A Guide to the Governor Thomas Mann Randolph Executive Papers, 1819-1822 Randolph, Thomas Mann, Executive Papers of Governor, 1819-1822 41887

A Guide to the Governor Thomas Mann Randolph Executive Papers, 1819-1822

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 41887


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© 2005 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
41887
Title
Governor Thomas Mann Randolph Executive Papers, 1819-1822
Physical Characteristics
4.33 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor (1819-1822 : Randolph). Executive papers, 1819-1822 (bulk 1820-1822). Accession 41887. State government records collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.


Biographical Information

Thomas Mann Randolph was born on 1 October 1768 at "Tuckahoe" in Goochland County, Virginia. Randolph was the son of Thomas Mann Randolph and Anne Cary, daughter of Archibald Cary. Educated at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland from 1785 to 1788, Randolph returned to Virginia and married his cousin Martha Jefferson, daughter of Thomas Jefferson, at Monticello in 1790. The couple settled at "Edgehill" in Albemarle County and had eleven children including Thomas Jefferson Randolph & George Wythe Randolph. Although he failed to be elected to the Virginia House of Delegates in 1797, Randolph served in the Eighth and Ninth Congresses of the U. S. House of Representatives from 1803 to 1807. He was defeated in his reelection attempt in 1809. A lieutenant-colonel in the Virginia Militia, Randolph received a commission as colonel in the U. S. Army in March 1813. Randolph helped recruit men for the Twentieth Regiment of Infantry and was ordered to Sackett's Harbor, Lake Ontario, under General James Wilkinson. Randolph returned to political life in 1819 with his election to the Virginia House of Delegates. That same year, Randolph was elected to his first of three one-year terms as governor of Virginia. While governor, Randolph was responsible for completing some of the work begun by his predecessors including the establishment of the University of Virginia and the mapping of Virginia's counties. Following his governorship, Randolph returned to the House of Delegates as a representative of Albemarle County in 1823 & 1824. His last political appointment came in 1826 & 1827 as a federal commissioner to determine the boundary between the state of Georgia and the territory of Florida. Despite financial difficulties and the estrangement from his family in his later years, Randolph returned to Monticello where he died on 20 June 1828. He is buried in the family graveyard at Monticello.

Scope and Content

Thomas Mann Randolph's Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three one-year terms as governor from 11 December 1819 to 11 December 1822. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Public Guard; the Lexington Arsenal; the Virginia Penitentiary; Capitol Square; John Wood's survey of Virginia's counties; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. These papers are arranged chronologically with pardons arranged to the rear of each year. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; muster rolls; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns; certificates; qualifications; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include John Quincy Adams, Secretary of State; John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War; William H. Crawford, Secretary of the Treasury; Thomas T. Tucker, Treasurer of the United States; Thomas Daugherty, Clerk of the House of Representatives; Henry Clay, Speaker of the House of Representatives; and James Johnson & James Pindall, Virginia's representatives in Congress.

John Quincy Adams, Secretary of State, writes to request a copy of the Statutes of Virginia (1819 Dec. 28). On 22 March 1821 Adams writes with respect to the Treaty of Ghent & compensation for owners of slaves carried away by British officers after the conclusion of peace (1821 March 22). Later, Adams encloses copies of a letter from the Minister of Britain complaining of an extra charge for pilotage required from British vessels in the port of Norfolk (1821 July 2). On 19 January 1822, Adams encloses a certified copy of the returns of the inhabitants of Virginia by the 4th Census. Adams also forwards a copy of the additional census of Alabama (1822 Nov. 6). Finally, Adams acknowledges receipt of depositions of the number, value, age, & sex of slaves carried away from Virginia by British officers after the conclusion of peace with Great Britain (1822 Nov. 8). As Secretary of War, John C. Calhoun, writes concerning the fire in the War Office in 1800 & the roll of the Virginia line on Continental Establishment (1820 Jan. 19); the cession of jurisdiction over the sites of the fortifications under construction at Old Point Comfort & the shoal called the Rip Raps (1821 Jan. 26); and a report from the Ordnance Department regarding the plan & construction of the Arsenal near Richmond & its defense (1821 April 24). William H. Crawford, Secretary of the Treasury, writes regarding the law authorizing the location of the Cumberland Road (1822 Jan. 18). Thomas T. Tucker, Treasurer of the United States, writes regarding the claims of Virginia against the U. S. on account of expenditures during the late war (1821 May 10 & 1822 April 26); Thomas Daugherty, Clerk of the House of Representatives, writes on 19 February 1821 to inform the governor of the death of Representative William A. Burwell. Henry Clay, Speaker of the House of Representatives, writes regarding the resignations of James Pleasants and George French Strother from the House of Representatives (1819 Dec. 13 & 1820 June 5). Lastly, James Johnson & James Pindall, Virginia's representatives in Congress, write to resign their seats in the House of Representatives (1820 June 5 & July 26).

