A Guide to the Governor James Pleasants Executive Papers, 1822-1825 Pleasants, James, Executive Papers of Governor, 1822-1825 42046

A Guide to the Governor James Pleasants Executive Papers, 1822-1825

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 42046


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© 2005 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
42046
Title
Governor James Pleasants Executive Papers, 1822-1825
Physical Characteristics
4.55 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor (1822-1825 : Pleasants). Executive papers, 1822-1825 (bulk 1823-1825). Accession 42046. State government records collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.


Biographical Information

James Pleasants, Jr., was born at "Contention" in Goochland County on 24 October 1769 to James Pleasants and Anne Randolph, aunt of Thomas Jefferson. Pleasants briefly attended William and Mary College in 1785 before reading law with Judge William Fleming of the Virginia Court of Appeals. In 1790, he married Susanna Lawson Rose, second daughter of Col. Hugh Rose. Pleasants fathered eight children, including John Hampden, founder of the Richmond Whig, who died in a duel with Thomas Ritchie. In 1791, Pleasants joined the bar of Amelia County. He began his career in politics in 1797 with an election to the House of Delegates representing Goochland County until 1802. Between 1802 and 1811, Pleasants served as clerk of the House of Delegates. Though elected judge in the Court of Appeals in 1811, Pleasants declined the post in order to serve the first of four terms in the U. S. House of Representatives as a Democrat Republican. An anti-British advocate during the War of 1812, Pleasants supported the growth of the navy as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of the Navy. Pleasants resigned on 14 December 1819 in order to accept an appointment by the Virginia Legislature to replace John W. Eppes in the U. S. Senate. While in the Senate, Pleasants served as chairman of the Committee on Naval Affairs during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Congresses. Pleasants later resigned from the Senate in December 1822 in order to succeed Thomas Mann Randolph as governor. During his three one-year terms as governor, Pleasants coped with a fire at the Penitentiary, boundary issues with the state of Maryland, and General Lafayette's visit to Virginia. In addition, Pleasants managed the settlement of Virginia's claims against the United States for War of 1812 expenditures and the establishment of the Western Lunatic Asylum in Staunton, Virginia. Although Pleasants retired from public life following his governorship, he remained active in politics as an Anti-Jacksonian. In 1829, Pleasants was elected as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1829-1830. Pleasants died on 9 November 1836 at his home in Goochland County following a long illness.

Scope and Content

James Pleasants' Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three one-year terms as governor from 11 December 1822 to 11 December 1825. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Public Guard; Virginia's claim against the U. S. for expenditures during the War of 1812; Herman Boye's map of Virginia; the Virginia Penitentiary; slavery; the boundary between Maryland & Virginia; the Western Lunatic Hospital; General Lafayette's visit to Virginia; the Bell Tower & other improvements to Capitol Square; the Lexington Arsenal; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. These papers are arranged chronologically with pardons arranged to the rear of each year. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; pardons; proposals; receipts; certificates; proclamations; contracts; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include John Quincy Adams & Henry Clay, Secretaries of State; John C. Calhoun & James Barbour, Secretaries of War; Daniel D. Tompkins & John C. Calhoun, Vice Presidents; Thomas T. Tucker, Treasurer of the United States; Henry Clay, Speaker of the House of Representatives; and Littleton W. Tazewell, Jabez Leftwich, James Barbour, Charles F. Mercer, & other representatives of Virginia in Congress.

As Secretary of State, John Quincy Adams writes to Governor Pleasants on several occasions acknowledging receipt of documents transferred to him by the governor in support of claims of citizens of Virginia for slaves carried off by British officers during the late war (1823 March 13 & 20, May 8 & 20, June 14, & Dec. 9). In addition, Adams transmits copies of the public journals of the Senate & House of Representatives (1823 April 30). Daniel Brent, Chief Clerk of the Dept. of State, forwards copies of laws passed in Congress (1823 Oct. 2). Brent also transmits an act confirming the act of the Legislature of Virginia entitled "an act incorporating the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Company" and an act of the Maryland Legislature confirming the same (1825 June 10). On 2 June 1823, Adams requests a list of factories or manufacturing establishments in Virginia incorporated by the laws of the state according to the resolution of the Senate dated 1 March 1823. Lastly, Adams transmits a joint resolution providing a place of deposit for the portrait of Columbus and directing the distribution of copies of the Declaration of Independence (1824 June 30). As Secretary of State, Henry Clay writes to transmit the laws passed in the 2nd session of the 18th Congress (1825 Oct. 26).

