A Guide to the Governor James Monroe Executive Papers, 1799-1802 Monroe, James, Executive Papers of Governor, 1799-1802 40936

A Guide to the Governor James Monroe Executive Papers, 1799-1802

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 40936


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
40936
Title
Governor James Monroe Executive Papers, 1799-1802
Physical Characteristics
5.28 cubic feet
Creator
Governor's Office
Physical Location
State Records Collection, Office of the Governor (Record Group 3)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. James Monroe Executive Papers, 1799-1802 (bulk 1800-1802). Accession 40936, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 5332-5350.


Biographical Information

James Monroe was born on 28 April 1758 in Westmoreland County, Virginia, to Spence Monroe and Elizabeth Jones. A graduate of William and Mary College in 1776, Monroe enlisted as a lieutenant in the Third Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army. Monroe was promoted to major following the Battle of Trenton, and served as a colonel and aid to General William Alexander from 1777 to 1778. Monroe studied law under Governor Thomas Jefferson and was elected to the House of Delegates in 1782, however, he vacated his seat when he was appointed to the Council of State. In 1783, Monroe was chosen as a delegate to represent Virginia in the Confederation Congress which he served until 1786. He returned to the House of Delegates in 1787 and represented Spotsylvania County in the Convention of 1788 to ratify the Federal Constitution. He lost an election to James Madison in the First Congress, but was later elected to the United States Senate on 9 November 1790 to replace the deceased William Grayson. He was reelected in 1791 and served in the Senate until his resignation on 27 May 1794. President George Washington appointed Monroe Minister Plenipotentiary to France on 28 May 1794.

Monroe became Governor of Virginia on 19 December 1799. During his first one-year term in office, Monroe successfully quelled Gabriel's Insurrection, the largest slave uprising in Virginia's history until that time. Monroe's governorship too saw the completion of the Virginia Penitentiary and the Manufactory of Arms. Monroe was elected to two additional one-year terms as governor. Following his governorship, in 1803, Monroe was appointed by President Thomas Jefferson as Minister Plenipotentiary to France, and later Minister Plenipotentiary to England from 1803 until 1807. Monroe returned to the House of Delegates in 1810 and was again elected governor on 19 January 1811. Monroe's second stint as governor, however, was short-lived as he resigned following his appointment by President James Madison as Secretary of State. Simultaneously, Monroe replaced John Armstrong as Secretary of War from 1814 to 1815. The culmination of Monroe's political career occurred with his election and subsequent reelection as the fifth President of the United States from 4 March 1817 to 3 March 1825. Monroe's last significant public position took place when he was elected president of the Virginia Constitutional Convention in 1829.

Monroe married Elizabeth Kortright in 1786. They had two daughters, Elizabeth and Maria Hester. He died at the home of his youngest daughter in New York City on 4 July 1831. Originally interred at the Marble Cemetery, Monroe's remains were later reinterred twenty-five years later in Richmond's Hollywood Cemetery after appeals by Governor Henry A. Wise and the Virginia Legislature.

Scope and Content Information

James Monroe's Executive papers are organized into two series. Series have been designated for Chronological files and Subject files. The bulk of the material can be found in the Chronological files' series.

The Chronological Files series primarily consists of incoming correspondence during Monroe's three one-year terms as governor between 19 December 1799 until 24 December 1802. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments & recommendations for state positions; slave insurrections; the construction of the Virginia Penitentiary & Manufactory of Arms; the Point of Fork Arsenal; the boundary between Tennessee & Virginia; public improvements; resignations; extraditions; state expenses & revenue; quarantine of vessels; elections; Presidential electors; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; accounts; oaths; contracts; pardons; proposals; receipts; election returns & certificates; qualifications; lists; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; resignations; bonds; commissions; orders; proceedings; applications; opinions; and other sundry items.

