A Guide to the Governor John Page Executive Papers, 1802-1805 Page, John, Executive Papers of Governor, 1802-1805 41056

A Guide to the Governor John Page Executive Papers, 1802-1805

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 41056


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© 2004 By the Library of Virginia. All rights reserved.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
41056
Title
Governor John Page Executive Papers, 1802-1805
Physical Characteristics
3.43 cubic feet
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

Collection is open to research.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. John Page Executive Papers, 1802-1805. Accession 41056, State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 5950-5959


Biographical Information

John Page was born at "Rosewell" plantation in Gloucester County to Mann Page II and Alice Grymes Page on 17 April 1743. A graduate of the College of William and Mary in 1763, Page represented Gloucester County from 1766 to 1768 and the college from 1771 to 1774 in the House of Burgesses. Page was appointed to the Council of State in 1774 by Governor John Murray, earl of Dunmore. During the Revolutionary War, Page served as vice president of the Committee of Safety under Edmund Pendleton from 1775 to 1776 and as president of the Council of State from 1776 to 1780. In this capacity, Page acted as lieutenant governor under Governor Patrick Henry, and later Thomas Jefferson. Page resigned from the Council on 7 April 1780 and fought as a militia officer in 1781 during the Yorktown campaign. Between 1781 and 1787, Page represented Gloucester County in the House of Delegates, excluding the session of 1784-1785 in which he served on the commission to determine the boundary between Virginia and Pennsylvania. Page was elected to the first four Congresses between 1789 and 1797. He returned to the House of Delegates from 1797-1798 and 1800-1801. Page succeeded James Monroe as governor, having been elected to three successive one-year terms from 1802 to 1805. His last public position was as U. S. Commissioner of Loans. Page fathered twelve children with his first wife Frances Burwell, whom he married in 1765, and eight children with his second wife Margaret Lowther, whom he married in 1789. He died on 11 October 1808 and was interred at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia.

Scope and Content

John Page's Executive papers are organized chronologically with undated items arranged at the end of each year. These papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during Page's three one-year terms as governor between 24 December 1802 and 11 December 1805. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; the Manufactory of Arms; the Virginia Penitentiary; the U. S. Constitution; the Public Guard; militia; public improvements; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; quarantine of vessels; elections; Presidential electors; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; opinions; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include President Thomas Jefferson; James Madison, Secretary of State; Henry Dearborn, Secretary of War; and Virginia's delegates in Congress. President Thomas Jefferson writes Governor Page in February 1803 regarding the militia system adopted by the National Legislature and requests a return of the Virginia's militia. On 15 April 1804, the President communicates on the subject of counterfeiting and the circulation of forged notes of the branch banks of the United States. A letter dated 10 November 1804, remarks on the affidavit of David Greenlaw and claims against the U.S. Treasury on the prosecution of the counterfeiter Thomas Logwood. Jefferson also responds to the Governor's correspondence concerning an asylum for free negroes and mulattoes (1804 Dec. 27). The President discusses suggested sites including St. Domingo, Sierra Leone, and beyond the Mississippi River. Lastly, President Jefferson writes regarding the delivery of a fugitive at Fort McHenry (1805 Dec. 9).

James Madison, Secretary of State, informs the governor of a model left at the Custom House in Philadelphia addressed to Governor Monroe (1803 March 26). A circular letter from Madison, dated 24 Sept. 1804, relates to the ratification of the 12th Amendment to the U. S. Constitution respecting the manner of voting for President & Vice President.

As Secretary of War, Henry Dearborn, writes the Governor regarding Virginia's claim against the United States for militia services in guarding U.S. military stores during the late insurrection (1803 June 13). Dearborn also submits a circular letter on the subject of an armed force agreeable to the act of Congress "for the more effectual preservation of peace in U. S. ports & harbors." Dearborn's letter includes circulars from James Madison regarding directions from the President to the Marshal of the District of Virginia and a circular to the Marshal transmitting a copy of the act of Congress (1805 June 19).

