A Guide to the Governor James Barbour Executive Papers, 1812-1814 Barbour, James, Executive Papers of Governor, 1812-1814 41557

A Guide to the Governor James Barbour Executive Papers, 1812-1814

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 41557


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© 2004 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
41557
Title
Governor James Barbour Executive Papers, 1812-1814
Physical Characteristics
7.68 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor (1812-1814 : Barbour). Executive papers, 1812-1814. Accession 41557. State government records collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 5499-5525.


Biographical Information

James Barbour was born in Orange County on 10 June 1775 to Thomas Barbour & Mary Pendleton. Barbour studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1793 in Orange County. He was elected to the House of Delegates in 1798 serving until 1804, and again from 1807 to 1812. Barbour became Speaker of the House of Delegates from December 1809 until January 1812. He was defeated by George William Smith for the governorship in 1811, but was elected to succeed him on 3 January 1812 after Smith's death in the Richmond Theater fire. Barbour served three one-year terms as governor until 11 December 1814. His governorship was defined by his role in defending the Commonwealth from the British during the War of 1812. For nearly two years, Barbour directed a chiefly defensive war against the British paying particular attention to the defense of Norfolk. Barbour maintained close contact with the Secretary of War and militia commanders in filling the various requisitions for militia and making preparations for the defense of the state.

Barbour was elected on 14 November 1814 to the United States Senate for the term commencing 4 March 1815. While in the Senate, Barbour acted as President pro tempore from 1817 to 1820, as well as Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations for the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, & Eighteenth Congresses. Barbour served as a senator until 7 March 1825 when he resigned in order to accept an appointment by John Quincy Adams as Secretary of War. Barbour again resigned on 26 May 1828 to become Minister of England until 23 September 1829. Barbour continued to remain active in politics serving as chairman of the 1831 convention of the National Republican Party and 1839 Whig Party convention.

James Barbour married Lucy Maria Johnson on 20 October 1795. The couple had three daughters and four sons including Benjamin Johnson Barbour who served as rector of the University of Virginia. Barbour and his family resided on his Barboursville estate in Orange County which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and built by Barbour in 1817. Barbour died of prostate cancer on 7 January 1842 and is buried in the family cemetery.

Scope and Content

James Barbour's Executive papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during his three one-year terms as governor from 4 January 1812 to 11 December 1814. These papers are arranged chronologically with pardons arranged to the rear. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics, however, the most significant correspondence during Barbour's governorship relates to the defense of Virginia from the British during the War of 1812. Other correspondence includes appointments & recommendations for state positions; prisoners & the Virginia Penitentiary; arms & the Virginia Manufactory of Arms; Fort Powhatan; the Powder Magazine at Westham; the Public Guard; the militia; resignations; state expenses & revenue; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; muster rolls; pay rolls; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns; certificates; qualifications; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include President James Madison; James Monroe, Secretary of State; William Eustis, John Armstrong, & James Monroe, Secretaries of War; and William B. Giles & John W. Eppes, Virginia's representatives in the Senate. President James Madison writes on 26 February 1814 regarding the appointment of an engineer to make a further examination & report with respect to Fort Powhatan. James Monroe, as Secretary of State, writes Governor Barbour enclosing the act of Congress declaring war on Great Britain & Ireland (enclosure not included - See Executive Communications) (1812 June 19). On 1 July 1812, Monroe encloses an act of Congress "to ascertain the western boundary of the tract reserved for satisfying the military bounties allowed to the officers and soldiers of the Virginia Line on Continental Establishment." Later, Monroe writes in support of the memorial of the daughters of Col. Robert H. Harrison, aid-de-camp to General Washington during the Revolutionary War (1812 Nov. 23). In his letter dated 21 March 1813, Monroe discusses the raising of a regiment for the defense of Norfolk & the neighboring coast and the mediation between the United States & Great Britain offered by Russia. In addition, Monroe writes regarding the claim of the Virginia State Line for an equal portion of the bounty land with those who served on Continental Establishment. In this same letter, Monroe remarks on the crimes committed by British troops at Hampton (1813 Oct. 23). Lastly, Monroe submits copies of the laws passed during the late session of Congress on the subject of the militia (1814 May 2).

The majority of correspondence from the Federal government, however, originates from the War Department. William Eustis writes regarding the President's call for the various executives to organize, arm, & equip their proportion of one hundred thousand militia (1812 April 15). Eustis writes again on 30 April 1812 regarding the calling out of the militia and measures for the defense of Norfolk. His letter of 27 May 1812 too relates to the defense of Norfolk. On 18 July 1812, Eustis requests two companies of artillery & five hundred infantry to Norfolk. On 1 September 1812, Eustis writes regarding the President's request for Virginia to call out, arm, & equip fifteen hundred of the detached militia to cooperate with the Northwestern Army. Lastly, Eustis writes regarding a commission for deputy quartermaster (1812 Sept. 7). Eustis was temporarily succeeded by James Monroe, Secretary of State. Monroe writes regarding the protection of the seaport towns (1813 Feb. 3).

John Armstrong, Jr., was appointed Secretary of War on 5 February 1813. Armstrong writes regarding orders to Col. Constant Freeman to concentrate the new recruits at Norfolk (1813 Feb. 10). On 22 March 1813, Armstrong writes regarding the enemy force and his authorization to Gen. Robert B. Taylor to make a further requisition for additional militia if necessary. Later, he encloses a letter from Col. J. Swift, Chief Engineer, informing him on the insignificance of Fort Powhatan against an exterior enemy (1813 Oct. 20). Additional correspondence from Armstrong relates to the following topics: the recall of three or four companies provided they are supplied under the second requisitions (1813 April 11); the law appointing an officer denominated as Paymaster of the Army (1813 April 27); the approval of Brig. Gen. Robert B. Taylor's measures (1813 July 3); the lack of rifles for distribution to the militia (1813 Aug. 4); the assignment of Big. Gen. Moses Porter to Norfolk (1814 April 2); a request that Gen. William B. Chamberlayne remain in command at Norfolk for several weeks until the arrival of Brig. Gen. Moses Porter (1814 April 8); the need for a brigadier general as part of the requisitions for militia (1814 April 18); the report of Decius Wadsworth regarding the construction of blockhouses at Fort Powhatan (1814 April 25); the quota of the requisition by the United States on Virginia (1814 July 4); the disposition of two thousand militia from the requisition on Virginia (1814 July 18); a detachment of militia referred to in the Governor's letter (1814 July 22); and the refusal by the commanding officer of the 8th Virginia Brigade to be called into service by Brig. Gen. Moses Porter at Norfolk (1814 Aug. 20). Armstrong was forced to resign as Secretary of War on 4 September 1814 following the burning of the Capitol.