The Governor received correspondence from three main sources: the Federal government, Virginia State government, and Governors from other states. Federal government correspondents include Presidents John Adams & Thomas Jefferson; John Marshall & James Madison, Secretaries of State; Samuel Dexter, Secretary of War; and Virginia's delegates in Congress. President John Adams writes Governor Monroe on 25 Aug. 1800 concerning the cession of the Marine Hospital at Norfolk to the United States on condition that the government pays the balance due commissioners. Additionally, on 3 June 1802, President Thomas Jefferson writes regarding the resolution of Virginia to look for a proper place, specifically Sierra Leone, Africa, to send insurgent negroes. Jefferson also communicates on the subject of upheaval in the French West Indies (1802 Nov. 24). John Marshall, Secretary of State, forwards laws from the last session of Congress (1800 Sept. N.D.). Later, James Madison writes enclosing a complaint by the agent of the U.S. at Jamaica of certain frauds in flour shipped there (1802 Jan. 2). Samuel Dexter, Secretary of War, acknowledges receipt of a list of land warrants issued from the Virginia Land Office to the officers & soldiers who served during the Revolutionary War on Continental Establishment (1800 June 16). As senators from Virginia, Stevens Thomson Mason & Wilson Cary Nicholas write the Governor regarding an attempt to repeal the Sedition Law, the closing of the contract with Robert McCormick for the delivery of arms to Virginia, and the inspection of the arms by John Shee of Philadelphia (1800 April 29). In another letter, Mason encloses the bonds of John Shee and Robert McCormick (1800 May 15).

The majority of correspondence in James Monroe's Executive Papers originates from Virginia State government. Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include John Clarke, Superintendent of Public Buildings; Martin Mims, Keeper of the Penitentiary; Archibald Blair, Clerk of the Council; Samuel Coleman, Assistant Clerk of the Council of State; Philip Norborne Nicholas, Attorney General; William Wirt, Clerk of the House of Delegates; Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate; Robert Quarles, Superintendent of the Point of Fork Arsenal; Thomas Newton, County Lieutenant & Superintendent of Quarantine for Norfolk; Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts; and William Berkeley, Treasurer.

Two significant building projects which began by Governor James Wood continued during Monroe's governorship with work on the Penitentiary and Manufactory of Arms. John Clarke, the Superintendent of these two building projects, corresponded frequently with the Governor. Included are the following subjects respecting the Penitentiary: proposals for furnishing lime (1800 Jan. 21); proposals for painting (1800 March 15); a report on the state of the public jail for the reception of criminals sent from the district jails (1800 March 26); an advance for Charles Cox as undertaker of the painting work (1800 April 11); the kitchen (1800 April 16); an alteration in Latrobe's original plan (1800 June 7 ); problems with the militia guard posted at the Penitentiary (1800 Oct. 15); carpenter's work on the Keeper's house (1800 Dec. 20); woodwork on the interior of the cells & the removal of gunpowder from the Penitentiary (1801 March 28); an advance to John Harvie for furnishing bricks, lime, etc., for the Penitentiary & Manufactory (1801 April 26); the purchase of window glass, iron, paint, etc., for the Penitentiary & Manufactory (1801 June 20); contracts by John Harvie & Martin Mims for furnishing bricks & lime for the Penitentiary & Manufactory (1801 Oct. 18); iron apparatus for cooking (1801 Nov. 28); the status of the Penitentiary & Manufactory (1801 Dec. 4); an alteration to the Penitentiary so that it can be easily cleansed for the health of the convicts (1802 May 8); the employment of negroes confined in the Penitentiary in the yard stone-cutting (1802 May 22); the digging of the well at the Penitentiary (1802 May 24); the inscription over the entrance to the Penitentiary (1802 Aug. 7); the removal of gunpowder from the Capitol to the Penitentiary (1802 Nov. 27); and lime furnished by John Harvie (1802 Nov. 27).

