A Guide to the Governor Wilson Cary Nicholas Executive Papers, 1814-1816 Nicholas, Wilson Cary, Executive Papers of Governor, 1814-1816 41612

A Guide to the Governor Wilson Cary Nicholas Executive Papers, 1814-1816

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 41612


[logo]

Library of Virginia

The Library of Virginia
800 East Broad Street
Richmond, Virginia 23219-8000
USA
Phone: (804) 692-3888 (Archives Reference)
Fax: (804) 692-3556 (Archives Reference)
Email: archdesk@lva.virginia.gov(Archives)
URL: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/

© 2005 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
41612
Title
Governor Wilson Cary Nicholas Executive Papers, 1814-1816
Physical Characteristics
3.03 cubic feet and 5 reels
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor (1814-1816 : Nicholas). Executive papers, 1814-1816 (bulk 1815-1816). Accession 41612. State government records collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.


Biographical Information

Wilson Cary Nicholas was born in Williamsburg, Virginia, on 31 January 1761 to Robert Carter Nicholas and Anne Cary. Educated briefly at William and Mary College, Nicholas left school in 1780 to serve in the Revolutionary War taking command of George Washington's Life Guard. After the destruction of the family's plantation in Hanover County by Cornwallis' troops in 1781, Nicholas moved to Albemarle County where he lived as a planter in his new home of Mount Warren. Nicholas married Margaret Smith of Baltimore in 1785. One of the couple's twelve children, Jane, married Thomas Jefferson's grandson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph. Nicholas served as justice of the peace for Albemarle County from 1786 to 1800 and succeeded his brother George as a member of the House of Delegates from 1784 to 1789. Both Wilson & George represented Albemarle County in the Virginia Convention of 1788 to ratify the United States Constitution.

Following a short-lived retirement from public service, Nicholas returned to the House of Delegates in 1794 and was later elected to the U. S. Senate in 1799 to fill the vacancy occasioned by the death of Henry Tazewell. Growing debts forced Nicholas to resign his seat in the Senate following the 1803-1804 session in order to accept a post as collector at the port of Norfolk. Nicholas, however, returned to public office upon his election as a representative in the Tenth & Eleventh Congresses on 4 March 1807. Health issues forced Nicholas to resign his seat in the House of Representatives on 27 November 1809. Nicholas succeeded James Barbour as governor of Virginia on 11 December 1814. Serving two one-year terms as governor, Nicholas directed the end of the War of 1812 and fought for Virginia's claims against the United States for war-time expenses. Following his governorship, Nicholas served as president of the Richmond branch of the Second Bank of the United States until its collapse in 1819. Nicholas died at "Tufton" on 10 October 1820 and is buried at the Monticello family cemetery.

Scope and Content

Wilson Cary Nicholas' Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his two one-year terms as governor from 11 December 1814 to 11 December 1816. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Public Guard; the Lexington Arsenal; proposed amendments to the U. S. Constitution; the militia; improvements to Capitol Square; George Boxley's contemplated insurrection; John Wood's survey of the James River; the settlement of accounts of Virginia with the United States for expenses during the War of 1812; the Virginia Penitentiary; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. These papers are arranged chronologically with pardons arranged to the rear of each year. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; muster rolls; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns; certificates; qualifications; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include President James Madison; James Monroe & William Harris Crawford, Secretaries of War; and James Barbour & William B. Giles, Virginia's senators in Congress. President James Madison writes on 29 May 1816 regarding the protection of the Chesapeake Bay including the proposal to fortify Old Point Comfort. Madison also writes accepting a commission as a visitor for Central College in Albemarle County (1816 Oct. 22).

James Monroe, as Secretary of War, writes the governor on 4 January 1815 regarding the defense of the seaboard, specifically Norfolk & Richmond. Monroe also writes regarding the enemy's force at Tangiers, the sailing off of a large detachment from the Chesapeake Bay, and the dismissal of Gen. Porterfield's brigade (1815 Jan. 14). Additional correspondence from Monroe includes the following subjects: a draft in favor of Maj. Joseph Wheaton for fifteen thousand dollars for the use of his department (1815 Jan. 25); an act of Congress authorizing the President to receive into U. S. service any corps which have been or may be raised and officered by the states (1815 Feb. 1); and the extra portion of force contemplated to be raised by Virginia under the conditions of the act of Congress (1815 Feb. 4). A. J. Dallas, Secretary of the Treasury, also encloses an extract of a letter from Col. Constant Freeman regarding the sending of a small detachment to Fort Powhatan (1815 April 15). William H. Crawford replaced Monroe as Secretary of War in 1815. On 17 June 1816, Crawford encloses a letter regarding the execution of the laws against delinquent militia men.