The majority of correspondence in Thomas Mann Randolph's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Wilson Bryan, Superintendent of Public Improvements of the Capitol Square; Claiborne W. Gooch & Bernard Peyton, Adjutants General; James Paxton, Commandant of the Lexington Arsenal; Blair Bolling, Commandant of the Public Guard; Samuel P. Parsons & Edmund Pendleton, Jr., Superintendents of the Penitentiary; John Robertson, Attorney General; William Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; John Burfoot & James E. Heath, Auditors of Public Accounts; Jerman Baker, Treasurer; and John Wood & Herman Boye, Surveyors.

Wilson Bryan completed the work of Arthur S. Brockenbrough as Superintendent of Public Improvements of Capitol Square. On 13 December 1819, Bryan writes to the governor regarding the trees on the south & west sides of the Capitol. Later, Bryan provides an estimate of the cost to protect the Public Square with posts & chains (1819 Dec. 16). In October 1820, there were various proposals submitted to the governor for graveling, turfing, & replanting trees on Capitol Square. Bryan writes on 20 October 1820 requesting to superintend the workmen engaged in finishing Capitol Square.

Claiborne W. Gooch, Adjutant General, corresponds with the governor in his role as Adjutant General and Commissary General of the Ordnance Department. Gooch writes regarding artillery in Lynchburg (1819 Dec. 14); the condition of the sick in the Public Guard (1820 Jan. 10); arms in Monroe & Greenbrier counties (1820 Jan. 4); a new regiment within the limits of Lewis County (1820 Jan. 15); the consolidation of the militia of Randolph County with Lewis County into the 125th Regiment (1820 Jan. 19); a drum & fife for Capt. Paxton at the Lexington Arsenal (1820 Jan. 27); the condition of the public edifices (1820 Jan. [N.D.]); the contract for a supply of rations to the convicts in the Penitentiary (1820 Feb. 26); arms & ammunition to prepare against an insurrection (1820 March 14); repairs to the Barracks yard & leaks in the roof of the Capitol (1820 June 22); arms left by the militia in Maryland & the District of Columbia during the late war (1820 July 3); the inspection of arms at the Lexington Arsenal (1820 July 17); a letter from Col. John Floyd regarding the services of a detachment of mounted riflemen on 12 September 1814 (1820 Feb. 16); the application of Capt. William Hutcheson for arms (1820 Oct. 23); arms at the Lexington Arsenal (1820 Oct. 29); a letter from Peyton Drew, Clerk of the General Court, regarding repairs to the Capitol (1820 Oct. [N.D.]); repairs to the Public Warehouse (1820 Nov. 28); the arms of the 115th Regiment (1820 Nov. 28); the case of Capt. John O'Bannon of the 55th Regiment (1821 Jan. 5); artillery sheds (1821 Jan. 9); and the protection of the turf, trees, etc., on the Capitol Square (1821 Jan. 25). On 6 March 1821, Gooch writes Governor Randolph to resign as adjutant general.