Correspondence from Virginia's delegates in Congress include: John Taylor accepting his appointment as United States senator in place of Stevens Thomson Mason who died in office (1803 June 10); William C. Nicholas resigning as U. S. senator to accept the post from the President as Collector of Norfolk (1804 May 22); Abraham B. Venable resigning his position in the U. S. Senate (1804 July 5); William B. Giles accepting his appointment to the U. S. Senate (1804 August 27); Andrew Moore accepting his appointment to the U. S. Senate (1804 September 20); & Giles accepting his appointment to the U. S. Senate (1804 Dec. 29). Giles & Moore write the Governor on 28 November 1804 regarding Virginia's claims against the United States and their terms in office. Finally, Giles & Moore write regarding compensation for Samuel Brooks (1804 Dec. 29).

The majority of correspondence in John Page's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include John Clarke, Superintendent of Public Buildings; Martin Mims, Keeper of the Penitentiary; Alexander Quarrier, Captain of the Public Guard; Daniel L. Hylton, Clerk of the Council; Samuel Coleman, Assistant Clerk of the Council of State; Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General; James Pleasants, Jr., Clerk of the House of Delegates; Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate; Thomas Newton, Superintendent of Quarantine for Norfolk; and Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts.

John Clarke, as Superintendent of the Public Buildings, corresponded frequently with the Governor, especially with respect to the Manufactory of Arms. Included are correspondence related to the following subjects: the purchase of files and other articles in Philadelphia (1803 Jan. 15 & June 25); rations for artificers, the status of the east wing of the Manufactory, & the necessity of calling Daniel Atherton, Master Armorer, into service (1803 Feb. 19); sheet iron for mounting muskets (1803 March 19); a fire engine & buckets for the building and arms for the artificers to aid the militia in suppressing insurrections (1803 April 27); written contracts with artificers (1803 April 29 & June 11); stamping arms made at Wheeler's Manufactory (1803 May 4 & 21); a state of the contracts for the erection of the Manufactory & Penitentiary (1803 May 13); payment to artificers & constructing a new bridge to the Manufactory (1803 May 14); muskets finished since the Manufactory was put into operation (1803 Oct. 13 & 1804 Sept. 22); the failure of the General Assembly to make appropriation for the completion of the Manufactory, Public Warehouse, & Penitentiary (1803 Oct. 15); the inspection of arms stored in the roof of the Capitol (1803 Dec. 13); procuring musket stocks from U. S. military stores (1804 Jan. 4); receipts from a warrant to furnish gunstocks for the use of the Armory (1804 Jan. 9); the commencement of arms manufacture in the east wing of the Manufactory and the need for additional artificers (1804 Jan. 19); an estimate of the expense of making arms & to complete the public buildings (1804 Jan. 24); rations for artificers (1804 Feb. 2); additional workmen, the suspension of work in the cannon foundry, & private work by the artificers (1804 Feb. 18); the removal of the old smith shops at the Penitentiary to the Manufactory (1804 Feb. 18); expenses in completing the steeple for the Manufactory (1804 March 3); the manufacture of cavalry swords & scabbards (1804 March 31); proposals for the erection of a house for ordnance & acquiring holsters, sword belts, & bar iron from Philadelphia (1804 April 13); the proposal by John Tinsley for making holsters & sword belts (1804 April 14); ordnance belonging to the Commonwealth scattered throughout the state (1804 June 8 & Sept. 7); fuel for the workmen at the Manufactory for cooking, etc. (1804 July 6); the examination of pistol holders & sword belts delivered by Capt. John Tinsley (1804 July 14); an increase in the number of artificers, a statement of the progress in making arms from 1 December 1803 to 1 December 1804, expenses, & apprentices (1804 Dec. 25); and the contract of Micajah Davis to deliver arms from New York (1805 Jan. 10).

Clarke also continued to correspond with regard to the Penitentiary. On 4 June 1803, Clarke remarks on the agreement by Anderson Barret to furnish the requisite material to build a wooden enclosure for the Penitentiary. He writes again on 23 July 1803 regarding payment to Barret. Clarke also writes concerning the removal of the old smith shop in the Penitentiary for a barracks for the guard (1804 Aug. 25). Lastly, in a letter dated 15 January 1805, Clarke requests that holsters, sword belts, & cartridge boxes be made by convicts in the Penitentiary.