James Barbour, U. S. Senate, writes on 23 January 1815 regarding Fort Powhatan. Both Barbour & William B. Giles write concerning a discount on the claims with the U. S. government and the defense of Fort Powhatan (1815 Feb. 7). Barbour & Giles also write on 15 February 1815 regarding the treaty of peace between the United States & Great Britain. Giles writes on 23 November 1815 resigning his seat in the U. S. Senate.

The majority of correspondence in Wilson Cary Nicholas's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include John Staples, Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms; Peter Crutchfield, Commandant of the Public Guard; William Campbell & Samuel P. Parsons, Keepers of the Penitentiary; Philip N. Nicholas, Attorney General; William Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate; John Burfoot, Auditor of Public Accounts; William Wirt & John Chew, Commissioners appointed to settle the accounts of the Commonwealth with the Unites States; and John Wood, Surveyor.

John Staples, as Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms, corresponded frequently with the Governor regarding arms and the Manufactory in Richmond, Virginia. Staples encloses monthly statements of the operations of the Manufactory from December 1814 to September 1815. In addition, Staples writes on 20 March 1815 regarding the number & description of arms to be made in the present year at the Foundry & Boring Mill. Staples also encloses a letter from his clerk, Stephen Woodson, who, in turn, encloses a recommendation for Mosby Woodson as his replacement (1815 April 29). Mosby Woodson too submitted his resignation according to a letter from Staples on 22 May 1815. Lastly, Staples corresponds respecting the inspection of fifty rifles made by Daniel Davis (1815 Oct. 12) and a statement of all the arms made at the Manufactory of Arms since its commencement (1815 Oct. 30).

Peter Crutchfield, Commandant of the Public Guard, provides monthly returns of arms & accoutrements belonging to the Public Guard, monthly reports of the daily duties performed by the Public Guard, and monthly muster rolls from December 1814 to October 1815.

William Campbell, Keeper of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Nicholas regarding a contract with Parkhill, Sabaton, & Company for grape shot & cannon balls (1815 Feb. 7); rations for the Penitentiary (1815 Feb. 13); boxes of old shoes & boots (1815 July 15); his resignation as Agent for Sales of Penitentiary Manufactures (1816 Feb. 1); charges against him by Pleasant W. Harwood as Keeper of the Penitentiary (1816 Feb. 24); and stone to be cut by convicts (1816 April 15). Campbell resigned as Superintendent of the Penitentiary on 25 March 1816, but was not replaced until 3 June 1816 by Samuel P. Parsons. Papers regarding the appointment of Parsons as Superintendent can be found at 3 June 1816. Parsons writes on 27 September 1816 regarding the building of a kitchen for the use of the Keeper of the Penitentiary, along with the repair & painting of his dwelling house.

Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General, provides opinions on the evidence or mode of proof required by law to establish claims to Revolutionary War bounty lands (1815 Feb. 20); the liability of the public for the damage done to the warehouse occupied as a magazine in Petersburg (1815 May 16); the duties of attorneys for the Commonwealth in inferior courts (1815 Dec. 12); the duties of the Public Printer (1816 April 25); escaped convicts from the Kentucky Penitentiary who committed felonies in Virginia (1816 May 14); and the proper mode of proceeding against county courts to compel them to pay the penalty for failing to nominate sheriffs within the time prescribed by law (1816 Dec. 2).

William Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, & Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation to the Governor. Noteworthy, is an act to authorize the Executive to enlarge the operations of the Manufactory of Arms, so as to augment the number of cannon & small arms fabricated there (1815 Jan. 9); a resolution that the Executive be requested to lay before the House a statement of the military expenses of the Commonwealth (1815 Dec. 11); and a resolution that the Governor be requested to open a correspondence with the Executives of the states interested in the effectual protection of the navigation of the Chesapeake in time of war (1816 Feb. 22).

