A Guide to the Governor William B. Giles Executive Papers, 1827-1830 Giles, William B., Executive Papers of Governor, 42310

A Guide to the Governor William B. Giles Executive Papers, 1827-1830

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 42310


[logo]

Library of Virginia

The Library of Virginia
800 East Broad Street
Richmond, Virginia 23219-8000
USA
Phone: (804) 692-3888 (Archives Reference)
Fax: (804) 692-3556 (Archives Reference)
Email: archdesk@lva.virginia.gov(Archives)
URL: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/

© 2006 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
42310
Title
Governor William B. Giles Executive Papers, 1827-1830
Physical Characteristics
4.55 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. William B. Giles Executive Papers, 1827-1830 (bulk 1827-1829). Accession 42310. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905


Biographical Information

William Branch Giles was born in Amelia County, Virginia, on 12 August 1762, to William Giles and Ann Branch. Giles was educated at Hampden-Sydney and graduated from the College of New Jersey, later known as Princeton University, in 1781. Giles studied law under George Wythe in Williamsburg and practiced law in Petersburg, Virginia, from 1784 to 1789. Elected to the First Congress in 1790 in place of Theodorick Bland, Giles served in the House of Representatives until his resignation in the Fifth Congress on 2 October 1798. Giles was elected to the Virginia House of Delegates from 1798 to 1800, however, he returned to Congress as a Democratic Republican from 4 March 1801 to 3 March 1803. After the resignation of Abraham B. Venable, Giles was appointed to the United States Senate on 4 March 1803. Giles was later elected on 4 December 1804 to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Wilson C. Nicholas. Giles continued serving in the Senate until his resignation on 3 March 1815. He returned to the House of Delegates for the 1815-1816 Session until retiring from politics. Giles, however, resumed his career in politics in 1825 with a defeat in the election against John Randolph to the United States Senate. Giles again returned to the House of Delegates to represent Amelia County for the 1826-1827 Session. Giles was elected governor of Virginia on 4 March 1827 and served three one-year terms until 4 March 1830. Giles was also elected to a fourth term as governor, but declined to serve another term. While governor, Giles served as a representative of the district composed of the counties of Amelia, Cumberland, Chesterfield, Nottoway, and the town of Petersburg to the Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830.

Giles married Martha Peyton Tabb, eldest daughter of John Tabb, in 1797, and remarried after her death to Frances Ann Gwynn of Prince William County in 1810. Giles fathered seven children between his two wives. He died and is buried at his estate of "Wigwam" on 4 December 1830.

Scope and Content

William B. Giles's Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three one-year terms as governor between 4 March 1827 and 4 March 1830. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; Herman Boye's map of Virginia; the Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830; the Virginia Penitentiary; amendments to the U.S. Constitution; the Washington Monument Fund; the Virginia State Library; Thomas W. White's publication of the journals of the Virginia General Assembly; arms and ammunition; the militia; military bounty claims; public improvements; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; pay rolls; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; opinions; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include President John Quincy Adams; Henry Clay & Martin Van Buren, Secretaries of State; James Barbour, Secretary of War; Richard Rush, Secretary of the Treasury; & Virginia's senators in Congress.