Finally, Clarke writes the Governor concerning the completion of the Public Tobacco Warehouse on the James River Canal in Richmond. Clarke writes regarding timber, framing, etc., for the warehouse (1803 Feb. 15 & March 11); rubbish removal (1803m June 18); proposals for slating the roof (1803 Aug. 20); payment to Peter Guerrant for erecting the frame & furnishing timber (1803 Sept. 10); a report of damaged tobacco (1804 July 27); complaints about the warehouse being unsafe for the deposit of tobacco (1805 Jan. 10); and claims for materials, work, etc. including iron work, slating, & insurance (1805 Jan. 11). On 26 March 1804, Clarke writes the Governor that he was informed by Thomas Underwood & William Price, the Superintendents of the Warehouse, that the warehouse is ready to receive tobacco.

Martin Mims, Keeper of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Page regarding numerous subjects related to prisoners and the Penitentiary. Included in these papers are list of balances (1803 Jan. 6 & 1804 Dec. 10); receipts for criminals (1803 Jan. 11, March 23 & 25); and statements of public arms distributed to the militia (1803 June 9 & Dec. 2, 1804 Jan. 10, 1805 May 18). On 13 January 1803, Mims requests a copy of the report by the Inspectors of the Penitentiary regarding his conduct as Keeper. Shortly thereafter, Mims again writes regarding the charges of official misconduct against him by the Inspectors of the Penitentiary (1803 Jan. 26). In addition, Mims writes regarding the escape of three convicts (1803 April 20); the account of Anderson Stile for a quarter salary as his assistant (1803 April 30); the indictment against James Thomas for horse stealing (1803 Sept. 10); expenses for conveying a prisoner to the Suffolk District Court (1804 Jan. 22); an appropriation for Anderson Stile & John Tucker as assistants (1804 Jan. 23); the escape of three slaves from the Penitentiary (1804 Jan. 30); arms to the 30th Regiment Virginia Militia (1804 Feb. 12); the escape of three prisoners from the Penitentiary (1804 March 30); the removal of two blacksmith shops from the interior of the Penitentiary to be used as barracks for the Public Guard (1804 May 26); the appointment of Harrison Gordon as clerk of the Penitentiary in place of William Dabney (1804 Aug. 11); a description of J. P. Jones, a prisoner at the Penitentiary (1804 Oct. 26); additional guard for the Penitentiary (1805 Aug. 24); Syrus, a runaway slave from Maryland (1805 Nov. 16); and an annual account of prisoners in the Penitentiary (1805 Nov. 30).

Alexander Quarrier, Captain of the Public Guard, provides periodic returns of arms & accoutrements in the Arsenal at the Capitol (1804 Dec. 9 & 1805 May 18). Quarrier writes regarding the state of military stores in Richmond (1803 May 28). On 19 April 1804, Quarrier writes respecting his report on the sentinels posted at the Penitentiary when prisoners escaped. Quarrier also submits a return of the strength of the Public Guard on 7 September 1805. In addition, there are applications & recommendations to the office of ensign of the Public Guard (1804 May).