John Clarke also devoted substantial correspondence to the construction, employment, and materials for the Manufactory of Arms. On 30 May 1801, Clarke writes Monroe regarding a trip north to locate artificers to work in the Manufactory. In his absence, he names William McKim as supervisor. Subsequently, on 12 June 1801, Clarke writes concerning the number of workmen to be employed in the Manufactory and the manner he proposes to conduct it after its completion. Clarke also provides details of the number of men required for various branches in the Manufactory. Similarly, in his letter dated 27 Nov. 1801, Clarke writes concerning the precise number of master armorers, clerks, commissaries, & machinists necessary for the Manufactory, along with their duties. On 23 Dec. 1801, Clarke writes the Governor defending his conduct as superintendent of the Manufactory following an inquiry by the General Assembly. On 4 Jan. 1802, Clarke encloses an estimate of the expense in the completion of the Manufactory of Arms & Penitentiary, as well as for the purchase of tools. Lastly, on 21 Aug. 1802, Clarke informs the Governor of the death of George Prosser who served as Assistant Superintendent for the Erection of Public Buildings. Additional subjects include: the digging of the foundations for the trip-hammer forge, etc., by Moses Bates (1800 March 28, April 4, & 1801 Jan. 16); work employed on the machinery (1800 April 5); the roofs of the Manufactory buildings (1800 April 18); contracts for shingles (1800 April 18 & May 9); the contract of George Williamson to clean & stamp state arms (1800 May 23, 30, & 7 June); masonry work by Niman Wise & James Carney (1800 April 6, June 27, Sept. 23, Oct. 5, & 1801 Nov. 13); the distribution of public arms to the militia of the several counties (1800 July 23, Aug. 10, & Sept. 25); examination of arms sent by James Swan for the militia (1800 Oct. 2); additional bricks (1800 Oct. 6); proposal by George Williamson to repair old arms at the Penitentiary (1800 Oct. 7); the contracts of Jesse Payne to furnish timber and John Harvie for bricks & lime (1800 Nov. 1 & 14); arms sent to the Penitentiary (1801 Jan. 7); the rental of a house for the accommodation of machinery of the Manufactory (1801 Jan. 20); the removal of arms from the Point of Fork Arsenal to Richmond (1801 Feb. 4); the preparation of the garret of the Capitol to receive arms from Point of Fork (1801 Feb. 14); barracks for the Armory Guard at the former hemp inspection warehouse near Rocketts (1801 Feb. 15 & 17); the appointment of a superintendent & his salary (1801 April 17); the employment of artificers at the Point of Fork Arsenal to repair arms until the Manufactory is ready (1801 May 9); contracts for artificers (1801 July 6); artificers & materials for the Manufactory at Philadelphia (1801 July 23); gunsmiths in New York & the examination of the state prison there (1801 July 27); proposals for the manufacture of arms (1801 Oct. 13); the employment of artificers (1801 Sept. 25 & Nov. 13); the procurement of armorers from Springfield, Massachusetts (1801 Oct. 31); neglected pieces of ordnance throughout the state (1801 Dec. 23); rations for soldiers (1802 Jan. 9 & 30); cut stone for the steeple (1802 Jan. 18); bells for the Manufactory, Penitentiary, & Capitol Building (1801 April 27, May 2, & 1802 Feb. 25); timber for fixing up the apparatus (1802 Feb. 13 & 24); an invoice of items furnished by John Hodson of Birmingham, England (1802 Feb. 25); the examination of arms sent by George Wheeler (1802 March 11); musket stocks & the employment of gunsmiths to clean the arms stored in the Capitol (1802 March 12 & 27); Henry Foxall's improvements for casting ordnance (1802 March 12 & May 22); apprentices to work in the Manufactory (1802 April 10); the account of Jesse Payne for timber (1802 May 12); the receipt of gun flints (1802 May 22); the examination of the public arms in the roof of the Capitol by Barlow & Hayes (1802 June 5); the foundation for the boring mill for ordnance (1802 July 24); the purchase of walnut timber for gun stocks from the United States (1802 July 23 & 24); reimbursement to artificers for travel expenses (1802 Aug. 7); the walls of the Foundry House & Armory (1802 Oct. 2); and the kitchens of the Manufactory (1802 Nov. 7).

John Clarke was also involved in miscellaneous projects including a project to construct a new tobacco warehouse along the James River Canal in Richmond. On 28 March 1801, Clarke enclosed proposals to the Governor for the tobacco warehouse. Shortly thereafter, he submitted proposals for building the walls (1801 June 13). On 24 July 1802, Clarke writes the Governor concerning the posts for the warehouse . He also writes regarding the purchase of slate from either New York or Philadelphia (1802 Sept. 18 & Nov. 8).

Martin Mims, Keeper of the Penitentiary, communicates with Governor Monroe regarding numerous subjects related to prisoners and the Penitentiary. Included in these papers is Mims' bond as Keeper of the Penitentiary (1800 March 25), along with a memorandum of negroes sentenced for transportation & sent to the Penitentiary for safekeeping (1802 Oct. 17). Among his correspondence are the following topics: extra brick work done in the Penitentiary in 1799 (1800 Jan. 4); the employment of George Anderson Stile to instruct the prisoners in making nails at the Penitentiary (1800 July 12); the employment of additional guards at the Penitentiary (1800 Sept. 6); rations for prisoners an escape attempt (1802 Jan. 13); a statement of the distribution of public arms to the militia (1802 May 4); an escape attempt by five prisoners (1802 July 24); the number of criminals who have been sent to the Penitentiary from each term since Fall 1800 (1802 Nov. 18); and a report of the Board of Inspectors of the Penitentiary re. the his conduct (1802 July 12).