Additionally, Munford & Hansford transmit certificates of the elections of the following individuals: James Barbour as senator in Congress to replace Richard Brent (1815 Jan. 2); John Cropper as brigadier general of the 21st Brigade of Virginia Militia (1815 Jan. 10); John W. Eppes as senator in place of William B. Giles (1815 Dec. 7); Armistead T. Mason as senator in place of William B. Giles (1816 Jan. 3); Henry St. George as brigadier general for the 16th Brigade in place of James Singleton (1816 Jan. 3); Directors of the Board of Public Works (1816 Feb. 16); John Staples, George Williamson, & Matthew Woodson as Superintendent, Master Armourer, & Assistant Armourer of the Manufactory of Arms (1816 Feb. 16); Griffin Stith as judge of the General Court in place of James Semple (1816 Dec. 9); William Daniel as judge of the General Court in place of John Dabney (1816 Dec. 9); James Semple as judge of the General Court in place of William Daniel (1816 Dec. 9); John W. Eppes as senator in Congress (1816 Dec. 10); and James P. Preston as governor (1816 Dec. 10).

John Burfoot, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Nicholas regarding various financial matters. Burfoot writes concerning the settlement of the account between the United States & Virginia (1815 Jan. 3); the appointment of a temporary clerk (1815 Jan. 13); warrants for the payment of postage (1815 Feb. 6; 1815 Sept. 2 & 9; 1816 Jan. 29); accounts of expenses for forwarding notices, executions, etc. (1815 March 10); warrants issued to persons without proper authority (1815 June 21); a judgment against John Henry by the General Court (1815 Sept. 2); arrears of taxes in Dinwiddie, etc., prior to 1806 (1816 March 4); copies of laws passed at the last session (1816 March 5); the death of the sheriff of Princess Anne County (1816 May 23); and a leave of absence (1816 July 30).

William Wirt & John Chew were appointed to settle the accounts of Virginia with the United States for expenses incurred during the War of 1812. William Wirt writes on 1 & 6 January 1816 regarding the settlement of these accounts. On 16 January 1816, Wirt writes regarding the receipt of two hundred thousand dollars on Virginia's payroll. Later, he states that they have procured six hundred thousand dollars in claims against the United States (1816 Jan. 30). Chew writes on 31 January 1816 regarding a warrant on account of the state for four hundred thousand dollars. His letter of 5 February 1816 regards the proposal of the Secretary of the Treasury for the Bank of Virginia for paying the four hundred thousand dollars to the state. Additionally, Chew writes regarding the payment from the Secretary of the Treasury (1816 Feb. 13). Lastly, Chew writes enclosing copies of correspondence sent & received from William H. Crawford, Secretary of War, and others (1816 Oct. 9). Further correspondence from John Chew provides periodic updates on the settlement of Virginia's claims (1816 May 5; 1816 June 23; & 1816 Aug. 30).

John Wood corresponded with the Governor regarding a contemplated survey of the principal rivers of the state on 6 July & 1 Aug. 1816. Wood accepted an appointment as surveyor in a letter dated 14 August 1816. He writes on 21 August 1816 concerning his appointment, the commencement of operations on 1 October, and a loan by Thomas Jefferson of his surveying instruments. Additional correspondence from Wood relate to the following topics: the taking of soundings in the channels (1816 Sept. 4); his compensation & securities (1816 Oct. 1); the start of his survey at Old Point Comfort up the north side of the James River (1816 Oct. 9); the completion of the survey of the north side of the James River (1816 Oct. 24); the survey of the south side of the James River from Richmond to Pagan Creek (1816 Nov. 5); the completion of the survey of the James River (1816 Nov. 25); and the latitude & longitude selected in order to execute a correct chart of the state (1816 Dec. 1).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence primarily relates to amendments to the U. S. Constitution, extraditions, and the distribution of laws. Included are letters from the following governors: Peter Early, Georgia; William Miller, North Carolina; John Cotton Smith, Connecticut; Caleb Strong, Massachusetts; William S. Pennington, New Jersey; Levin Winder & Charles Ridgely, Maryland; William Jones, Rhode Island; Simon Snyder, Pennsylvania; Daniel D. Tompkins, New York; Thomas Worthington, Ohio; Isaac Shelby, Kentucky; Daniel Rodney, Delaware; & William C. C. Claiborne, Louisiana.