James Monroe replaced Armstrong as Secretary of War. Monroe writes on 31 August 1814 regarding the enemy's evacuation of Nottingham. On 1 September 1814, Monroe writes regarding the embarkation of the enemy vessels on the Patuxent and the danger of other principal towns including Richmond, Norfolk, & Baltimore (1814 Sept. 1). Shortly thereafter, Monroe writes of the inability to prevent the enemy from passing the battery at the White House on the Potomac River, the departure of the fleet down the Patuxent River, and the possibility of an attack on Richmond or Norfolk (1814 Sept. 6). The same day he writes the Governor again regarding a request to the Governor of North Carolina for fifteen hundred troops to report to the commanding officer at Norfolk. On 14 September 1814, he writes of the unsuccessful attempt by the British to capture Baltimore by land & water. Monroe encloses a letter he received from Maj. Gen. S. Smith communicating this intelligence. Additional correspondence from Monroe includes the following subjects: the movements of the enemy past Annapolis and the defense of Norfolk & Richmond (1814 Sept. 19); additional requisitions for militia to march for Washington (1814 Oct. 2); the expense attending the militia called into service (1814 Oct. 6); the order of Gen. Joel Leftwich's Brigade & John Breckinridge's Brigade to Washington (1814 Oct. 15) Lt. Col. Hamilton's orders to proceed to the Northern Neck with five hundred men of the 3rd Rifle Regiment (1814 Nov. 3); and muskets, rifles, & heavy ordnance for the ensuing year from the Armory at Virginia (1814 Nov. 18).

Virginia's representatives in Congress correspond occasionally with Governor Barbour. William B. Giles, Virginia's senator in Congress, writes regarding the resolutions of the General Assembly respecting the right of the several state legislatures to instruct its senators in Congress (1812 Nov. 30). Giles again writes on 20 November 1813 regarding the adjusting of the account between the U. S. and the individual states for expenses incurred in calling forth the militia. Giles also encloses an act to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union. On 17 July 1813, John W. Eppes writes requesting information on the conduct of the enemy at Hampton for a committee of the House of Representatives. In addition, Eppes informs the Governor of the location of the enemy fleet on the Potomac River seventy miles below Alexandria. Eppes also writes concerning a revision of the militia laws and the expenses of the state during the war (1813 Dec. 23). Lastly, Eppes encloses a letter from Hugh Nelson, U. S. House of Representatives, regarding Virginia's claim for supplies against the U. S. (1814 Jan. 1). Similarly, in a letter dated 8 April 1814, Virginia's delegation in Congress writes regarding Virginia's claim against the U. S. for the reimbursement of money expended by the state in calling out, equipping, & marching its militia.

The majority of correspondence in James Barbour's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include key military figures during the War of 1812 such as Brig. Gen. Robert B. Taylor, Aid-de-Camp John Myers, Brig. Gen. Moses Porter, Lt. Col. William Sharp, William Lambert, James Bankhead, and Deputy Adjutant Generals William W. Hening & Claiborne W. Gooch. Additionally, prominent correspondents within Virginia State government include John Staples, Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms; Peter Crutchfield, Commandant of the Public Guard; Abraham Douglas & William Campbell, Keepers of the Penitentiary; Philip N. Nicholas, Attorney General; William Munford, Clerk of the House of Delegates; Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate; and Samuel Shepard & John Burfoot, Auditors of Public Accounts.

Brigadier General Robert B. Taylor corresponded frequently with Governor Barbour regarding topics of a military nature. Taylor accepted a commission as lieutenant colonel of the 3rd Regiment of Virginia Cavalry on 27 April 1812. More importantly, Taylor writes the Governor on 14 January 1813 accepting the office of brigadier general in charge of the defense of Norfolk. Taylor was placed under Federal authority on 9 February 1813 commanding the 5th Military District. Taylor mostly provides the Governor with intelligence on the strength of the enemy forces, its movements, & location (1813 March 10, 11, 13, 16, 18, 28, & 29; & 1813 April 1). Taylor also corresponds with respect to the following subjects: Col. Armistead of the Engineer Corps, exemptions for Quakers, pay for soldiers, & the deficiency of officers (1813 March 21); the increase in the enemy's forces in Lynhaven Bay with the arrival of Admiral Warren, attacks on vessels near Craney Island & the Nansemond River and the advance of barges "up the roads" (1813 March 24); a request that the artillery at Gloucester and other companies not be dismissed, payment to the troops, tents, & powder (1813 March 26); an extract of the general orders of the War Department on the proportions of officers, non-commissioned officers, & privates (1813 March 26); the arrival of General Wade Hampton, payment of troops, & uniforms (1813 April 27); his plan to uniform the militia (1813 April 29); the cost of horses, the transfer of Capt. Green's Company to Fredericksburg with Capt. Benedict, & the discharge of Capt. Taylor's Company from Petersburg (1813 May 19); sickness, desertions, & enemy movements (1813 June 19); drafts on the neighboring counties & the strength of the enemy forces (1813 June 27); the defense of Nansemond (1813 July 2); the possible intention of the enemy & the need for camp equipage, accoutrements, & wagons (1813 July 1); the replacement of troops whose term of service will soon expire (1813 July 15); his trips to Richmond & Washington to meet with the Secretary of War (1813 July 16); his awaiting the orders of the Secretary of War in Georgetown (1813 July 25); the arrival of troops from Holly Spring Camp & payment for their freight (1813 Aug. 20); the claim of Virginia for rations & pay (1813 Oct. 3); Capt. Sandford's application for 3rd lieutenant (1813 Oct. 31); the situation of the troops at Hampton (1813 Nov. 5); and a requisition for militia to be placed in the service of the U. S. & organized into companies of cavalry, artillery, riflemen, & infantry (1813 Dec. 13).

John Myers, aid-de-camp, too writes regarding the enemy movements in the absence of Brig. Gen. Taylor. On 30 March 1813, Myers informs the Governor of the position of the enemy fleet, as well as the position of the U. S. S. Constellation at Craney Island. Myers later relates the capture of British sailors who were taken on board the U. S. S. Constitution (1813 April 13). On 17 June 1813, Myers encloses a letter from Maj. William Nimmo, 1st Bn. 2nd Virginia Regt., regarding the demand of the British Frigate Atalante for sheep & oxen with a threat of force. Finally, there is a letter from Myers regarding enemy movements and two British deserters (1813 July 12).