Daniel L. Hylton & Samuel Coleman, as Clerk & Assistant Clerk of the Council, communicate with the Governor regularly through the Council Office. Within these papers are extracts from Council minutes with advice of the Council on such topics as a guard from the 19th Regiment to prevent the escape of Thomas Logwood (1804 May 30); the arrangement of the militia (1804 June 30); Martin Mims' account for services rendered to the Commonwealth in the reception, care, & distribution of public arms (1805 Jan. 25); and the appointment of Dr. John Brockenbrough as commissioner to lay off & establish the boundaries of the city of Richmond (1805 Feb. 23). Hylton administered certificates of oath to several state officials including John Page as Governor and George Hay as a member of the Privy Council (1802 Dec. 24); Philip Grymes as a member of the Privy Council (1803 May 30); William Brockenbrough as a member of the Privy Council (1803 June 3); Mann Page as District Judge for the High Court of Chancery at Williamsburg (1803 June 15); John Page as Governor (1803 Dec. 20); and Lyne Shackleford as Privy Councilor (1804 Feb. 4). Additionally, Hylton administered an affidavit from David Greenlaw which served as critical evidence against counterfeiters in North Carolina (1804 Nov. 1). Samuel Coleman writes requesting powder for the artillery to celebrate the anniversary of independence (1803 June 24 & 1804 June 30); the apportionment of arms to the militia (1803 Oct. 14); and the arrangement of artillery into regiments & battalions and the cavalry into regiments & squadrons (1804 March 30). Coleman writes to the Superintendent of Quarantine at Port Royal enclosing a proclamation by the Governor for quarantine of vessels from New York, the West Indies, and other places (1803 Aug. 23). Lastly, on 1 November 1804, Coleman encloses a report of the Inspectors of the Penitentiary regarding the case of Thomas Merryman, the salary of assistants to the Keeper, & the number of inmates confined in the Penitentiary. Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General, writes regarding numerous subjects including: William Bell, a supposed fugitive from justice (1803 Jan. 12); the suit of Martin's heirs against the Commonwealth (1803 Feb. 15); compensation for the services of Mr. Irving, the American Consul at London (1804 April 12); a slave condemned for murder whose time of execution passed because of the death of the high sheriff (1804 May 30); the road leading from the state road to the mouth of the Little Kanawha (1804 Oct. 10); memorials of Phillip Moody & Leighton Wood for compensation as officers attending court martial (1805 Feb. 25); the case against Moses & Stephen Austin (1805 June 7); and the suit brought by Robert Bristoe to recover a tract of land in Prince William County now in possession of the Commonwealth (1805 Oct. 30). In his letter, dated 4 April 1804, Nicholas encloses contracts with William Anderson & William Minton regarding the rent of public land in Buckingham. In addition, the Attorney General provides opinions on the act related to the salary of the Public Printer (1803 March 5); Martin's lands escheated to the Commonwealth (1803 March 29); John Woodward, appointed to purchase & dispose of the lands of William Hutchison in Greenbrier County (1803 Oct. 11); and depredations on public lands at Point Comfort (1804 April 12). Lastly, Nicholas encloses a deed confirming the transfer of land at New Point Comfort for the purpose of building a lighthouse (1804 Oct. 20).

James Pleasants, Jr., Clerk of the House of Delegates, and Theodosius Hansford, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation and qualifications of election to the Governor. Pleasants encloses an act of the General Assembly to amend the penal laws of the Commonwealth (1803 Dec. 5); a resolution regarding the amount of money expended in filling up the gully between the Capitol & Governor's House (1804 Jan. 18); a resolution regarding an estimate of all the sums necessary to cover expenditures arising from the laws (1805 Jan. 8); and a resolution regarding the amount for which condemned transported slaves have been sold (1805 Jan. 5). Hansford encloses a resolution regarding the election of Abraham B. Venable as U. S. Senator in the room of Stevens Thomson Mason (1803 Dec. 7); the qualification of Hugh Holmes as judge of the General Court in the place of Joseph Jones (1805 Dec. 6); and the notification of the election of William H. Cabell as governor (1805 Dec. 7). There are also extracts from the Senate & House journals regarding the appointments of Andrew Moore & William B. Giles to the U. S. Senate (1804 Dec. 4).

Thomas Newton, Jr., Superintendent of Quarantine for Norfolk Borough, frequently writes the Governor. Most of Newton's correspondence relates to infectious diseases & the quarantine of vessels (1803 Aug. 19, 1803 Sept. 9, 14, 17, & 19, 1803 Oct. 11 & 26). Newton sometimes encloses returns of vessels examined by J. K. Read , Port Physician at Norfolk (1803 Oct. 15 & Nov. 10). In a letter dated 3 April 1803, Newton encloses a copy of a letter George W. Ewing, American Consulate Office in London, regarding the ship Mary carrying Americans discharged from the British Navy. In another letter, he encloses the report of J. K. Read, Port Physician, respecting the health of the passengers on board the ship Mary (1803 April 6). On 14 April 1803, Newton remarks on the lands taken up by Governor Henry at Cape Henry. In a letter from 21 September 1803, Newton encloses the deposition of Benjamin White regarding impressments by British officers in Norfolk. Newton also informs the Governor of depredations committed by fishermen on public land adjoining Point Comfort (1804 June 23). On 6 July 1804, Newton submitted his letter of resignation as Superintendent of Quarantine. Subsequent correspondence from Newton relates to George Foley & Joseph Morel, fugitives from justice (1804 Oct. 22, 1805 April 11, & 1805 May 20); David Greenlaw & counterfeiters in North Carolina (1804 Oct. 19 & 27); and the illegal conduct of free negroes in Norfolk & Isle of Wight (1805 Feb. 14). Newton also served as President of the Dismal Swamp Canal Company and encloses a report of the President & Board of Directors in his letter dated 16 November 1804. Lastly, Newton comments on the necessity of appointing a quarantine officer at Norfolk. He recommends merging the positions of quarantine officers & port physician (1805 June 4).

Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts, corresponds often with Governor Page regarding various financial matters. Shepard regularly encloses accounts of expenses for forwarding notices, executions, etc. (1803 April 30, 1803 July 1, 1803 Sept. 10, 1803 Nov. 4, 1804 April 13, 1804 Sept. 8, 1805 Feb. 9, 1805 April 20, & 1805 Nov. 29). Shepard also writes regarding accounts from the Secretary of War (1803 Aug. 24); executions returned on land & tenements for want of bidders (1804 June 30 & 1805 June 28); warrants issued on the Contingent Fund (1804 Sept. 7 & 1805 Oct. 5); shares in the Appomattox Canal Company (1804 Dec. 14); warrants issued for an additional subscription to the Appomattox Canal Company (1804 Dec. 15); a statement of warrants from 1 October 1804 to the present (1805 May 18); and official statements of the taxes for the year 1804 (1805 Nov. 30). Finally, on 2 February 1804, Shepard writes regarding charges against him of official misconduct.

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to extraditions and the exchange of laws. Included are letters from the following governors: Thomas McKean, Governor of Pennsylvania; James Turner, Governor of North Carolina, James B. Richardson & Paul Hamilton, Governors of South Carolina; Caleb Strong, Governor of Massachusetts; William Henry Harrison, Governor of the Indiana Territory; Edward Tifflin, Governor of Ohio; Cato West, Acting Governor of the Mississippi Territory; Robert Bowie, Governor of Maryland; & John Milledge, Governor of Georgia. Thomas McKean writes regarding his demand for John Dolan, a fugitive who fled to Norfolk (1803 Jan. 4) and the apprehension of George McDougall & Elizabeth Becom (1804 Feb. 1). In addition, Governor McKean encloses a resolution approving an amendment to the U. S. Constitution proposed by Kentucky to confine the judiciary power of the U. S. Courts to cases in law & equity, etc. (1805 April 5). Lastly, McKean encloses an act of the Pennsylvania Legislature to improve the navigation of the Ohio River (1805 April 5). James Turner writes demanding fugitives from justice Edmund Martin (1804 Feb. 23) and Willis Watkins (1804 April 14). On 8 January 1805, Turner encloses a letter from James Doyle & David Dickey regarding the Civil Volunteer Society to detect and bring to justice all violators of the laws. James B. Richardson writes regarding the establishment of a Penitentiary House in South Carolina and requests information including expenses & laws defining the punishment of crimes (1804 June 10). Richardson also writes regarding the crimes of George Foley & Joseph Morel in the murder of Lewis L'Orient in Norfolk (1804 Nov. 28). Richardson's successor, Paul Hamilton, writes of the arrest of George Foley (1805 March 28) and the debt due Mr. Winn by Foley who was delivered up to Virginia (1805 June 27). In his letter to the Governor, Caleb Strong encloses a resolution regarding an amendment to the U. S. Constitution to apportion the representatives among the several states according to the number of free inhabitants (1804 June 22). Later, Governor Strong transmits a resolution approving an amendment to the U. S. Constitution to prevent the further importation of slaves to the United States (1805 Feb. 15). William Henry Harrison writes regarding the delivery of Obediah Williams, a fugitive from justice (1805 Feb. 23). Edward Tiffin writes regarding the capture of George Fridley who escaped from the District Jail of Staunton (1805 Feb. 18). Tiffin also transmits a copy of the revised laws of the state of Ohio (1805 Oct. 10). Cato West, Secretary of the Mississippi Territory, encloses a memorial & law establishing a hospital in the city of Natchez (1805 March 26). Lastly, Robert Bowie encloses a letter from Walter Dorsey, Chief Justice of the Baltimore County Criminal Court, regarding Obediah Williams, alias John W. Thompson, who is confined in a Baltimore County Jail (1805 May 29). John Milledge writes regarding the purchase of a negro named Bob, alias Bob Tucker (1805 July 29).