A Guide to the Governor William H. Cabell Executive Papers, 1805-1808 Cabell, William H., Executive Papers of Governor, 1805-1808 41135

A Guide to the Governor William H. Cabell Executive Papers, 1805-1808

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 41135


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© 2004 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
41135
Title
Governor William H. Cabell Executive Papers, 1805-1808
Physical Characteristics
5.0 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. William H. Cabell Executive Papers, 1805-1808. Accession 41135, State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 5950-5959


Biographical Information

William H. Cabell was born on 16 December 1772 at Boston Hill in Cumberland County to Nicholas and Hannah Carrington Cabell. Educated at Hampden-Sydney College and the College of William and Mary, Cabell received a bachelor of law degree in 1793. Cabell relocated to Amherst County and represented the county in the House of Delegates for five terms including 1796, 1798, and between 1802 & 1805. Following his service in the Assembly, Cabell was elected for a one-year term as governor of Virginia on 6 December 1805, and reelected for two additional terms in 1806 and 1807. The most significant event of Cabell's governorship occurred on 22 June 1807 when the British warship Leopard attacked and boarded the American frigate Chesapeake under Commodore James Barron off the Virginia coast in search of British deserters. After his last term as governor, Cabell was elected judge of the General Court on 14 December 1808. Two years later, in March 1811, Governor James Monroe appointed Cabell to the Virginia Court of Appeals, which became the Supreme Court of Appeals. Cabell served on the Court of Appeals for forty-one years, becoming president of the Court on 18 January 1842.

William H. Cabell married his cousin Elizabeth Cabell on 9 April 1795 and they had three children. Elizabeth died of consumption on 5 November 1801. Cabell remarried on 11 March 1805 to Agnes Sarah Bell Gamble, daughter of Robert Gamble of Richmond, and fathered eight additional children. Cabell died in Richmond on 12 January 1853 and is buried in Shockoe Cemetery. Cabell County in present-day West Virginia was named for Cabell in 1809.

Scope and Content

William H. Cabell's Executive papers are organized into two series. Series have been designated for Chronological files and the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair. The bulk of the material can be found in the Chronological files' series.

SERIES I: Chronological Files. This series primarily consists of incoming correspondence during Cabell's three one-year terms as governor between 11 December 1805 and 12 December 1808. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Virginia Manufactory of Arms; the Virginia Penitentiary; amendments to the U. S. Constitution; the Public Guard; militia; public improvements; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; elections; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; opinions; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include President Thomas Jefferson; James Madison, Secretary of State; Henry Dearborn, Secretary of War; Robert Smith, Secretary of the Navy; and Virginia's delegates in Congress. President Thomas Jefferson writes Governor Cabell on 19 Sept. 1807 enclosing a letter he received from Mathew Clay requesting a command with the volunteer troops about to be raised. Jefferson also writes regarding the offer of service by William Dandridge & the Henrico Junior Volunteer Infantry attached to the 33rd Regiment of Virginia Militia (1807 Oct. 7). On 27 Nov. 1807, the President corresponds regarding models of swords from Europe and the payment of the Virginia Militia for their late services. Finally, the President writes regarding the amendatory bill in the House of Representatives concerning the embargo (1808 March 13).

James Madison, Secretary of State, periodically transmits laws of Congress according to the act of the general promulgation of the laws of the United States (1807 April 22). Madison also transmits copies of laws to the Collector of Customs at Alexandria (1808 April 4). See Series II for additional correspondence from James Madison.

As Secretary of War, Henry Dearborn, writes the Governor regarding cavalry arms (1807 Feb. 13); the destruction of records in the War Office in 1800 (1807 Feb. 24); the report of the Accountant of the War Dept. regarding the pay of militia to repel invasions, etc. (1807 Nov. 19); a request for annual returns of the state's militia (1807 Dec. 2); the formation of volunteer corps offering their services into battalions or regiments with suitable field & staff officers (1807 Dec. 26); the formation of twelve-month volunteers into corps distinct from other troops (1808 Jan. 12); gun carriages & accounts remitted by William W. Hening (1808 March 1); the practice of the U.S. Armory in proving musket barrels (1808 March 15); a proposed site for a battery on the James River (1808 March 15); the caliber of muskets made in U.S. armories (1808 March 29); cannon (1808 April 4); and the act of Congress passed on 30 March 1808 "authorizing a detachment from the militia of the U.S." including Virginia's quota of troops (1808 Oct. 29). Among these papers is a copy of a letter from Dearborn to Joseph Perkins, Superintendent of the Armory at Harpers Ferry, regarding improvements in the manufacturing of arms (1806 March 1). See Series II for additional correspondence from Henry Dearborn.

Robert Smith, Navy Dept., writes Governor Cabell on 23 Dec. 1807 transmitting an impression of the medal presented to the late Commodore Edward Preble in pursuance to the resolution of Congress dated 3 March 1805. Later, Smith encloses an order to deliver timber for gun carriages (1808 Feb. 29).

Correspondence from Virginia's delegates in Congress include the following: a letter of resignation from Christopher Clark from the House of Representatives (1806 Aug. 9); a letter from Joseph Lewis regarding the resolution of the Virginia General Assembly for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution allowing senators in Congress to be removed from office by the majority vote of the state legislature (1808 Feb. 29); and a letter of resignation by Representative John Claiborne (1808 June 28). The majority of correspondence in William H. Cabell's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include John Clarke, Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms; Martin Mims & Abraham Douglas, Keepers of the Penitentiary; Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General; Daniel L. Hylton, Clerk of the Council; Samuel Coleman, Assistant Clerk of the Council of State; James Pleasants, Jr., Clerk of the House of Delegates; Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate; Alexander Quarrier, Captain of the Public Guard; and Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts.