Bernard Peyton succeeded Claiborne W. Gooch as adjutant general. Peyton writes regarding similar issues including: the account of John Caskey for transporting muskets to the Lexington Arsenal (1821 April 13); a letter from Capt. William Finney re. the arms of the Richmond Light Infantry Blues (1821 April 23); the commission of Benjamin B. Bradford as lieutenant colonel of the 44th Regiment (1821 June 15); the formation of a volunteer company of artillery to be attached to the 54th Regiment (1821 Aug. 7); a requisition of arms & accoutrements for a volunteer company of light infantry in Suffolk (1821 Dec. 5); Mordecai Cook's request for equipment for a company of volunteer artillery of Portsmouth (1821 Dec. 18); a requisition of Capt. Byrne for a piece of artillery & accoutrements (1822 Jan. 14); the certificate of election of officers to a company of volunteer riflemen to be attached to the 2nd Battalion of the 31st Regiment (1822 Feb. 11); and a claim for transporting arms and a requisition for cannon & equipment for a company of artillery attached to the 14th Regiment (1822 Feb. 21).

James Paxton, Commandant of the Public Guard at the Lexington Arsenal, encloses half-monthly returns of the Public Guard under his command (1819 Dec. 16 & 1821 Feb. 15). In addition, Paxton writes concerning such topics as musket boxes (1819 Dec. 16); supplies (1820 Jan. 19; 1822 Jan. 2, 5, & 25; & 1822 Dec. 9); John Jordan's contract for rations (1820 Feb. 16); the hiring of a new drummer (1820 Oct. 10); the discharge of two privates in the Public Guard (1820 Dec. 20), a substitute for a private in the Public Guard (1821 Sept. 17); increased compensation for Dr. William H. Montgomery as surgeon at the Arsenal (1821 Oct. 20); and clothing & the contract of John Jordan for repairs to the Arsenal (1821 Oct. 22).

Blair Bolling served as both Commandant of the Public Guard & Superintendent of Public Property, following the resignation of Claiborne W. Gooch as adjutant general. In these roles, Bolling writes regarding the following topics: deserters (1820 June 13); an estimate of the cost of making a pair of steps at the eastern end of the Barracks (1820 June 20); his application as adjutant general (1821 March 8); the authority to purchase things necessary for the preservation of the turfing on Capitol Square (1821 March 12); the discharge of a soldier in the Public Guard (1821 March 14); an examination of the Magazine near the Penitentiary (1821 March 15); the retraction of his withdrawal of his candidacy for adjutant general (1821 March 19); powder in the Magazine owed by private individuals (1821 March 20); repairs in the turfing on Capitol Square & the need for a cart & horse (1821 March 28); authority to perform certain duties relating to the Office of Superintendent of Public Property (1821 March 31); cannon at the Penitentiary for the Public Guard (1821 June 27); repairs to the Portico of the Capitol (1821 Aug. 21 & Sept. 4); accounts for work done on the Capitol (1821 Nov. 14); the claim of William Ritter who was contracted to make cushions for the Hall of Delegates (1821 Dec. 20); James Warrell's request for a hydrant to carry off excess water through pipes under the Public Square (1822 Jan. 24); an estimate of skids to preserve the cannon at the Armory (1822 May 17); the discharge of John McGahan from the Public Guard (1822 May 30); and boxes made at the Penitentiary for packing arms (1822 Sept. 20).

Samuel P. Parsons, Superintendent of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Randolph regarding the receipt for an escaped prisoner named Billy (1820 Feb. 11); the case of John Fink convicted of grand larceny (1820 May 18 & 31); the case of Abner W. Mercer (1820 Aug. 16); the case of Billy Walden (1820 Sept. 15 & 1821 Aug. 14); a statement of the Penitentiary's account with the Commonwealth as purchasing agent (1821 Feb. 17); the value of slaves confined in the Penitentiary for sale & transportation (1821 June 25); the escape of a slave named Archer (1821 Nov. 26 & 27); the pardon of prisoners before he leaves office (1822 Feb. 27); and the pardon of two convicts in the Penitentiary (1822 March 18). Parsons was replaced by Edmund Pendleton, Jr., as Superintendent of the Penitentiary in February 1822. Pendleton writes regarding the removal of Andrew M. Crew, one of the turnkeys in the Penitentiary, and the appointment of his nephew John T. Page in his place (1822 March 18, 26, & 27). Pendleton also writes concerning boxes to be constructed at the Penitentiary for arms in the Armory (1822 June 7; 1822 July 6; & 1822 Sept. 19). Lastly, Pendleton encloses statements of the manufacturing operations of the Penitentiary from 1 March 1822 to 13 September 1822 (1822 Dec. 2).