Governor Peter Early, Georgia, transmits resolutions in favor of the proposed amendment to the Constitution to reduce the term of service of senators from six years to four years (1814 Dec. 12). Early also writes enclosing a certified copy of an affidavit regarding the apprehension of Israel Maires (1815 Oct. 6). Governor William Miller, North Carolina, transmits a resolution against the same amendment proposed by the states of Tennessee & Pennsylvania to reduce the terms of senators (1814 Dec. 28). Miller also transmits copies of the laws of North Carolina (1815 April 14; 1815 Dec. 11; & 1816 April 10). Additionally, Miller writes regarding the demand for John Shehorn, a fugitive from justice (1815 July 3). Lastly, Miller writes regarding the fortification of the Chesapeake Bay (1816 March 12). Governor John Cotton Smith, Connecticut, transmits resolutions for seven amendments to the Constitution respecting apportionment of representatives, the admission of new states, limitations for embargos, declarations of war, presidential term limits, and others (1815 Feb. 4). Governors Caleb Strong, Massachusetts; William S. Pennington, New Jersey; Simon Snyder, Pennsylvania; & Daniel D. Tompkins, New York, transmit resolutions regarding the same seven amendments proposed by Connecticut & Massachusetts to the Constitution (1815 Feb. 13 & 20; 1815 March 15; 1815 May 4). Governor Strong also transmits a resolution rejecting the amendment to the Constitution dividing each state into districts for the purpose of appointing electors for President & Vice President (1816 Feb. 14). Governor William Jones, Rhode Island, & Thomas Worthington, Ohio, also enclose resolutions against this amendment (1816 March 8 & 19). Governors Levin Winder, Maryland; William Jones, Rhode Island; & John Cotton Smith, Connecticut, transmit resolutions against the amendment proposed by the state of Pennsylvania to reduce the terms of senators in Congress (1815 Feb. 26 & 1815 March 2). Governor Charles Ridgely, Maryland, writes regarding the extradition of John Carey (1816 Jan. 31). On 2 February 1816, Ridgely encloses an act "for erecting a bridge over the River Potomac." Governors Thomas Worthington, Ohio; Isaac Shelby, Kentucky; and Daniel Rodney, Delaware, transmit copies of laws passed by their respective state legislatures (1815 May 27; 1815 June [N.D.]; & 1816 Aug. 14). Worthington also writes on 1 February 1816 regarding the extradition of James Hunt. In addition, Worthington encloses the account of expenses in the arrest & transportation of Hunt (1816 April 11). On 15 September 1815, Governor William C. C. Claiborne encloses an act to regulate the administration of the Charity Hospital of the City of New Orleans, along with a drawing & plan of the hospital. Claiborne also writes regarding obtaining a steam frigate for the defense of the Mississippi River (1816 Feb. 13). Lastly, Claiborne transmits a resolution rejecting the seven amendments proposed to the Constitution by Massachusetts & Connecticut, and the amendment to reduce the term of senators in Congress (1816 March 25).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: John Gaillard, president pro tempore of the U. S. Senate, re. the death of Senator Richard Brent (1814 Dec. 30); S. H. Geradin re. researching the archives of the state in order to do a continuance of Burk's History of Virginia (1815 Jan. 28); Richard Crump re. the appearance of nine enemy barges in Hampton roads (1815 Jan. 29); James Bootwright re. a proposal to furnish rations for the prisoners in the Penitentiary (1815 Feb. 7); Moses Green resigning as adjutant general (1815 Feb. 14); Richard D. Bayly re. the death of Thomas Evans, one of the judges of the General Court (1815 Feb. 15); William G. Pendleton, Register, re. additional paper presses for the plats & certificates of survey in the Land Office (1815 March 13 & April 24); George Parker re. his commission as judge pro tempore of the 14th Circuit in place of Thomas Evans (1815 April 9); Robert Quarles resigning his seat on the Council of State (1815 April 21); William Wirt re. is proposal to rent the Foundry & Boring Mill for three months (1815 April 24); Stephen Woodson resigning as clerk of the Manufactory of Arms (1815 April 24); William Chamberlayne resigning as brigadier general (1815 April 28); Robert Quarles, Quarter Master General, requesting a portion of the Public Guard to guard the articles exposed for sale at the Capitol (1815 May 18); William Rush, Philadelphia, encl. his proposal for a statue of Washington (1815 July 4); Benjamin Connor requesting a charter for permission to erect bridges over the Roanoke River & encl. his patent & drawing of the bridge (1815 Sept. 27); William H. Roane declining the appointment to the Council as a result of his election to Congress (1815 Nov. 25); James Smith, Agent of Vaccination, encl. a memorial to the U. S. House & Senate for more effectual encouragement of vaccination in the United States (1816 March 1); Thomas Jefferson re. the acts & journals of Virginia taken by Congress & encl. a copy of his catalogue to deposit in the Council (1816 Feb. 2); Waller Holladay & James M. Bell re. the conspiracy of George Boxley to start an insurrection in Spotsylvania, Louisa, & Orange (1816 March 1); Bushrod Washington re. a resolution requesting the remains of George Washington to be removed from Mt. Vernon to the Capitol of Virginia (1816 March 18); Robert Mills submitting a sketch for the improvement of Capitol Square (1816 March 18); Frank Carr re. the establishment of Central College in Charlottesville & the appointment of six visitors (1816 March 25); John Binns transmitting his proposal to publish an edition of the Declaration of Independence (1816 April 1); James McDowell, John Bowyer, & William Caruthers re. the proposed site of an arsenal in Lexington (1816 April 10); Charles A. Cox re. his proposal to paint the Capitol (1816 April 11); Henry Hurford re. his proposal for painting the exterior of the Capitol (1816 April 15); John Clarke re. his proposal to enclose the Public Square with a cast-iron balustrade (1816 April 27); Sackville King re. the death of Judge John Dabney (1816 May 7); John Clarke re. his plan for the improvement of the Public Square (1816 May 12); William Daniel resigning as judge of the General Court (1816 June 2); James McDowell, John Bowyer, & William Caruthers re. the purchase of a lot belonging to the heirs of Daniel Wendal in Lexington in order to prevent other buildings from being placed too near the Arsenal (1816 June 4); James Warrell re. a site for the museum to be built on Capitol Square (1816 June 11); James Semple accepting an appointment as judge of the General Court to replace William Daniel (1816 July 26); William Caruthers re. an examination of the site proposed for the Arsenal in Lexington (1816 Aug. 7); William Daniel accepting the appointment of judge of the General Court in place of William Dabney (1816 Aug. 7); Orris Paine enclosing the opinion of a number of carpenters to cover the roof of the Capitol with slate (1816 Aug. 19); J. Oldham re. an estimate of the wood work to be done on the Capitol (1816 Aug. 17); Griffin Stith accepting his appointment as judge of the General Court (1816 Aug. 22); John Tyler resigning his seat in the Council having been elected to Congress (1816 Dec. 1); and Maximillian Godefroy transmitting his designs for the Washington Monument (1816 Dec. 7).