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: William Dabney, Board of Inspectors of the Penitentiary, re. vacancies from the resignations of George Hay & Major Scott (1803 Jan. 13); John Page to Lt. Governor John Guerrant re. his absence (1803 Jan. 31, 1805 Aug. 19, & 1805 Oct. 16); John Tyler resigning as judge of the Court of Chancery in Williamsburg (1803 May 25); William Nelson., Jr., resigning as judge of the Court of Chancery in Williamsburg (1803 May 25 & June 1); Francis & Alexander Tubeuf re. payment to the colony of their deceased father Francis Peter de Tubeuf (1803 May 31); Mann Page re. his commission as chancellor for the Williamsburg District (1803 June 14); J. A. Chevallie, Agent for the representatives of the late Caron de Beaumarchais, re. the decree from the Court of Appeals against the State of Virginia (1803 Oct. 8); James Lownes, Micajah Davis, Thomas Ladd, & Thomas Elliott resigning as Inspectors of the Penitentiary (1803 Oct. 12); Anderson Barret re. an estimate of a house to keep the cannon (1803 Oct. 14); James Monroe, Minister to England, re. land disputes in Virginia with British subjects (1803 Nov. 29); Robert Mitchell resigning as Inspector of the Penitentiary (1804 Feb. 24); John Dixon soliciting appointment as Public Printer in the room of Meriwether Jones (1804 March 29); Samuel Pleasants, Jr., re. his appointment as Public Printer (1804 April 4); James Greenhow re. quarters for the Public Guard (1804 April 14); Edmund Randolph re. a case under his care (1804 May 12); Harry Toulmin, Secretary of State for Kentucky, re. counterfeiters (1804 May 14); Edmund Randolph re. the trial of Thomas Logwood in the U. S. Circuit Court (1804 May 24); Governor Page to the Council re. the case of Thomas Logwood (1804 May 28); John Marshall re. his opinion to guard Logwood who was convicted of a felony (1804 May 31); Edmund Randolph re. Thomas Logwood's case (1804 June 7); William Prentis, Mayor of Petersburg, re. the discovery of forged bank notes (1804 June 8); John Beckley, Clerk of the U. S. House of Representatives, transmitting copies of the journal (1804 June 11 & 1805 May 17); John Robinson re. the closing of the doors of the Capitol after hours (1804 Aug. 11); James Greenhow re. an infirmary for the Public Guard (1804 Aug. 25); John P. Shields enclosing a presentment of the Richmond District Grand Jury against Alexander Quarrier for erecting a necessary on Capitol Square near the spring leading to his house (1804 Sept. 25); Jacob Wagner, Chief Clerk of the Dept. of State, forwarding copies of the laws of the U. S., 2nd Session, 7th Congress (1804 Oct. 5); Governor Page to the President re. the Sierra Leone Company and permission to use their lands as an asylum or to use land in Louisiana for the removal of some 19,000 free negroes & mulattoes (1804 Oct. 29); Governor Page to the Governor of Kentucky re. the affidavit of David Greenlaw charging Joseph Morel & George Foley with the murder of Lewis L'Orient (1804 Nov. 5); Benjamin Woods, Deputy Attorney for the North Carolina District, re. David Greenlaw's affidavit (1804 Nov. 23); Benjamin Day, Mayor of Fredericksburg, re. suppressing the practice of gaming (1804 Dec. 13); Monsieur Oster enclosing the recognition of James Madison by President Jefferson of his official character as Sub Commissary of Commercial Relations for the Port of Norfolk (1804 Dec. 18); Robert Mitchell, Mayor of Richmond, re. unlawful gaming within the city & a fine for firing "Christmas guns" (1804 Dec. 25); J. Saunders, Capt. U. S. Artillery enclosing a return of ordnance & military stores at Fort Nelson & Norfolk and a monthly return of his company of artillerists (1805 June 30); William McKim re. an estimate for building the steeple at the Manufactory of Arms (1805 Aug. 22); George Goosley re. the sale of convicted slaves confined in the Penitentiary (1805 Aug. 23 & 24); P. D. Robert enclosing an extract of the memorials to the commissioners appointed for examining claims to lands in the Indiana Territory District of Kaskaskias (1805 Sept. 8); and Creed Taylor accepting his appointment as judge of the General Court to replace Joseph Jones (1805 Nov. 6).