John Robertson, Attorney General, provides opinions on the bond of the Treasurer (1820 Jan. 24); the sheriffalty of Monongalia County (1820 Feb. 14); the appointment of sheriffs in the counties of Nansemond & King William (1821 Oct. 23); and the obligation of banks to receive certain bank notes of the Treasurer (1821 Oct. 24). Robertson also writes regarding the contracts entered into by the Executive with John P. Shields & Thomas Strode (1820 May 30).

William Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, often submits legislation to the governor. Noteworthy is a resolution that the Executive be authorized & required to add to the publication directed by the 124th section of the militia law (1820 Feb. 16); a resolution announcing to James Barbour his reelection as senator in Congress (1821 Jan. 16); an act concerning the Potomac Company (1821 March 1); an act creating a new county out of parts of Bath, Botetourt, & Monroe (1822 Jan. 30); and an act providing for the repairs of the Armory & the preservation of the public arms (1822 March 2).

Additionally, Munford transmits certificates of the election of the following individuals: James E. Heath as auditor of public accounts (1820 Jan. 1); William Robertson as a member of the Privy Council (1820 Jan. 1); Isaac Booth as brigadier general of the 20th Brigade (1820 Jan. 7); William McCoy as brigadier general of the 18th Brigade (1820 Jan. 20); William Yates as a member of the Privy Council (1820 Jan. 27); Thomas M. Randolph as governor (1820 Dec. 17); Jerman Baker as Treasurer (1821 Jan. 15 & 1822 Jan. 14); Maj. S. Pitts as brigadier general of the 21st Brigade (1821 Feb. 15); Alexander L. Botts as a member of the Privy Council (1821 Feb. 15); Matthew Woodson as master armorer for the Manufactory of Arms (1821 March 5); commissioners of the Kanawha River & Road and James River navigation (1822 Jan. 21); Edmund Pendleton, Jr., as superintendent & Matthew H. Rice as storekeeper or general agent of the Penitentiary (1822 Feb. 18); and James Pleasants, Jr. as governor (1822 Dec. 10).