John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, writes on 6 February 1823 regarding a company of artillery stationed at the Bellona Arsenal. James Barbour replaced Calhoun as Secretary in March 1825. Barbour encloses a letter from Peter Hagner regarding evidence to be presented by Virginia to obtain payment of interest under the law passed by the last Congress (1825 March 18). On 19 April 1825, Barbour writes regarding Virginia's claim for interest and $50,000 placed to the credit of the Treasurer of Virginia. Lastly, Barbour writes regarding the adjustment of Virginia's claim for interest against the United States (1825 July 8).

Daniel D. Tompkins, Vice President, and later, John C. Calhoun, write regarding the resignations of James Pleasants, Jr., and James Barbour from the Senate (1822 Dec. 16 & 1825 March 9). Thomas T. Tucker, Treasurer of the United States, writes regarding the adjustment of the claims of Virginia by the United States (1823 Jan. 17). Henry Clay, Speaker of the House of Representatives, corresponds with Governor Pleasants regarding the death of William Lee Ball (1824 March 20). Littleton W. Tazewell writes on 10 December 1824 accepting his appointment as senator in Congress. On 21 February 1825, Jabez Leftwich, a representative from Virginia in Congress, writes to suggest the appointment of John Floyd to replace James Barbour. Jared Williams, William McCoy, J. S. Barbour, & P. P. Barbour, Virginia's representatives in Congress, also write to recommend Floyd as Barbour's replacement (1825 Feb. 22). Before his appointment as Secretary of War, James Barbour writes regarding a bill awarding payment of interest to Virginia (1825 March 2). On 11 March 1825, Barbour writes resigning his seat in the Senate to become Secretary of War. Lastly, Charles F. Mercer writes regarding the appointment of commissioners on the part of Virginia to act with Maryland in opening books for subscriptions to the stock of the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Company (1825 May 20 & June 7 & 9).

The majority of correspondence in James Pleasants' Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General; Blair Bolling, Commandant of the Public Guard; James Paxton, Commandant of the Lexington Arsenal; Edmund Pendleton, Jr., & Samuel P. Parsons, Superintendents of the Penitentiary; John Robertson, Attorney General; William Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates, & Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate; James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts; Jerman Baker, Treasurer; Cary Selden, Agent for Virginia Claims; and Herman Boye, Surveyor.

Bernard Peyton, Adjutant General, encloses a letter from Col. McWhorton, 125th Regiment, protesting the regimental court of enquiry (1825 Feb. 28). On 1 April 1825, Peyton encloses a letter from Robert White recommending Thomas Hallbrook to clean & pack the public arms at Lexington. Lastly, Peyton encloses a letter from Robert Triplett regarding his appointment as Virginia Military Land Agent (1825 April 22). [See Adjutant General Records (Acc. No. 36767) for additional correspondence from Bernard Peyton]

Blair Bolling served as both Commandant of the Public Guard & Superintendent of Public Property, following the resignation of Claiborne W. Gooch as adjutant general in March 1821. In these roles, Bolling writes regarding the discharge of David Cunningham (1823 Jan. 21); three soldiers discharged for the Public Guard who died in the Poor House in Richmond (1823 April 17); and the work of Levi Swain on the Court of Appeals (1825 Oct. 8). [See Commandant of the Public Guard Records (Acc. No. 36717) for additional correspondence from Blair Bolling]

James Paxton, Commandant of the Public Guard at the Lexington Arsenal, writes regarding the cost of covering the Lexington Arsenal & other improvements (1824 May 26, June 8, & July 30). On 16 March 1825, Paxton writes regarding an appropriation to improve the Public Square at the Arsenal. Lastly, Paxton corresponds regarding proposals for cleaning & packing the arms at the Lexington Arsenal (1825 March 26).

