A Guide to the American Song Sheet Collection, ca. 1840-1860 American Song Sheet Collection, ca. 1840-1860 39848b

A Guide to the American Song Sheet Collection, ca. 1840-1860

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 39848b


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Alex Lorch

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
39848b
Title
American Song Sheet Collection, ca. 1840-1860
Physical Characteristics
.225 cubic feet (87 leaves)
Creator
American Song Sheet printers in New York City and Boston
Physical Location
Personal Papers Collection, Acc. 39848b
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Do not serve originals; serve photocopies.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

American Song Sheet Collection, ca. 1840-1860. Accession 39848b, Personal Papers Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Hugh C. Dischinger, 12 August 2002.


Historical Information

Before advanced audio technologies were introduced in the late 19th century, Americans learned popular music from printed song sheets. Song sheets do not contain measured music but rather are single printed six by eight inch sheets with lyrics. Their intense popularity reached its peak during the mid-19th century, from circa 1840 to around 1870. Song sheets are an early example of American popular media and offer a unique perspective on the political, social, and economic life of the era. To produce the song sheets printers used a raised plate to ink engraved illustrations and text onto the paper. Competing printers often printed the same song sheet but with a different border or illustration to entice collectors.

Scope and Content Information

Consists of American song sheets chiefly printed circa 1840-1860 in New York, New York, and Boston, Massachusetts. Includes works by Stephen C. Foster. Song sheets note performances by Dan Emmett, George White, and Charley White. There are also song sheets composed for performance by minstrel groups. Topics of songs include New York gangs and Tammany Hall, slavery and antislavery movements, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Irish immigrants, temperance, Bowery Street activity in New York City, the Crimean War, firefighters and firefighting, national politics, and African-American social life. Principal printer of song sheets was J. Andrews. Also includes some newspaper clippings of popular songs. Collector of song sheets undetermined.

These song sheets originally were adhered to the pages of a ledger in the Business Records Collection, acc. 39848a.

Arrangement

Alphabetical by song title.

