A Guide to the Governor James Patton Preston Executive Papers, 1816-1819 Preston, James Patton, Executive Papers of Governor, 1816-1819 41737

A Guide to the Governor James Patton Preston Executive Papers, 1816-1819

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 41737


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© 2005 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
41737
Title
Governor James Patton Preston Executive Papers, 1816-1819
Physical Characteristics
5.0 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor (1816-1819 : Preston). Executive papers, 1816-1819 (bulk 1817-1819). Accession 41737. State government records collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.


Biographical Information

James Patton Preston was born at "Smithfield" in Montgomery County, Virginia, on 21 June 1774, the ninth child of Colonel William Preston and Susanna Smith. He was educated at the William & Mary College from 1790 to 1795. In 1799, Preston qualified as justice of the peace for Montgomery County. He married Nancy Taylor of Norfolk, Va., sister of Gen. Robert B. Taylor, on 13 June 1801. One of Preston's six children, William Ballard Preston, became Secretary of the Navy in President Zachariah Taylor's Cabinet and a senator in the Confederate Congress. From 1801 to 1804, Preston served in the Virginia Senate. Preston also represented Montgomery County in the House of Delegates from 1810 to 1812. During the War of 1812, he was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the 12th U. S. Infantry. On 15 August 1813, he was promoted to colonel of the regiment and reassigned to the 23rd U. S. Infantry. Severely wounded at the battle of Chrysler's Farm on 13 November 1813, Preston was later discharged from the army on 15 June 1815.

Preston returned to politics with his re-election to the House of Delegates on 11 November 1816. This term in the House was extremely short-lived as he was elected governor on 11 December 1816 to succeed Wilson Cary Nicholas. Preston served the maximum three one-year terms as governor until 11 December 1819. Notable achievements during his governorship include the establishment of the University of Virginia, improvements to Capitol Square, and the charting of Virginia's rivers & counties. Following his governorship, President James Monroe appointed Preston postmaster for Richmond from 1824 to 1837. In 1837, he was chosen president of a convention at Abingdon to plan a railroad from Lynchburg to Tennessee. He died on 4 May 1843 and is buried at a family plot at "Smithfield." Preston County, West Virginia, was named in his honor in 1818.

Scope and Content

James Patton Preston's Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three one-year terms as governor from 11 December 1816 to 11 December 1819. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; repairs & improvements to the Capitol & Capitol Square; the Public Guard; the Lexington Arsenal; John Wood's surveys of Virginia's rivers & counties; the Virginia Penitentiary; the settlement of accounts of Virginia with the United States for expenses during the War of 1812; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. These papers are arranged chronologically with pardons arranged to the rear of each year. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; muster rolls; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns; certificates; qualifications; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; and other sundry items. The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states.

Federal government correspondents include President James Madison; John Quincy Adams, Secretary of State; John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War; William H. Crawford, Secretary of the Treasury; James Barbour & Armistead T. Mason, Virginia's senators in Congress; and Henry Clay, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

President James Madison writes on 1 March 1817 enclosing his answer to the address of the General Assembly dated 10 February regarding his presidency. As Secretary of State, John Quincy Adams often transmitted recently passed laws of Congress. On 29 July 1817, Richard Rush, Acting Secretary of State, encloses a resolution of the Senate to prepare & report a statement relative to the regulations & standards for weights & measures which may exist in the several states. John Quincy Adams encloses a resolution of Congress proposing an amendment to the Constitution against citizens to accept titles of nobility from a foreign power without the consent of Congress (1818 Jan. 7). Adams also transmits thirty volumes of Wait's Edition of State Papers to Virginia (1818 Oct. 19), a copy of Seybert's Statistical Annals (1819 March 19), copies of the public journals of the Senate & House of Representatives (1819 July 19), and six sets of documents for distribution (1819 Nov. 8). John C. Calhoun, Secretary of War, writes to Governor Preston regarding an arrangement with the state of Virginia for a supply of arms (1818 May 6). William H. Crawford, Secretary of the Treasury, encloses the resolution of Congress that the Secretary transmit a general statement of the condition of the Bank of the United States & its offices (1819 July 23). James Barbour & Armistead T. Mason, Virginia's senators in Congress, write enclosing a letter from Daniel Pettibone requesting aid for his improvements in the welding of cast steel to iron (1817 Feb. 24). Lastly, Henry Clay, Speaker of the House of Representatives, writes regarding the death of Peterson Goodwyn, a Virginia Congressman (1818 March 19).

The majority of correspondence in James Patton Preston's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Orris Paine, Arthur S. Brockenbrough, & Wilson Bryan, Superintendents of Public Improvements of the Capitol Square; Thomas Strode, Paul A. Sabbaton, John P. Shields, George C. Longden, & James Kinkead, contractors on Capitol Square improvements; Claiborne W. Gooch, Adjutant General; James Paxton, Commandant of the Lexington Arsenal; Peter Crutchfield & Blair Bolling, Commandants of the Public Guard; John Staples, Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms; Samuel P. Parsons, Keeper of the Penitentiary; Philip N. Nicholas & John Robertson, Attorneys General; William Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; William Robertson, Clerk of the Council of State; John Burfoot, Auditor of Public Accounts; John Wood, Surveyor; and John Chew, Commissioner appointed to settle the accounts of the Commonwealth with the Unites States.