Moses Porter was promoted to Brevet Brigadier General on 10 September 1813. On 1 November 1814, Brigadier General Moses Porter succeeded Brig. Gen. Thomas Parker, who had replaced Taylor on 5 February 1814. Porter writes regarding the defenseless situation at Norfolk and suggests organizing a provisional force of two thousand men to be equipped by the state (1814 July 4). On 15 July 1814, Porter requests that the militia in the vicinity of Norfolk be excluded from the draft for an additional force. Later, he requests an additional company or two of the local militia to be stationed at Fort Powhatan (1814 July 19). In August 1814, Porter notifies the Governor of the arrival of twenty-three additional sail up the Chesapeake (1814 Aug. 16) and comments on the inadequate force at Fort Powhatan (1814 August 30).

Lt. Col. William Sharp, as commander of the 54th Regiment of Virginia Militia at Norfolk Borough, played an important role in the defense of Norfolk against the British. Sharp communicated with Governor Barbour throughout the war, but his correspondence was particularly valuable before the arrival of Brig. Gen. Taylor. Significant correspondence from Lt. Col. Sharp includes the following: the death of Brig. Gen. Thomas Mathews (1812 Feb. 24); the defenseless situation of Norfolk & the condition of arms & ammunition (1812 April 12); arms at Norfolk & the establishment of a general deposit of arms (1812 April 18); arms & ammunition for his regiment (1812 June 29); the appearance of a British Squadron of ships in Lynhaven Bay (1813 Feb. 4); a letter from William C. Veale regarding a boatload of prisoners sent onshore from the British Squadron (1813 Feb. 6); a mob of Spanish & Portuguese sailors who assembled at Norfolk & the firing of heavy cannon near Craney Island & Fort Norfolk (1813 Feb. 8).

William Lambert was appointed an agent stationed at Windmill Point in Lancaster County, at the mouth of the Rappahannock River, to watch & report on enemy movements. Lambert's correspondence details depredations of the enemy in Northumberland County (1814 March 25); the force of the enemy at New Point (1814 April 1); enemy movements up the Chesapeake & runaway slaves taken by the enemy (1814 April 8); enemy movements up the Rappahannock River (1813 April 22); enemy depredations on the Corotoman Estate (1814 April 29); the taking of slaves by the enemy in Northumberland County (1814 May 8); an attempt by the enemy to land on the southern shore of the Potomac for the purpose of taking slaves (1814 May 13); enemy movements up the Chesapeake & a landing of three thousand British troops in the Northern Neck (1814 July 22); enemy movements on the Rappahannock River & the destruction of property by British troops in Westmoreland County (1814 July 29); and enemy depredations at Kinsale & the capture of three schooners on Cone Creek (1814 Aug. 12).

James Bankhead served as Assistant Adjutant General to the Adjutant General of Virginia at Norfolk. In this capacity, Bankhead writes regarding the exposed situation of Norfolk on 12 April 1814. In this letter, Bankhead also encloses a report of state property at Norfolk. On 10 August 1814, he encloses the requisition on the Executive of Virginia for a regiment of militia. His letter of 24 November 1814 comments on the strength of the post at Norfolk. Finally, on 2 December 1814, Bankhead reports that Admiral Cockburn's Squadron is on the Rappahannock with a determination to plunder the inhabitants & devastate the country. Bankhead also mentions the arrival of troops at Bermuda with New Orleans as their supposed destination.

William W. Hening & Claiborne W. Gooch served as Deputy Adjutant Generals under Adjutant General Moses Green during the War of 1812. Hening writes concerning the strength of the 15th & 59th Regiments (1812 Feb. 9); the overall strength of the militia (1812 March 28); extra compensation for his new duties as Deputy Adjutant General during the war (1812 July 3); a regulation to keep the requisition full (1813 Feb. 13); a recommendation by the Frederick County Court for Henry St. George Tucker as captain of a troop of cavalry (1813 July 14); and the procurement of horses (1814 Sept. 22). On several occasions, Claiborne Gooch submitted general orders for Moses Green calling out the militia to Norfolk to replace those whose term of service will expire (1814 Feb. 17; 1814 March 31; 1814 May 8 & 13; & 1814 June 29). In addition, Gooch provides general orders regarding the inspection of arms, accoutrements, ammunition, etc., in preparation for invasion (1814 June 22); the requisition of the President on the militia of Virginia (1814 July 20); and the requisition of the commanding General at Norfolk (1814 Aug. 13).

John Staples, as Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms, corresponded frequently with the Governor regarding arms and the Manufactory in Richmond, Virginia. Staples encloses monthly statements of the operations of the Manufactory from January 1812 to November 1814. Some of these statements were prepared by Stephen Woodson, Clerk. In addition, Staples also corresponds respecting the following topics: musket stocks from Philadelphia (1812 Jan. 8); recommendations in favor of Stephen Woodson as clerk of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms (1812 Feb. 10); the number of arms on hand & the number of arms issued since 21 December 1811 (1812 Feb. 27); the roof of the Armory (1812 March 6); the number of cannon on hand (1812 April 3); a burst gun manufactured at the Virginia Manufactory (1812 Aug. 31); a list of unmounted cannon for service, not fit for service, old cannon shot, new cannon shot, & arms (1813 Jan. 6); instructions as to the propriety of the corps under his command to perform sentinel duty at the Armory (1813 Feb. 6); the Foundry and manufacture of cannon for the United States and other states (1813 March 1); artificers to accompany troops for the purpose of repairing arms (1813 April 10); the building of a powder magazine at Westham (1813 June 24); pistols & scabbards for cavalry swords (1813 Sept. 6); a vacancy in the office of Assistant Armorer due to the resignation of George Edington (1813 Sept. 30); the organization of the artificers into a select company (1813 Dec. 3); salt on the coast of Princess Anne County (1814 Jan. 27); new rifles requiring repairs (1814 Feb. 3); defective rifles manufactured by Frederick Sheets (1814 Feb. 3); waste water below the Manufactory (1814 Feb. 14); old cartouche boxes (1814 Feb. 22); and accounts for repairing arms (1814 Nov. 10). Also noteworthy is a report by Staples & William Campbell estimating the cost of a powder magazine at Westham (1813 June 16).