John Burfoot, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Randolph regarding various financial matters. Burfoot transmits a statement of the receipts into the Treasury for the year ending 30 September 1819 (1819 Dec. 15). Burfoot was replaced by James E. Heath in January 1820. Heath writes on 8 January 1820 regarding the vacancy in the Council of State as a result of his acceptance & qualification as auditor. In addition, Heath writes regarding the claim of Ensign Thomas C. Clarke of the 1st Regiment of Virginia Militia (1820 Jan. 6); a request that the Adjutant General inspect the Auditor's Office to enlarge the fireplace or add another one (1820 Jan. 11); the employment of additional copying clerks to expedite the copying of tables of assessment for the commissioners of the revenue (1820 Feb. 4, 18, & 23); a certificate of the amount due him as a member of the Privy Council (1820 Feb. 11); the appointment & payment of clerks to copy tables of assessment (1820 March 1); the expenses of the assessment(1820 March 13 & 14); a statement of the interest paid by the Commonwealth to the Bank of Virginia & Farmers Bank of Virginia on loans (1820 March 15); advances to the riders for carrying out notices to delinquents (1820 March 23); a lot of land in Boydtown not sold for want of bidders (1820 April 10); the papers of Fayette Johnston, administrator of Richard Johnston, quarter master during the late war (1820 April 18); an agent to superintend the sale of certain property in Boydtown (1820 April 29); an estimate of the cost of changes proposed to be made in the furniture of the Auditor's Office (1820 July 1); delinquent counties (1820 Aug. 7 & Oct. 28); the sheriff of Loudoun County (1820 Oct. 3); presses in the Capitol (1820 Oct. 7); the sale of lands of delinquents (1820 Oct. 29); the disposal of the presses in the Auditor's Office (1820 Nov. 15); the account of Virginia against the United States (1820 Nov. 29); the reassessment of part of Norfolk County (1821 Jan. 30); the appointment of Mordecai Cooke as collector of revenue for Norfolk County (1821 March 6); his absence from Richmond (1821 March 31); the appointment of Joseph L. Fry as agent to sell lands (1821 July 9); the appointment of John F. May as agent to sell lands (1821 July 17); bond of John F. May (1821 July 27); the bond of E. M. Wilson as agent to dispose of lands (1821 Aug. 23); the bond of John J. Allen as agent in Harrison County (1821 Oct. 6); the bond of M. Wilson (1821 Nov. 7); the bond of William G. Pendleton as Register of the Land Office (1822 Jan. 19); claims against the United States (1822 Feb. 27); the bond of Valentine W. Southall as agent for the Commonwealth (1822 April 25); the bond of Richard G. Morris as agent for Gloucester County (1822 May 20); a request for certain papers to be used in a suit against James Pindall (1822 Aug. 7); a request for an absence (1822 Aug. 16); the unsettled accounts against the General government (1822 Oct. 1); and the claim of Valentine W. Southall (1822 Oct. 10).

Jerman Baker, Treasurer, writes regarding the state of the Treasury (1820 May 1); a bill of repairs for the Treasury Office (1820 June 22); a report of the state of the public funds (1820 July 21); the accounts of John Preston, late Treasurer (1820 Oct. 9); witnesses in the Commonwealth's cases against late Treasurer John Preston (1820 Oct. 10); the propriety of discharging the debts due on account of loans made during the last fiscal year by the Bank of Virginia & Farmers Bank (1820 Nov. 4); the account against the late Treasurer (1820 Nov. 13); an additional table for his office (1820 Dec. 4); and the cleaning of the flues of the chimney in his office (1821 July 2).

John Wood corresponded with the Governor regarding his work creating maps of Virginia's counties. Wood periodically informs the Governor of the completion of two plans for several county maps (1820 Feb. 14; 1820 June 29; 1820 Oct. 10; 1820 Dec. 21; 1821 March 14; 1821 Aug. 14; 1821 Nov. 30; & 1822 Feb. 4). On 3 January 1820, Wood writes regarding county boundaries and the scale on each county map. In addition, Wood writes concerning the scale of counties west of the Blue Ridge (1820 Oct. 5 & 10). John Wood died in 1822 before he could finish his work. Herman Boye was chosen to fulfill Wood's contract. Herman Boye writes on 15 May 1822 proposing to complete Wood's contract to survey the state of Virginia and make a general map of each county, along with a general map of the state. He writes on 13 November 1822 regarding his pay to complete the Wood's contract. Lastly, Herman Boye writes requesting an extension for completing the contract between the Commonwealth & John Wood (1822 Nov. 22).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the governor. This correspondence primarily relates to amendments to the U. S. Constitution, extraditions, and the distribution of laws. Included are letters from the following governors: Jonathan Jennings, Indiana; Ethan A. Brown & Allen Trimble, Ohio; Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut; Samuel Bell, New Hampshire; William Findlay, Pennsylvania; Samuel Sprigg, Maryland; Shadrack Bond, Illinois; Isaac H. Williamson, New Jersey; Gabriel Holmes, North Carolina; Thomas Bennett, South Carolina; and DeWitt Clinton, New York.