Edmund Pendleton, Jr., Superintendent of the Penitentiary, corresponds with Governor Pleasants concerning various subjects. Most notably, Pendleton writes following the fire at the Penitentiary on 8 August 1823. Pendleton discusses the following topics in his correspondence: an estimate of the expense to alter the culverts in the Penitentiary (1823 April 12); the completion of three hundred boxes for public arms (1823 April 16); an escape attempt & the use of force by the Public Guard stationed at the Penitentiary (1823 May 3); the cooking operations at the Penitentiary (1823 Aug. 13); the smallest number of men necessary for the safekeeping of the convicts (1823 Sept. 12); repairs to the Penitentiary (1823 Sept. 12); smiths bellows from the Armory for the Penitentiary (1823 Sept. 12); the condition of the Penitentiary & the number of guard necessary to safe keep the convicts (18 Oct. 6); a request for anvils & a vice from the Armory (1823 Oct. 21); the building of another arch in the southwestern wing of the Penitentiary (1823 Oct. 23 & 31); the conduct of Thomas Riley (1824 Jan. 5); gun boxes (1824 Jan. 9); the discharge of the auxiliary guard enlisted to insure the safekeeping of convicts at the Penitentiary (1824 Jan. 23); the conduct of John Elliott (1824 Jan. 29); and the value of a slave named Daniel brought from Accomack County (1824 Feb. 3).

Samuel P. Parsons replaced Pendleton as superintendent in February 1824. Parsons writes regarding the removal of the house near the Penitentiary for storing cannon carriages & requesting a stronger guard while repairs continue (1824 April 6); the storage of the cannon & carriages at the Foundry & the cost of clothing for the guard (1824 April 9); the escape of James Irvin (1824 May 20); the trial of Milly Jackson (1824 June 10); the escape of John Bryant (1824 July 15 & Oct. 28); the examination of the Boring Mill at the Armory (1824 July 16); repairs to the Armory & the transfer of iron to the Penitentiary (1824 July 29); the contract of Levi Swain for building the Guard & Bell House (1824 July 31); the escape of John Weaver (1824 Sept. 1); the escape of five prisoners (1824 Sept. 17); the case of John Wiley (1824 Nov. 20); the dismissal of the additional guard at the Penitentiary (1824 Nov. 23); a recommendation that John Gilmore be transferred to the hospital (1824 Dec. 15); the conduct of John Johnson (1824 Dec. 27); an estimate of the value of the slaves condemned to transportation (1825 Feb. 24); the completion of the Bell House on Capitol Square by Levi Swain (1825 March 18); the commutation of the punishment of George Dixon (1825 March 19); proposals for alterations to the General Court Room in the Capitol Building including specifications and architectural drawing (1825 April 5); the removal of two convicts from the solitary cells (1825 July 27); the theft of articles from the Penitentiary by a member of the Public Guard (1825 April 11); a recommendation that Thomas T. Leonard be removed to the hospital (1825 Aug. 31); permission to use the large screw & fly press at the Armory for the operations at the Penitentiary (1825 Oct. 3); a recommendation that Charles Allen be removed from solitary confinement (1825 Nov. 9); and a recommendation that William Bowers be removed to the hospital (1825 Nov. 23).

John Robertson, Attorney General, provides opinions on the duty of the Attorney for the Commonwealth in the case of the escheator of Richmond against the President of the Literary Fund (1823 Feb. 17) and the extent to which the superintendent can apply the force of the guard stationed at the Penitentiary in order to prevent escapes (1823 June 24). Robertson also writes regarding the prosecution against Dandridge Hogg for passing a counterfeit note (1825 Jan. 11).

William Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, & Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation to the governor. Noteworthy is a joint resolution that the Executive be requested to communicate the state of the Commonwealth's claim upon the United States for monies expended by the state during the War of 1812 (1823 Jan. 15); an act for completing the publication of the Statutes At Large (1823 Jan. 24); resolutions regarding the 103rd section of the law to regulate the militia passed 9 March 1819 where the Executive is requested to purchase three sites and to have an arsenal erected on each (1824 Dec. 9); resolutions to appoint a joint committee to wait on the arrival of Gen. Lafayette & cause a seat of each house to be prepared for him during his stay (1824 Dec. 30); a resolution requesting the number of convicts discharged from confinement in the Penitentiary before their term had expired since the establishment of the institution (1824 Dec. 21); a resolution that the Executive communicate to what number of free white persons convicted & punishable by the infliction of stripes since the act of 21 Feb. 1823 have extended them clemency & pardoned (1824 Dec. 30); and a resolution that the Executive be requested to transmit a copy of the act to the commissioners appointed by the act to authorize the establishment of a Western Lunatic Hospital (1825 Feb. 18).