Peter Crutchfield, Commandant of the Public Guard, provides monthly returns of arms & accoutrements belonging to the Public Guard, monthly reports of the daily duties performed by the Public Guard, and monthly muster rolls from January 1812 to November 1814.

Abraham Douglas, and later William Campbell, Keeper of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Barbour regarding the conduct of certain prisoners during their confinement (1812 Jan. 14 & 28); the amount of commissions allowed him and his assistants on the profits of the Penitentiary (1812 Feb. 14); the pardon of John Moss by the President (1812 Feb. 20); the price of seine twine, cotton cloth, & other articles manufactured at the Penitentiary (1812 March 30); and a statement of the operations of the Penitentiary from 1 December 1811 to 13 May 1812 (1812 June 24). Douglas submitted his resignation on 30 March 1812 and was succeeded by William Campbell. Campbell writes regarding similar topics including the price of articles manufactured at the Penitentiary (1812 Nov. 6); a model of a miniature double field piece (1812 Nov. 16); rations allowed at the Penitentiary (1812 Nov. 28); extra services for superintending the powder magazine (1813 Jan. 21); the price of nails manufactured at the Penitentiary (1813 Feb. 22); a new privy for the Penitentiary (1813 March 7); the cases of Jeremiah B. Jackson & Dolly Chappell (1813 April 8); traveling expenses for a prisoner entitled to a discharge (1813 May 1); gun powder stored in the magazine (1813 June 10, 1814 June 22, & 1814 Dec. 3); the conduct of William Haw (1813 June 12); a plot to blow up the Penitentiary with gun powder from the Magazine (1813 July 21); a contract to supply the Penitentiary with coal & wood (1813 Aug. 4); and the amount of gun powder purchased at Fredericksburg (1814 July 29). Especially significant are the Keeper's reports on the number of prisoners received into the Penitentiary, the number discharged, the number remaining, their occupations, and articles manufactured at the Penitentiary (1812 Feb. 12; 1812 July 1; 1812 Dec. 17; & 1813 July 1).

Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General, provides opinions on issuing commissions to sheriffs (1812 March 8); the sentence of Joseph Findlay (1813 May 29); the case of the Deputy Assessor for Russell County (1813 July 5); items on the account of Samuel Pleasants, Public Printer (1813 Nov. 29); and the case of James Malone & the serving of consecutive terms for several offenses (1814 May 5). He also writes on the following subjects: suits against the Commonwealth for certain fees claimed for services alleged to have been performed in escheated lands (1812 Feb. 9); witnesses against John McCall charged with robbing the Treasury (1812 March 23); his declining to go to Norfolk to attend the Superior Court (1812 July 10); the claim of James Taylor for property burnt in Norfolk (1813 Feb. 23); and the application of Richard H. Baker as notary public at Suffolk (1813 March 2).

William Munford, as Clerk of the House of Delegates, & Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation to the Governor. Noteworthy, is a resolution requesting the Executive to lay before the Assembly the correspondence regarding the claim of the Commonwealth to reimburse them for various expenditures in calling out the militia since 1 January 1807 (1813 May 19); a resolution requesting the Executive lay before the House a statement of the expenses incurred in the defense of the Commonwealth (1813 Dec. 7); a resolution requesting the Executive to lay before the House a statement of the manner in which the detachment of the militia ordered out for the defense of the Commonwealth by the general orders of 6 February 1813 (1813 Dec. 13); a resolution to purchase match-coats for the use of the militia in service at Norfolk or elsewhere (1814 Fe. 15); a resolution regarding the removal of the restrictions imposed by the law upon the transportation of the arms of the Commonwealth beyond the limits thereof (1814 Oct. 12); a resolution regarding Treasury notes received by the Federal government (1814 Nov. 14); a resolution regarding the accounts of the Commonwealth adjusted with the Federal government (1814 Nov. 14); an act authorizing a loan for the pay & support of the troops in the service of the Commonwealth (1814 Nov. 18); and a resolution requesting a report of the number of militia detained for service under the requisition of 1812 (1814 Dec. 9).

Additionally, Munford transmits extracts from the House Journal regarding the elections of the following individuals: Peter V. Daniel as Privy Councilor (1812 Jan. 7); John G. Jackson as Brigadier General (1812 Jan. 9); Daniel Smith as judge of the General Court (1813 Jan. 22); Peter Randolph, Jr., as judge of the General Court (1812 Jan. 22); James Allen as judge of the General Court (1812 Jan. 22); Robert Nelson as judge of the Superior Court of Chancery for the District of Williamsburg (1812 Dec. 4); William G. Pendleton as Register of the Land Office (1814 Oct. 17); and John Burfoot as Auditor of Public Accounts (1814 Oct. 18).

Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds with Governor Barbour regarding various financial matters. Shepard regularly encloses accounts of expenses for forwarding notices, executions, etc. (1812 June 24; 1812 Sept. 5; 1813 March 19; 1813 May 3; 1813 Aug. 18; 1814 March 7; 1814 April 23; 1814 Aug. 22). In addition, Shepard writes concerning a list of counties where there have been no collectors of the revenue (1812 Feb. 1); a list of notaries public in office (1812 March 5); the tax on seines for the year 1811 (1812 March 7); accounts between the Penitentiary & the Commonwealth (1812 March 26; 1813 March 15; & 1814 April 13); the high sheriff on Monongalia County's levy of a fini facias on the lands of Stephen Morgan (1812 May 30); Joseph Faucett, the agent for collecting arrears of taxes from the securities of William Nall, former sheriff of Rockingham County (1812 June 16); a statement of the Keeper of the Penitentiary showing the commissions due him on profits from 1 December 1811 to 13 May 1812 (1812 July 3); accounts for postage (1812 July 6; 1812 Aug. 12; 1812 Sept. 25; 1813 April 30; 1813 July 1 & 3; 1813 Aug. 20; 1813 Oct. 7; 1814 Aug. 17, 24 , & 27; 1814 Sept. 28); the appointment of an agent to attend the sale of George Rennie's land in Randolph County (1812 July 9); lists of warrants drawn on the Contingent Fund (1812 Oct. 6; 1813 April 22); the account of the U. S. with Virginia (1812 Oct. 13); the fund appropriated for distributing public arms (1812 Oct. 19); an execution against Morgan Tompkins, late sheriff of Gloucester County (1813 March 6); the appointment of an agent to superintend the sale of land in Kanawha County (1813 May 21); accounts & vouchers returned to the Auditor's Office (1813 June 18); the settlement of accounts of Paymaster Pendleton (1813 June 16); money advanced to Col. Nathaniel Cargill, Quartermaster, to the troops ordered to Norfolk (1813 Aug. 4); returns of the Commissioner of Revenue for the Borough of Norfolk (1813 Oct. 16); the lack of collectors of the revenue for Harrison, Nansemond, Norfolk, Princess Anne, & York counties (1814 Feb. 20); debt due the Commonwealth from Morgan Tompkins, late sheriff of Gloucester County (1814 Feb. 23); the amount of unexpended funds in the Military Contingent Fund (1814 July 16); executions issued against William Morris, late sheriff of Kanawha County (1814 July 18); warrants drawn on the Military Contingent Fund (1814 Aug. 23 & 1814 Sept. 23); and the account of Peyton Drew, Clerk of the General Court (1814 Sept. 6). Samuel Shepard resigned as Auditor of Public Accounts and was replaced by John Burfoot on 18 October 1814.