Governors Jonathan Jennings, Indiana; Ethan A. Brown, Ohio; Samuel Bell, New Hampshire; & Thomas Bennett, South Carolina; transmit resolutions against the amendment to the Constitution that Congress make no law to erect or incorporate any bank except within the District of Columbia (1820 Jan. 3 & 22). The Secretary to Governor Williamson of New Jersey also transmits a resolution regarding the same amendment to the Constitution. Williamson, himself, transmits copies of the state's revised laws on 29 November 1821. Governor Oliver Wolcott transmits a report of a committee to whom was referred certain declarations of the Commonwealth regarding slavery (1820 June 10). Governor Ethan A. Brown writes regarding a demand for David W. Gallagher, a fugitive from justice (1821 April 2). Allen Trimble, Acting Governor of Ohio, writes on 4 February 1822 regarding an exchange of a map of Ohio. Governor William Findlay, Pennsylvania, writes regarding a demand for Isaac Smith (1821 Jan. 8). Governor Samuel Sprigg, Maryland, encloses resolutions regarding the appointment of commissioners for the navigation of the Potomac River (1821 June 5). Sprigg also writes regarding a demand for Rezin Wooten, a fugitive from justice (1821 July 4). Lastly, Sprigg writes concerning the correct meridian of the western boundary of Maryland & Virginia (1822 June 22). Governor Shadrack Bond, the first governor of Illinois, transmits copies of the acts of the Illinois General Assembly (1821 Aug. 23). William Plummer, Secretary to the Governor of North Carolina, transmits a certified transcript of an act passed relative to the stock in the Dismal Swamp Canal (1820 Jan. 7). Later, Governor Gabriel Holmes, North Carolina, transmits resolutions relative to the appropriation of public lands for the purpose of education (1822 June 25). Finally, Governor DeWitt Clinton writes regarding a demand for Eber Hale, an escaped criminal (1822 Nov. 20).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: J. G. Jackson resigning as brigadier general (1820 Jan. 1); applications for the office of Clerk of the Council (1820 Jan.); John P. Shields re. the completion of his contract to plant trees on the Public Square (1820 Jan. 19); applications for assistant clerk or copying clerk of the Council (1820 Jan.); Thomas M. Randolph, President of the Literary Fund, encl. the report of the state of the Literary Fund (1820 Feb. 14); John P. Shields re. his claim for work done on Capitol Square (1820 May 1); Robert Stanard, Attorney of the U. S. for the Virginia District, requesting that a convict be received at the Penitentiary (1820 May 26); John Hills, 1st Lieutenant of Ordnance, re. the evacuation of the General Government from Ft. Powhatan and the removal of all property belonging to the United States (1820 July 13); John C. Montague re. his proposal to graduate the graveling part of the Public Square forming a horseshoe (1820 Oct. 17); Robert Watkins & John T. Ayres proposing to complete the Capitol Square by graveling, turfing, planting, & replanting trees (1820 Oct. 19); Philip P. Barbour re. compensation as counsel for Virginia in the U. S. Supreme Court (1820 Nov. 25); William Munford, William McKim, & Robert Greenhow, Directors of the Penitentiary, submitting a statement of the operations of the Penitentiary (1820 Nov. 30); John W. Taylor re. the death of William A. Burwell (1821 Feb. 22); Peter Randolph resigning as judge of the General Court (1821 Feb. 22); recommendations & applications for Clerk of the Council in place of John Burfoot (1821 Feb. & March); applications for the office of adjutant general (1821 March); applications for the office of military lands in Kentucky (1821 March 23); Samuel Taylor declining an appointment as judge of the General Court (1821 March 28); Thomas T. Bouldin accepting an appointment as judge of the General Court (1821 March 30); J. W. Pleasants, Assistant Clerk of the Council, re. pay for performing the duties as Clerk of the Council & Assistant Clerk for sixteen days (1821 March 31); Lt. E. Brown, Public Guard, re. receipts for the pay & supplies for the guard stationed at Ft. Powhatan (1821 April 19); C. Tompkins re. an estimate of the repairs of the Magazine at Westham (1821 May 26); John Dupignac re. permission to raise a balloon on Capitol Square (1821 Aug. 21); Richard Eppes suggesting a portion of the Public Guard at the Manufactory of Arms for the protection of public property until its operations cease on 1 January 1822 (1821 Dec. 15); William W. Hening requesting access to the archives of the Council Chamber to research the situation of unsatisfied claims for land bounties of the troops engaged on state establishment during the Revolution (1822 Jan. 22); James Warrell asking for permission to lay logs to draw off the water continually escaping from the spring in the northeast part of Capitol Square which leaves the Museum in a damp & humid state (1822 Jan. 22); Robert B. Taylor accepting a commission as major general of the 4th Division of Militia (1822 Jan. 28); John S. Hening re. compensation for his services as agent for the claimants of military lands lying west of the Tennessee River in Kentucky (1822 Feb. 18); John Adams, Mayor of Richmond, re. the division of the city into wards (1822 March 11); John Adams complaining of the Keeper of the Locks of the James River Canal (1822 May 20); Lt. Col. Bomford, U. S. Ordnance Dept., re. the delivery of arms to the Virginia Militia according to the act of Congress for arming the militia of the United States (1822 June 22); E. Brown encl. the sale at auction of the house & other property found at Ft. Powhatan (1822 June 28); Daniel Morgan re. the death of Thomas Van Swearingen, a representative in Congress (1822 Sept. 2); John W. Green accepting his appointment as judge of the Court of Appeals (1822 Oct. 11); Peyton Drew, Clerk of the General Court, re. repairs to his office in the Capitol (1822 Oct. 11); Philip P. Barbour declining an appointment as chancellor (1822 Oct. 13); and William G. Pendleton, Register of the Land Office, encl. an estimate of certain repairs needed for the Land Office (1822 Oct. 23).