John Clarke, as Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms, corresponded frequently with the Governor, regarding arms and the Manufactory in Richmond, Virginia. Included are correspondence related to the following subjects: Capt. Potter's attempt to sell the gunstocks unwarrantably detained by him (1805 Dec. 31); sums necessary to be appropriated for the Manufactory, Penitentiary, & James River Warehouse (1806 Jan. 4); claims now due for work done on the public buildings (1806 Jan. 6); the account of Gen. John Shee of Philadelphia who was authorized to procure gunstocks for the Manufactory (1806 March 15 & 1807 April 29); arms for Capt. Peter Crutchfield's Company of Cavalry (1806 May 7); repairs necessary for the barracks of the Public Guard (1806 Aug. 26); iron for the Manufactory (1806 Oct. 3); warrants to pay the artificers at the Manufactory (1806 Oct. 14); coal for the winter season (1806 Nov. 1); a plan for a canal & crane proposed to be made in front of the Public Tobacco Warehouse on the James River Canal (1806 Nov. 22); arms for all the cavalry troops and the number of arms on hand in the Manufactory (1806 Dec. 18); William McKim's work on the dome & belfry of the Manufactory (1806 Dec. 23); arms for Gloucester County which were sent to the Manufactory (1807 Jan. 19); a vacancy in the Independent Corps of Artificers (1807 Feb. 19); seasoned timber & castings for the machinery at the Manufactory (1807 April 17); brass-hilted swords & scabbards for the Norfolk Artillery (1807 June 11); arms fit for service at the Manufactory (1807 July 10); the erection of the Boring Mill & a balance due him for building machinery at the Manufactory (1807 Sept. 1); an account regarding the amount of payments made to him for building the Manufactory (1807 Sept. 11); Daniel Peck's account for cleaning & repairing public muskets (1808 Jan. 25); powder used in proving the barrels of muskets, rifles, & pistols (1808 March 7); proving arms at the Manufactory (1808 March 19); the manufacture of rifles (1808 March 21); a recommendation from Capt. Saunders for William Hall to construct gun carriages (1808 March 24); sword scabbards (1808 April 6); the apparatus necessary for the Foundry & Boring Mill (1808 April 13); the erection of a powder magazine (1808 April 15); fire-bricks for the furnaces of the Foundry (1808 April 20); the description of a rifle for military service (1808 March 21); a plan of the Foundry at the Manufactory & a change in Henry Foxall's proposal to furnish the apparatus, machinery, etc. (1808 June 15); the number of cavalry swords & pistols on hand (1808 June 25); stone at the Boring Mill (1808 Aug. 5); the construction of the Boring Mill for the Manufactory (1808 Aug. 6); arms for the 33rd Regiment commanded by Capt. Robertson Lord (1808 Aug. 13); repairing arms (1808 Sept. 14); charges against him printed in The Virginian newspaper and his request for an investigation (1808 Oct. 21); the account of Col. Thomas Moore to Thomas Mix for the repair of Amherst muskets (1808 Nov. 3); his illness & preparation for the Armory Committee's examination of charges against him (1808 Nov. 18); and proposals by Robert Spence for digging a ditch to bring water into the well at the Penitentiary (Undated). Particularly noteworthy is a letter from Clarke to the Committee of the Executive Council appointed to form or fix on the design of a sword to be presented to Lt. Presley N. O'Bannon, hero of the Tripolitan War, in conformity to a resolution of the General Assembly. Clarke encloses four colored drawings of the sword's hilt (1806 March 29). Similarly, on 1 Aug. 1806, Clarke encloses a copy of his plan describing his design of a sword for Lt. O'Bannon.

Martin Mims, and later Abraham Douglas, Keeper of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Cabell regarding numerous subjects related to prisoners and the Penitentiary. Mims encloses statements of the accounts of the Penitentiary (1805 Dec. 21 & 1806 Dec. 24); statements of the names of the negroes in the Penitentiary for transportation (1806 Feb. 5 & 1806 Dec. 2); a receipt for an award to five slaves for their service in pursuing the convicts who escaped from the Penitentiary (1806 March 8); a receipt for John Trample who escaped on 1 Feb. (1806 March 31); and a list of names of sundry persons united for the purpose of stealing, plundering, etc. (1806 Aug. 15). In addition, Mims writes regarding the escape of eight prisoners from a solitary cell in the Penitentiary (1806 Feb. 3); the removal of three hundred stand of arms from the Penitentiary (1806 Feb. 15); his wagon account for the carriage of arms (1806 June 28); the conduct of two inmates (1806 June 28); escape attempts (1806 Sept. 18); convicts Mary Martin & William Hughes confined in the Penitentiary (1806 Oct. 14); the conduct of Anderson Halloway (1807 Jan. 8); the number of holsters & scabbards on hand at the Penitentiary (1807 Jan. 19); materials of tin & wood cartridge boxes (1807 Jan. 29); a recommendation of Pleasant Howard who acted as a turnkey at the Penitentiary (1807 Feb. 13); the appointment of William Clair as Assistant Keeper of the Penitentiary (1807 March 4); his account with the Jail & Penitentiary (1807 March 6); the diet of the convicts (1807 March 25); and the conduct of John Charlton (1807 April 17). On 29 February 1807, Martin Mims submitted his resignation effective at the end of March. Mims was replaced as Keeper of the Penitentiary by Abraham Douglas of Philadelphia, Pa. In his letter of 3 March 1807, Douglas encloses a recommendation from the Inspectors of the Prison of Philadelphia. Douglas writes on 18 March 1807 regarding his appointment and discusses the diet of the convicts at the prison in Philadelphia. As Keeper of the Penitentiary, Douglas writes concerning scantling & plank to make tables & benches for the convicts in order to eat their meals at the same time (1807 March 31); a report of the fire at the Penitentiary on 19 May 1807 (1807 May 30); his account for articles furnished sick prisoners & vinegar for the prisoners to prevent scurvy (1807 Oct. 1); the value of slaves in the Penitentiary (1807 Oct. 27); an account of the Penitentiary from 1 April to 1 Dec. 1807 and a request for a larger appropriation (1807 Dec. 5); the commission of the Keeper & the profits of the Penitentiary (1808 Feb. 19); the resignation of William H. Quarles as Deputy Keeper and the appointment of Samuel Carter (1808 April 22); the use of the former guard house by one of the turnkeys at the Penitentiary (1808 June 19); the manufacture of cartridge boxes at the Penitentiary (1808 June 19); the commission on the profits of the Penitentiary (1808 Aug. 5); the advice of Council praising his conduct as Keeper (1808 Sept. 17); the appointment of Jacob Valentine as Assistant Keeper to replace John McCoys (1808 Sept. 26); machinery for spinning cotton in the Penitentiary (1808 Sept. 26); and an account of the Penitentiary for the last twelve months (1808 Dec. 4). Douglas also submits updates on the number of prisoners in the Penitentiary (1807 May 1 & 1807 June 10); statements of the raw material on hand at the Penitentiary (1807 June 24); an account of work done by the convicts at the Penitentiary (1807 July 2 & 1808 July 13); and rations furnished by Samuel Pointer for the use of the prisoners (1807 July 31 & 1807 Sept. 1).

Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General, writes regarding numerous subjects including drafts of bonds for George Goosely & his securities to transport condemned slaves out of the United States (1805 Dec. 17); gunstocks detained by Capt. Potter against whom a suit was brought by the Commonwealth (1806 Jan. 2 & 14); the case in the Staunton Chancery Court of the estate of Mr. Martin whose property supposed to have escheated to the Commonwealth (1806 Jan. 30); complaints against John Stephenson, a magistrate of Wood County (1806 June 25); claims of James J. Green, Adjutant of the 106th Regiment of Militia (1806 Dec. 30); the case of Kibber & Compton and the act regulating the mode of proceedings in criminal cases (1808 April 15); and the suit against Col. John Harvie's representatives by the Commonwealth (1808 Nov. 15). In addition, the Attorney General provides opinions on magistrates leaving their country (1806 May 30); the duties of agents appointed for the sale of property taken by execution of the Commonwealth from delinquent sheriffs (1806 June 25); the court martial of aliens entering companies of volunteers (1807 Oct. 5); and the offense of maiming (1808 Jan. 16).

Daniel L. Hylton & Samuel Coleman, as Clerk & Assistant Clerk of the Council, communicate with the Governor regularly through the Council Office. The Council provides regular extracts from Council minutes with advice of the Council on such topics as George Goosely's contract with the Commonwealth to transport condemned slaves (1805 Dec. 20); the appointment of John Clarke as Superintendent of the Virginia Manufactory of Arms (1806 March 1); a proclamation prescribing the uniform of the militia (1806 March N.D.); rules of the Penitentiary & corporal punishment by the Keeper (1807 Jan. 23); the appointment of a new Keeper of the Penitentiary (1807 March 5); the dismissal of Alexander Quarrier as Commandant of the Public Guard (1807 March 6); arms for the 7th, 54th, & 95th Regiments of Militia with the surplus to the 20th & 115th Regiments (1807 July 1); an address of thanks to James Monroe for his services as Minister of England (1807 Dec. 23); and the death of Gen. William Moseley, late Treasurer (1808 Oct. 4). On 6 March 1807, John Guerrant, Alexander McRae, & John Heath, members of the Council, protested the choice of Abraham Douglas as Keeper of the Penitentiary over William Campbell, a Revolutionary War officer. Hylton also writes the Governor on 18 April 1807 regarding a supply of rough marble for the Penitentiary.

In addition, Hylton often administered certificates of oath to several state officials including William H. Cabell as Governor (1805 Dec. 11); William Waller Henning as Privy Councilor (1806 Jan. 2); William Munford as Privy Councilor (1806 May 28); William Aylett as Privy Councilor (1806 May 31); Lewis Harvey as Privy Councilor (1806 Dec. 6); Nicholas Hallam as Privy Councilor (1807 March 9); George W. Smith as Privy Councilor (1807 Dec. 15); and John Tyler as Governor (1808 Dec. 12).

Samuel Coleman corresponds respecting subaltern officers of a company of artillery commanded by Maj. Singleton (1806 Jan. 13); compensation for the Assistant Clerk who served during his absence (1807 April 1); the appointment of Robert Guerrant as Assistant Clerk (1807 July 27); a report of clothing issued to the Public Guard (1808 June 1); and the death of Robert Guerrant & recommending John Woodson Pleasants as his successor (1808 July 21). Also noteworthy is a resolution by the Council to wear black crape on their left arms for one month in respect to the memory of George Wythe (1806 June 14).

James Pleasants, Jr., Clerk of the House of Delegates, and Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation to the Governor. Pleasants encloses resolutions respecting the amount for which condemned slaves have been sold (1805 Dec. 25); the presentation of a sword to Lt. Presley N. O'Bannon for his gallant service in the war with Tripoli (1805 Dec. 30); the removal to the Armory of all the ordnance & military stores belonging to the state (1806 Feb. 3); the printing of the act to further amend the several acts concerning the militia of the Commonwealth (1806 Feb. 5); further time for locating & surveying the lands on the north west side of the Ohio River (1807 Jan. 20); authority of the Executive to purchase twenty copies of Rev. James Madison's map of Virginia for circulation to other states, etc. (1807 Jan. 20); and the repair of the furniture in the Senate Chamber and locks for tables to be placed therein (1807 Jan. 22).