Orris Paine, Arthur S. Brockenbrough, & Wilson Bryan all served as Superintendent of Public Improvements of Capitol Square during Preston's governorship. Orris Paine requests to have two models made regarding the manner of Godefroy's plan for the Capitol Square (1817 April 3). Paine also writes regarding the completion of one-third of the digging and filling up of the Capitol Square (1817 May 8). Additional correspondence from Orris Paine relate to the following subjects: the stone steps hammered by James Kinkead under the contract of Thomas Strode (1817 May 13); the work of John P. Shields in digging & removing the earth under the contract of Thomas Strode (1817 May 13); the roof of the Capitol (1817 May 14); repairs to the chimneys of the Capitol (1817 May 24); a skylight for the Capitol to light the garret & conference rooms in the southeast & northwest corners (1817 May 30); a report of repairs recommended to be done on the Capitol (1817 June 20); the recommendation of Godefroy to close up two windows in the pediment ends of the Capitol and the finishing of the dome under the skylight (1817 July 5); a copy of the orders in Council relating to the repairing of the Capitol & improving the Square since July 1816 (1818 Feb. 21); and his report on public property including the certification of accounts, the stone steps, furniture of the Capitol, etc. (1818 March 5). Paine continued to correspond with the Governor after his replacement as superintendent in the role as administrator of James Kinkead, one of the contractors who furnished granite for Capitol Square. On 2 June 1818, Paine requests an advance on the contract of James Kinkead, deceased, for furnishing the steps on Capitol Square. Paine also writes regarding the order drawn by Thomas Strode for $3,000 in favor of James Kinkead (1818 June 12); the steps furnished under contract with James Kinkead (1818 July 16); his proposal for leasing out the Foundry, Boring Mill, & waste water from the Armory (1818 July 18); the contract of P. A. Sabbaton for enclosing the Public Square (1818 Dec. 28); Richard North's letter regarding his bill for marble basins (1818 Dec. 30);, the balance due him for the steps contracted for by James Kinkead with Thomas Strode (1819 March 29); the certificate of A. S. Brockenbrough regarding the completion of the steps on both sides of the Capitol (1819 July 2); payment for his work to set the steps (1819 July 15); the certificate of A. S. Brockenbrough regarding the completion of three-fourths of the work around the Governor's lot (1819 Aug. 16); the certificate of A. S. Brockenbrough regarding the completion of the steps & ashlars around the Capitol (1819 Aug. 17); the entrance gate into the Governor's yard (1819 Oct. 2); the completion of the stone wall, capping stones, & brace stones (1819 Nov. 4); and the number of feet of railing required to enclose the Public Square & Governor's lot (1819 Nov. 16 & 30).

Arthur S. Brockenbrough replaced Orris Paine as Superintendent of Public Improvements in March 1818. Brockenbrough writes on 28 March 1818 regarding his proposal to undertake the superintendence of the gradation of the Public Square. In his letter of 3 April 1818, Brockenbrough encloses a sketch of Capitol Square along with an explanation of the enclosure around the Square. In addition, Brockenbrough corresponds with respect to the following subjects: the steps in the Public Square (1818 April 8); braces for the enclosure around the Public Square (1818 April 13 & 18); an estimate for enclosing the Barracks on the Public Square (1818 April 25); the three gates around the Public Square (1818 May 10); a kiln of bricks purchased by Orris Paine for the public (1818 May 25); the gates, spring, steps, & enclosure in Capitol Square (1818 May 25); the balance of the kiln of bricks belonging to the public & sold for rent (1818 June 2); the request of Orris Paine, administrator of the estate of James Kinkead, to measure the granite steps for the Public Square (1818 June 2); the employment of laborers to prepare the ground for setting & laying the stone around the Public Square & finishing the Governor's stable & public privy (1818 June 13); the springs on either side of the Capitol (1818 July 16); the brick wall separating the Governor's yard & square, the public privy, & the Governor's stable (1818 July 16); the stone wall on Bank Street (1818 July 23); the expense of collecting the water from the springs on each side of the Capitol (1818 July 28); a letter from Orris Paine re. the brace stones & steps around the Capitol (1818 July 28); the claim of George C. Longden for stone work on the Public Square (1819 Sept. 23); the completion of half the work of putting up the braces to the iron railing by Robert Linn (1818 Oct. 9); the contract of George C. Longden for laying the stone around the Public Square (1818 Oct. 10); the certificate of William G. Goodson's work on the public privy (1818 Oct. 25); the certificate of John Segar's work on the brick wall on the Public Square (1818 Nov. 14); the removal of the plank fence around the Governor's yard (1818 Nov. 14); the account of Richard North for marble basins, contracts for completing the public necessary, & alterations to the principal gate at the Public Square (includes small sketch of gate) (1818 Nov. 18); the receipt for George C. Longden's stone work around the Public Square on Bank Street (1818 Nov. 26); the steps on the west side of the Capitol & culverts (1818 Nov. 28); the claim of Thomas B. Conway for drilling holes in the stone around the Public Square (1818 Dec. 1); fixing the marble basins under the steps of the Capitol (1818 Dec. 1); the account of George C. Longden for stone work on Bank Street (1818 Dec. 31); the contract of William G. Goodson for the carpenter's & joiners work on the public privy (1819 Feb. 9); the gate near the Governor's House (1819 Feb. 17); the certificate of Robert Linn for putting up braces for the iron railing (1819 Feb. 23); his appointment as Superintendent of Public Improvements & the inspection of the railing put up by Paul A. Sabbaton (1819 March 16); a sketch of his plans to level the Governor's yard on 13th or Governor's Street (1819 March 18); the certificate of Thomas B. Conway's work on drilling holes in the stone around the Public Square (1819 March 22); his arrangement with Mr. Perryman to open the flue to the fireplace in the part of the room designed for the use of the clerk of the Chancery Court (1819 March 30); the contract of Daniel Calverly to remove the rust & paint the iron railing around the Public Square, and an estimate of the cost to finish the Governor's Stable & brick wall (1819 April 5); posts & chains on the edge of the terraces & coal houses about the Capitol (1819 May 28); his pay (1819 June 12); the certificate of Orris Paine for the setting of the steps of the Capitol & for stone & brick work (1819 July 1); a statement of the cost of finishing the Governor's stable (1819 July 3); a coal house for the Governor's lot & repairs to the Capitol (1819 July 28); an estimate of the expense for conveying the water under the public privy (includes plan of a culvert) (1819 July 31); a report on the state of the public works about the Capitol & Public Square & ashlars around the Capitol (1819 Aug. 17); the certificate regarding the completion of three-fourths of the painting of the railing around the Public Square (1819 Aug. 19); and the certificate of John Kennedy for the completion of stuccoing the Capitol (1819 Oct. 25).

Wilson Bryan replaced Brockenbrough as superintendent sometime in late 1819. Bryan writes to the Governor regarding a report on P. A. Sabbaton's contract (1819 Nov. 19) and a deposit about the Capitol for ash from the offices (1819 Dec. 4).