Other noteworthy items include: certificates of oath for Nicholas as governor (1814 Dec. 12 & 1815 Dec. 12); a proclamation directing that the court for Essex County be held in the building erected for the Clerk's Office in Tappahannock (1814 Dec. 17); an account of munitions of war on hand at the magazine at Westham, the Laboratory, & fixed ammunition in the Penitentiary (1814 Dec. 19 & 24); a resolution of the Louisiana General Assembly re. gratitude for the citizens of Louisiana during the invasion by the British (1815 Feb. 1); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Armistead Atkins (1815 Feb. 2); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of John Oneale (1815 March 20); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Littleberry Hurt (1815 March 20); proceedings of the Quarterly Meetings of the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Penitentiary (1815 April 14; 1815 June 8; 1815 July 1 & 29; 1815 Sept. 28); proceedings of the Visitors of the Penitentiary re. the causes of the fire (1815 April 16 & 1815 June 8); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Thomas Douglas (1815 April 17); a proclamation of Lt. Gov. Linah Mims offering a reward for the apprehension of Robert Loggins (1815 May 17); the certificate of oath of William Carson as a member of the Privy Council (1815 June 21); proceedings of the Board of Visitors (1815 July 8 & 22; 1815 Oct. 12; 1816 Feb. 24); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas for an election to replace Matthew Clay, a representative in Congress (1815 July 29); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Jonathan Piercy & Curtis McCleester (1815 Nov. 20 & 1816 May 22); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Galloway Burke (1815 Nov. 20); a certificate of oath for John Tyler as a member of the Privy Council (1815 Dec. 9); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Robert Gibson (1815 Dec. 14); proceedings of the Monthly Board of Visitors (1815 April 22 & June 24); the bond of John Burfoot as Auditor of Public Accounts (1816 Jan. 3); court records from Louisa & Spotsylvania counties re. the insurrection of George Boxley (1816 March 5); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Levy Gibson (1816 May 4); proceedings of a meeting of the Nottoway Tribe of Indians for the purpose of choosing new trustees (1816 May 11); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Thomas Richardson (1816 May 14); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Elijah Davidson (1816 May 14); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of George Boxley (1816 May 18); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas for an election to fill the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the death of Thomas Gholson (1816 Aug. 30); the contract of Thomas Strode with the Commonwealth to execute Godefroy's plan for regulating the surface of the Public Square (1816 Sept. 30); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas offering a reward for the apprehension of Carrington Simpson (1816 Sept. 20); a proclamation of Governor Nicholas for an election to fill the vacancy in Congress occasioned by the death of John Clopton (1816 Sept. 24); a report of the commissioners appointed by the act of the Legislature of North Carolina to incorporate a company to cut a canal from Roanoke to Meherrin River & from the waters of the Chowan River to the James River or Dismal Swamp Canal (1816 Nov. [N.D.]); a certificate of election of electors for President & Vice President of the United States on behalf of Virginia (1816 Dec. 3); and a deed of covenant between Edward W. Trent & Orris Paine, Superintendent of the Improvement of the Public Square, to furnish granite stone for the support of the iron railing around the Square (1816 Dec. 10).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with pardons and undated items arranged to the rear.