President John Quincy Adams writes to acknowledge receipt of the map of Virginia (1828 March 28). Henry Clay, Dept of State, transmits copies of the laws of Congress (1827 May 17). Clay also writes regarding the transmission of the May sessions of 1778, 1779, & 1781 of the Journals of the General Assembly for republication (1827 Oct. 20, Nov. 1, & Dec. 11). Daniel Brent served as Acting Secretary of State in the absence of Henry Clay. Brent writes Governor Giles delivering proceedings of Congress (1828 Sept. 23). Brent also writes to request copies of the Proclamation of the King of England from 7 October 1763 from the archives of the state of Virginia to be used as evidence to settle the northeastern boundary line of the United States (1828 Sept. 26). Lastly, Brent encloses a letter from George Walterston, Librarian of Congress, requesting the return of certain volumes of the journal of the Virginia Legislature (1829 Jan. 29). Later, Martin Van Buren writes requesting the number of incorporated colleges in the state for the distribution of public documents (1829 April 16). Van Buren also writes regarding the delivery of acts of Congress (1829 May 4). James Barbour, Secretary of War, writes requesting a copy of the map of Virginia (1827 Oct. 13). Richard Rush, Secretary of the Treasury, writes regarding the law passed at the last session of Congress for the relief of certain surviving officers & soldiers of the Army of the Revolution (including act & forms of declarations (1828 June 12). Rush also writes to acknowledge receipt of the governor's letter and a copy of a register offered by the governor (1828 July 7). John Tyler, Virginia senator, writes regarding a law to appropriate a part of the public lands in relief of the officers & soldiers of Virginia whose Revolutionary land claims remained unsatisfied (1828 Dec. 15). Tyler later writes regarding documents necessary to fulfill the instructions according to the General Assembly (1829 Jan. 16). Lastly, Tyler writes regarding the resolution of the Virginia General Assembly regarding the lands reserved between the Scioto & Miami rivers (1829 April 9). Littleton W. Tazewell, Virginia senator, writes regarding his re-election to the Senate (1829 Feb. 12).

The majority of correspondence in William B. Giles's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Samuel P. Parsons, Superintendent of the Penitentiary; James Robertson, Attorney General; William H. Richardson, Clerk of the Council & Librarian; George W. Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts; Lawson Burfoot, Treasurer; Thomas W. White; and Herman Boye, Surveyor.

Samuel P. Parsons, Superintendent of the Virginia Penitentiary, corresponded with Governor Giles regarding various issues respecting prisoners and the Virginia Penitentiary. Parsons writes respecting the valuation of transports in the Penitentiary (1827 March 28, July 21, Oct. 19; 1828 Oct. 31; & 1829 March 24); timber for gun carriages (1827 March 31, Nov. 3, & 5); the purchase of a spinning machine for the use of the Penitentiary (1827 April 20); male transports at the Penitentiary (1827 June 9); permission to work the transports out of the walls of the Penitentiary in repairing the aqueduct conveying water to the institution (1827 June 11 & 14); permission to employ C. Lumpkin as sergeant & turnkey pro tem in place of Abner Griffin (1827 July 19); work done on the Armory by John Goddin & Charles W. McGinnis (1827 Oct. 24); a notice in The Compiler stating that Rev. Adam Payne will preach at the Penitentiary (1827 Dec. 22); the conduct of Jacob Ruse, a convict in the Penitentiary (1828 Jan. 15); a letter from D. L. Burr declining the acceptance of the office of Director of the Penitentiary (1828 Feb. 11); the trial & conviction of Joseph Hunter (1828 April 2); his recommendation of the pardon of Ambrose Dowdy (1828 May 5); the resolutions of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary regarding the repair of the road leading to the Penitentiary (1828 July 1); the case of Nicholas Gibson, a convict in the Penitentiary (1828 Sept. 2); his recommendation of the pardon of John Dode (1829 Jan. 17); the adoption of his arrangement that excludes intercourse with the prison at meal times (1829 May 9); the restriction of visitors in the interior of the Penitentiary (1829 May 26); the old magazine near the Penitentiary (1829 June 26); an estimate of the value of convict slaves in the Penitentiary (1829 Aug. 13); the pardon of Frederick, a slave confined in the Penitentiary (1829 Aug. 15); the nomination of John Jacob as second keeper of the Penitentiary (1829 Oct. 26); the removal of John Bates from the County Jail to the Penitentiary (1829 Nov. 25); the trial & conviction of David W. Noe & Sarah Taylor (1829 Dec. 4); a letter from Blair Bolling re. non-commissioned officers for the Penitentiary (1830 Feb. 4); harnesses furnished for the Richmond Artillery (1830 Feb. 8); and the health of certain convicts in the Penitentiary (1830 Feb. 17).