Both the Governor and Superintendent of Public Improvements corresponded with the various contractors working on the improvements to Capitol Square. The major contractors include Thomas Strode, Paul A. Sabbaton, John P. Shields, George C. Longden, Edward W. Trent, & James Kinkead. Thomas Strode writes regarding his contract with Capt. John P. Shields for all the work to be done on Capitol Square except the steps & stonework (1817 Jan. 13). Strode also writes regarding the contract of James Kinkead for the completion of the stone steps on the Public Square (1817 May 1 & Dec. 30). Paul A. Sabbaton corresponds regarding his proposal & estimate for making a railing to enclose the Public Square (1817 March 10 & 17), his payment & the shipment of two-thirds of the castings (1817 Sept. 30), his third payment (1818 Jan. 3), the cutting of the stone & braces for the railing around Capitol Square (1818 Jan. 22), the railing around Capitol Square (1818 Feb. 2), measurements of the enclosure around the Public Square (1818 Dec. 17), balls & chains for the gates (1819 March 10), the settlement of his account (1819 March 14 & 19), and a request for payment (1819 Oct. 25). John P. Shields writes regarding his proposal to lay the stone around Capitol Square for the enclosure (1817 May 7 & July 11). George C. Longden also writes regarding his own proposal to furnish stone for enclosing the Public Square (1817 May 9). Edward W. Trent writes regarding his proposal to set the stone intended to enclose the Public Square (1817 May 10) and his contract (1817 Dec. 14 & 1818 March 7). Lastly, James Kinkead writes regarding his proposal to furnish granite stone for the steps of the Capitol (1817 June 26 & 1818 Jan. 1).

Claiborne W. Gooch, Adjutant General, corresponds with the governor in his several roles as Adjutant General, Commissary General of the Ordnance Department, Superintendent of Public Edifices, and President of the Board of Visitors of the Penitentiary. As Adjutant General, Gooch writes regarding the resignation of Mann S. Valentine, an officer of the Public Guard, & the uniforms of the guard (1817 March 29); the recommendation for Robert Williamson as lieutenant to the guard at the Lexington Arsenal (1817 July 15); the magazine at Westham, the magazine at the Penitentiary, cartridge boxes & pistol holders stored in the Capitol, clothing for the Public Guard, & the conduct of officers (1817 July 21); clothing for the Public Guard (1817 Aug. 12); his request for records to assist him in the settlement of accounts between Virginia & the U. S. for arms, ordnance, etc. (1817 Aug. 12); the settlement of accounts between the U. S. Ordnance Dept. & Virginia (1817 Dec. 8); the letter of William Price, Superintendent of the Public Warehouse, re. repairs to the building (1817 Dec. 15 & 22); an estimate for repairing the Public Warehouse (1818 Jan. 9); the annual return of the militia & arms, accoutrements, & ammunition for the year 1817 (1818 Jan. 28); an account of the work done in repairing the Public Warehouse (1818 Feb. 6); the conference room used by the Court of Appeals & the skylight in the Capitol (1818 Feb. 18); the guard stationed at the Lexington Arsenal (1818 March 6); a circular letter re. the preservation of public arms (1818 March 7); the furnishing of clothing for the guard stationed at Lexington by the Keeper of the Penitentiary (1818 March 7); recruiting instructions to Lt. James Paxton for the guard at the Lexington Arsenal (1818 March 7); the charges made by the state of Virginia against the U. S. for camp equipage, ordnance stores, etc., during the late war (1818 March 27); Capt. Turner's request for arms (1818 April 13); a small house at the rear of the Penitentiary & an iron grate door at the recently opened passage on the ground floor of the Capitol (1818 May 30); a new artillery company in the 76th Regiment (1818 July 18); the receipts of James Paxton for bounty & contingent expenses (1818 July 20); swords for the Powhatan Troop of Cavalry (1818 Dec. 2); the rank roll of colonels in the militia (1818 Dec. 1); the formation of a new regiment from Nicholas County (1818 Dec. 30); an estimate for the erection of an iron grate door for the clerk of the Chancery Court in the lower part of the Capitol (1819 Jan. 4); the strength of the artillery company in the 27th Regiment (1819 Feb. 3); the discontinuance of military parades on the Capitol Square on account of the improvements (1819 March 22); leaks in the roof of the Capitol & other problems (1819 April 15); the detail of the Public Guard to examine into the condition of the public edifices & property in Richmond (1819 July 16); the consolidation of the 89th & 36th Regiments (1819 Oct. 6); carpets & repairs (1819 Nov. 5); and his duties in relation to public edifices (1819 Nov. 11).

As Commissary General of Ordnance, Gooch writes regarding a report of ordnance belonging to Virginia at Fort Powhatan (1817 May 3); the condition of public arms collected from the commanding officers of regiments in different parts of the state (1817 June 25); the accounts between the U. S. Ordnance Dept. & the state of Virginia (1817 July 21); the condition of ordnance & the gun house near the Penitentiary (1817 Aug. 3); the claim of Virginia against the U. S. for the quota of arms due under the appropriation of Congress of 1808 (1817 Sept. 20); Capt. Chase's letter to salvage shot & shells from the Pamunkey River (1817 Sept. 21); a return of rifles & accoutrements for Capt. Turner's Company of Riflemen attached to the 19th Regiment (1817 Dec. 9); the number & condition of ordnance in the different regiments of the state (1817 Dec. 8); the application of Capt. Hope to exchange arms to be cleaned & repaired (1817 Dec. 12); the transfer of ordnance from Nansemond County to Norfolk & ordnance for the 73rd Regiment (1817 Dec. 22); the poor state of public arms in the different counties (1818 March 2); ordnance stores & camp equipage (1818 July 6); ordnance stores in use during the late war (1818 July 14); an inventory of ordnance transferred by Virginia to the U. S. (1818 Oct. 10); the removal of arms to the Lexington Arsenal & the recommendation that Lt. Paxton attend to procuring winter supplies for his guard (1818 Nov. 27); proposals for conveying arms to the Arsenal (1818 Dec. 24); an inventory of ordnance & quarter master's stores delivered to the U. S. during the month of January 1819 (1819 Jan. 1); artillery pieces in Winchester (1819 Jan. 17); muskets, etc., belonging to the 2nd Regiment (1819 Jan. 17); the erection of sheds for the preservation of ordnance (1819 Feb. 17); gun flints (1819 Feb. 26); transporting arms to the Lexington Arsenal (1819 May 1); a report of arms, accoutrements, etc., in the State Arsenals (1819 June 24); arms from the U. S. (1819 June 30); muskets to the Lexington Arsenal (1819 Oct. 28); and payment for the building of a cannon house in Surry County (1819 Dec. 10).