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. Included are letters from the following governors David B. Mitchell, Georgia; William Hawkins, North Carolina; Elbridge Gerry & Caleb Strong, Massachusetts; William Jones, Rhode Island; Joseph Bloomfield, New Jersey; William Blount, Tennessee; Roger Griswold & John Cotton Smith, Connecticut; Robert Bowie, Maryland; William Plumer, New Hampshire; Return J. Meigs, Ohio; Daniel D. Tompkins, New York; Simon Snider, Pennsylvania; W. C. C. Claiborne, Louisiana; and Daniel Rodney, Delaware.

Governor David B. Mitchell, Georgia, transmits a resolution in favor of the proposed amendment to the Constitution against any citizen accepting any title of nobility or honor from a foreign power from holding public office (1812 Jan. 4). Governor William Plumer, New Hampshire, transmits a similar resolution on 12 December 1812. Governor William Hawkins, North Carolina, transmits a proposed amendment to the Constitution regarding the election of representatives to Congress and the appointment of electors to vote for President & Vice President (1812 Jan. 4 & 1813 Jan. 4). Hawkins also transmits an act ratifying the amendment to the Constitution regarding titles of nobility (1812 Jan. 14). On several occasions, Hawkins transmits copies of the laws of North Carolina (1812 March 26; 1813 April 14; & 1814 April 13). He also writes regarding the demand for John Williams, a fugitive from justice (1812 April 9). Governor Elbridge Gerry, Massachusetts, encloses a resolution of the Massachusetts Legislature to wear a badge of mourning for the death of Governor George William Smith in the Richmond Theater fire (1812 Jan. 14). Governors William Jones, Rhode Island; Joseph Bloomfield, New Jersey; William Blount, Tennessee; & Roger Griswold, Connecticut; write to acknowledge the receipt of the resolutions of the Virginia Assembly on the right to instruct their senators in Congress (1812 March 9, 10, & 20). Governor Robert Bowie, Maryland, writes on 24 July 1812 transmitting a copy of the laws of Maryland. Governor Return J. Meigs, Ohio, transmits resolutions relative to the jurisdictional right of the state of Ohio over the Ohio River (1813 Jan. 18). Governor William Blount, Tennessee, writes on 4 July 1813 regarding the demand for a fugitive named William Crush. Governor Daniel D. Tomkins, New York, writes regarding Thomas Williams, a free negro confined in Norfolk (1813 Aug. 21). Governor John Cotton Smith, Connecticut, writes to acknowledge receipt of the acts of the Virginia Legislature (1813 Nov. 18). Governor Simon Snider, Pennsylvania, encloses a resolution of the House of Representatives for an amendment to the Constitution to reduce the term of service in Congress from six years to four years (1814 March 17). Governor W. C. C. Claiborne, Louisiana, writes regarding the failure of the requisition of troops made by Gen. Flournoy to the Executive (1814 March 30). Daniel Rodney, Delaware, transmits copies of the laws of Delaware (1814 May 10). Rodney also writes regarding a certificate of the residency of Samuel Maule in Lewes, Delaware (1814 Oct. 28). Lastly, Caleb Strong, Massachusetts, encloses the votes against an amendment to the Constitution proposed by Pennsylvania & Tennessee to reduce the terms of senators in Congress (1814 Oct. 11).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: Edward Christian, Clerk of the Court, re. the death of Samuel Tyler, Judge of the Chancery District Court at Williamsburg (1812 March 23); James Barbour to Peyton Randolph re. an error in his circular to the commandants of regiments which failed to enumerate York County (1812 April 24); William Price & Thomas Underwood encl. an estimate for digging & walling a canal from the present canal to the Public Warehouse in Richmond (1812 April 20); John Tyler, Jr., re. the formation of a volunteer company in Charles City County (1812 May 4); William Tatham re. his report of the defense of the maritime frontier of the Commonwealth (1812 May 8, 9, & 10); William Tatham re. the defense of Lynhaven Bay (1812 May 14); William Tatham encl. a sketch of a telegraph on the lever principle designed by him to communicate from Lynhaven Bay to Richmond in twenty-five minutes (1812 May 17); William Tatham re. the survey of a military canal from Lynhaven Bay to the eastern branch of the Elizabeth River (1812 May 20); James Greenhow re. the sick and a hospital at the Penitentiary (1812 May 28); John Preston, Treasurer, requesting to remove his office to one of the unoccupied rooms in the upper part of the Capitol during the summer months (1812 July 18 & 1813 May 31); Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory re. his meeting with the President on behalf of the Governor's applications to the Secretary of War for the defense of Norfolk (1812 July 22); Abraham Trigg re. his appointment as one of the commissioners to run a line between the lands reserved by the Commonwealth for the benefit of the officers & soldiers of the Virginia Line between the Scioto & Miami Rivers in Ohio and the other lands ceded to the U. S. (1812 Aug. 8); Lt. Col. John Connell encl. confirmation that Forts Mackinaw, Detroit, & Mawmie are in possession of the British (1812 Aug. 27); Peter Hagner, War Dept., Accountant's Office, transmitting ten thousand dollars on account of the militia per the act of 10 April 1812 (1812 Sept. 7); Thomas T. Tucker, U. S. Treasurer, encl. a draft for ten thousand dollars issued by the Secretary of War (1812 Sept. 8); Robert Brent, Paymaster of the U. S. Army, re. the pay of officers under the command of Edward Lucas in Norfolk (1812 Sept. 25); George Williamson, Armory, encl. a list of gun powder belonging to the state of Virginia now in the Magazine (1812 Nov. 23); W. Croghan, on behalf of George Rogers Clark, re. receipt of the Governor's letter approving of his conduct as an office during the Revolutionary War & a sword voted to him by the Assembly (1812 Dec. 15); William Tatham re. a bill to amend the bill passed on 10 December 1791 authorizing him to raise a sum of money to enable him to complete his geographical work (1812 Dec. 27); William Tatham offering his services for fortifying any point or position suitable for defending against any maritime enemy (1812 Dec. 27); William Tatham requesting various documents he transmitted related to the defense of the maritime frontier, etc. (1812 Dec. 27); John Brockenbrough recommending Messrs. Douglas & Huddleston engaged in the stone work of Monumental Church to engrave the description on the pedestal of Washington's statue (1813 Jan. 5); Abraham