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

Wilson Cary Nicholas Executive Papers
1814
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      12-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      21-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
1815
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      11-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      11-19
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      20-28
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      18-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 14
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 15
      16-30
    • Box 1
      Folder 16
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      22-31
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      21-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      16-31
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 2
      Folder 12
      3-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 13
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 14
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      2-30
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      2-14
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      17-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      2-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      20-30
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      1-14
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      17-29
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • Box 3
    Folder 12
    Undated
  • Box 3
    Folder 13
    Pardons
1816
  • January
    • Box 3
      Folder 14
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 15
      16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 16
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      16-28
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      1-8
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      9-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      22-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      16-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      16-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-9
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      10-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      21-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      11-19
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      22-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      16-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 5
      Folder 12
      2-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 13
      23-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 14
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 5
      Folder 15
      1-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 16
      21-30
    • Box 5
      Folder 17
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      1-29
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • Box 6
    Folder 5
    Pardons
  • Box 6
    Folder 6
    Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1814
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      Dec. [N.D]
  • 1815
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      Jan. [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      Feb. [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      May 10
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      May [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      June 2
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      June 27
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      June [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      July 19
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      July [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      Aug. 30
    • Box 7
      Folder 12
      Aug. [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 13
      Sept. 7
    • Box 7
      Folder 14
      Sept. 29
    • Box 7
      Folder 15
      Sept. [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 16
      Oct. 2
    • Box 7
      Folder 17
      Oct. [N.D.]
    • Box 7
      Folder 18
      Nov. 14
    • Pardons
      • Box 7
        Folder 19
        Archer (slave)
      • Box 7
        Folder 20
        Caesar(slave)
      • Box 7
        Folder 21
        Hollingshead, Richard
      • Box 7
        Folder 22
        Pasley, Solomon
  • 1816
    • Box 7
      Folder 23
      Jan. 3
    • Box 7
      Folder 24
      Jan. 3
    • Box 7
      Folder 25
      April 1
    • Box 7
      Folder 26
      May 11
    • Box 7
      Folder 27
      Sept. 9
    • Box 16
      Folder 28
      Sept. 30
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1815
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      Feb. 1
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      April [N.D.]
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      June 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      Aug. 21
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      Sept. 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      Oct. 6
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      Nov. 10
  • 1816
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      Jan. 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      Feb. 4