Additionally, Munford transmits certificates of the election of the following individuals: Thomas Nelson as principal agent & storekeeper of the Penitentiary (1822 Dec. 16); John Taylor as senator in Congress (1822 Dec. 19); Thomas Ritchie as public printer (1823 Dec. 5); Joseph Wyatt as elector for president & vice president (1824 Nov. 30); Littleton Waller Tazewell as senator in Congress (1824 Dec. 7); James Heath as auditor of public accounts (1825 Jan. 1); Philip P. Barbour as judge of the General Court (1825 Feb. 7); and John Randolph as senator in Congress (1825 Dec. 9).

James E. Heath, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Pleasants regarding various financial matters. Heath writes concerning such topics as the settlement of the account of the officers of the Public Guard for servant's clothing (1823 Jan. 6); a statement of the accounts of Virginia against the General Government (1823 Jan. 17); the appointment of Mordecai Cooke as a collector of arrearages of revenue due from Norfolk County (1823 Feb. 24 & 1824 Dec. 21); an account for the expense of delivering notices to various parts of the state (1823 June 25); an advance for employing a special messenger & for sending out notices (1823 Aug. 5); the sum paid to members of the last Legislature on account of mileage (1823 Aug. 15); the appointment of William Porter as an agent to collect the debt due in Orange County (1824 April 14); the bond of Thomas P. Ray as agent for the Commonwealth (1824 June 23); the accounts of Thomas Ritchie as public printer (1824 June 23); the execution against James B. Ferguson (1824 July 16); the appointment of Walter F. Jones as agent for the Commonwealth (1824 Aug. 16); the debt collected by William Jones and paid into the Treasury from the estate of a lunatic (1824 Oct. 1); an estimate of the necessary alterations to connect part of the office of the General Court with the Auditor's Office (1825 March 1); the appointment of Dudley Evans as an agent for the Commonwealth to purchase lands in Monongalia County (1825 March 16); the bond of Ephraim S. Eddy as agent for Kanawha County (1825 April 12 & May 18); evidence for the payment of interest due to Virginia by the U. S. (1825 April 22); a letter from the escheator of Fluvanna County (1825 May 6); the invoice of James A. Campbell for raw materials purchased by him for manufacture at the Penitentiary (1825 May 16); a warrant on the Treasury for money due the post office (1825 Sept. 15); and lands in Norfolk County belonging to the Commonwealth (1825 Dec. 1).

Jerman Baker, Treasurer, writes regarding his receipt of a check from the Treasurer of the United States on account of advances made by Virginia during the late war with Great Britain (1823 Jan. 22); the repair of the fireplace in his office (1823 April 7); a financial report to be communicated with the Governor of Maryland (1823 July 9); a drain for the east side of the Capitol similar to the one on the west side (1824 July 6); the payment of $50,000 into the Treasury on the warrant of the 2nd Auditor and put to the credit of President & Directors of the Literary Fund (1825 May 17); a request for the employment of some person to clear the flues & fireplaces in the Treasurer's Office (1825 May 25); and the receipt of a check from the Treasurer of the United States on account of interest on loans or monies borrowed by the state during the late war (1825 July 25).

As Agent for Virginia Claims, Cary Selden writes to Governor Pleasants regarding a statement of differences on the settlement of the account of the State of Virginia with the United States for claims during the War of 1812 (1835 June 27 & July 12 & 30). On 9 March 1825, Selden writes regarding the bill enacted by the 18th Congress for reimbursing Virginia the amount of interest paid by the state for different sums of money borrowed & loaned to the General Government during the late war (1825 March 9). Lastly, Selden writes regarding compensation for his services (1825 Aug. 13).