Trigg encl. his report as one of the commissioners for running the line between the Scioto & Little Miami Rivers in the state of Ohio (includes plat) (1813 Jan. 13); James Barbour to Lt. Gov. Mallory re. an affair between the enemy and the militia of Princess Anne County (1813 Feb. 11); Thomas Wilson, Mayor of Richmond, re. a conspiracy between the slaves & free negroes to burn the city and murder the white inhabitants (1813 Feb. 12); Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory re. the defeat of Gen. Winchester's Northwest Army (1813 Feb. 11); Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory re. the passage of the Eastern Defense Bill to raise one regiment of infantry, a troop of cavalry, a company of riflemen, & two companies of artillery (1813 Feb. 13); James Wood re. the British blockade and the defenseless situation in Norfolk (1813 Feb. 13); William Crawford re. the final settlement of the yearly Penitentiary accounts by the Auditor (1813 March 3); William Armistead re. the death of Judge William Nelson (1813 March 8); Brig. Inspector James Maurice encl. a statement of Matthias Rich re. intelligence he gathered as a prisoner on board the British fleet (1813 March 8); James Maurice re. enemy movements near Hampton Roads (1813 March 9); Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory re. additions to the enemy force (1813 March 10); James Maurice re. movements of three ships of war into the Bay (1813 March 22); Lt. Col. Miles Selden re. the defense at Fort Powhatan (1813 March 26); Robert Saunders re. his acceptance of a commission as judge of the General Court (1813 March 26); John Clarke re. the defense of the rivers from enemy ships & encl. a copy of his letters to Gov. Cabell on 2 August & 21 August 1807 (1813 March 26); Charles W. Morgan, U. S. S. Constitution, re. a sword presented him by Virginia (1813 March 27); William Daniel re. his appointment as judge of the Williamsburg Circuit of the General Court (1813 April 3); Richard E. Parker re. the death of his grandfather Judge Richard Parker (1813 April 5); Robert Nelson re. an estimate for repairing the Capitol in Williamsburg (1813 April 7); Ellison Currie accepting his appointment as judge of the General Court to replace Richard Parker (1813 April 12); Stapleton Crutchfield re. a vast increase of the enemy & their threatening position near Hampton Roads (1813 June 21); Stapleton Crutchfield re. his retreat from Hampton with the force under his command & his confrontation with the enemy near Hampton (1813 June 25); Robert G. Scott re. the particulars of the enemy's attack on Hampton (1813 June 25); Thomas Griffin & Robert Lively re. their meeting with Admiral Warren re. hospital supplies from Norfolk, prisoners, & desolation by the enemy in Hampton (1813 July 4); Thomas Jefferson requesting an appointment for John Strode in the Commissary, Quartermaster Department, Foundry, Armory, or Penitentiary (1813 July 13); Robert Lyman re. an expected insurrection in Halifax County and encl. a clipping from The Courier (1813 July 16); Lt. Col. James McDowell re. the movements of his detachment since leaving camp at Richmond, the movements of the enemy fleet on the Potomac River, & encl. the organization of a regiment for the defense of the Potomac (1813 July 25); the Committee of Vigilance of Petersburg encl. a letter from Richard Bate re. an estimate of additional works & repairs for Fort Powhatan (1813 July 26); John G. Baxter re. his plan for destroying the British fleet by combining a gun boat & steam boat with a wheel at the bow containing a large number of cannon (1813 Aug. 1); William Mathers re. his plan to burn the enemy ships using a rifle gun firing a rocket of his own design (1813 Aug. 4); Michael Garber encl. a plan of a spherical shell to fire at the British ships (1813 Aug. 10); James Greenhow suggesting the removal of the British prisoners in the Penitentiary (1813 Aug. 13); Christopher Ford re. his invention to convey torpedoes (1813 Sept. 7 & 10); Robert Greenhow, Mayor of Richmond, re. apprehensions of insurrection among the blacks under the instigation of the British & advising the removal of the Powder Magazine (1813 Sept. 8); Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory to Robert B. Taylor re. pay & rations for militia in actual service of the U. S. (1813 Oct. 1); John Turberville to William Hening encl. a letter from him to the Commander of the British Naval Forces in the Potomac re. escaped slaves on board British vessels & a letter from Capt. William Middleton re. his trip to the British ship Dragon to see the slaves on board (1813 Nov. 8); James McDowell encl. a letter from Robert B. Taylor re. four British prisoners at Richmond (1813 Dec. 7); Arthur Sinclair, U. S. Navy, re. the resolution of the General Assembly commending his services on the late contests on Lake Ontario (1814 Jan. 16); William Simmons re. accounts for expenditures made for militia services (1814 March 8); Governor Barbour to the Secretary of War re. the retirement of Gen. Thomas Parker from command at Norfolk & his order for Brig. Gen. Chamberlayne to take command (1814 March 20); Brig. Gen. William Chamberlayne re. the refusal of Col. Freeman to transfer command of the troops in Norfolk to any state office unless directed by the War Dept. (1814 March 31); H. S. G. Tucker re. intelligence that the enemy are in possession of the Westmoreland Courthouse (1814 July 25); John Davenport re. the death of Charles Blagrove, Register of the Land Office (1814 Aug. 20); William W. Hening, Clerk of the Superior Court of Chancery for the Richmond District, re. the removal of court papers in cases of invasion or insurrection (1814 Aug. 26); William C. Williams re. the position of the enemy fleet at the mouth of Occoquan Creek (1814 Aug. 28); William C. Williams re. the action against the enemy near Blandensburg, Maryland, & the burning of the Navy Yard, Capitol, & War Office in Washington (1814 Aug. 28); William C. Williams re. the removal of the enemy from Washington, the damage to the Capitol & President's house, & the location of the Secretary of War (1814 Aug. 28); Walter G. Anderson, U. S. Navy, offering his services in sinking old vessels in the James River to stop the enemy fleet (1814 Sept. 7); John Davenport re. his safe arrival at Cartersville with the records & papers of the Land Office (1814 Sept. 11); Lt. Col. Archibald Ritchie re. the possession of the enemy of the town of Essex (1814 Dec. 1); and Governor Barbour to the Council thanking them for their kindness & support during his time in office (1814 Dec. 10).

