gilmer comments on his, Carr's, and Wirt's health, and on Peachy R. Gilmer, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, William Pinkney, John Randolph, Martha Randolph, Spencer Roane, Creed Taylor, Henry St. George Tucker, and Robert Wirt, among others. He remarks on his failed courtships of Ellen Wayles Randolph (Coolidge) (1796-1876) and Elizabeth Tucker Coalter (Bryan) (1805-1856). Gilmer writes about his travels to the Virginia springs and to Albemarle County, Virginia.

Arrangement

Chronological


Contents List

Letter, 23 February 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, [Virginia], to Dabney Carr, Winchester, [Virginia], regarding William Wirt's advice to Gilmer to move to Baltimore, Maryland; Gilmer's opinion of Baltimore; the Baltimore bar; and Gilmer's decision to stay in Richmond. Gilmer mentions his books still in Winchester. Comments on Joseph C. Cabell and the Central College (University of Virginia), and recommends Judge Hugh Holmes for the site committee.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 11 April 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, regarding his and Peachy R. Gilmer's plans to make Carr a state Supreme Court judge. Gilmer has not settled in at Richmond, nor yet argued a case. Discusses local politics in Albemarle County, Virginia, and comments on James Monroe's popularity. Also discusses personal matters.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 25 April 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to [Dabney Carr, Winchester], stating that there is no activities in the courts and describing his defense of a murderer. He sends personal remarks and greetings.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 25 May 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, regarding Henry St. George Tucker, a reply to "Decius," John Randolph, business conditions in Richmond, Mrs. French and "Sena Sama" the Hindoo adventurer in town, personal plans, news, and greetings.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 13 June 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning a flood in Winchester; a church convention in Charlottesville, Virginia, combined with an attack on Thomas Jefferson by potential attendees; Gilmer's vacation plans; and William Wirt. Gilmer states that the Superior Court of Chancery in Richmond is poorly run. He attaches a not for collection (not extant). Gilmer adds that "Decius" is writing again and comments on the Richmond social scene.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 16 August 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Ridgway, Albemarle County, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning some land business in Clarkesburg, [(West) Virginia]. Gilmer must be back in Richmond by 1 September for a case. Comments on his health and an invitation to Mr. Divers. Gilmer remarks on agricultural improvements in Albemarle County, the forthcoming church convention, and the Allegheny Mountains.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 12 October 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Fredericksburg, [Virginia], to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning Macon's embarassed affairs and Gilmer's distaste for work relating to it. Gilmer states that he and William Wirt are going to ignore "Decius," and comments on poor appreciation of real humor. Gilmer mentions his writing under "Ricardus." Gilmer believes that Carr should write a history of parties in the United States or a biography of Thomas Jefferson. Gilmer also sends personal and professional news.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 13 December 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, describing an encounter between William Wirt and William Pinkney. Gilmer comments on an appearance before the Court of Appeal. He expresses disgust over Andrew Jackson's actions in Florida. Gilmer had considered running for counsellor of state. He asks after Judge Holmes' health and mentions Colonel James' marriage. Gilmer remarks on the virtues of motherhood to children and states that the Central College will pass the legislature.
3 p. ALS.
Letter, 5 January 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, sending season's greetings. Gilmer remarks on the reprint of the autobiography of Captain John Smith. He discusses his good relations with Thomas Jefferson and the Randolph family, despite rumors against Gilmer. Gilmer states that Spencer Roane commented favorably on Carr's decrees. Mentions the Missouri question.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 21 February 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr commenting that he has recovered two lots in Richmond and Manchester, [Virginia], which belong to the Gilmer family and that Peachy R. Gilmer has bought a farm in Fluvanna County, [Virginia]. Gilmer remarks on Richmond as a legal training ground, and makes personal inquiries.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 16 March 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, expressing his regard for Winchester society. Gilmer remarks on his relationship with Jefferson and the Randolph family, condemning the "son of Scipio" for efforts to damage it. Also comments on his relationship with Ellen Wayles Randolph.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 12 April 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that he is travelling to Georgia with John Patterson to recover land.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 31 May 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, describing his trip to Georgia with John Patterson and his foregoing of the project. Gilmer mentions that Ellen Randolph is in town.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 22 June 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that he will be staying in Richmond for the summer due to his legal practice. He sends a letter for Henry St. George Tucker.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 28 September 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Ridgway, Albemarle County, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, informing him that Peachy R. Gilmer's land speculation in Fluvanna County failed. Gilmer remarks on his poor health while in Richmond and other personal news. He mentions Judge Holmes, Miss Zane, Colonel Warren, William Wirt, Miss Baker, and economic conditions in Richmond.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 17 October 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning Gilmer's personal and professional plans. He comments on family news, Dr. Wardlaw's death, and John Randolph. Gilmer mentions his hopes for marriage and Julia Wickham. Gilmer states that the legislature will not raise salaries. He discusses John Smith's history of Virginia.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 19 December 1819, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, commenting on his health and court appearances. Gilmer discusses William Wirt and his lack of formal education. Gilmer mentions John Smith's hiostory of Virginia. Comments on marriage, Thomas Jefferson, Ellen Randolph, and his relationship with them and the Randolph family.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 8 February 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating his regard for Carr and sending seeds of the Minorca muskmelon, along with a method for preventing the degeneration of seeds. Mentions William Wirt.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 27 April 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that he is suffering from depression. He discusses the death of Stephen Decatur, Wilson Cary Nicholas' business failure, John Randolph's madness, and Mrs. Philip Norborne Nicholas' death. He is unable to go to Albemarle. Offers some general reflections on life and mentions the Wirts' visit.