Herman Boye was chosen to fulfill John Wood's contract to create maps of Virginia's counties and the general map of the state. Herman Boye writes on 8 June 1823 requesting further time to complete the contract made by the Commonwealth with John Wood. Boye also writes requesting a commission to specify the powers vested in him as commissioner to meet with the commissioners of Maryland (1824 July 12). In addition, he writes concerning the completion of the general map of the state (1825 April 1); proposals of sundry engravers in Philadelphia for engraving the general map of Virginia (1825 May 10); arrangements made in Philadelphia with Henry S. Tanner for engraving the general map of Virginia (1825 May 22); the contract & bond of Henry S. Tanner (1825 June 3); the progress of the engraving of the general map (1825 July 30); the receipt for part of his salary for superintending the engraving (1825 Sept. 21 & Oct. 5); and expenses in publishing the general map (1825 Oct. 5).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the governor. This correspondence primarily relates to amendments to the U. S. Constitution, extraditions, and the distribution of laws. Included are letters from the following governors or secretaries of state: Joseph Hiester, Pennsylvania; John Adair & Joseph Desha, Kentucky; John Brooks, Massachusetts; Samuel Stevens, Maryland; John Clark & George M. Troup, Georgia; Joseph C. Yates & DeWitt Clinton, New York; Edward Coles, Illinois; William Hendricks, Indiana; Cornelius Peter Van Ness, Vermont; Albion K. Parris, Maine; Joseph Haslet & Samuel Paynter, Delaware; Isaac H. Williamson, New Jersey; Jeremiah Morrow, Ohio; William Carroll, Tennessee; Walter Leake, Mississippi; Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut; & Hamilton R. Gamble, Missouri.