Other noteworthy items include: a proclamation by Governor Page for the capture of George Case (1803 Jan. 7); bonds of William Moseley as Treasurer (1803 Jan. 13, 1804 Jan. 25, & 1805 Jan. 15); a memorandum of clothing to be furnished to the Public Guard by Thomas Underwood (1803 Jan. 13); a receipt from John Miles of 100 stand of arms delivered to John Shee in Philadelphia (1803 Jan. 28); a report of the committee appointed in relation to the President's message regarding the militia (1803 Feb. 7); a report of the commissioners for laying Richmond into wards (1803 Feb. 23); a bill of lading for arms shipped from Philadelphia by John Shee (1803 March 11 & 21); proceedings of the Board of Inspectors of the Penitentiary regarding the conduct of Martin Mims as Keeper (1803 March 3); proceedings of the Board of Inspectors regarding the Keeper's accounts (1803 March 25); a petition of the convicts in the Penitentiary asking for an allowance of chewing tobacco (1803 April 30); a proclamation by Lt. Governor John Guerrant regarding the capture of three escaped convicts (1803 April 30); advice of the Inspectors of the Penitentiary regarding Rule #15 and their temporary orders (1803 June 11); the commission of Mann Page as judge of the High Court of Chancery at Williamsburg (1803 June 11); a proclamation by Governor Page for a reward for the capture of Lewis McWane & John Boyd who escaped from the District Jail of Charlottesville (1803 Aug. 6); a report of vessels subject to quarantine by J. K. Read, Port Physician at Norfolk (1803 Sept. 23); a list of persons permitted by the Richmond District Court to qualify as citizens (1803 Oct. 1); a report by the commissioners on the status of the Treasury (1803 Oct. 3); a commission of Thomas Underwood as Superintendent of Public Tobacco Warehouse in Richmond (1803 Oct. 15); a proclamation by Governor Page revoking his previous proclamation to perform quarantine on vessels from New York & the West Indies (1803 Oct. 29); a bond of William Price as Superintendent of Public Tobacco Warehouse in Richmond (1803 Dec. 26); an oath of John Heath as Privy Councilor (1803 Dec. 30); a bond of Thomas Underwood as Superintendent of Public Tobacco Warehouse in Richmond (1804 Jan. 2); a proclamation by Governor Page for the apprehension of William Christe charged with murder (1804 Jan. 13); minutes of the committee appointed to examine into the cause of the escape of the prisoners from the Penitentiary (1804 March 31); a proclamation by Governor Page for the apprehension of Israel Wilkinson who escaped from the District Jail at Staunton (1804 March 31); a proclamation by Governor Page for the apprehension of Joseph Caldwell, Robert Peirson, & Cullen Demmory who escaped from the Penitentiary (1804 March 31); a proclamation by Governor Page for the capture of David Bowman who escaped from the sheriff of Hardy County (1804 May 30); a bond of Samuel Pointer for furnishing rations to the Public Guard (1805 March 26); a proclamation of Governor Page for a reward for the capture George Dilliard (1805 June 5); a return of the Richmond Republic Blues by Capt. George William Smith (1805 June 8); a proclamation for a reward for the capture of Joseph & John Thruston (1805 June 19); a proclamation of Lt. Governor John Guerrant regarding the quarantine of vessels from New York, Philadelphia, & the West Indies (1805 Sept. 21); a contract of William McKim for erecting the steeple of the Manufactory of Arms (1805 Nov. 2); a proclamation by Governor Page for a reward for the capture of David Phenix (1805 Nov. 2); and the bond of Samuel Pleasants, Jr., as Public Printer (1805 Dec. 6).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with undated items arranged to the rear.

Related Material

Separated Material

Oversized materials have been separated into Oversized (Clamshell Box) and Oversized (Newspaper Box).


Adjunct Descriptive Data

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1799-Dec. 31, 1807, VOL. IX, Richmond: J.H. O'Bannon, Superintendent of Public Printing, 1890.

Bibliography

Flournoy, H. W., CALENDAR OF VIRGINIA STATE PAPERS, January 1, 1799-Dec. 31, 1807, VOL. IX, Richmond: J.H. O'Bannon, Superintendent of Public Printing, 1890.