Alexander Quarrier, Captain of the Public Guard, occasionally writes the Governor concerning such topics as the house contracted with Robert Crouch to be used as a hospital for the sick of the Public Guard (1806 Nov. 8). In February 1807, William Nash, a sentinel of the Public Guard, killed a citizen named John McCredie while on duty. Quarrier provides a report of the incident defending himself and responding to affidavits (1807 March 4). The Council of State appointed a Committee of the Executive on 6 Feb. 1807 to ascertain & report all material circumstances in any degree relating to the incident including whether the orders of the Commandant have been regularly repeated to the troops under his command (1807 March 6). The Council submitted advice on 6 March 1807 to dismiss Quarrier as Commandant of the Public Guard and Thomas Underwood as Lieutenant for negligence in the incident, however, two members of the Council, Alexander McRae & John Guerrant, disapproved of the advice. Quarrier submitted his letter of resignation on 22 March 1807. On 5 August 1808, Quarrier joined John Clarke in writing the governor concerning the condition of the Capitol. A later letter by Quarrier & Clarke provides the expense of repairs (1808 Aug. 13). Quarrier also provides a list of laborers at work on the Public Square from 1 Nov. (1808 Nov. 18).

Other documents related to the Public Guard include the following: bonds of Samuel Pointer to furnish the Public Guard with provisions (1806 May 20 & 1806 Sept. 15; 1807 April 18); estimates for erecting a house for the Public Guard (1806 Sept. 26); proposals for clothing the Public Guard by John Andrew (1806 Sept. 30); a list of non-commissioned officers & privates discharged from the Public Guard by an act of Assembly (1808 Jan. 21); and a statement of clothing delivered to the soldiers of the Public Guard including the names of the soldiers and the date they were recruited (1808 Jan. 20 & 1808 June 2).

Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds often with Governor Cabell regarding various financial matters. Shepard regularly encloses accounts of expenses for forwarding notices, executions, etc. (1806 Feb. 11; 1806 April 19; 1806 Sept. 20; 1807 Jan. 29; 1807 May 2; 1807 Sept. 5; 1808 May 10; & 1808 Sept. 16). Shepard also writes regarding the expenditures of the Public Guard from 1805 to 1807 (1806 Jan. 7 & 1807 Jan. 8); a statement of warrants drawn on the Treasury on account of works on the Manufactory of Arms & James River Warehouse (1806 Jan. 8); a statement of warrants to draw on the Contingent Fund from 1 Oct. 1804 to 1 Oct. 1805 (1806 Jan. 30); executions levied on personal property not sold for want of buyers (1806 Feb. 10; 1807 July 13; & 1808 July 8); a temporary leave of absence (1806 June 28); an act to amend the laws respecting executions on behalf of the Commonwealth against sheriffs (1806 July 5); warrants for opening a road from the upper navigation of the James River to the upper navigation of the Kanawha River (1806 Oct. 21); warrants issued on the fund appropriated by an act "for manufacturing arms including officers salaries" (1806 Nov.8); warrants drawn on the funds for completing the Manufactory of Arms & Boring Mill (1806 Nov. 22); certificates for allowances of services of the office of judge advocate (1806 Dec. 30); soldiers of the 10th Virginia Regiment on Continental Establishment who have drawn their balance of full pay (1807 Jan. 21); warrants issued since 30 Sept. 1806 (1807 March 5); a list of expenditures from 1 Oct. 1806 to 31 Jan. 1807 (1807 March 18); sheriffs acting in each district to collect the arrears of taxes from the year 1785 (1807 April 30); unexpended funds of the appropriation for "expenses of removing convicts to the Penitentiary" (1807 June 5); a list of expenditures which have exceeded the appropriation charged on the revenue of 1806 from 1 Oct. 1806 to 4 Jan. 1808 (1808 Jan. 5); a list of counties where collectors of revenue are to be appointed (1808 April 6); vouchers to accompany the account for settlement with the United States (1808 April 13); the account of the Penitentiary from 1 April 1807 to 30 March 1807 (1808 Sept. 10); and a list of warrants issued for the expense of the Public Guard for the security of public property in Richmond (1808 Sept. 23). Additionally, John Carter's letter of resignation as Assistant to the Auditor can also be found within these papers (1806 Sept. 8).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to amendments to the U.S. Constitution and the exchange of laws. Included are letters from the following governors: William C.C. Claiborne, Territory of Orleans; John Milledge, Georgia; Paul Hamilton, South Carolina; Christopher Greenup, Kentucky; Joseph Bloomfield, New Jersey; Nathaniel Mitchell & George Truitt, Delaware; Robert Wright, Maryland; Israel Smith, Vermont; John Trumball, Connecticut; and John Langdon, New Hampshire. William C.C. Claiborne transmits a copy of the laws for the Territory of Orleans (1806 Feb. 7). John Milledge, Georgia, writes to George Jefferson regarding the sale of the negro Bob (1806 March 31). Paul Hamilton, South Carolina, requests information on the expenses, rules of confinement, etc., for the Penitentiary in preparation for the establishment of a similar facility in South Carolina (1806 June 18). Christopher Greenup, Kentucky, encloses a copy of the several resolutions of the Kentucky General Assembly regarding their attachment to the federal government & their confidence in the same (1806 Dec. 22). Governor Greenup also encloses an address by the Kentucky Assembly respecting the turnpike or toll-gate erected in the gap of the Cumberland Mountain (1806 Dec. 27). Joseph Bloomfield, New Jersey, transmits a resolution of the New Jersey General Assembly regarding the proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1807 Jan. 27); responds to the resolution of Virginia proposing an amendment to the U.S. Constitution for the removal of senators (1808 March 3); transmits copies of the acts passed by the New Jersey Assembly (1808 April 23); and acknowledges receipt of Dr. Madison's map of Virginia (1808 April 25). Nathaniel Mitchell, Delaware, encloses a resolution of the Delaware General Assembly approving the amendment to the U.S. Constitution proposed by Kentucky to restrain the judiciary power of the U.S. courts (1807 Feb. 25). Later, Gov. George Truitt transmits a resolution of the Delaware General Assembly disapproving of the amendment proposed by the Vermont General Assembly respecting the dismissal of Federal Judges (1808 Feb. 15) and acknowledges receipt of the map of Virginia & acts of the Virginia Assembly (1808 May 16). On 22 Jan. 1807, Robert Wright transmits a resolution instructing the senators & representatives of Maryland in Congress to prohibit the importation of slaves into the United States from Africa, the West Indies, etc. Israel Smith, Vermont, transmits a resolution of the Vermont General Assembly to procure an amendment to the U.S. Constitution empowering the President to remove any of the U.S. judges by a majority vote of the House & two-thirds of the Senate (1807 Dec. 7). John Trumball, Connecticut transmits resolutions of amendments to the U.S. Constitution in opposition to Virginia's proposed amendment (1808 June 10). Lastly, John Langdon, New Hampshire, transmits a resolution expressing gratification for Virginia in sending a map of the state (1808 June 25).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: the President & Directors of the Dismal Swamp Company reporting on the progress made by the company (1805 Dec. 21); Edmund Randolph re. the case of gunstocks kept by Capt. Potter intended for Capt. Clarke & the Manufactory of Arms (1805 Dec. 30); Thomas Underwood, Superintendent of the Public Warehouse, re. making the roof of the warehouse able to receive flour for storage by providing a hoisting apparatus (1806 Jan. 10); William Fulcher proposing to purchase the condemned negroes in the Penitentiary for transportation beyond the limits of the U.S. (1806 Jan. 31); William McKim to John Clarke re. an estimate for a dome, etc., as a steeple to the Virginia Manufactory of Arms (1806 Feb. 26); William Foushee resigning as a member of the Privy Council (1806 April 11); Edward Carrington, Mayor of Richmond, re. the case of Billy, a negro slave sentenced to death (1806 April 28); Paul Carrington resigning as a judge of the Court of Appeals (1807 Jan. 7); William McKim re. the painting of the cupola of the Manufactory of Arms (1807 Jan. 15); Hugh Phelps re. the treasonable enterprise of Aaron Burr & his associates (1807 Feb. 14); Arthur Campbell encl. a letter from Meriwether Lewis, Capt. of the 1st U.S. Infantry Regt., re. Walker's line between Virginia & North Carolina (1807 Feb. 23); Alexander Spotswood to Edmund Randolph re. manuscript books containing his grandfather's correspondence with the British Ministry (1807 April 20); Henry Lee re. the present militia system (1807 Nov. 23); Thomas Mathews re. the British ships Itruria and Triumph (1808 Jan. 11); Robert Gamble resigning from the Board of Visitors of the Penitentiary (1808 Jan. 23); John Tyler re. the Chancery Courts & the alteration of the district law (1808 Feb. 10); William W. Hening re. the President's recommendation of thirty thousand additional troops and the continuance of the embargo against Great Britain (1808 Feb. 25); William W. Hening re. Virginia's accounts with the War Dept. (1808 Feb. 28 & 1808 March 1); Creed Taylor resigning as a visitor of the Penitentiary (1808 April 29); Henry Foxall, Columbia Furnace, offering to make all the machinery necessary for casting, boring, & turning cannon for the factory in Richmond (1808 April 28); William W. Hening re. Virginia's claims against the United States (1808 April 17, 23, 19, & 27); Samuel G. Adams requesting the use of all the surplus water from the two springs after supplying the Capitol & barracks (1808 June 25); Samuel A. Otis forwarding three copies of the journals of the U.S. Senate (1808 July 2); Henry Blow, William Blow, & Samuel Blunt, Trustees of the Nottoway Tribe of Indians, re. the tribe and including a list of male members, their age, & employments (1808 July 18); Patrick Magruder transmitting copies of the journal of the House of Representatives (1808 Sept. 15); Henry Blow, William Blow, & Samuel Blunt, Trustees of the Nottoway Tribe of Indians, re. the sale of their lands in 1792 or 1793 (1808 Oct. 8); Thomas Mathews enclosing a letter from William Sharp, Lt. Col. of the 54th Regt., re. a suspected insurrection of slaves in Norfolk including depositions (1808 Nov. 18); and Richard Young, surveyor on the public property, enclosing a resolution of the Richmond Common Council re. the names of streets, lanes, & alleys not previously named by the Directors of Public Buildings (1808 Dec. 7).