5 p., ALS.
Letter, 30 May 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester (forwarded from Albemarle County), reporting that rumors of bank frauds are untrue. Has not heard from Dabney Terrell. States that Dr. Carr is married and returning to the practice of medicine. Gilmer states he is enthusiastic about the law, and mentions Raleigh's case in Winchester. Also mentions William Wirt.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 31 May 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, asking for news. Gilmer mentions that the courts are starting their sessions. Comments on William Wirt, James Monroe, and John Quincy Adams. Gilmer discusses Spencer Roane's opinion of John Marshall's decision in McCulloch v. Maryland. He describes a violent thunderstorm.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 18 June 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr regretting having missed him at Albemarle. Sends personal news and observation on mutual friends. Mentions the Shanandale Springs. Gilmer is writing Supreme Court reports.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 19 July 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, mentioning Mrs. Carr's illness. Gilmer will be unable to visit the Shanandale Springs. Nearly finished with the court reports, Gilmer contemplating writing a refutation of Jeremy Bentham's essay on usury laws lately supported by George Hay. Believes he will attack Bentham and ignore Hay.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 10 August 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr detailing his last farewell with the Abbe Correa de Serra.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 30 September 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, regarding his visit to Albemarle County to attend to the affairs of Wilson Cary Nicholas' affairs. Gilmer still hopes to be married, and mentions Ellen Randolph. States there are few appropriate women in Richmond except for Julia Wickham. Gilmer mentions the possibility of meeting Carr and William Wirt in either Albemarle County or Washington D.C. Gilmer says that he saw Judge Holmes in Albemarle. Mentions opposition to the university, and states that Thomas Jefferson's plans are too expensive.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 5 November 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, mentioning Mrs. Carr and Miss Baker. "A Vindication of the Laws..." completed, and the compliments of Spencer Roane and William Wirt to be published. Gilmer will send Carr a copy. Comments on the prose style of the English essayists, and expresses admiration for Rosseau's style. Gilmer mentions that William Wirt is in town. He comments on Wilson Cary Nicholas' affairs and the virtue of honesty.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 10 December 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr sending a copy of "A Vindication of the Laws..." to Carr. Gilmer says that he made light of the work of George Hay. Will be unable to go to Albemarle County.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 21 December 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, thanking Carr for his compliments on his essay, which John Randolph also complimented. Gilmer's Reports not printed, waiting on the legislature. Gilmer cannot leave Richmond because of his work. Gilmer states that Spencer Roane thinks Gilmer should write Thomas Jefferson's biography. Gilmer comments on Governor Thomas Mann Randolph's message. Adds personal remarks and greetings.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 3 January 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, sending the letter by Mr. Lee. Discusses Carr's reversal by the Supreme Court, offering analysis. Gilmer relates Spencer Roane's opinion of Carr. Describes George Hay's reaction to "A Vindication of the Laws...," and mentions a letter from Thomas Jefferson on the essay. Adds that John Randolph is showing it to his congressional colleagues.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 15 January 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, regretting that he cannot meet in Albemarle. States that Martha Jefferson Randolph has left Richmond and is now at Tuckahoe, and comments on Ellen Randolph. Gilmer discusses George Hay, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison on his essay, and comments on Madison's character.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 4 March 1820 [1821], Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, commenting on the death of William A. Burwell and Henry Lee's scandalous conduct. Gilmer mentions Lee's efforts at befriending him. Gilmer discusses Thomas Jefferson, the Randolph family, Ellen Randolph, and the lack of profit in "intercourse with the great." Adds personal remarks and comments on Carr's seal.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 25 March 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that court is out of session. States that George Hay is seeking letters of recommendation to be sent to President James Monroe, his father-in-law. Comments on Virginia's honor and Monroe's character. Gilmer discusses marriage, the lack of suitable ladies, and Jefferson's grand daughters. States that Virginia Randolph is to marry Nicholas Trist. Gilmer accepts an invitation to visit. Mentions William Wirt's vertigo and John Randolph's insanity. Also mentions Carr's seal and states he has one on order.