Contents List

John Page Executive Papers
1802
  • December
1803
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      1-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      18-31
  • Box 1
    Folder 4
    February
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      2-21
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      22-29
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      3-15
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      16-30
  • Box 1
    Folder 9
    May
  • June
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      1-14
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      16-30
  • July
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      1-14
    • Box 1
      Folder 13
      17-30
  • Box 1
    Folder 14
    August
  • Box 1
    Folder 15
    September
  • Box 2
    Folder 1
    October
  • Box 2
    Folder 2
    November
  • Box 2
    Folder 3
    December
  • Box 2
    Folder 4
    Undated
  • Pardons
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      A-I
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      J-T
1804
  • January
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      2-13
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      16-31
  • Box 2
    Folder 9
    February
  • March
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      1-23
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      16-31
  • April
    • Box 2
      Folder 12
      2-15
    • Box 2
      Folder 13
      16-28
  • May
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      2-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      11-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      21-31
  • June
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      11-25
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      21-31
  • July
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      2-14
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      20-31
  • August
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      3-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      16-24
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      25-31
  • September
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 13
      16-30
  • October
    • Box 3
      Folder 14
      1-13
    • Box 3
      Folder 15
      19-30
  • November
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      16-29
  • December
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      17-29
  • Box 4
    Folder 5
    Undated
1805
  • January
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      1-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      16-26
  • February
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      4-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      16-26
  • March
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      4-14
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      16-28
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      3-15
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      16-30
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 14
      1-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 15
      21-31
  • June
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      16-30
  • August
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      17-31
  • September
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      1-15
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      16-28
  • October
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      1-14
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      16-30
  • November
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      2-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      16-30
  • Box 6
    Folder 3
    December
  • Box 6
    Folder 4
    Undated
Box 6
Folder 5
Undated
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1803
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      Jan. 1
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      Jan. 6
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      Jan. 26
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      Feb. 19
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      April 27
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      April 29
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      May 4
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      May 13
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      Aug. 20
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      Oct. 8
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      Oct. 15
    • Box 7
      Folder 12
      Oct. 15
    • Box 7
      Folder 13
      Nov. 4
    • Box 7
      Folder 14
      Dec. 1
    • Box 7
      Folder 15
      Dec. 13
    • Box 7
      Folder 16
      Undated
    • Box 7
      Folder 17
      Pardons - Bill (Slave)
  • 1804
    • Box 7
      Folder 18
      Jan. 2
    • Box 7
      Folder 19
      Jan. 24
    • Box 7
      Folder 20
      Feb. 18
    • Box 7
      Folder 21
      Feb. 23
    • Box 7
      Folder 22
      March 5
    • Box 7
      Folder 23
      March 30
    • Box 7
      Folder 24
      April 4
    • Box 7
      Folder 25
      April 14
    • Box 7
      Folder 26
      May 22
    • Box 7
      Folder 27
      June 10
    • Box 7
      Folder 28
      June 30
    • Box 7
      Folder 29
      July 27
    • Box 7
      Folder 30
      Sept. 7
    • Box 7
      Folder 31
      Sept. 7
    • Box 7
      Folder 32
      Sept. 11
    • Box 7
      Folder 33
      Sept. 22
    • Box 7
      Folder 34
      Sept. 23
    • Box 7
      Folder 35
      Dec. 1
    • Box 7
      Folder 36
      Dec. 17
  • 1805
    • Box 7
      Folder 37
      Jan. 26
    • Box 7
      Folder 38
      March 14
    • Box 7
      Folder 39
      April 5
    • Box 7
      Folder 40
      May 18
    • Box 7
      Folder 41
      May 18
    • Box 7
      Folder 42
      Nov. 28
    • Box 7
      Folder 43
      Nov. 29
    • Box 7
      Folder 44
      Nov. 30
    • Box 7
      Folder 45
      Nov. [N.D.]
  • Box 7
    Folder 46
    Undated
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1803
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      Jan. 4
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      April 30
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      Nov. 10
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      Pardons - Bob (Slave)
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      Pardons - Lewis (Slave)
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      Pardons - Holloway, Anderson
  • 1804
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      June 22
  • 1805
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      March 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      May 5
    • Box 8
      Folder 10
      June 30