As Superintendent of Public Edifices, Gooch provided monthly reports on the condition of the Capitol, Armory, Public Guard Barracks, Public Warehouse, & Penitentiary (1816 Dec. [N.D.]; 1817 Feb. [N.D.], March 29, June 26, Aug. [N.D.], Nov. [N.D.]; 1818 March 3, June [N.D.], Aug. [N.D.]; Sept. [N.D.], 1818 [N.D.]; 1819 Jan. 30, July [N.D.], August [N.D.], & Oct. [N.D.]).

Finally, as President of the Board of Visitors of the Penitentiary, Claiborne W. Gooch writes regarding the classification of prisoners & pardons (1819 Feb. 27), rations & the health of the prisoners (1819 March 2), and estimates in procuring a better supply of water for the use of the Penitentiary (1819 July 1).

James Paxton was appointed commandant of the newly constructed Lexington Arsenal in 1818. Paxton submits weekly returns of the Public Guard at the Arsenal (1818 Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 2, & Dec. 8). Later, Paxton sends half monthly returns (1819 July 14, Oct. 31, & Nov. 30). In addition, Paxton writes to the Governor with respect to the following topics: the grounds of the Arsenal & gun racks (1818 March 18); the recruiting of the guard at the Arsenal (1818 May 29); the claim of Jefferson Caruthers for taking care of the buildings at the Arsenal, his pay, supplies, & enlistments (1818 June 10); accepting his position as paymaster to the guard at the Arsenal (1818 July 11); an estimate of the expense for enclosing the Arsenal (1818 July 12); pay for his services (1818 Aug. 1); supplies for recruiting at the Arsenal (1818 Aug. 18); muster & pay rolls at the Arsenal (1818 Aug. 20); the enclosure of the Arsenal (1818 Sept. 21); the desertion of a soldier Stephen Jarvis (1818 Sept. 29); the desertion of Henry Miller (1818 Oct. 27); muster & pay rolls & his subsistence account (1818 Oct. 28); improvements to the Arsenal (1818 Nov. 17); fuel for the arsenal (1819 Jan. 12); pay & subsistence account for January 1819 (1819 Feb. 3); the employment of a surgeon & winter clothing for the guard (1819 Feb. 6); accounts for bounties, premiums, & contingent expenses (1819 July 14); the account of Davidson & Gilmore for timber delivered to complete the gun racks at the Arsenal (1819 July 20); his conduct as commandant of the Lexington Arsenal (1819 Aug. 12); an abstract of provisions furnished by John Jordan to the guard at the Arsenal (1819 Nov. 11); and contracts for rations (1819 Nov. 27).

Peter Crutchfield, Commandant of the Public Guard, provides a monthly muster roll of the Public Guard (1818 June [N.D.]). Blair Bolling replaced Peter Crutchfield as Commandant of the Public Guard in 1818. In a letter to the Governor on 31 July, Bolling accepts his appointment. Bolling also writes regarding a recommendation of the discharge of a soldier (1818 Sept. 8); returns for fuel (1818 Oct. 1); the discharge of Thomas Davis (1818 Dec. 9 & 12); weekly returns of the Public Guard (1819 Feb. 8); the morning report of the Public Guard (1819 March 10); a railing from the corner of the Barracks to the corner of the enclosure of the Capitol Square & the removal of the steps (1819 April 6); cap cords for the uniforms furnished for the Public Guard by the Penitentiary (1819 May 28); the detail of the Public Guard for cleaning the Public Necessary (1819 July 16 & 19); and the report of the Public Guard (1819 Oct. 31).

John Staples, as Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms, corresponds with the Governor regarding Daniel Pettibone's letter on the subject of improvements in welding cast steel to iron (1817 March 27) and the plastering of the inside of the Lexington Arsenal (1817 Aug. 25). Additionally, Staples provides a statement of the operations of the Manufactory of Arms for the year ending 30 November 1817 & a statement of the number & description of public arms on hand at the Armory (1817 Dec. 1).

Samuel P. Parsons, Keeper of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Preston regarding his refusal to certify the agent's invoice of purchases (1817 Jan. 9); his nomination of William Jarvis as 1st assistant & Thomas Jones as 4th assistant in the Penitentiary (1817 March 27); clothing for the Public Guard (1817 April 25); a list of convicts confined in the Penitentiary for sale & transportation (1817 June 30); the sale of seven transport slaves to Henry King (1817 July 1); the quarterly account of the Penitentiary (1817 July 6); the recommendation of Abner Griffin as turnkey & sergeant to the Penitentiary (1817 Sept. 18); the remaining convicts in the Penitentiary for sale & transportation (1817 Dec. 17); rations for the Penitentiary (1818 March 4); the house originally intended for the Keeper of the Penitentiary (1818 March 9); the advertisement in The Compiler notifying the public that the Keeper of the Penitentiary is authorized to supply the institution with raw materials (1818 March 12); the case of Jonathan Parker & Alexander McCrackon confined in the Penitentiary for grand larceny (1818 March 20); the nomination of Daniel Tolly as Assistant Keeper of the Penitentiary (1818 May 9); the account for the workmanship & materials in erecting the new building at the Penitentiary (1818 July 23); the recommendation of Andrew M. Crew as turnkey & repairs to the wells in the Penitentiary (1818 Oct. 28); weekly returns & the transportation of arms to the Arsenal (1818 Nov. 23); the cases of Thomas Howard, Presley Jennings, & William Welsh (1819 Jan. 30); and recommendations of David Potty as 3rd Assistant Keeper & William Simpson as 4th Assistant Keeper (1819 April 3).

Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General, provides opinions on slaves condemned to death & reprieved from transportation (817 Feb. 24); the claim of Richard Clough Anderson as principal surveyor of the lands given by law to the officers & soldiers on Continental & State establishments in Kentucky (1817 Dec. 15); claims against the Ship George & Brig Adams relative to certain quarantine charges (1818 Jan. 19); the claim of Jacob Beeson as agent on behalf of the Commonwealth (1818 Jan. 19); the authority of the superior & inferior courts to imprison for contempt of court for periods longer than the duration of the terms of those courts & whether the Executive has the authority to pardon them (1818 Jan. 30); the authority of the Executive to decide on the propriety of paying the Keeper of the Penitentiary additional compensation (1818 March 27); the power of the Executive to appoint directors for the North Western Bank (1818 June 21); the title of the hemp house lot (1818 June 23); the case of Pleasant W. Harwood (1818 July 29); and the writ of forcible entry & detainer brought by Richard Young against the soldiers of the Public Guard relative to the Hemp House lot (1818 Aug. 6). Nicholas resigned as attorney general in a letter to the Governor dated 8 January 1819 and was replaced by John Robertson. Robertson provides an opinion on the case of an individual claiming money to be paid by the Commonwealth through the Executive who made a false affidavit (1819 April 6).

William Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, often submits legislation to the Governor. Noteworthy is a resolution of the House of Delegates that the Governor & Council be requested and the Treasurer instructed to appoint no person suspected of committing usurious practices (1817 Jan. 4); a resolution that the Executive be requested to lay before the Assembly the reports of the Adjutant General in relation to the public edifices, Public Guard, munitions of war, & public property (1817 Jan. 20); an act for providing seals for the Superior Courts of Law (1818 Jan. 10); a resolution that the Executive lay before the House copies of all existing contracts for repairing & improving the Capitol or Public Square (1818 Feb. 7); an act to provide for the collection of the arrears of the Commonwealth's revenue due prior to January 1819 (1819 Jan. 12); a resolution that the Solicitor's Office in the basement story of the Capitol be fitted up & set apart for the use of the Board of Public Works (1819 Feb. 1); an act concerning the publication of the statutes at large (1819 March 10); and a resolution of the House of Delegates regarding the election of James Pleasants as a senator in Congress to supply the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of James W. Eppes (1819 Dec. 10).

Additionally, Munford transmits certificates of the elections of the following individuals: John Preston as Treasurer (1817 Jan. 17); William F. Pendleton as a member of the Privy Council (1817 Jan. 21); Jerman Baker & John M. Martin as members of the Privy Council (1818 Jan. 4); John W. Greene as judge of the Superior Courts of Chancery at Williamsburg & Fredericksburg (1818 Dec. 11); and Thomas Mann Randolph as governor (1819 Dec. 10).

William Robertson, Clerk of the Council of State, often submits the advice of the Council to the Governor. Significant advice by the Council include the following: the discharge of Orris Paine as Superintendent of Improvements (1818 Feb. 17); contracts for stone to set the foot of each brace to secure the iron railing around the Public Square, for cutting away the earth near the Barracks, for coping the stone for the braces, & for building a brick wall near the Governor's kitchen (1818 April 23); the leasing of the Foundry & Boring Mill, pardons, & a bounty to recruits under Capt. James Paxton (1818 April 24); and the opinion of Philip N. Nicholas regarding the case of Joseph Towns who was commissioned sheriff of Mecklenburg County in 1815 (1818 June 12). In addition, there is an advertisement to be published in several newspapers soliciting a model of the monument to be erected to Gen. George Washington (1818 June 17).

John Burfoot, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Preston regarding various financial matters. Burfoot requests advances for sending out public riders to issue notices of delinquencies (1817 March 24 & Sept. 18). In addition, Burfoot writes to discuss arrearages of taxes in various counties without sheriffs (1817 April 10); a warrant for Edmund Saunders, Clerk of the Auditor of Public Accounts, for notices of public delinquents (1817 May 31); the repair & improvement of his office in the Capitol (1817 June 20); a statement of the taxes on lands sold for the nonpayment of taxes in Lee County (1817 July 28); the abolition of the Accountant's Office (1817 Dec. 10); the expense of riders to give notice to delinquent sheriffs (1818 June 13; 1819 June 10; & 1819 Nov. 19); an additional clerk (1818 April 18); delinquent sheriffs in Harrison County (1818 June 26); returns against delinquent sheriffs in Harrison County (1818 July 16); his leaving of office after Oct. 15 (1818 Oct. 6); presses for papers in the Auditor's Office (1819 March 15); the collection of the revenue of Norfolk County & Princess Anne County (1819 May 27); and accounts with the U. S. & lands under execution in Harrison County (1819 Oct. 6).

John Wood corresponded with the Governor regarding his work in charting Virginia's river and creating maps of Virginia's counties. On 15 December 1816, Wood writes regarding his chart of the James River, the boundaries of the counties, and the latitude & longitude of particular places in the state. Wood also writes regarding his proposal to complete a chart of Virginia in five years (1817 April 4); his proposal to survey the state for the proposed chart of Virginia (1817 May 12); the completion of his survey of the Piankitank & one side of the Rappahannock River (1817 June 23); an account of the surveys of the Rappahannock & Piankitank rivers (1817 July 23); the completion of the survey of the York River & the beginning of the survey of the Chesapeake Bay from Cape Henry (1817 Aug. 13); the survey of the Bay Shore between Cape Henry & the North River (1817 Aug. 23); charts of the York River, the Virginia side of the Potomac River, & the Bay Shore from Lynhaven Creek to North River & Smith's Point (1817 Oct. 20); an alteration of his contract in surveying the Bay Shore & North River (1818 June 1); the charts of the Chickahominy, Pamunkey, & Mattaponi rivers (1818 Oct. 12); advances for his work to create charts of each county & a general map of the Commonwealth (1819 March 23 & April 5); the survey of the Chickahominy River (1819 May 11); and the completion of maps for ten counties (1819 Oct. 25).

John Chew was appointed to settle the accounts of Virginia with the United States for expenses incurred during the War of 1812. Chew writes to Governor Preston on several occasions with respect to the progress of the settlement of the claims of Virginia against the General Government (1817 April 9); the remarks of the examining clerks upon the accounts & vouchers from Virginia (1817 April 17); his arrival in Richmond with $250,000 from the U. S. Treasury on account of the claims of Virginia for expenses in the late war (1817 May 5); compensation for his services since 6 May 1817 (1818 Aug. 19); muskets returned to Richmond & arms given by the General Government to militia encamped at Elliot's Mill in Maryland (1818 Sept. 14); the order for the transportation & delivery of arms due for the quota of the state of Virginia under the act of Congress dated 23 April 1808 (1818 Oct. 9); and the settlement of the last account of Virginia with the United States. (1819 Dec. 8).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence primarily relates to amendments to the U. S. Constitution, extraditions, and the distribution of laws. Included are letters from the following governors: William Miller & John Branch, North Carolina; William Jones, Rhode Island; John Tayler & DeWitt Clinton, New York; Thomas Worthington & Ethan A. Brown, Ohio; Gabriel Slaughter, Kentucky; John Brooks, Massachusetts; Andrew Pickens, South Carolina; William Plumer, New Hampshire; Oliver Wolcott, Connecticut; David Holmes, Mississippi; Jacques Philippe Villere, Louisiana, Charles Goldsborough, Maryland; and William Findlay, Pennsylvania.