Archibald Blair & Samuel Coleman, as Clerk & Assistant Clerk of the Council, communicate with the Governor regularly through the Council Office. Blair encloses proceedings of the Council regarding topics such as the appointment of John Cowper as Vice Consul of Sweden (1800 March 15) and the calling out a proportion of the militia of Henrico, Chesterfield, & Richmond (1800 Sept. 6). Also, Blair writes on 7 June 1800 regarding a motion to remove him as Clerk of the Council during his absence. Samuel Coleman, as Assistant Clerk to the Council, both sent and received letters from Governor Monroe. Monroe informed the Council on several occasions of his temporary absence from office (1800 March 5, 1800 May 11, & 1800 Sept. 26). On 21 Feb. 1801, Monroe encloses a letter from Philip Sheppard requesting $500 for Pharaoh, one of his slaves who discovered the intended insurrection. Monroe also discusses an act to purchase the freedom of Pharaoh & Tom as a reward for their service. Coleman's letter in response also relates to these slaves who assisted in the prevention of the insurrection (1801 Feb. 28).

Attorney General Robert Brooke died in office on 27 February 1800. Edmund Randolph assisted the Governor with opinions during Brooke's absence with illness and until a replacement was appointed. On 8 January 1800, Governor Monroe requests Randolph's opinion on the legality of trying slaves brought from Maryland into Southampton where they murdered their masters. Randolph's letter in reply on the same date indicates that these slaves were properly tried since they were not in the Commonwealth for the 12-month period required by the law of December 1792. Randolph also served as counsel for the Commonwealth in its negotiations with Robert Pollard concerning payment for arms furnished by him (1800 Feb. 8). Lastly, Randolph informs the Governor of the suit in the Federal Court of Hamilton vs. Newton in favor of the defendant (1800 June 5). Philip Norborne Nicholas was appointed Attorney General on 15 March 1800. In a letter dated 6 June 1800, Nicholas encloses a letter from David Robertson, County Attorney for the District of Brunswick, regarding a fine imposed on Washington Crofts. Nicholas provides his opinion on several subjects including: the case of Thomas Carter, a revenue collector for the United States, who wished to serve as a militia officer in Virginia (1800 Aug. 3); the right of the Executive to condemn lands for the use of sick in cases of quarantine (1800 Sept. 6); the admission of negroes into Virginia who were taken as a prize to a U.S. vessel of war (1801 Feb. 11); the emancipation of the slaves Pharaoh & Tom (1801 March 10); his prosecution in the case against Dr. J.K. Read (1801 April 30 & 1801 May 20); the transportation of seamen under contract to perform a voyage (1801 May 20); the suit of De Beaumarchais (1801 Dec. 11 & 24, 1802 Feb. 20); public lands in Buckingham County purchased for supporting a blast furnace by Balentine & Reveley (1802 Feb. 20); deputies or assistants for Martin Mims as Keeper of the Penitentiary (1802 May 23); and the Little River Turnpike Company (1802 Dec. 6).

William Wirt, Clerk of the House of Delegates, and Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation and qualifications of election to the Governor. Wirt submits a resolution requesting a statement of arms which have been issued from the public arsenal to the militia (1799 Dec. 20). Also included are notices for the following elections: John Clopton & James Wood to the Privy Council (1799 Dec. 11); Samuel McCraw & John Mayo to the Privy Council (1799 Dec. 11); Alexander Stewart to the Privy Council in place of Hardin Burnley (1799 Dec. 12); William Foushee to the Privy Council in place of John Allen (1799 Dec. 12); James Monroe as Governor (1799 Dec. 19); William Berkeley as Treasurer (1799 Dec. 21 & 1802 Jan. 5); Archibald Stuart as Judge of the General Court in place of James Henry (1800 Jan. 13); James Wood as Privy Councilor (1800 May 29); David Coleman, John Shore, David Carroll Brent, & John Bowyer as electors for the Presidential & Vice Presidential election (1800 Dec. 2); Meriwether Jones as Public Printer (1800 Dec. 4 & 1801 Dec. 9); Philip Norborne Nicholas as Attorney General in place of Robert Brooke (1800 Dec. 4); James Monroe as Governor (1801 Dec. 10); Samuel Tyler & John Clopton to the Privy Council (1801 Dec. 12); John Brown as Judge of the District Court of Chancery at Staunton (1802 Jan. 27); and William Wirt as Judge of the District Court of Chancery at Williamsburg (1802 Jan. 28).