John Robertson, Attorney General, provides opinions on the lease made to Archer & Povall for the use of the Boring Mill (1827 Sept. 1); the case of John & Margaret Glassell, guardians of Robert E. Lee & Elizabeth Lee, infants, against Robert E. & Elizabeth Lee (1827 Dec. 10); magistrates' responsibility for the sufficiency of jails and the duties & responsibilities of sheriffs in the safekeeping if prisoners (1828 Feb. 2); deeds of trust (1828 April 4); public bonds & the special act to invest the Washington Monument Fund (1828 April 14 & 26); deeds of trust & the Washington Monument Fund (1828 May 7); Capt. Edward Richardson's request for a court of enquiry (1828 July 24); the sale of transport slaves to Charles S. Lucas of Alabama by Richard Ligon (1828 Sept. 24); the proceeding by J. H. Thorington to recover debt due from Richard Ligon & his securities (1829 Jan. 2); a deed of release from Messrs. Archer & Povall for the rent of the Boring Mill (1829 March 12); the case of Henry, a slave tried for a willful & malicious assault (1829 March 18); compensation for C. Johnson for his services in the suits, etc., of the Commonwealth vs. Jerman Baker, former Treasurer, and his securities (1829 July 24); and the claim of Samuel Shepherd & Co. in printing circulars to the commissioners of revenue (1830 Jan. 30).

William H. Richardson served as both Clerk of the Council of State & Librarian. As the first State Librarian, Richardson was instrumental in procuring books and a Library Room in the Capitol. On 10 May 1828, Richardson encloses two proposals with estimates to do the wood work of the Library Room to be fitted up in the Capitol. Later, he submits a memorandum regarding the painting of the Library Room in the Capitol (1828 Sept. 18). Richardson also writes several times concerning the purchase of books for the Library (1828 Oct. 3, 1829 June 19, July 28, & Aug. 24). Richardson also encloses a list of books for the Library (1829 July 30).

George W. Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, often submits legislation to the governor. Noteworthy is an act concerning the Armory regarding the lease of the Boring Mill by Branch T. Archer & William Povall (1829 Jan. 29); a resolution for the appointment of commissioners to run a dividing line between the lands reserved and the lands ceded by the Commonwealth in the state of Ohio (1829 Feb. 13); a resolution requesting the Executive to open a correspondence with the United States relative to the lands between the Scioto & Little Miami rivers (1828 Feb. 24); and an act concerning the Library (1829 Feb. 28). Additionally, Munford transmits a certificate of the election of Lawson Burfoot as treasurer (1829 Jan. 9).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Giles regarding copies of acts (1827 March 8); the postage account for his office (1827 April 2 & Sept. 22); the balance of the appropriation for improving the Public Square (1827 April 3); his bond as auditor (1827 April 20); the allowance for the sheriff of Lee County for transporting a prisoner to the Penitentiary (1827 May 9); the account of Kimbraugh & Hooper to make boxes for the Auditor's Office (1827 July 18); the accounts of Baskerville & Hicks for castings in 1814 (1827 Oct. 24); the appointment of Col. William Lambert as agent to settle claims with the United States (1827 Nov. 5); the claim against the General Government (1827 Nov. 23); compensation to Philip P. Barbour & J. B. Carr who were employed by the escheator of Albemarle County to defend the right of the Commonwealth in two cases (1827 Dec. 4); compensation to Col. William Lambert as agent employed to collect evidence to sustain the suspended items in the account against the General Government (1828 Jan. 15); compensation to Philip B. Barbour for his services in the case of Miller's escheated land in Albemarle County (1828 Jan. 22); a request for the new map of Virginia for the investigation of delinquent lands (1828 Feb. 1); the amount of Branch T. Archer's & William G. Povall's bond for rent of the Boring Mill at the Armory (1828 March 17); the Treasury (1828 March 29); the purchase of slaves belonging to Richard Ligon by Charles S. Lucas of Alabama (1828 Oct. 18); a request for carpet in his office in the winter (1828 Nov. 25); the receipt of bonds, mortgages, & deeds of trust for the Washington Monument Fund (1829 Jan. 5); the claim against Clement Townsend & others for the purchase of convicts (1829 Feb. 10); compensation for John Shackleford as counsel to William Ashby (1829 Feb. 17); the collection of the debt due from Lewis & Townsend (1829 Feb. 17); claims against the General Government (1829 April 23 & 28); the petition of James Swan respecting the forfeiture & sales of his lands for the nonpayment of taxes (1829 June 25); the bond of Phineas Capin, agent for the Commonwealth (1829 June 27); the petition of William Porter re. his claim for commissions as agent for the Commonwealth (1829 July 23); the appointment of Gustavus Schmidt for the collection of the unsatisfied judgment of the Commonwealth against Lewis & Townsend and others (1829 Sept. 1); information requested by the secretary of the Convention (1829 Oct. 10); the bond of Chiswell Dabney as agent for the Commonwealth (1829 Nov. 26); and a request for pigeon holes on his writing desk (1830 Jan. 29).