Governor William Miller, North Carolina, transmits an act of the North Carolina General Assembly respecting the Dismal Swamp Canal Company (1817 Jan. 2). Later, John Branch writes regarding a demand for High R. Irvine, a fugitive from justice (1818 March 26). William Jones, Rhode Island, acknowledges receipt of the journals of the Virginia Conventions of 1775 & 1776 (1817 April 17). John Tayler, N. Y., also writes to acknowledge receipt of the journals (1817 April 24). Governors Thomas Worthington, Ohio; Gabriel Slaughter, Kentucky; Andrew Pickens, South Carolina; DeWitt Clinton, N. Y.; & David Holmes, Mississippi; transmit copies of the recently passed laws (1817 June 5; 1817 Sept. 26; & 1818 Feb. 16; 1818 July 13; 1819 July 22, 1819 Aug. 30). Governor John Brooks, Massachusetts, encloses a copy of the proceedings of the Council regarding William Ryan, a fugitive from justice (1818 Feb. 11). Governor William Plumer, New Hampshire; DeWitt Clinton, N. Y.; & David Holmes, Mississippi; enclose resolutions for an amendment to the U. S. Constitution to divide each state into districts for the purpose of electing representatives in Congress (1818 Aug.). Governor Gabriel Slaughter, Kentucky, writes concerning the resolution of Virginia to appoint a commissioner to inspect the obstructions on the Ohio River (1818 Oct. 22). Governor Thomas Worthington, Ohio, encloses resolutions regarding amendments to the Constitution related to choosing Representatives in Congress & compensation to members of Congress (1818 Dec. 7). Worthington also writes regarding receipt of the resolution of Virginia regarding the improvement of the navigation of the Ohio River (1818 Dec. 8). Later, Governor Ethan A. Brown, Ohio, writes regarding the appointment of Gen. Edward W. Tupper as commissioner on the part of Ohio to survey the Ohio River (1819 April 30). Governor Jacques Philippe Villere, Louisiana, transmits a set of Martin's Digest of the Statutes of Louisiana (1818 Dec. 8). Governor Charles Goldsborough, Maryland, writes regarding the demand for John Baker (1819 June 5), the demand for Jesse McCoy (1819 June 14), the demand for Thomas Barnes (1819 June 30), the cases of both McCoy & Barnes (1819 June 30), and the demand of Martin F. Maker (1819 Nov. 29). Lastly, Governor William Findlay, Pennsylvania, encloses a copy of a presentment against Daniel Miller for committing fornication (1819 Nov. 8).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: Griffin Stith accepting an appointment as judge of the General Court (1816 Dec. 14); Edmund Pendleton Gaines acknowledging receipt of the resolutions of the General Assembly re. his conduct in the defense of Ft. Erie in 1814 (1816 Dec. 22); Robert Quarles, Quarter Master General, re. the need for clerks (1817 Jan. 13); Arthur Smith resigning as a member of the Privy Council (1817 Jan. 16); Richard Young re. a new edition of a map of Richmond which he wishes to delineate on the Public Square the contemplated improvements according to the plan made by Maximillian Godefroy (1817 Jan. 24); John Binns transmitting his proposal to print an edition of the Declaration of Independence (1817 March 6); James Smith, U.S. Agent for Vaccination, encl. his bond & printed regulations of the general institution for the preservation & distribution of vaccine matter (1817 March 26); James Warrell re. his museum & infringements by some of the improvements to Capitol Square (1817 Feb. 24); Robert Quarles encl. a general return of quarter master stores, ammunition, arms, & ordnance (1817 March 18); William Munford re. the removal of his office as Keeper of the Rolls to the apartment in the Capitol formerly occupied by the Committee for Courts of Justice (1817 May 16); Preston Smith requesting permission to occupy the Senate Chamber as the Treasury Office during the summer months (1817 May 27); Frederick Clarke encl. a letter from Peter F. Smith re. the value of a lot adjoining the Capitol Square (1817 June 26); David Robertson re. the death of Griffin Stith, judge of the Circuit Court in Petersburg (187 July 13); John W. Eppes re. his certificate of election as senator in Congress (1817 Dec. 1); Henry Banks encl. a report, letter, & map of a new road from Kentucky to Virginia (1818 Jan. 10); Thomas R. Joynes encl. a presentment of a grand jury at a Superior Court of Law held for Accomack County of Southy Lucas & Noah Small for stealing two freedmen (1818 Jan. 3); John Preston re. the purchase of part of the Governor's lot (1818 Feb. 10); Board of Directors of the Penitentiary re. the statement of the operations of the Penitentiary from 1 December 1817 to 28 February 1818 (1818 Feb. [N.D.]); J. Oldham re. the appointment of commissioners to examine & value the work done on the Capitol under contract with the Executive or Orris Paine (1818 March 19); Charles Everette resigning as a member of the Council of State to become a candidate in the next Assembly (1818 March 28); acceptance letters for commissioners for fixing the site of the University (1818 April); Samuel Brooks encl. designs for the seals of the Superior Courts of Randolph & Scott counties (1818 April 13); James Madison accepting his appointment as commissioner for the University (1818 May 22); Lewis Hoff, Cashier, encl. reports of the Bank of the Valley (1818 June 25); Hugh Nelson re. the death of his brother Robert, Chancellor of the District of Williamsburg (1818 July 10); Robert Saunders re. the death of Robert Nelson and the recommendation of William Browne as his replacement (1818 July 11); Thomas Jefferson accepting the appointment as one of the commissioners to fix the site for the University (1818 July 13); Lt. E. Brown, Public Guard, requesting permission to level down & regulate the surface so as to extend the limits of the parade grounds (1818 July 17); William C. Greenup, Secretary of the Illinois Convention, transmitting a copy of the Constitution of the State of Illinois (1818 Sept. 11); Linah Mims resigning from the Privy Council (1818 Oct. 1); Ethan A. Clay, U. S. Armory Springfield, applying for the position of Superintendent of the Armory in Richmond (1818 Nov. 9); Bernard Peyton, Secretary of the Board of Public Works, encl. a resolution requesting a suitable apartment in the Capitol for the safekeeping of books, maps, charts, & papers (1818 Nov. 23); William W. Hening re. the state of the Chancery Office (1818 Nov. 26); William Hening re. the publication of the Statutes At Large (1819 March 17 & May 26); Alden Bradford, Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, re. the arrest of Curtis McLeister charged with a crime in Virginia (1819 June 12); John Marshall re. prisoners charged with piracy & requesting permission to confine them in the Penitentiary (1819 July 2); John Adams, Mayor of Richmond, re. the prevalence of yellow fever in the West Indies & the enforcement of quarantine laws of the state (1819 July 16 & Aug. 19); P. N. Nicholas re. designs of a monument to be erected to the memory of George Washington by Maximillian Godefroy (1819 Aug. 16 & 18); and Thomas T. Tucker, U. S. Treasury, re. a list of payments made to John Chew (1819 Nov. 23).