Other noteworthy items include: certificates of oath for Thomas Mann Randolph as governor (1819 Dec. 13 & 1821 Dec. 15), Jerman Baker as Treasurer (1820 Jan. 29), William Smith as a member of the Privy Council (1820 Feb. 23), & William H. Richardson as clerk of the Privy Council (1821 March 7); proclamations of Governor Randolph & Lt. Governor Peter V. Daniel offering a reward for the apprehension of escaped convicts (1820 Jan. 5 & 15; 1820 June 13 & 19; 1820 July 20; 1820 Oct. 24; 1820 Nov. 18; 1820 Dec. 19; 1821 March 23; 1821 April 16; 1821 Aug. 16 & 25; 1821 Nov. 5 & 26; 1821 Dec. 15; 1822 Feb. 12; 1822 April 12; 1822 June 28; 1822 July 6; & 1822 Sept. 7 & 20); proceedings of the Board of Directors of the Penitentiary (1820 March 4; 1820 April 8; 1820 June 10, 17, & 24; 1820 Aug. 12 & 19; 1820 Oct. 7 & 28; 1820 Dec. 9, 16, & 30; 1821 Feb. 9 & 17; 1821 March 14 & 30; 1821 May 23; 1821 June 13 & 20; 1821 July 5 & 18; 1821 Sept. 26; 1821 Nov. 2; 1821 Dec. 12; 1822 Jan. 23 & 30; 1822 Feb. 13, 19, & 27; 1822 March 8 & 27; 1822 April 17; 1822 May 1 & 29; 1822 July 17; 1822 Aug. 7; & 1822 Oct. 26); proclamation of Governor Randolph re. the compact between the Commonwealth & James River Company (1820 March 16); report of the Committee for examining the Capitol Square (1820 April 21); reports of the Committee to examine the Auditor & Treasurer's Offices (1820 May 9; 1820 Dec.5; 1821 April 25; 1821 July 25; 1821 Nov. 20; 1822 March 9; & 1822 Nov. 18); a proclamation of Lt. Gov Peter V. Daniel re. an election to fill the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the resignation of James Pindall (1820 Aug. 5); proclamation of Governor Randolph re. indemnification for the loss of slaves carried away by British officers after the conclusion of peace (1821 April 18); proclamation of Governor Randolph re. the rates of pilotage for foreign vessels (1821 July 10); report of the Committee to whom was referred the reports & resolutions of the legislatures of Maryland & New Hampshire and the proceeding in the U. S. Senate re. appropriations of public lands for the purpose of education (1821 Dec. [N.D.]); report of the Committee appointed to divide the City of Richmond into wards (1822 March 22); contract between Lewis Ludlam & Bernard Peyton to remove all ordnance, etc., from Ft. Powhatan to the Armory in Richmond (1822 April 17); bond of Arthur S. Brockenbrough, Proctor, & Thomas Jefferson, Rector, to renew certificate No. 32 in favor of the Proctor of Central College as Proctor of the University of Virginia (1822 July 6); proclamation of Governor Randolph re. an election to fill the vacancy in the House of Representatives by the death of Thomas Van Swearingen (1822 Sept. 7); proclamation of Governor Randolph appointing Philip P. Barbour as judge of the High Court of Chancery to replace John W. Green (1822 Oct. 11); resolutions of Kentucky providing for the appointment of a Board of Commissioners under the 8th article of the compact with Virginia & ratifying the Convention of the commissioners appointed to make the necessary arrangements for constituting the Board (1822 Nov. 22); and the contract of Herman Boye to complete the work of John Wood (1822 Nov. 22).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with pardons and undated items arranged to the rear.