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 26 April 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, accepting Carr's reproof for cynicism. Gilmer hopes they may meet in Albemarle County. Discusses Dabney Minor's and William Wirt's health. States that the chancellorship hasn't been offered to anyone. Gilmer comments on William Wirt's legal battle with William Pinkney. Remarks on the state of the Richmond bar.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 13 June 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, discussing plans to visit. Gilmer describes an encounter with Robert Stanard in the United States Circuit Court, over which John Marshall is presiding. Gilmer protests against anti-dueling laws.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 27 June 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning arguments in Preston's case. Discusses Philip Barbour's qualities as a lawyer, and Gilmer's quarrel with Robert Stanard. Gilmer comments on the anti-dueling law, his past fights with others, and Stanard's character. Gilmer laments the decline in quality at the Richmond bar. Adds personal inquiries.
4 p. ALS.
Letter, 28 July 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, concerning meeting in Albemarle County. Comments on "tomalto's" [tomatoes] as an antibilious. Gilmer states other travel uncertain. Gilmer offers personal reflections. Comments that there will be a barbecue. Mentions John Quincy Adams.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 24 September 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Ridgway, Albemarle County, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning his summer travels. States that Dabney Minor did not go to Kentucky. Gilmer provides family news. Comments on Spencer Roane's praise and criticism of Carr's opinions, and Gilmer compares him to other chancellors. Gilmer remarks on his hopes for the future.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 18 December 1821, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, sending letter by Henry St. George Tucker. Offers personal greetings. Gilmer remarks on William Wirt, Christmas plans, and reflections of past Christmases.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 4 January 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Washington, thanking him for his letter. Gilmer unable to come to Washington. Mentions William Wirt, Miss Baker, the Richmond ladies, and Ellen Randolph. Offers his personal reflections and greetings.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 12 January 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that he has sent legal notes. Gilmer's brother Peachy is visiting. Gilmer has a proposal to argue a case claiming Illinois and other states under an Indian title.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 28 [January] 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating how the legislature has not acted on the new judgeship. Mentions a rumor that Carr might be on the faculty of the soon-to-be University of Virginia. Gilmer asks for news from Washington, and comments on James Monroe.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 11 February 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that John Coalter is about to be married. Gilmer is concerned for Coalter's daughter's, Elizabeth Tucker Coalter, health. Gilmer has a low opinion of her doctor. States that a new judge has not been chosen. Gilmer remarks on William Wirt's health and Henry Clay's talents.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 14 February 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Washington, informing him that the new judge still has not been appointed. Comments on the health of William Wirt and of Elizabeth Coalter.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 21 February 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that the legislature did not appoint a sixth judge this session. Gilmer recommends actions to secure it for Carr in the upcoming session. Comments on the health of Elizabeth Coalter and of William Wirt.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 28 February 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr relating the tale of his courtship of Elizabeth Coalter and her rejection of his proposal. Comments on William Pinkney's death.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 26 March 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr thanking Carr for his commiserations and advice. Gilmer reviews the rejected proposal and believes that Elizabeth Coalther rejected him for Dr. Theodore Dudley. Gilmer will revise and enlarge his "Sketches of American Orators."
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 26 April 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr discussing his vaction plans, including a visit to the William Wirts and a possilbe Northern tour. Gilmer comments on his readings in the law and ruminates philosophically on his future. He describes his letter seal and the Gilmer crest and mottoes.
3 p., AL., signature removed.
Letter, 25 June 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, detailing his successes in court this term, and discussing his vacation plans. Gilmer comments on deaths among their friends.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 7 August 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning difficulties with Chancellor Creed Taylor. Gilmer discusses Robert Wirt's illness, staing that his mind is disordered. Gilmer mentions his travel plans and sickness in Richmond.