Other noteworthy items include: quarterly reports of the Board of Visitors of the Penitentiary (1816 Dec. 31; 1817 Jan. 18 & 22; 1817 July 19; 1817 Dec. 20; 1818 Jan. 2, 6, & 23; 1818 Feb. 28; 1818 March 7; 1818 April 10; 1818 May 23; 1818 Aug. 22; 1818 Sept. 11; 1818 Oct. 10; 1819 Jan. 16; 1819 Feb. 3 & 20;1819 March 2; 1819 April 24; 1819 June 12; 1819 July 17 & 24; 1819 Aug. 7; & 1819 Nov. 20); bonds of John Burfoot as Auditor of Public Accounts (1817 Jan. 3; 1818 Jan. 1; & 1819 Jan. 1); oath of qualification from James E. Heath as a member of the Privy Council (1817 Jan. 7); bond of William G. Pendleton as Register of the Land Office (1817 Jan. 7); contract between Thomas Strode & John P. Shields (1817 Jan. 13); proclamations by Governor Preston & Lt. Governor Peter V. Daniel offering rewards for the apprehension of criminals (1817 Jan. 15; 1817 Feb. 17; 1817 July 9; 1817 Nov. 1; 1817 Dec. 2 & 20; 1818 Feb. 9 & 19; 1818 April 25; 1818 May 29; 1818 July 29; 1818 Sept. 21; 1818 Oct. 9; 1818 Nov. 3 & 13; 1818 Dec. 4; 1819 Jan. 5 & 8; 1819 April 6 & 12; 1819 May 10, 27, & 28; 1819 June 10; 1819 July 14; 1819 Aug. 17 & 18; 1819 Oct. 6 & 29); report of the committee appointed by the Executive to lay off the City of Richmond into wards (1817 March 20); the proposal of Sewall Osgood & William Lee for enclosing the Capitol Square (1817 April 10); applications for Door Keeper for the Council (1817 May & June); account of Cook & War for grooving & soldering copper, etc. (1817 June 3); receipts of P. A. Sabbaton for advances on the contract for enclosing the Public Square (1817 July 10 & Nov. 4); proclamation of Governor Preston ordering the quarantine of all vessels suspected of carrying yellow fever (1817 July 15); account of Baker Bevins for slating the Capitol (1817 July 20); contract of Edward W. Trent to set the stone around the Public Square on which the iron railing is to be fixed (1817 Aug. 12); petition of the Public Guard for an increase in wages or compensation for extra duties (1817 Oct. 9); petition of the Nottoway Indians choosing trustees (1817 Oct. 11); account of John Bosher for carpenter's work for the governor's new stable (1817 Nov. [N.D.]); proclamation of Governor Preston revoking his proclamation of 15 July directing the performance of quarantine (1817 Dec. 5); account of James Kinkead for furnishing stone for the Capitol (1817 Dec. 6); receipt of James Smith for work done in the Capitol (1817 Dec. 29); account of John Anderson for digging earth out of the Governor's lot (1817 Dec. [N.D.]); certificates of Jerman Baker & John M. Martin as members of the Privy Council (1818 Jan. 7); certificate of oath of Capt. James Paxton as lieutenant commandant of the Lexington Arsenal (1818 Jan. 28); demand of Gov. Preston for Thomas Spiers, a fugitive of justice in North Carolina (1818 Feb. 4); bond of John Staples as Superintendent of the Manufactory of Arms (1818 Feb. 14); report of the commissioners to settle the accounts of former trustees for the Nottoway & Nansemond Indians (1818 Feb. 28); report of the committee to communicate copies of all existing contracts for repairing & improving the Capitol or Public Square (1818 Feb. [N.D.]; account by C. Tompkins of the measurements for the stucco & plastering done by Mr. Gill on the Capitol (1818 March 28); contract between the Governor & John Jordan to furnish rations for the guard at the Lexington Arsenal (1818 March 30); contract between the Governor & A. S. Brockenbrough to perform the duties of superintendent of the gradation & improvement of the Public Square or repairing or improving the Capitol conformably to Godefroy's plan (1818 April 1); proclamation of Governor Preston re. the Bank of the Valley of Virginia (1818 May 7); contract between A. S. Brockenbrough & Orris Paine, administrator of James Kinkead, to furnish granite stones for the enclosure of the Public Square (1818 May 15); accounts of J. Oldham for repairs of carpenter's work done on the Capitol in 1816 & 1817 (1818 May 20); contract between Arthur S. Brockenbrough & Robert Linn to furnish iron braces for the enclosure of the Public Square (1818 May 25); contract between A. S. Brockenbrough and Bailey & Horton to build a wall on the Public Square (1818 May 25); proclamation of Governor Preston authorizing & directing that the courts for Westmoreland County be held at the house of Thomas Spence until a new courthouse is built (1818 June 5); bond of Richard Holstead as Inspector General of Lumber for the Borough of Norfolk (1818 June 6); bond of William H. Hening as agent for the distribution of vaccine matter (1818 July 8); proclamation of Governor Preston for all superintendents of quarantine to perform quarantine for twenty days (1818 July 23); contract between A. S. Brockenbrough & William G. Goodson for the carpenter's work for the Public Privy (1818 Sept. 1); proclamation of Governor Preston revoking his proclamation of 22 July for the performance of quarantine (1818 Dec. 9); certificate of oath for James Patton Preston as governor (1818 Dec. 15); report of the committee appointed to investigate the state of accounts relative to the improvement of the Capitol & Public Square with estimates to complete the various improvements on the Capitol & the Public Square (1818 [N.D.]); proclamation of Governor Preston authorizing the North Western Bank of Virginia to being operations (1819 Jan. 16); proclamation of Governor Preston re. a reward for the apprehension of the perpetrator who broke into the Magazine in Richmond to steal gun powder (1819 Feb. 20); proclamation of Governor Preston re. a reward for the apprehension of the perpetrator who killed a slave named Mingo who was pardoned by the Executive (1819 Feb. 22); proclamation of Governor Preston re. the formation of the several Boards of Principal Assessors (1819 March 15); account of Thomas B. Conway for work done on the Capitol Square (1819 March 23); contract between Orris Paine & Arthur S. Brockenbrough to dig & carry off the earth from the foundation of the stone wall to be put up on Capitol & 13th Street around the Governor's lot (1819 March 31); contract of John Wood to make an accurate chart of each county and a general map of the Commonwealth (1819 April 1); contract between Orris Paine & A. S. Brockenbrough to furnish & set granite plinths for the wall parts for the steps of the Capitol (1819 April 8); contract between Robert Barz & Jeremiah Keenan & A. S. Brockenbrough to undertake the carpenter's & joiner's work of the Governor's stable (1819 May 14); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Peter V. Daniel re. the quarantine of any vessels infected with any contagious disease (1819 Aug. 19); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Peter V. Daniel convening the Board of Principal Assessors (1819 Oct. 1); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Peter V. Daniel re. a reward for the apprehension of the persons who murdered Martin Mims, the receiver of tolls at Trent's Bridge (1819 Oct. 6); proclamation of Lt. Gov. Peter V. Daniel discontinuing quarantine (1819 Oct. 6); a report of the committee appointed to examine into the condition of the Auditor's Office (1819 Nov. 7); an account of P. A. Sabbaton for putting up three thousand feet of railing (1819 Nov. 10); proclamation of Governor Preston re. the demand of the state of Pennsylvania for Daniel Miller (1819 Nov. 16); contract between the Executive & Carter & Blake to prepare cotton backs for the plans of John Wood (1819 Nov. 22); report of John Preston, Treasurer, to the General Assembly (1819 Dec. [N.D.]; contract between the Governor & Christopher Tompkins & Thomas B. Conway to cut & drill all the holes in the stone around the Capitol Square (Undated); and bills for the Arsenal & Barracks at Lexington (Undated).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with pardons and undated items arranged to the rear.