Lawson Burfoot writes on 2 April 1828 accepting his position as treasurer in place of Jerman Baker who died in office. Burfoot also writes regarding the deposit of a sum of money by the Committee of the Executive Council to the credit of the Commonwealth found in the Treasury after the death of the late Treasurer (1828 April 21); the bond of the late Treasurer (1828 April 21); the balance in the Treasury (1828 Nov. 27); and the interest due on the Washington Monument Fund (1829 June 9).

Thomas W. White was appointed by the governor to print 250 copies of the journals of the houses of the General Assembly from 1777 to 1790. White encloses his bond on 24 July 1827. White also writes regarding missing Senate journals between 1777 & 1790 (1827 Dec. 4); the completion of the first volume of the journal of the House of Delegates from 1777 to 1780 (1828 Jan. 26); the completion of the second volume of the journals of the House of Delegates from May 1781 to October 1785-1786 (1828 May 13); and the completion of his contract (1828 July 29).

Herman Boye was chosen to fulfill John Wood's contract to create maps of Virginia's counties and the general map of the state. Herman Boye writes on 1827 March 28 regarding his proposal for executing the reduction & engraving of the map of Virginia on a scale of ten miles to the inch. Boye also writes regarding the acceptance of his proposal to publish the map of Virginia (1827 April 13 & 27). In addition, Boye writes regarding permission to donate one of the maps to the American Philosophical Society (1827 July 2); the shipment of boxes containing maps (1827 July 23; Aug. 12; Sept. 9; & 1828 Jan. 29); damage to maps in transit (1827 Aug. 4 & Sept. 1); covers for the maps (1827 Aug. 8); advances of funds (1827 Sept. 18 & 25, Dec. 22); and the copyright of the reduced map of Virginia (1827 Oct. 13).

Governors and secretaries from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to amendments to the U.S. Constitution, extraditions, the exchange of laws, and receipt of the new map of Virginia. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries: Enoch Lincoln, Maine; Joseph Kent & Daniel Martin, Maryland; Gideon Tomlinson, Connecticut; Norman Williams, Vermont; John Forsyth, Georgia; Charles Polk, Delaware; Allen Trimble, Ohio; Nathaniel Pitcher, New York; Levi Lincoln, Massachusetts; James Iredell & John Owen, North Carolina; Ezra Butler, Vermont; Gerard C. Brandon, Mississippi; Stephen D. Miller, South Carolina; John A. Shulze, Pennsylvania; John Miller, Missouri; & John Murphy, Alabama.