3 p., AL., signature removed.
Letter, 7 September 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that Robert Wirt is now in his care and still disordered in his mind. Gilmer mentions sickness in Richmond. States that John W. Green is appointed to the state Supreme Court of Appeals.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 1 November 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning Robert Wirt's illness and its symptoms.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 25 November 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that Robert Wirt's illness is worse, and that Gilmer has advised William Wirt to send him to Philadelphia for treatment. Gilmer discusses his defense of Lithgow and the Richmond bar. Also sends personal remarks. Gilmer asks Carr to go to Washington and speak with Wirt about Robert.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 29 December 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that he has sent Robert Wirt home, and that Robert is now in Philadelphia. Gilmer discusses a potential trip to New York in the summer and one to Albemarle County in the spring. He mentions the possibility of a new Supreme Court of Appeals judgeship and Carr's chances for it. Gilmer comments on the Kentucky compromise and local news.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 23 February 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, stating that the author of letters signed "Henry" is [either James or Philip] Barbour. Gilmer also mentions his social plans. He complains of the "minister Ply. to Madrid" [Hugh Nelson] and James Monroe. Gilmer states that the legislature is doing nothing on a possible judgeship. He comments on local news and recommends Cicero as reading for Dabney [Minor].
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 13 April 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, commenting on national politics. He states that rumors of a romance are untrue. Gilmer mentions his travel plans and adds that Henry St. George Tucker has left Richmond.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 15 April [May] 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, recommending White Sulphur Springs for Mrs. Carr. Gilmer also comments on Warm Springs. He remarks on Thomas Jefferson, his aunt and uncle Divers at Farmington and their health, and personal reflections.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 29 June 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, recommending strawberries and Sweet Springs for illness. Gilmer comments on the company at the springs. He comments on Creed Taylor, public outcry against the Court of Appeals, personal inquiries, Bonaparte, and the Spanish Revolution.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 24 September 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning travel during the summer, personal news, and cures.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 17 October 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, concerning Henry St. George Tucker's health, Mrs. Carr's health, Warm Springs, Gilmer's health, and sickness in Richmond. Gilmer states that John Coalter is going to resign as judge.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 13 December 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that his health and his legal practice are improving. Comments on the Richmond bar, his library, and a case on loss after sale. Gilmer mentions his plans for Washington at Christmas. He comments on James Monroe and his message on French interference in South America.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 22 January 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, regarding Carr's health. Gilmer comments on his own regimen and continued good health. States that he will stay in Richmond. Gilmer comments on Henry St. George Tucker.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 4 February 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that Judge Fleming is dead. States that Henry St. George Tucker is heading to Richmond to push Carr for Fleming's spot on the Court of Appeals, and mentions other plans to push Carr for the position.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 4 February 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that there is no confirmation of Judge Fleming's death.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 13 February 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that Judge Fleming is not dead and commenting on his judgeship. Gilmer adds that Henry St. George Tucker is ill and that the Abbe Correa de Serra is dead.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 24 February 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, "Conference Room Ct. appeals," [Richmond], to Dabney Carr, announcing Carr's election to the Supreme Court of Appeals with vote tally.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 25 February 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that the Court of Appeals will adjourn on 1 April. Gilmer asks after Carr's health and that of Judge Holmes. States that Henry St. George Tucker will succeed Carr to the chancellorship of the Winchester Superior Court of Chancery.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 5 March 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that Henry St. George Tucker has been elected to succeed Carr. Gilmer recommends that Carr come to Richmond immediately.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 6 March 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to Dabney Carr stating that Carr should come to Richmond immediately to qualify for his judgeship. Gilmer adds that the court will sit through the month, and that Henry St. George Tucker was elected to succeed him.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 3 May 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, "Steam Boat," to Dabney Carr informing him that he had to leave without seeing Carr. Asks Carr to keep his mission a secret [recruiting professors for the University of Virginia].
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 17 September 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, London, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, stating that his return had been delayed because of summer vacations in England. Gilmer comments that he has employed four professors of the first caliber. Remarks on plans for the future and British lawyers. Gilmer states he expects to be back in February.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 14 November 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, New York, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, stating that his health has been destroyed by his return voyage from England, and commenting on his health. Gilmer has received no news from Virginia.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 4 December 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, New York, to Dabney Carr commenting on his return voyage and stating that his illness is not known. Gilmer asks for news and comments on the introduction of robes into courts by Joseph Story.
3 p., ALS.