Other noteworthy items include: bonds of William Moseley as Treasurer (1806 Jan. 1; 1807 Jan. 7; & 1808 Jan. 12); a report of the Committee appointed to enquire into the causes & circumstances attending the breaking of the Penitentiary by the convicts and their escape (1806 Feb. 8); an estimate for building a foundry at the Manufactory of Arms by William McKim & Robert Hyde (1806 Feb. 22); an estimate for building a boring mill at the Manufactory of Arms by William McKim & Robert Hyde (1806 Feb. 22); a list of slaves reprieved for transportation & sold by the Commonwealth (1806 March 8); a bond of William & Robert McKim to build a cupola with a dome roof & belfry for the Virginia Manufactory of Arms (1806 March 10); a report of the Committee appointed to visit the Penitentiary & examine minutely into the manner in which the rules & regulations are carried into effect (1806 April 5); an estimate & drawing of a crane by William Street for the Public Warehouse (1806 May 26); a note & plan by R.B. James for a canal to the Public Warehouse (1806 Sept. 27); proclamations by Governor Cabell & Lt. Gov. Alexander McRae offering a reward for the capture of various criminals (1806 Oct. 14; 1807 April 2; 1808 Jan. 15; 1808 April 30; 1808 July 27; 1808 June 25; 1808 Aug. 5; 1808 Aug. 19; & 1808 Sept. 23); proceedings of the Monthly Visitors of the Penitentiary (1807 April 24; 1807 Oct. 30; 1807 Dec. 30; 1808 Feb. 2; & 1808 July 25); the bond of Abraham Douglas as Keeper of the Penitentiary (1807 May 16); a proclamation of Governor Cabell to hold court for Culpeper County in the Mason's Hall until the courthouse is refurbished (1807 June 20); a general statement showing the cost of articles brought by the agent for manufacture in the Penitentiary (1807 Sept. 1); a report of the Visitors of the Penitentiary regarding the price of nails manufactured there (1807 Oct. 26); bonds of Samuel Pleasants, Jr., as Public Printer (1807 Dec. 9 & 1808 Dec. 10); a list of cavalry officers (1807 Dec. 22); a report of the Committee to examine the quality of the arms in the Manufactory of Arms (1808 Jan. 22); a resolution from Samuel A. Otis, Secretary of the U.S. Senate, for a Committee to inquire into the expediency of amending the act to establish the judicial courts of the U.S. (1808 Feb. 21); a proclamation by Gov. Cabell authorizing the Warwick County Court to be held at the house of Wade Mountfort at Rich Neck until the former can be repaired or rebuilt (1808 Feb. 24); an inventory of articles on hand at the Penitentiary (1808 June 1); a report of the Committee appointed to reprove arms at the Manufactory (1808 July 22); an estimate by Samuel Brooke of the greater & lesser seals for the Chancery Courts including drawings of the state seal (1808 Sept. 2); a pay roll of officers of Virginia Militia & an abstract of expenditures in the Quarter Master's Dept. in the service of the United States (1808 Sept. 11); an account current of the U.S. with Robert C. Jennings acting as Pay Master of the Virginia Militia (1808 Sept. 30); and a report of the Committee on the state of the Register's Office following the death of William Price which provides a list of all the materials in the office such as grant books, plats & certificates, etc. (1808 Oct. 15).

SERIES II: Chesapeake-Leopard Affair Files. This series primarily contains incoming correspondence related to the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair from June and November 1807. In addition to correspondence, there are petitions, proceedings, advice of Council, resolutions, reports, and other sundry items. These files were originally separated to provide a ready-reference to researchers. The documents originate from several chief sources including: Thomas Mathews, Thomas Newton, William Dudley, the Council of State, & miscellaneous sources.

Thomas Mathews, Brigadier General of the Virginia Militia, provides the most correspondence related to the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair. Mathews furnishes regular reports to the Governor respecting the location and movement of the British Squadron in July & August 1807. In addition, Mathews often provides copies of correspondence sent & received by him. Mathews writes the Governor on 23 June 1807 enclosing a copy of his letter to James Madison, Secretary of State, informing him of the confrontation between the Chesapeake and the British warship Leopard off the Capes of Virginia on 22 June. On 26 June, Mathews informs the Governor of the appearance of a British lieutenant in Norfolk delivering dispatches to the British Consul. In his letter of 8 July, Mathews discusses the conditions of Forts Norfolk & Nelson and preparations in the event of a British attack. Mathews encloses his letter to Commodore Douglas transmitting the President's proclamation and a letter from G. Newton who provides an account of his meeting with Douglas in delivering the proclamation (1807 July 13). Mathews estimates the force of the squadron including the number of marines & seamen in his letter dated 15 July. His letter of 17 July forwards his instructions to Capt. Shepard & Capt. Robert B. Taylor to prevent ships from making excursions on shore for supplies. In the same letter, he also encloses a dispatch from Richard E. Lee regarding his meeting with Commodore Douglas. On 28 July, Mathews encloses several letters to and from Maj. Littleton Tazewell regarding instructions in exchanging flags with the British Squadron and Tazewell's meeting with Capt. Humphries on board the Leopard. Similarly, Mathews encloses a copy of his letter to Capt. Thomas Hardy, orders to Maj. Tazewell, and Tazewell's report of the capture of two British officers & three seamen attempting to procure supplies (1807 Aug. 3). In addition, Mathews encloses the report of Capt. Robert Taylor regarding fugitive slaves and Americans on board the British ships (1807 Aug. 7). Particularly interesting is Mathews' letter of 15 Aug. enclosing Capt. Robert Taylor's report containing a list of persons examined on board the Triumph & Columbine as possible America citizens. On 13 Aug., Mathews informs the Governor of the arrival of a new ship flying the flag of a British Vice Admiral, supposedly Admiral George Cranfield Berkley. Lastly, Mathews encloses his letter & general orders to Maj. Thomas Newton regarding instructions to prevent the British Squadron from taking supplies and water from Virginia's shores (1807 Aug. 26).