Other noteworthy items include: certificate of oaths for Nathaniel H. Claiborne, James Wood, & Peter V. Daniel as members of the Privy Council (1812 Jan. 8 & 9); a certificate of oath for John Russell as Clerk of the Council (1812 Jan. 15); the bond of John Staples as Superintendent of the Manufactory of Arms (1812 Feb. 18); proceedings of the Monthly Board of Visitors at the Penitentiary (1812 Feb. 19; 1812 Sept. 7; 1813 July 10; 1813 Oct. 16); proceedings of the Quarterly Meeting if the Board of Visitors (1812 July 8; 1812 Oct. 19; 1812 Dec. 15; 1813 May 24; 1813 Sept. 7; 1813 Nov. 22; 1814 April 8; 1814 July 11); a proclamation by Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory offering a reward for the apprehension of William Crush (1812 March 2); a proclamation by Lt. Gov. Charles K. Mallory appointing James Johns as agent to convey David Bosworth, a fugitive from justice in Maryland, to the jail of Prince Edward County (1812 March 9); a report by the Governor to the Council re. his visit to the eastern frontier for the purpose of collecting information on the defense of the state against invasion (1812 May 12); certificates of oath for Robert Quarles & John Campbell as a members of the Privy Council (1812 May 28 & 1812 June 1); a report of the committee appointed to make certain enquiries of the Superintendent of the Armory (1812 Aug. 15); appointments of electors for President & Vice President (1812 Aug. & Sept.); a report of the commissioners to explore the upper navigation of the James River (1812 Oct. 26); a certificate of the services of Robert H. Harrison by Bushrod Washington (1812 Nov. 24); a certificate of Robert Taylor, Speaker of the Senate, & Andrew Stevenson, Speaker of the House of Delegates, re. the election of electors to supply vacancies (1812 Dec. 2); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of Peter Pippets (1812 Dec. 8); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of Daniel Beach (1812 Dec. 9); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of Malichie Branham (1813 Jan. 23); a resolution of William B. Lamb, Mayor, & George Newton, President of the Common Council, that Richard E. Lee & Robert B. Taylor be appointed to proceed to Richmond & Washington to represent the state & federal government on the exposed & defenseless situation at Norfolk (1813 Feb. 1); appointments of officers in the corps to be raised for the defense of the state (1813 March); a report by Samuel Shepard on the Penitentiary accounts (1813 March 15); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of John Emery (1813 April 1); a report of the commissioners appointed to lay off the city of Richmond into wards (1813 April 2); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of Benjamin Miller (1813 April 10); an act of Congress to encourage vaccination by appointing James Smith a vaccine agent in Baltimore and to transfer vaccine matter free of postage (1813 May 4); advice of the Council re. the letter of Lt. Col. James Robinson, Princess Anne County, informing the Governor of the enemy's landing, depredations, & repulsion by a detachment of militia (1813 June 21); pay roll of Capt. James Bonner's Company of drafted militia detached from the 63rd Regiment stationed at Fort Powhatan (1813 July 12); pay roll of Capt. Thomas E. Fortune's Company of Artillery detached from the 2nd Regiment stationed at Fort Powhatan (1813 July 26); an inventory of stores belonging to the Commonwealth on board the Schooner First Attempt (1813 Sept. 6); a certificate of oath for Arthur Smith as a member of the Privy Council (1813 Dec. 27); the bond of Charles Blagrove as Register of the Land Office (1814 Jan. 6); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of the slaves Cyrus Archer, Field Archer, & Dick (1814 Jan. 17); proceedings of the Richmond Committee of Vigilance (1814 Feb. 3); a proclamation by Lt. Gov. Linah Mims directing that the county & superior courts for Campbell County be held in Lynchburg (1814 March 11); a proclamation by Governor Barbour directing that the county & superior courts for York County be held at the house of Matthew Wells in the town of York (1814 March 16); a proclamation by Governor Barbour re. an election to replace John Dawson as a representative of Congress (1814 April 14); a bill of repairs on the Capitol by Richard Garret (1814 April 26); a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of John Robertson (1814 April 27); a presentment by the Richmond Hustings Court re. the removal of the Powder Magazine away from the Penitentiary to a more suitable distance away from the city (1814 May 12); extracts of the general orders of Brig. Gen. Robert B. Taylor and the surgeons of the army at Norfolk re. the appointment of Dr. J. T. Barraud as Surgeon General (1813 June 5); a survey of land belonging to the Commonwealth at Westham in Henrico County (1814 July 9); the bond of Robert Hyde to erect a building for the deposit of munitions of war (1814 July 28); proceedings of the Mayor & Aldermen of Richmond re. the city's present state of defenses (1814 Aug. 20); a proclamation by Governor Barbour calling the General Assembly into session on the 2nd Monday of October (1814 Sept. 1); a report of a survey of the road from Camp Fairfield to New Bridge on the Chickahominy River down to Bottom Bridge with a list of houses on the main direct road from Richmond to the Brick House, etc. (1814 Sept. 17); a report of the President & Directors of the Literary Fund (1814 Oct. 1); a resolution of the Vermont Legislature against the amendments proposed by the Legislatures of Tennessee & Pennsylvania to reduce the term of service for senators in Congress (1814 Nov. 4); and a proclamation by Governor Barbour offering a reward for the apprehension of Larkin Cottrell (1814 Nov. 26).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with pardons and undated items arranged to the rear.

Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

James Barbour Executive Papers
1812
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      4-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      16-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      16-29
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      21-31
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      16-24
    • Box 1
      Folder 13
      25-30
    • Box 1
      Folder 14
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-8
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      9-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      16-25
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      26-31
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      1-5
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      6-12
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      13-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      21-25
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      26-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      1-6
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      7-14
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      15-24
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      25-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      21-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      21-30
    • Box 3
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      21-30
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      2-14
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      16-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      Filing Jackets
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      16-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • Pardons
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      A-M
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      N-W
  • Box 4
    Folder 13
    Undated
1813
  • January
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      16-31
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      11-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      16-28
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      1-7
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      8-12
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      13-16
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      17-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      21-25
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      26-29
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      30-31
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      1-5
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      6-9
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      10-14
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      15-21
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      22-27
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      28-30
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      11-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      16-25
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      26-30
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      1-8
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      9-15
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      16-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      21-26
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      27-29
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      30
    • Box 7
      Folder 12
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      1-3
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      4-7
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      8-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      11-13
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      14-17
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      18-21
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      22-29
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      30-31
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 8
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 8
      Folder 12
      21-31
    • Box 8
      Folder 13
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      1-8
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      9-19
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      20-30
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      20-31
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      1-10
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      11-20
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      21-30
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      21-31
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • Pardons
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      A-H
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      M-W
  • Box 10
    Folder 7
    Undated
1814
  • January
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      16-25
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      26-31
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Filing Jackets
  • February
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 11
      Folder 3
      21-28
    • Box 11
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • March
    • Box 11
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 11
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 11
      Folder 7
      21-31
    • Box 11
      Folder 8
      Filing Jackets
  • April
    • Box 11
      Folder 9
      1-10
    • Box 11
      Folder 10
      11-20
    • Box 11
      Folder 11
      21-30
    • Box 11
      Folder 12
      Filing Jackets
  • May
    • Box 12
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 12
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 12
      Folder 3
      21-31
    • Box 12
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • June
    • Box 12
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 12
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 12
      Folder 7
      21-26
    • Box 12
      Folder 8
      27-30
    • Box 12
      Folder 9
      Filing Jackets
  • July
    • Box 12
      Folder 10
      1-9
    • Box 12
      Folder 11
      11-15
    • Box 13
      Folder 1
      16-20
    • Box 13
      Folder 2
      21-27
    • Box 13
      Folder 3
      28-31
    • Box 13
      Folder 4
      Filing Jackets
  • August
    • Box 13
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 13
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 13
      Folder 7
      21-28
    • Box 13
      Folder 8
      29-31
    • Box 13
      Folder 9
      Filing Jackets
  • September
    • Box 13
      Folder 10
      1-5
    • Box 13
      Folder 11
      6-15
    • Box 13
      Folder 12
      16-25
    • Box 14
      Folder 1
      26-30
    • Box 14
      Folder 2
      Filing Jackets
  • October
    • Box 14
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 14
      Folder 4
      11-20
    • Box 14
      Folder 5
      21-31
    • Box 14
      Folder 5
      Filing Jackets
  • November
    • Box 14
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 14
      Folder 8
      11-18
    • Box 14
      Folder 9
      19-30
    • Box 14
      Folder 10
      Filing Jackets
  • December
    • Box 14
      Folder 11
      1-10
    • Box 14
      Folder 12
      Filing Jackets
  • Pardons
    • Box 14
      Folder 13
      A-G
    • Box 14
      Folder 14
      H-M
    • Box 14
      Folder 15
      P-W
  • Box 15
    Folder 1
    Undated
Undated
  • Box 15
    Folder 2
    Part 1
  • Box 15
    Folder 3
    Part 2
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1812
    • Box 16
      Folder 1
      Jan. 14
    • Box 16
      Folder 2
      Jan. 23
    • Box 16
      Folder 3
      Jan. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 4
      Feb. 1
    • Box 16
      Folder 5
      Feb. 14
    • Box 16
      Folder 6
      March 26
    • Box 16
      Folder 7
      March [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 8
      April 8
    • Box 16
      Folder 9
      April 30
    • Box 16
      Folder 10
      April [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 11
      June [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 12
      July 3
    • Box 16
      Folder 13
      July 31
    • Box 16
      Folder 14
      Aug. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 15
      Sept. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 16
      Oct. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 17
      Oct. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 18
      Nov. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 19
      Dec. 5
    • Box 16
      Folder 20
      Dec. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 21
      Pardons - Amy (slave)
  • 1813
    • Box 16
      Folder 22
      Jan. 4
    • Box 16
      Folder 23
      Jan. 10
    • Box 16
      Folder 24
      Jan. 12
    • Box 16
      Folder 25
      Jan. 18
    • Box 16
      Folder 26
      Jan. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 27
      Feb. 12
    • Box 16
      Folder 28
      Feb. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 29
      March 26
    • Box 16
      Folder 30
      May [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 31
      June 12
    • Box 16
      Folder 32
      June 23
    • Box 16
      Folder 33
      June [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 34
      July [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 35
      Aug. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 36
      Sept. 9
    • Box 16
      Folder 37
      Nov. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 38
      Dec. 16
  • 1814
    • Box 16
      Folder 39
      Jan. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 40
      Feb. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 41
      April 18
    • Box 16
      Folder 42
      May [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 43
      July 8
    • Box 16
      Folder 44
      July [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 45
      Aug. 6
    • Box 16
      Folder 46
      Aug. 22
    • Box 16
      Folder 47
      Aug. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 48
      Sept. [N.D.]
    • Box 16
      Folder 49
      Nov. [N.D.]
    • Pardons
      • Box 16
        Folder 50
        Dyer, William
      • Box 16
        Folder 51
        Vaughan, James
    • Box 16
      Folder 52
      Undated
    • Box 16
      Folder 53
      Undated
    • Box 16
      Folder 54
      Undated
    • Box 16
      Folder 55
      Undated
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1812
    • Box 17
      Folder 1
      Feb. 25
    • Box 17
      Folder 2
      April 15
    • Box 17
      Folder 3
      April 21
    • Box 17
      Folder 4
      May 12
    • Box 17
      Folder 5
      June 25
    • Box 17
      Folder 6
      July 1
    • Box 17
      Folder 7
      Oct. 26
    • Box 17
      Folder 8
      Dec. 17
    • Box 17
      Folder 9
      Undated
  • 1813
    • Box 17
      Folder 10
      Feb. 16
    • Box 17
      Folder 11
      March 15
    • Box 17
      Folder 12
      April 8
    • Box 17
      Folder 13
      July 1
    • Box 17
      Folder 14
      July 12
    • Box 17
      Folder 15
      July 26
    • Box 17
      Folder 16
      Aug. 10
    • Box 17
      Folder 17
      Aug. 25
    • Box 17
      Folder 18
      Oct. 14
  • 1814
    • Box 17
      Folder 19
      April 12
    • Box 17
      Folder 20
      April 13
    • Box 17
      Folder 21
      May 24
    • Box 17
      Folder 22
      July 2
    • Box 17
      Folder 23
      Aug. 20
    • Box 17
      Folder 24
      Sept. 9