Governor Enoch Lincoln, Maine, encloses a report of a committee of the House of Representatives of Maine regarding the distribution of the funds of the United States for internal improvement and education (1827 March 17). Governor Joseph Kent, Maryland, submits a renewal for the removal of Samuel Robinson, a free man of color who is charged with carrying off a slave (1827 May 23). Later, Daniel Martin writes regarding the demand for Charles Smith, a fugitive from justice (1829 April 21). Governor Gideon Tomlinson, Connecticut, encloses resolutions of the General Assembly of Connecticut against the resolution of the state of Maine in relation to the funds which may be appropriated for objects of internal improvement (1827 June 27). Secretary of State Norman Williams, Vermont, encloses resolutions against expressing an opinion on the resolution from Maine in relation to the funds for internal improvement. Williams also encloses a resolution against an amendment of the Constitution as will prevent the election of President from devolving upon the House of Representatives (1827 Dec. 14). Governor John Forsyth, Georgia, requests a copy of the penal code of Virginia & regulations for the discipline of the Penitentiary (1828 Feb. 11). Governor James Iredell, North Carolina, requests information on the establishment of an insane asylum including the cost & number of patients (1828 Sept. 8). Iredell also writes to demand Thomas Mitchell, Jr., a fugitive from justice (1828 Dec. 1). Later, Governor John Owen writes regarding the navigation of the Pasquotank River (1828 Dec. 26). Governor Stephen D. Miller, South Carolina, too writes to demand a fugitive from justice named John Huston. Governor John A. Shulze, Pennsylvania, writes regarding a demand for a fugitive named Simon Johnston (1829 May 21). Governor Charles Polk, Delaware, writes regarding a demand for James Herron & James Vincent (1829 June 30). Governor Allen Trimble, Ohio, forwards a resolution in favor of the resolution of Pennsylvania that the tariff of 1828 accords with the spirit of the Constitution (1830 March 1). Various governors also write to acknowledge receipt of the new map of Virginia includes Charles Polk, Delaware; Nathaniel Pitcher, New York; Levi Lincoln, Massachusetts; John Forsyth, Georgia; Ezra Butler, Vermont; Gerard C. Brandon, Mississippi; John Miller, Missouri, & John Murphy, Alabama.