Maj. Robert Quarles submits quarterly returns of arms, ordnance, & public stores at Point of Fork (1800 Jan. 1, 1800 April 1, 1800 July 1, & 1800 Oct. 1). In addition, Quarles writes concerning powder to be sent to Richmond (1800 Jan. 4); an advance for contingent expenses (1800 April 2); rations for the additional guard (1800 Sept. 3); enlistments, an advance for clothing, & a contract for rations (1800 Sept. 27); contractor's bond for rations during the ensuing year (1800 Oct. 18); public property at the Point of Fork (1801 March 6); the completion of the removal of arms from the Point of Fork to Richmond (1801 April 12).contracts for rent of public lands & houses at Point of Fork (1801 July 4); payment to John Gray for boxing up lumber from the Arsenal to Richmond (1802 Aug. 14); and renting out public lands at the Arsenal (1802 Sept. 27).

Thomas Newton, Jr., County Lieutenant & Superintendent of Quarantine for Norfolk Borough, frequently writes the Governor concerning infectious diseases & the quarantine of vessels (1800 July 12, 13, & 30, 1800 Aug. 22 & 29, 1800 Sept. 6, 1800 Oct. 9, 1801 Sept. 30, & 1802 Aug. 13). Newton's letter on 8 May 1800 relates to the valuation of the Gosport lands in Norfolk. In his letter dated 1800 Aug. 22, Newton mentions his commission for holding the election of electors for President & Vice President. On 2 Sept. 1800, he provides a list of persons who died from disease since his last return. In addition, Newton sometimes encloses reports of vessels visited & examined by Dr. J.K. Read (1802 Sept. 17, 1802 Oct. 18 & 26). Newton also writes regarding a prize vessel belonging to one of the New England governments with a cargo of thirty slaves bound for Havana from Guinea which was captured by Capt. Baron of the frigate Chesapeake. Several letters by Newton relate to the quarantine of a Spanish vessel called the Brig Ann (1801 May 16, 17, & 27). Newton was also involved in the Dismal Swamp Company and reports on its progress (1801 Oct. 28, 1801 Nov. 14 & 20, 1802 Sept. 27).

Governor Wood corresponds often with Samuel Shepard, Auditor of Public Accounts, and William Berkeley, Treasurer, regarding various financial matters. Shepard regularly encloses accounts of expenses for forwarding notices, executions, etc. (1800 April 19, 1800 Sept. 6, 1800 Nov. 8, 1801 April 11, 1802 April 10, & 1802 Sept. 3). On 17 Jan. 1801, Shepard provides a list of counties where there is no Collector of the Public Taxes. Additionally, John Carter, Clerk of the Auditor's Office, submits lists of warrants issued through the Auditor's Office (1800 Feb. 10, 1800 April 30, 1800 Aug. 9, 1800 Oct. 10, & 1801 Aug. 7). As Treasurer, William Berkeley regularly communicates reports and balances of specie in the Treasury (1800 Feb. 24, 1800 March 1, 1800 July 5,12,19, & 26, 1800 Dec. 23, 1801 Jan. 31, 1801 March 21, 1801 May 9 & 16, 1801 June 13, & 1801 Aug. 29). On 11 Feb. 1800, Berkeley encloses a letter from Edmund Randolph, in the absence of the Attorney General, regarding tobacco burned in one of the warehouses in Petersburg (1800 Feb. 11). In another letter, dated 14 June 1800, Berkeley writes concerning the establishment of a guard at the Capitol. Following Gabriel's Insurrection, Berkeley managed the discharge of claims for executed slaves. He writes on 31 Dec. 1800 that the sum for these claims is exhausted and will be increased by the late insurrection. On several occasions, Berkeley advises the Governor on the sale of the public tobacco in the Treasury (1801 Jan. 16 & 1801 May 2). The bonds of William Berkeley as Treasurer can also be found in these papers (1799 Dec. 31, 1801 Jan. 7, & 1802 Jan. 6).