Governors Joseph Hiester, Pennsylvania; Joseph C. Yates, New York; Joseph Haslet, Delaware; & Samuel Stevens, Maryland; write regarding demands for fugitives from justice (1823 Jan. 3, March 7 & 11; 1825 July 8 & Aug. 18). Governor John Adair, Kentucky, writes regarding commissioners appointed on the part of Kentucky to decide matters of difference between the states of Virginia & Kentucky (1823 Jan. 7). Governors John Brooks, Massachusetts; John Clark, Georgia; & Joseph C. Yates, New York; transmit resolutions against the amendment to the Constitution proposed by Pennsylvania that Congress make no law to erect or incorporate any bank except within the District of Columbia (1823 Jan. 20, 29, & May 31). Governor Samuel Stevens, Maryland, writes regarding a report of the commissioners appointed by the Executives of Maryland & Virginia to survey the Potomac River (1823 Jan. 24). Later, Governor Stevens encloses an act confirming the act of the General Assembly of Virginia incorporating the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Company (1825 Feb. 2). Governors Governor Edward Coles, Illinois, transmits acts of the Illinois General Assembly (1823 June 10 & 1825 June 5). Coles also transmits a report & resolutions on the subject of the claim originated by the State of Maryland to grants of lands from the United States for the purpose of education (1823 Aug. 10). Governor William Hendricks, Indiana, encloses a joint resolution relative to the Illinois grant in Clark County (1823 July 3). Governor Cornelius P. Van Ness, Vermont, writes to recommend Timothy Hubbard (1823 Oct. 20). Governor George M. Troup, Georgia, encloses a resolution proposing an amendment to the U. S. Constitution that no part of the Constitution be construed to authorize the importation or ingress of any person of color into any one of the United States contrary to the laws of the state (1824 Jan. 10). Governors Albion K. Parris, Maine; Samuel Paynter, Delaware; Joseph Desha, Kentucky; Isaac H. Williamson, New Jersey; William Hendricks, Indiana; & Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut; transmit resolutions against the amendment proposed by the State of Georgia (1824 Feb. 26 & 28; 1825 Jan. 31 & [N.D.], Feb. 5, & June 1). Governor Walter Leake, Mississippi, & Secretary of State Hamilton R. Gamble, Missouri, transmit resolutions in favor of Georgia's proposed amendment to the Constitution (1825 Feb. 4 & March [N.D.]). Governor Jeremiah Morrow, Ohio, transmits resolutions proposing the gradual emancipation of slaves (1824 Jan. 24). Governors Isaac H. Williamson, New Jersey; Samuel Paynter, Delaware; William Hendricks, Indiana; Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut; & Edward Coles, Illinois; transmit resolutions in favor of the Ohio resolution (1825 Jan. 31, Feb. 8 & 10, & June 1). Governors George M. Troup, Georgia, Walter Leake, Mississippi, enclose resolutions disapproving the Ohio resolution (1824 Dec. 22 & 1825 Feb. 7). Governor William Carroll, Tennessee, transmits a preamble & resolutions against Congress nominating persons to fill the offices of president & vice president (1824 Nov. 20). Governor Jeremiah Morrow also writes regarding the arrest of fugitives from Virginia (1825 Aug. 30). Lastly, Governor DeWitt Clinton, New York, transmits copies of statutes passed at the last session of the Legislature (1825 Aug. 17).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: John Taylor accepting his appointment as senator in Congress (1822 Dec. 21); Directors of the Penitentiary re. annual reports of the operations of the Penitentiary (1822 Dec. 21); John Taylor acknowledging receipt of his credential as senator in Congress (1823 Feb, 22); William Gray, British Consul at Norfolk, re. the imprisonment of a free negro named John Jackson, a British subject from Nova Scotia (1823 March 3); A. S. Brockenbrough, University of Virginia, re. a balance against him for monies advanced to pay for certain improvements around the Capitol (1823 March 13); John Adams, Mayor of Richmond, encl. a letter & advertisement from Ezra A. Stevens concerning his lectures on astronomy (1823 May 17); G. Bomford, Ordnance Dept., re. the apportionment of arms to the several states & territories of the United States procures under the act of 1808 (1823 Aug. 22); Capt. Samuel Cary offering to raise a company of volunteers to guard the convicts (1823 Aug. 10); Jesse Williams proposing to do the brick work at the Penitentiary (1823 Aug. 12); John Brockenbrough re. a loan from the Bank of Virginia (1823 Aug. 15); James W. Steel & R. M. Gaw, Philadelphia, proposing to engrave the general map of Virginia (1823 Aug. 16); John Adams requesting arms for the use of the militia & night watch in Richmond (1823 Sept. 1); Otis Manson re. the completion of the roof of the Penitentiary (1823 Sept. 19); Thomson F. Mason accepting his appointment as commissioner to settle the western limits of the state & the dividing line between Maryland & Virginia (1823 Sept. 20); George R. Myers re. his account for labor & materials expended in the repairs of the brick work at the Penitentiary (1823 Oct. 3 & 22); Lt. Thomas J. Baird, Bellona Arsenal, re. the arrival of a portion of the arms intended by the U. S. for the State of Virginia (1823 Oct. 3); J. Brown, 2nd Auditor, re. the alteration of his office to keep off the dampness (1823 Nov. 24); J. Brown re. his bond as 2nd Auditor (1824 Feb. 9); John A. Gimball, Secretary of State of Mississippi, encl. a resolution re. the neutrality of the U. S. in the war against Spain (1824 Jan. 27); William C. Holt, Speaker of the Senate, requesting a carpet for the staircase, passage, & gallery of the Capitol (1824 Feb. 25); Peter Dupuy proposing to lease the Boring Mill at the Armory (1824 March 1); James Madison re. his appointment as visitor of the University of Virginia (1824 March 11); Way & Gideon re. the publication of the "Journals of the Old Congress" (1824 March 12); Chapman Johnson re. the state's claim against the General Government for interest on advances during the late war (1824 March 23); J. Robertson, Jr., resigning as Register of the Land Office for an appointment as Collector of Customs for the Port of Petersburg (1824 April 23); Daniel Totty requesting permission to remove a house from the public ground near the Penitentiary (1824 May 31); Chris Manch enclosing his proposal to construct a Bell Tower on the southwest corner of Capitol Square (includes drawing) (1824 June 13); John Brockenbrough encl. a resolution of the Common Council of Richmond to appoint a committee to enquire of the Commonwealth whether they are willing to relinquish the charge of Capitol Square (1824 June 16); Thomas Stanton enclosing his proposal to construct a Bell Tower on the southwest corner of Capitol Square (includes drawing) (1824 June 23); Lewis A. Tarascon re. the propriety of establishing a wagon road from the Missouri River to the Columbia River (1824 July 1); Thomson F. Mason re. the boundary line between Virginia & Maryland (1824 July 10 & 17); John Goddin regarding his proposal to construct the Bell Tower on Capitol Square (1824 July 13); William Clinton re. the duel between Gen. John C. Hunter & Thomas Hewet (1824 Nov. 21); Lt. Edgar Allan Poe & Capt. John Lisle, Richmond Junior Volunteers, re. permission to retain arms drawn from the Armory (1824 Nov. 17 & 23); George & Pleasant Winston proposing to undertake the work for repairing the Penitentiary (1824 Dec. 9); John Tyler, Chairman of a Committee of the House of Delegates, encl. a resolution appointing a committee to enquire into the expediency of reimbursing from the Treasury the whole or any part of the expenditure incurred in the reception of Gen. Lafayette at Yorktown (1824 Dec. 27); James Mitchell encl. a list of Illinois bounty lands for sale or redemption (1825 Jan. 13); Andrew Stevenson encl. a letter from Lafayette accepting the invitation of the General Assembly (1825 Jan. 14); the Committee of the Congregation of Monumental Church requesting the Public Guard to have the bell run every Sabbath to announce public worship (1825 Jan. 28); Philip P. Barbour accepting his appointment as judge of the General Court (1825 Feb. 10); John Brockenbrough, Chairman of the Committee of the Common Hall of Richmond, re. contracts for work to be done on Capitol Square (1825 Feb. 22); John Brockenbrough re. the improvement of the walks & planting on Capitol Square (1825 Feb. 24); John Adams, Mayor of Richmond, requesting the Executive to appoint commissioners to divide the city into wards (1825 March 3); J. S. Johnston, Senate Chamber, encl. resolutions in relation to the application of the funds, derived from public lands, to education & internal improvements (1825 March 4); Thomas Jefferson re. the law passed by Congress authorizing the payment to Virginia of such a portion of her claim as will cover the donation of $50,000 to the University of Virginia (1825 March 10); T. Cadwallader re. the swords made for Generals Gaines & Scott & Capt. Warrington as gifts from the state of Virginia (1825 April 5 & 20); Edward Valentine, Jr., recommending directors of the Lunatic Hospital at Staunton (1825 April 9); Claude Crozet re. his opinion of the map of Virginia created by Herman Boye (1825 April 15); Charles H. Hyde, Captain of the Fire Company lately organized in Richmond, requesting the use of the engine belonging to the state (1825 April 17); John Brockenbrough on behalf of the Commissioners of Streets in Richmond requesting permission to remove the earth between the Bell House & Bank Street and to convey the water of the spring between the Capitol & Gun House through a hydrant at Bank Street (1825 April 28); T. Mason, President of the Potomac Company, encl. proceedings of the general meeting of the proprietors of the Potomac Company (1825 May 19); William Seldon re. his bond as Register of the Land Office (1825 May 23); John Henson re. his claim for an additional allowance for covering the Lexington Arsenal (includes sketch of cupola & correspondence) (1825 May 23); James Monroe re. his message to Congress before his retirement from office (1825 June 7); George Hay re. the resolutions of the House of Delegates to present to General Lafayette copies of the Bill of Rights & other public acts (1825 Aug. 13); Levi Swain re. the completion of his work at the Capitol (1825 Oct. 4); William H. Cabell, judge of the Court of Appeals, re. smoke in the rooms prepared under the act of the General Assembly for the accommodation of the Court of Appeals & Clerk of the Court (1825 Oct. 26); and Anderson Barret re. his examination of the fireplaces in the rooms lately fitted out for the Court of Appeals (1825 Nov. 1).