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: William Matthews re. arms for the use of the students of the University of Virginia (1827 March 27); James E. Heath, Joseph Allen, William W. Hening, Peyton Drew, William Selden, George W. Munford, & Jerman Baker requesting Dr. Robert Mayo's patent grate into their offices in the Capitol to correct the inconveniences of smoking chimneys (includes copy of the Virginia Jackson Republican) (1827 April 16); Col. John R. Wallace re. the site of a new arsenal in Warrenton (1827 May 14); Levi Swain requesting a reconsideration of his claim for extra work on the guard house or Bell Tower (1827 May 27); Alexander D. Kelly recommending Warrenton as the site for an arsenal (1827 June 11); James Brown, Jr., requesting a copy of the new map of Virginia (1827 Aug. 4); James Madison re. missing journals of the Virginia General Assembly for the sessions of May 1779 & 1782 (1827 Sept. 8 & Dec. 10); Philip Reed, Chairman of a meeting of commissioned officers of the Revolutionary War in Baltimore, encl. proceedings to petition Congress for compensation for their service (1827 Sept. 19); John Wallace encl. a plat & survey for the site of an arsenal in Warrenton (1827 Nov. 11); Joseph C. Cabell re. the missing journals of the Senate (1827 Dec. 24); Joseph C. Cabell accepting a position as visitor of the University of Virginia (1828 March 1); James Monroe encl. a memoir regarding his unsettled claims upon the United States for his missions to Europe (enclosure in Library Stacks) (1828 March 25); William C. Rives accepting an appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1828 March 27); Anthony Evans, agent for several officers & soldiers of the Revolution for the purpose of locating their military land warrants, re. military lands in Ohio between the Scioto & Little Miami rivers (1828 July 31); William G. Ewell & T. Archer proposing to modify the terms of their contract regarding the Boring Mill at the Armory (1828 Aug. 19); John H. Peyton, Director of the Western Lunatic Asylum, re. the governor's request for a plan of the buildings, the rules & regulations, the cost of the institution, the number of patients its capable of accommodating, and an account of the annual receipts & expenditures (1828 Dec. 9); John H. Peyton encl. the printed bylaws of the Western Lunatic Asylum (1828 Dec. 24); Conrad Robinson encl. a copy of the proceedings of the Grand Assembly from 6 January 1639 (1829 Feb. 20); Marquis de Lafayette acknowledging receipt of the maps of Virginia presented to him by a resolution of the General Assembly (1829 Feb. 26); Blair Bolling & William Gay re. the rental & repair of the Boring Mill (1829 March 4); James Brown, Minister at Paris, encl. a letter regarding the presentation of the map of Virginia to the Geographical Society of Paris (1829 March 10); William P. Sheppard, Clerk of the Richmond Common Council, re. the obligation of the Commonwealth to keep the enclosure of the Public Square in repair (1829 April 13); William C. Rives re. the resignation of his seat in Congress & as a visitor of the University of Virginia (1829 May 16); J. F. May accepting his appointment as judge of the General Court (1829 May 30); Thomas Jefferson Randolph accepting his appointment as a visitor of the University of Virginia (1829 June 8); Thomas Cohoon re. his patent for a new method of ascertaining the weight of canal boats & their cargo (1829 July 13); Mayor Joseph Tate, Richmond, re. an outbreak of small pox on board the Schooner Armada approaching the city (1829 Dec. 28); Blair Bolling re. cannon carriages (1830 Feb. 4); Clement White, Superintendent of Quarantine at Richmond, re. the quarantine of the Schooner Armada (1830 Jan. 2, 8, 21, & 28; Feb. 9 & 18); Governor William B. Giles to Linn Banks, Speaker of the House of Delegates, re. the pamphlet of David Walker (1830 Jan. 6); H. G. Otis, Mayor of Boston, re. the pamphlet published by [David Walker] in Boston (1830 Feb. 10); and D. W. Patterson resigning as director of the Lunatic Hospital in Staunton (1830 Feb. 5).