Other sundry letters from Mathews relate to the following topics: resolutions of the inhabitants of Norfolk & Portsmouth (1807 June 25); resolutions of citizens prohibiting intercourse & supplies with British ships (1807 June 29); the location of the British Squadron and reported threats by the British for a supply of water & provisions (1807 July 3); the escape of slaves who were received by the British ships (1807 July 20); citizens furnishing labor for the erection of batteries at Fort Norfolk and the necessity of erecting works at Craney Island, Washington Point, & intermediate points along the river (1807 July 29); provisions for the British Ship Columbine (1807 Aug. 9, 17, & 22); Americans on board Capt. Hardy's ships (1807 Aug. 10); Commodore Stephen Decatur's gunboats (1807 Aug. 18); and his visit to the posts established at the Pleasure House & Lynhaven Inlet (1807 Aug. 21).

Thomas Newton, Major Commandant at Norfolk, provides daily status reports of the British Squadron within the Capes in September & October 1807. On 31 Aug., Newton writes regarding the detachment of militia under his command and the liberation of the American seamen & a slave on board the British Squadron. Newton also transmits copies of letters from Sir Robert Laurie, Capt. H.M.S. Milan, regarding impressed American seamen and a report by Capt. John Reade & Capt. Tully Robinson (1807 Sept. 4). On 16 Sept., Newton writes concerning the landing of men from one of the British ships and the desertion of five British sailors. His letters of 26 & 29 August relate to the court martial of John Bourke, a private in Capt. Peter Nestle's Company of Artillery, accused of striking an officer. The proceedings on Bourke's court martial are enclosed in Newton's second letter. Newton encloses another letter from Capt. Robert Laurie on 1 Oct. regarding American seamen on board British ships. Lastly, in his latter dated 11 Oct., Newton requests the discharge of men under the command of Capt. Nestle. In this letter, Newton also mentions his leaving command on 15 Oct. Newton also comments on the defenseless situation of this part of the country and recommends the construction of a fort on Craney Island. After Oct. 15, Capt. John Reade, 20th Regt., provided the Governor with status reports on the British Squadron (1807 Oct. 21, 24, & 25). In addition, along with these reports, Reade encloses a report of the state of arms in his detachment (Oct. 21) and writes concerning the arrest of two men in his command (25 Oct.).

William Dudley, Major Commandant at Hampton, too provides significant correspondence respecting the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair. In his letter dated 14 July, Dudley encloses a return of the troops on duty at Hampton & its vicinity. On 18 July, Dudley details the British ship Triumph's boarding of a pilot boat in an attempt to request them to receive & deliver a letter to the British Consul. Major Dudley encloses a letter from Capt. T.M. Hardy, H.M.S. Triumph, regarding dispatches from the Commander in Chief to the Envoy Extraordinary at Washington, along with letters for the Consul at Norfolk, and his orders for Capt. Bradshaw to proceed to Hampton Roads to deliver the dispatches & complete his provisions (1807 Aug. 2).

The Council of State provides regular advice to the Governor respecting the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair. On 25 June, the Council advise the Governor to dispatch an express to the President informing him of the capture of the Chesapeake. The Council also advise the Governor to write the President for the purpose of preventing the troops on board the British Squadron now blockading Norfolk from landing (1807 July 6). Other sundry advice by the Council documents a detachment of militia to march to Norfolk with two companies of infantry from Col. George W. Smith of Richmond & a company of infantry by Maj. James Byrne of Petersburg (1807 July 6) and captured marines & midshipmen belonging to the British Squadron (1807 July 27).

Miscellaneous documents relating to the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair include the following: a request for the advice of the Governor & Council regarding the capture of the Chesapeake (1807 June 23); proceedings of the Ledger Office in Norfolk (1807 June 24); proceedings of citizens of Williamsburg (1807 June 26); proceedings of citizens of Portsmouth (1807 June 27); proceedings of citizens of Hampton (1807 June 28); a letter from James Madison enclosing a proclamation by President Jefferson requiring all armed vessels under the British flag to depart U.S. waters (1807 July 2); a letter from Richard E. Lee, Mayor of Norfolk, enclosing a copy of correspondence between him and J.E. Douglas regarding the resolution of 29 June prohibiting correspondence between the British Consul at Norfolk and the British ships in Lynhaven Bay (1807 July 4); a letter from Littleton W. Tazewell enclosing a copy of his letter to Richard E. Lee regarding his conversation with Commodore Douglas and his general mistrust of their intentions (1807 July 6); a letter from Henry Dearborn, War Dept., regarding measures to organize, arm, & equip one hundred thousand militia (1807 July 6); a letter from R.G. Robb enclosing resolutions of a meeting of citizens of Port Royal (1807 July 9); a letter from Thomson Mason enclosing proceedings of a meeting of citizens of Fairfax County (1807 July 15); a letter from Robert Gamble enclosing a roll of the Silver Greys associated for the purpose of guarding Richmond (1807 July 22); a letter from E.T. Dupont de Nemours & Company, manufacturers of gun powder in Wilmington, Delaware, offering to supply Virginia with cannon & musket powder (1807 July 27); a letter from Governor Christopher Greenup enclosing proceedings of a meeting of citizens of Franklin (1807 July 28); resolutions from a meeting of citizens of Washington County (1807 Aug. 2); a letter from John Clarke regarding the mounting of heavy cannon on carriages to repel the marine force including a drawing of gun placements along a river full of enemy ships (1807 Aug. 2); a letter from Henry Dearborn, War Dept., requesting the Governor to hold all volunteer associations as part of the quota of militia in readiness (1807 Aug. 3); a letter from Henry Dearborn, War Dept., regarding the pay of the militia & camp equipage (1807 Aug. 3); a pay roll of Capt. Edmund C. Goodwin's Company of Light Infantry under Col. John Mayo (1807 Aug. 5); a letter from Thomas Jefferson returning papers received on the 18th (1807 Aug. 21); a letter from Henry Lee regarding the volunteer levy & preparations for war such as guarding seaports at Norfolk & the York River and arming free negroes (1807 Aug. 24); a letter from Samuel Coleman regarding the arming & equipping of the men in the requisition of the Secretary of War (1807 Aug. 27); and a letter from Capt. Peter Nestle transcribing a letter from Henry Dearborn regarding the discharge of the two companies of militia now in service (1807 Nov. 2).