Governors from other states comprise a significant amount of correspondence received by the Governor. This correspondence mostly relates to extraditions and the exchange of laws. Included are letters from the following governors: John Drayton, Governor of South Carolina; Ben Ogle & John F. Mercer, Governors of Maryland; John Jay, Governor of New York; Benjamin Williams, Governor of North Carolina; Thomas McKean, Governor of Pennsylvania; James Garrard, Governor of Kentucky; John Sevier & Archibald Roane, Governors of Tennessee; Caleb Strong, Governor of Massachusetts; Joseph Bloomfield, Governor of New Jersey; and John Trumball, Governor of Connecticut. John Drayton writes regarding the delivery of Elijah Hill for horse stealing (1800 Feb. 24); the transmission of South Carolina laws passed in 1799 (1800 May 5); and information on the negro insurrection in Virginia in order to prevent a similar conspiracy in South Carolina (1801 Sept. 27). Ben Ogle encloses a letter from Governor Richard Basset of Delaware regarding the negroes convicted in Southampton County (1800 April 26). Subsequently, his successor, John Francis Mercer, encloses a resolution passed to incorporate a company for establishing a turnpike road (1801 Dec. 31) and requests the requisition of Newell Walton (1802 Aug. 13). Benjamin Williams transmits a resolution (1801 Dec. 26) and a copy of public acts (1802 March 8). On 3 June 1800, John Jay discusses the regulations of the Penitentiary in New York and advises the Director of the Penitentiary in Virginia to visit the prisons in New York & Philadelphia. Thomas McKean writes concerning capital offenses and a pamphlet concerning crimes & punishments containing an account of the jail & Penitentiary House in Philadelphia (1800 June 16). James Garrard's correspondence relates to an act establishing the boundary between Virginia & Kentucky (1800 Dec. 27); a proclamation re. the capture of William Lamme (1801 Feb. 21); and copies of the acts passed at the last session (1802 Sept. 1). Both John Sevier & Archibald Roane write regarding the adjustment of the boundary line between Virginia & Tennessee and the meeting of the commissioners (1801 June 21, 1802 March 3, & 1802 Aug. 7). Lastly, Caleb Strong, Joseph Bloomfield, & John Trumball, transmit copies of acts, etc., from their respective legislatures (1801 May 8, 1802 Feb. 20, & 1802 June 18).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: George Winston proposing to make bricks for the Penitentiary (1799 Dec. 9); Robert McCormick & Company proposing to furnish four thousand stand of arms to Virginia (1799 Dec. 30); James Swan re. the condition of arms furnished the Commonwealth in his first contract (1799 Dec. 31); Alexander Quarrier re. the enlistment of a sergeant & 5 privates for one month to guard the arms in the Capitol (1800 Jan. 21); James Latimer re. taking under his care the land belonging to the Commonwealth at Old Point Comfort (1800 Feb. 7); Charles Cox proposing to paint the Penitentiary (1800 Feb. 7); G.K. Taylor applying for the position of Attorney General (1800 March 5); Robert Pollard re. payment to James Swan for arms (1800 March 8,11, 18, & 29); John Cowper re. his appointment by the President as Vice Council for Sweden (1800 March 11); Andrew Dunscomb & Samuel Parsons, Acting Inspectors, encl. a copy of the minutes of the Board of Inspectors of the Penitentiary House (1800 April 26); William Hay & William Berkeley encl. a resolution that the Acting Inspectors of the Penitentiary be requested to cause the lower range of cells in the east end to be fitted up as dungeons for confining prisoners (1800 May 28); John Marshall re. his appointment by the President as Secretary of State (1800 June 7); J. Grammer to Augustine Davis re. a potential insurrection (1800 Aug. 9 ); Dr. James McClurg re. the intelligence received by Augustine Davis re. an intended insurrection (1800 Aug. 10); Edmund Randolph & Daniel Call re. filling up the stagnant pond on the Public Square (1800 Aug. 30); Mosby Sheppard re. intelligence of a slave insurrection led by Gabriel (1800 Aug. 30); Amos Alexander, Mayor of Norfolk, re. cases of yellow fever & the probably election of Thomas Jefferson