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

James Patton Preston Executive Papers
1816
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      12-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      Filing Jackets
1817
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      2-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      16-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      1-27
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      1-14
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      16-29
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      16-30
    • Box 1
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 1
      Folder 14
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 15
      16-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 16
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      21-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      21-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      16-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 2
      Folder 12
      1-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      4-25
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      27-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      1-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      23-30
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      1-11
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      12-25
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      26-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • Pardons
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      C-G
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      H-W
  • Box 3
    Folder 13
    Undated
1818
  • January
    • Box 3
      Folder 14
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 15
      16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 16
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-14
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      16-28
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      16-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      21-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      18-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      10-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      21-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      21-31
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      1-13
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      14-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 5
      Folder 12
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 13
      16-29
    • Box 5
      Folder 14
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      16-31
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      2-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      23-30
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      16-31
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      Filing Jackets
  • Box 6
    Folder 10
    Pardons
  • Box 6
    Folder 11
    Undated
1819
  • January
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 13
      16-31
    • Box 6
      Folder 14
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 6
      Folder 15
      1-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 16
      16-28
    • Box 6
      Folder 17
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      16-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      22-31
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      19-30
  • May
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      1-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      17-31
  • June
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      1-12
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      14-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      21-27
    • Box 7
      Folder 12
      28-30
  • July
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      2-15
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      16-31
  • September
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      2-15
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      16-30
  • October
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      1-13
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      16-31
  • November
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      22-30
  • December
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      1-10
  • Pardons
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      A-K
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      M-W
  • Box 9
    Folder 7
    Undated
Undated
Box: 9
Folder: 8
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1816
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Dec. 13
  • 1817
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      Aug. 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      Sept. 13
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      Dec. 1
  • 1818
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      March 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      June [N.D.]
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      July 17
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      Aug. 15
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      Oct. 10
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      Oct. 10
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Nov. 3
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Dec. 23
  • 1819
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Jan. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 14
      Jan. 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 15
      June 7
    • Box 10
      Folder 16
      Sept. 24
    • Box 10
      Folder 17
      Oct. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 18
      Oct. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 19
      Oct. 17
    • Box 10
      Folder 20
      Oct. 27
    • Box 10
      Folder 21
      Oct. 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 22
      Nov. 11
    • Box 10
      Folder 23
      Nov. 24
    • Pardons
      • Box 10
        Folder 24
        Beuner, Jacob, et al.
      • Box 10
        Folder 25
        Smith, Munford
    • Box 10
      Folder 26
      Undated
    • Box 10
      Folder 27
      Undated
    • Box 10
      Folder 28
      Undated
    • Box 10
      Folder 29
      Undated
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1817
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      Dec. 31
  • 1818
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      Jan. 10
    • Box 11
      Folder 3
      Jan. 28
    • Box 11
      Folder 4
      June 25
  • 1819
    • Box 11
      Folder 5
      Jan. 6
    • Box 11
      Folder 6
      July 31
    • Box 11
      Folder 7
      Nov. 8
    • Box 11
      Folder 8
      Dec. 7
    • Pardons
      • Box 11
        Folder 9
        Jennings, Presley
      • Box 11
        Folder 10
        Mingo (slave)
      • Box 11
        Folder 11
        Woodford, Thomas