Other noteworthy items include: certificates of oath for James Pleasants, Jr., as governor (1822 Dec. 17 & 1823 Dec. 17); proclamations of Governor Pleasants & Lt. Governor Peter V. Daniel offering a reward for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1823 Jan. 22; 1823 March 28; 1823 April 9; 1823 May 9 & 19; 1823 July 11; 1823 Oct. 10 & 27; 1823 Nov. 24; 1823 Dec. 5; 1824 March 17; 1824 April 30; 1824 May 15; 1824 July 16 & 22; 1824 Sept. 29; 1824 Oct. 25; 1825 Feb. 1; 1825 April 1; 1825 May 11 & 31; 1825 Sept. 28; 1825 Oct. 18); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary (1823 Jan. 29; 1823 March 19; 1823 April 1; 1823 May 5, 21, & 23; 1823 June 11 & 24; 1823 July 30; 1823 Sept. 11; 1823 Oct. 10; 1823 Nov. 25; 1823 Dec. 3, 10, 17, 24, & 31; 1824 Feb. 4, 11, & 28; 1824 March 24; 1824 April 9; 1824 June 2 & 9; 1824 Oct. 29; 1824 Nov. 18; 1824 Dec. 24; 1825 March 17; 1825 May 2; 1825 Aug. 5; & 1825 Dec. 6); reports of the Committee appointed by the Executive to examine the Auditor's & Treasurer's Offices (1823 March 8; 1823 Aug. 16; 1823 Nov. 14; & 1825 Jan. 7 & Nov. 12); a general account of Executive expenditures occasioned by the burning of the Penitentiary House on 8 August 1823 (1823 Nov. 28); reports of the Directors of the Penitentiary on the practicality & expense of repairing the Penitentiary (1823 Aug. 12); a contract with James Bootwright for supplying rations for Capt. Cary's Company of Militia guarding the convicts at the Penitentiary (1823 Aug. 18); a report of the Executive Committee on the Penitentiary (1823 Sept. 6); an article by James Mease, M.D., "On the Penitentiary System of Pennsylvania" (1823 Dec. 26); a resolution of Alabama that Gen. Andrew Jackson should succeed James Monroe as president (1823 Dec. 26); a bill (H.R. 252) authorizing the payment of interest due to the State of Virginia (1824 Jan. 3); resolutions of citizens of Mississippi re. the qualifications of Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson as president, the nomination of Gen. Thomas Hinds, Dr. B. C. Barry, & Gen. James Patton, and the appointment of a committee of correspondence(1824 Feb. 9); a proclamation by Governor Pleasants re. an election to supply the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the death of William Lee Ball (1824 March 5); recommendations for Register of the Land Office (1824 April); a report of the commissioners appointed to settle the western limits of the state & the dividing line between Virginia & Maryland (1824 Nov. 1); a proclamation re. the meeting of electors for president & vice president (1824 Nov. 15); an estimate of the expenses in publishing the map of Virginia by Herman Boye (1824 Dec. 20); a report & accounts of the committee appointed by the Executive to make suitable arrangements for the reception & accommodation of General Lafayette (1825 Feb. [N.D.]); a report of the commissioners appointed to locate the Western Lunatic Asylum (1825 April 2); the appointment of the Court of Directors of the Western Lunatic Hospital (1825 April 19); the contract of John Woodson for cleaning & packing arms at the Lexington Arsenal (1825 May 6); and a proposal by the Court of Appeals to change the plan of alterations for the General Court room in the Capitol (1825 June 17).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with pardons and undated items arranged to the rear.