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

Thomas Mann Randolph Executive Papers
1819
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      12-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      21-31
1820
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      21-31
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      1-14
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      15-29
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      16-31
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      16-29
  • May
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      16-31
  • June
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      12-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      21-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      Undated
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      1-14
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      16-31
  • September
    • Box 2
      Folder 12
      2-29
  • October
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      2-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      21-31
  • November
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      17-30
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      16-31
  • Box 3
    Folder 7
    Undated
1821
  • January
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      16-31
  • February
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      4-22
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      23-28
  • March
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      1-6
    • Box 3
      Folder 13
      7-14
    • Box 3
      Folder 14
      15-31
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      2-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      21-30
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      1-26
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      27-31
  • June
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      21-25
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      26-30
  • July
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      2-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      12-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      21-31
  • Box 5
    Folder 1
    August
  • Box 5
    Folder 2
    September
  • Box 5
    Folder 3
    October
  • Box 5
    Folder 4
    November
  • December
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      1-11
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      12-31
  • Pardons
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      A-P
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      R-W
1821
  • January
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      16-30
  • February
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      1-16
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      17-28
  • March
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      2-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      22-29
  • April
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      16-30
  • May
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      16-25
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      26-31
  • June
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      11-17
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      18-22
    • Box 6
      Folder 13
      24-30
  • July
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      16-31
  • August
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      2-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      23-31
  • Box 7
    Folder 5
    September
  • October
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      16-31
  • November
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      1-18
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      19-30
  • Box 7
    Folder 10
    December
  • Box 8
    Folder 1
    Pardons
Undated
Box: 8
Folder: 2
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1819
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Dec. 14
  • 1820
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      Jan. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      Jan. 7
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Feb. 9
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Feb. 14
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      March 15
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      April 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      May 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      June 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      July 10
  • 1821
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      April 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      April 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      June 7
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      June 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      June 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      June 26
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      June 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      July 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      July 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      Aug. 14
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      Aug. 30
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      Oct. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      Oct. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      Oct. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 25
      Nov. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 26
      Dec. 22
  • 1822
    • Box 9
      Folder 27
      June 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 28
      June 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 29
      Nov. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 30
      Nov. 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 31
      Nov. 22
    • Box 9
      Folder 32
      Dec. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 33
      Undated
    • Box 9
      Folder 34
      Undated
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1819
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Dec. 15
  • 1820
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      March 23
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      June 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      Oct. 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      Oct. 29
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      Nov. 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      Nov. 30
  • 1821
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      Jan. 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      Feb. 17
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      May 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Nov. 27
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Dec. 11
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Dec. 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 14
      Dec. 31
  • 1822
    • Box 10
      Folder 15
      Nov. 6
    • Box 10
      Folder 16
      Nov. 6
    • Box 10
      Folder 17
      Dec. 2
    • Box 10
      Folder 18
      Dec. 10