Contents List

1
Angelina Baker.
2
Annie Laurie.
J. M. Jackson, printer.
3
Answer of Katy Darling.
J. Andrews, printer.
4
Answer to "Willie we have missed you." Willie'll roam no more.
J. Andrews, printer.
5
Bobbin around.
A highly popular song. As sung nightly at the Broadway Theatre, by Mrs. Barney Williams.
6
Bobbing around. No. 3.
A banjo solo as composed and sung by J. H. Budworth at White's Opera House, with tremendous applause. J. Andrews, printer.
7
Caroline of Edinburg town.
J. Andrews, printer.
8
The carrier dove./'Tis midnight hour.
9
Come to the ole gum tree.
J. Andrews, printer.
10
Dead Rabbits' fight with the Bowery Boys. 1857.
Written at Hoboken by Saugerties Bard. Air to Jordan. J. Andrews, printer.
11
The death of Annie Laurie.
A sequal composed by William Taylor. J. Andrews, printer.
12
The dying Californian.
J. Andrews, printer.
13
Engine no. 10.
27th Street between 9th and 10th Avenues. Air to Low backed car.
14
Faded flowers.
Jackson, printer.
15
New song, fare thee well, Kitty dear.
Composed expressly for Wood's Minstrels. Music published and for sale by W. Hall and Son. J. Andrews, printer.
16
Farewell Lilly dear.
17
Few days. No. 2.
J. Andrews, printer.
18
Gentle Annie.
By the highly popular author, Stephen C. Foster. The music of this beautiful song can be obtained at the music store of Firth, Pond and Company, New York.
19
Grave of Ben Bolt.
J. Andrews, printer.
20
The grave of Lilly Dale.
J. Andrews, printer.
21
Good news from home.
The music of this song can be obtained at the store of George P. Reed, Boston, extensive music publisher.
22
Gum tree canoe.
Jackson, printer.
23
Hard times come again no more.
By Stephen C. Foster. Jackson, printer.
24
Have you seen my sister.
A highly popular comic song. Tune to Bob and John. J. Andrews, printer.
25
The hazel dell.
Song and chorus by Wurzel. The music of this song can be obtained at the store of William Hall and Son, New York, extensive music publishers.
26
Home, sweet home./My boyhood's home.
J. Andrews, printer.
27
I have something sweet to tell you.
The music of this song can be obtained at the store of Firth, Pond and Company, New York, extensive music publishers.
28
I'll hang my harp on a willow tree.
J. Andrews, printer.
29
I'll throw myself away.
30
I'm off for Baltimore.
J. Andrews, printer.
31
I'm off for California.
J. Andrews, printer.
31a
John Dean and his own Mary Ann. Or, the gallant young coachman and the cruel father.
Air to Villikins and his Dinah. J. Andrews, printer.
32
Jordan is a hard road to travel. No. 5.
J. Andrews, printer.
33
Julius' trip to the World's Fair.
34
Kitty Kimo.
Composed and arranged by Charles White and sung nightly by Old Dan Emmitt with thunders of applause. If you want to spend a pleasant evening and enjoy a hearty laugh go to White's Melodeon.
35
Life in Bond Street.
Barr, printer.
36
Lilly Dale.
The music of this song is sold at Gould and Berry's Music Store. J. Andrews, printer.
37
The lily of the west.
Air to Caroline of Edinburgh town. J. Andrews, printer.
38
Little Eva to her papa./Little Eva in heaven.
Little Eva to her papa: As sung by Little Cordelia Howard in the successful drama of Uncle Tom's Cabin at the National Theatre in New York City. Little Eva in heaven: As sung by J. B. Howe at the National Theatre in New York.
39
Little Topsy's song.
Words by Eliza Cook and music by Hutchinson. J. Andrews, printer.
40
Maggy by my side.
As sung by George White. If you want to spend a pleasant evening and enjoy a hearty laugh, go to White's Melodeon. J. Andrews, printer.
41
Mary of the wild moor.
A beautiful ballad. J. Andrews, printer.
42
Massa's in the cold ground.
43
Mrs. Cunningham and the baby.
Air to Villikins and his Dinah. J. Andrews, printer.
44
Mrs. Cunningham's baby.
Air to the Other side of Jordan. By Boots. Barr, printer.
45
My heart's in old Ireland.
J. Andrews, printer.
46
My love he is a sailleur boy 19 y'rs old.
As sung with unbounded applause by that inimitable delineator of Ethiopian characteristics, Dan Bryant. J. Andrews, printer.
47
My old Kentucky home, good night.
48
My poor dog tray.
J. Andrews, printer.
49
Nelly darling.
J. Andrews, printer.
50
Nelly was a lady.
J. Andrews, printer.
51
Old Bob Ridley, O.
A highly popular negro chaunt. Sung nightly with shouts of applause by Mr. C. White at his new and beautiful opera house, directly opposite the Bowery Theatre. J. Andrews, printer.
52
Old dog tray.
Sung nightly with tremendous applause by E. P. Christy's celebrated Band of Minstrels.
53
Old dog tray. No. 2.
A parody from the New York Clipper. J. Andrews, printer.
54
Paddy's fight with the Know-Nothings.
By Tom Robinson. Air to Rory O'More or The Campbells are Coming. J. Andrews, printer.
55
Poor Billy Vail.
A parody on Lilly Dale. J. Andrews, printer.
56
Poor old slave.
Sung by J. Carroll with tremendous applause at White's celebrated Band of Minstrel's. Jackson, printer.
57
Pop goes de weasel.
J. Andrews, printer.
58
Pop goes the weazle! No. 3.
J. Andrews, printer.
59
Remember the poor.
60
Ring, ring de banjo.
Sung with tremendous applause by Christy's celebrated Band of Minstrels.
61
Roll on silver moon.
Jackson, printer.
62
Rosa Lee.
J. Andrews, printer.
63
Rosalie, the prairie flower.
J. Andrews, printer.
64
"Rough and tumble," or the Amos Street fight between Poole and Morrissey.
Air to I'll throw myself away. J. Andrews, printer.
65
Sad news from home.
The music of this song can be obtained at the store of George P. Reed, Boston, extensive music publisher.
66
Sheepskin, beeswax.
As sung nightly with thunders of applause by Dan Emmitt at White's Melodeon, New York. J. Andrews, printer.
67
Sparking Sunday night.
Air to Wait for the wagon. J. Andrews, printer.
68
The spider and the fly.
J. Andrews, printer.
69
Sweet Kitty Clyde.
Jackson, printer.
70
That blessed baby. Or, the mother's appeal.
J. Andrews, publisher.
71
That cottage home.
Air to Oh! susannah. J. Andrews, printer.
72
New song. Uncle Bill.
A parody on Nancy Till. J. Andrews, printer.
73
Uncle Tim the toper.
J. Andrews, printer.
74
Vilikins and his Dinah! Or, the cup of cold pison.
Sung nightly by Charley White with shouts of applause. J. Andrews, printer.
75 and 76
Wait for the wagon. (2 copies)
77
The watcher.
J. Andrews, printer.
78
Welcome home.
As sung at Buckley's.
79
What is home without a mother.
By Alice Hawthorne.
80
When I was in the tombs.
Air to I'm sitting on the style, Mary. J. Andrews, printer.
81
Wide awake yankee doodle.
82
Willie we have missed you.
J. Andrews, printer.
83
Yes, we miss thee at home.
Answer to Do they miss at home. J. Andrews, printer.