Arrangement

William H. Cabell's Executive papers are organized into two series. Series have been designated for Chronological files and the Chesapeake-Leopard Affair. Each series is arranged chronologically.

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated into Oversized (Clamshell Box) and Oversized (Newspaper Box).


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1799-Dec. 31, 1807, VOL. IX, Richmond: J.H. O'Bannon, Superintendent of Public Printing, 1890. Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1799-Dec. 31, 1807, VOL. IX, Richmond: J.H. O'Bannon, Superintendent of Public Printing, 1890. Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1808-December 31, 1835, VOL. X, Richmond: James E. Goode, Printer, 1892.

Contents List

Series I: Chronological Files
  • 1805
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      December
  • 1806
    • January
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        1-14
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        2-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        18-28
    • March
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        21-31
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 11
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 1
        Folder 12
        1-10
      • Box 1
        Folder 13
        11-30
    • July
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • August
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        16-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      October
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      November
    • December
      • Box 2
        Folder 9
        1-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 10
        22-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      Undated
  • 1807
    • January
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        1-14
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 3
        Folder 5
        2-12
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        1-20
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        22-30
    • May
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 10
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • July
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        16-31
    • August
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        3-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        17-31
    • September
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        21-30
    • October
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        1-20
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        21-31
    • November
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        1-14
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        16-30
    • December
      • Box 5
        Folder 5
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        16-31
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      Undated
  • 1808
    • January
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 9
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 5
        Folder 10
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 11
        16-29
    • March
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        16-23
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        24-30
    • April
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        11-20
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        21-30
    • May
      • Box 6
        Folder 7
        1-14
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        15-30
    • June
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 10
        16-23
      • Box 6
        Folder 11
        24-30
    • July
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        1-8
      • Box 7
        Folder 2
        9-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        21-27
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        28-31
    • August
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        1-5
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        6-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 7
        Folder 8
        1-10
      • Box 7
        Folder 9
        11-20
      • Box 7
        Folder 10
        22-30
    • October
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 8
        Folder 3
        21-31
      • Box 8
        Folder 4
        Pardons - Gillespie, Thomas
    • November
      • Box 8
        Folder 5
        1-10
      • Box 8
        Folder 6
        11-20
      • Box 8
        Folder 7
        21-30
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      December
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      Undated
  • Box 8
    Folder 10
    Undated
Series II: Chesapeake-Leopard Affair
  • 1807
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      June
    • July
      • Box 9
        Folder 2
        1-7
      • Box 9
        Folder 3
        8-10
      • Box 9
        Folder 4
        11-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 5
        16-19
      • Box 9
        Folder 6
        20-22
      • Box 9
        Folder 7
        23-28
      • Box 9
        Folder 8
        29-31
    • August
      • Box 9
        Folder 9
        1-6
      • Box 9
        Folder 10
        7-15
      • Box 9
        Folder 11
        17-31
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      September
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      October
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      November
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1805
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Dec. 21
  • 1806
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      Jan. 4
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      Jan. 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      March 10
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      March 29
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      April 18
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      May 6
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      June 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      June 23
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      Aug. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Sept. 13
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Sept. 27
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Oct. 23
    • Box 10
      Folder 14
      Undated
  • 1807
    • Box 10
      Folder 15
      Jan. 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 16
      Jan. 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 17
      Jan. 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 18
      March 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 19
      March 19
    • Box 10
      Folder 20
      March 26
    • Box 10
      Folder 21
      March 31
    • Box 10
      Folder 22
      April 16
    • Box 10
      Folder 23
      June 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 24
      July 25
    • Box 10
      Folder 25
      Aug. 7
    • Box 10
      Folder 26
      Sept. 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 27
      Dec. [N.D.]
  • 1808
    • Box 10
      Folder 28
      Jan. 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 29
      Feb. 15
    • Box 10
      Folder 30
      March 19
    • Box 10
      Folder 31
      March 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 32
      June 2
    • Box 10
      Folder 33
      June 4
    • Box 10
      Folder 34
      June 25
    • Box 10
      Folder 35
      July 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 36
      July 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 37
      Aug. 14
    • Box 10
      Folder 38
      Aug. 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 39
      Oct. - Pardons - Gillespie, Thomas
  • Chesapeake-Leopard Affair, 1807
    • Box 10
      Folder 40
      June 24
    • Box 10
      Folder 41
      June 25
    • Box 10
      Folder 42
      July 10
    • Box 10
      Folder 43
      July 15
    • Box 10
      Folder 44
      Aug. 2
    • Box 10
      Folder 45
      Aug. 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 46
      Aug. 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 47
      Aug. 31
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1806
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      March 8
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      Aug. 30
  • 1807
    • Box 11
      Folder 3
      April 30
  • 1808
    • Box 11
      Folder 4
      Jan. 5
    • Box 11
      Folder 5
      Jan. 20
    • Box 11
      Folder 6
      April 25
    • Box 11
      Folder 7
      Sept. 11
    • Box 11
      Folder 8
      Sept. 30
  • Chesapeake-Leopard Affair, 1807
    • Box 11
      Folder 9
      July 2
    • Box 11
      Folder 10
      July 4