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

James Pleasants Executive Papers
1822
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      12-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      21-31
1823
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      16-31
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      3-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      17-28
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      17-31
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      16-30
  • May
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      16-31
  • June
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-8
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      9-14
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      16-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      21-25
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      26-30
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      1-7
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      8-18
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      19-30
  • August
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      16-31
  • September
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      16-30
  • October
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      16-31
  • November
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      1-14
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      16-30
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      17-31
  • Pardons
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      A-F
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      G-W
  • Box 3
    Folder 13
    Undated
1824
  • Box 4
    Folder 1
    January
  • February
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      2-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      21-28
  • March
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      1-12
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      16-30
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      19-30
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      1-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      22-31
  • June
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      1-9
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      10-19
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      21-27
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      28-30
  • July
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-5
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      6-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      16-28
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      29-31
  • August
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      3-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      16-31
  • September
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      17-30
  • October
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      16-30
  • November
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 12
      16-30
  • December
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      17-30
  • Pardons
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      A-L
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      M-W
  • Box 6
    Folder 5
    Undated
1825
  • January
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      17-31
  • February
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      16-30
  • March
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      1-14
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      16-30
  • April
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      1-9
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      11-28
  • May
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      2-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      11-23
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      24-31
  • June
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      11-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      16-30
  • August
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 12
      16-30
  • Box 8
    Folder 1
    September
  • October
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      1-15
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      17-29
  • November
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      1-12
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      14-20
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      21-26
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      27-30
  • Box 8
    Folder 8
    December
  • Pardons
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      B-M
    • Box 8
      Folder 10
      R-W
Undated
Box: 8
Folder: 11
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1822
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Dec. 23
  • 1823
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      March 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      April 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      June 21
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Aug. 22
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      Nov. 14
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      Nov. 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Dec. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      Dec. 10
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      Pardons - Becks, Nicholas
  • 1824
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      March 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      April 22
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      April 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      June 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      July 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Sept. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Oct. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Oct. 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      Dec. 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      Dec. 11
  • Pardons
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      Alsop, Thomas
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      Joe of Pierce
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      Jones, Thomas
  • 1825
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      Jan. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 25
      Jan. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 26
      Feb. 15
    • Box 9
      Folder 27
      March 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 28
      May 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 29
      June 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 30
      July 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 31
      Aug. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 32
      Dec. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 33
      Dec. 10
    • Box 9
      Folder 34
      Pardons - Dixon, George
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1823
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Jan. 3
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      March 11
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      June 14
  • 1824
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      Nov. 23
  • 1825
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      June 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      June 27