Other noteworthy items include: proclamations by the governor & lieutenant governor offering rewards for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1827 March 20 & 22, April 7 & 16, June 4, July 28, Aug. 11, Sept. 29, Oct. 6 & 16; 1828 March 13, April 8, 24, & 29, July 8, Sept. 10, Nov. 21, Dec. 9; 1829 March 3, 27, & 31, Sept. 15, Oct. 1, 2, & 10); the contract of Herman Boye for the publication of four hundred copies of the map of Virginia and eight hundred copies of the reduced map (1827 May 1); the proclamation authorizing the Manchester & Petersburg Turnpike Company to demand & receive tolls (1827 May 14); the report of the Committee to select books for the Public Library & making purchases (1827 Oct. 24); the certificate of copyright for the reduced map of Virginia created by Herman Boye (1827 Oct. 31); a certificate of qualification by Joseph Tate, Mayor of Richmond, for William B. Giles as governor (1827 Dec. 12); a list of free negroes in the Penitentiary sentenced for transportation (1828 Jan. 17); proposal to borrow from the Executive the money belonging to the Washington Monument Fund (1828 March); an estimate for fitting up the General Court Room for a library (1828 March 21); the contract of Samuel Shepherd & Co. to print 250 copies of the journals of the Senate & House of Delegates for the year 1776 (1828 March 28); certificates of qualification of Lawson Burfoot as treasurer (1828 April 8, 1829 Feb. 6, & 1830 Jan. 23); an ordnance of the Common Council of Richmond relating to the Public Square (1828 April 10); an estimate by Bosher & Brown to execute the wood work for fitting up the Library in the Capitol (1828 April 19); advice of the Council requiring the Captain of the Public Guard inspect the Capitol once per month and to make use of the Public Guard to keep the Capitol clean & in good repair (1828 April 22); certificates, will, and deeds regarding the land of John Mayo in Henrico County which was purchased by John Powell from Samuel Price & James Vaughan (1828 May 5); the contract of Bosher & Brown to fit up the room in the Capitol for a Library Room (1828 May 7); the advice of Council to close the western side of the Public Square for the preservation of the trees (1828 May 27); the notice of the Directors of the Western Lunatic Hospital that the institution will be ready for the reception of patients on July 25 (1828 June 20); the proclamation regarding the results of the vote for a Convention (1828 Sept. 1); advice of Council that the Library Committee be authorized to employ an agent to purchase books for the Public Library and to employ a competent person to paint the Library Room (1828 Aug. 22); a statement re. a summary of expenditures for the map of the state (1828 Oct. 12); a proclamation re. the election of electors of President & Vice-President of the United States (1828 Nov. 19); the certificate of qualification of William B. Giles as governor (1828 Dec. 11); a remonstrance of the states in favor of the tariff adopted by the Georgia State Legislature (1828 Dec. 20); an ordinance relating to the Public Square in the city of Richmond and the yard of the City Hall (1829 March 13); a report of the committee appointed to draft rules for the Penitentiary encl. rules & regulations for the government of the Penitentiary (1829 May 26); a report of the committee to enquire in what parts of the Commonwealth are arms most wanted to guard against insurrection from slaves (1829 Aug. 4); a report of the committee on the list of books transmitted by the Librarian (1829 Aug. 18); a proclamation re. an election to replace Ellyson Currie, a member of the Convention (1829 Sept. 4); a proclamation declaring the Schooner Armada under quarantine due to small pox (1830 Jan. 5); a proclamation to extend the quarantine of the Schooner Armada (1830 Jan. 18); and a proclamation that the amended Constitution be published once a week for three successive months (1830 Jan. 18).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with undated items arranged to the rear.

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

William B. Giles Executive Papers
1827
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      5-17
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      19-25
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      26-31
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      1-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      21-30
  • May
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      17-31
  • June
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      1-11
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      22-31
  • September
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      16-30
  • October
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      16-31
  • November
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      1-11
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      12-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      20-30
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      16-31
1828
  • January
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      11-26
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      27-31
  • February
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      1-8
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      11-29
  • March
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-11
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      12-25
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      19-25
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      11-21
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      22-29
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      22-31
  • June
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      23-30
  • July
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-11
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      12-31
  • July
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      16-31
  • September
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      16-30
  • October
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      17-31
  • November
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      17-21
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      22-29
  • December
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      11-31
1829
  • January
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      16-31
  • February
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      2-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      11-29
  • March
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      2-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      21-31
  • April
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      16-30
  • May
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      16-30
  • June
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      16-30
  • July
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      1-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      3-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      16-31
  • September
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      16-30
  • Box 7
    Folder 9
    October
  • November
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      2-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      16-30
  • December
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      16-31
1830
  • January
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      2-15
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      16-28
  • February
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      13-29
  • March
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      1-4
Undated
Box: 8
Folder: 8
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1827
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      March 31
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      April 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      April 14
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      April 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      May 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      June 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      July [N.D.]
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Nov. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      Dec. 15
  • 1828
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      Jan. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      April 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      May 10
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      May 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      July 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      July 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      Dec. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Dec. 1
  • 1829
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Jan. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Feb. 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      March 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      April 21
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      June 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      June 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      Oct. 1
  • 1830
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      Feb. 15
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1827
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      April 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      Oct. 30
  • 1828
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      March 28
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      March 31
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      May 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      May 28
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      Nov. 7
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      Dec. 18
  • 1829
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      May 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      Aug. [N.D.]
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Oct. 31