as President (1800 Sept. 6); Amos Alexander re. proceedings for aiding the health officer & the Governor's proclamation re. Gabriel (1800 Sept. 13); James Taylor encl. a copy of a letter from Oliver Wolcott, Treasury Dept., re. the Marine Hospital (1800 Oct. 24); Edmund Pendleton, Jr., re. four of seven slaves committed to the jail of Caroline County for conspiracy based on the testimony of Ben Woolfolk (1800 Oct. 22); James McClurg, Mayor of Richmond, re. accommodating the Government with the corporation bell (1800 Dec. 3); Benjamin DuVal re. the necessity of patrols in Norfolk (1800 Dec. 26); Benjamin Stoddert, Navy Dept., to John Hopkins re. approval of the deed for conveyance of the Gosport lands to the United States (1801 March 3); Creed Taylor re. his acceptance of an appointment as Commissioner for Virginia to adjust the boundary line between Virginia & Tennessee (1801 April 25); John Miles presenting pistols to manufacture for the State of Virginia along with muskets & swords (17801 July 28); Creed Taylor re. the boundary line between Virginia & Tennessee (1801 Oct. 10); James Keith re. progress made by the Potomack Company in rendering the river navigable (1801 Nov. 13); William Foushee reporting on the James River Company and the improvement of the James River (1801 Nov. 26); Moses Bates re. the digging of the foundation for the Armory (1801 Dec. 2); James Tilton encl. extracts from the journals of the Senate of Delaware (1802 Jan. 17); Joseph Martin & Creed Taylor requesting another commissioner to settle the boundary between Virginia & Tennessee (1802 Jan. 26); Richard Jones re. an intended insurrection in Nottoway County & Petersburg (1802 Jan. 2); Moses Greer & John Prunty soliciting appointment as commissioners to run the boundary line between Virginia & Maryland (1802 Feb. 1& 2); Du Pont de Nemours re. Houdon statue of Washington (in French) (1802 Feb. 23); Thomas Mathews re. reports of an insurrection (1802 March 10 & 13, 1802 June 15); John Cowper, Mayor of Norfolk, re. inhabitants of the French islands who sought refuge in Norfolk along with their slaves (1802 Jan. 11); Creed Taylor re. the meeting to run the boundary line between Virginia & Tennessee (1802 March 27 & 29); John Clarke re. the broken bell formerly belonging to the Capitol proposing to be purchased by John Taylor (1802 April 8); John Cowper, Mayor of Norfolk, re. a rumored insurrection on Easter Monday, and the trial & execution of leaders involved in the conspiracy (1802 April 17 & 27, 1802 May 8, 1802 June 1); John B. Scott re. the trial of people plotting a proposed insurrection in Halifax County (1802 April 21, 23, & 30); George Goosley proposing to transport the slaves confined in the Penitentiary to either Surinam or Havana (1802 June 5 & 8); Christopher Gore, Commissioner to England, to Thomas Jefferson re. the emancipation of negroes for settlement in Sierra Leone (1802 Oct. 10); Saguaresa, Indian Chief, re. land belonging to the Pamunkey Indians (1802 Nov. 15); and Governor Monroe re. his retirement from office (1802 Dec. 7).

Other noteworthy items include: a report by Nathaniel Quarles & Jesse Bowles on the number of bricks laid in the Penitentiary (1799 Dec. 24); court proceeding of Southampton County of the slaves Sam & Hatter Isaac for the murder of Harris Spears & Joshua Butte (1800 Jan. 21); statement on the Tobacco Fund from 25 Nov. 1789 to 30 Sept. 1799 by Nathaniel Shepard (1800 March 4); schedule of guns examined & proved by Jacob Cooke (1800 March 29); report of Martin Mims & William Rawleigh re. the foundation of the tilt hammer forge at the Manufactory of Arms (1800 April 3); list of commissioners in each county for supervising the Presidential election (1800 July 29); proceedings of the Corporation of Richmond re. the infectious disease at Norfolk (1800 Aug. 28); return of election for electors in Norfolk County (1800 Nov. 5); list of electors appointed by the Governor (1800 Dec. 3); oath of Daniel Hylton as Clerk of the Privy Council (1801 Jan. 20); proclamation by Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of a slaves named Greenock (1801 Feb. 7); deeds from Philip Sheppard & Elizabeth Sheppard, etc., for the sale of slaves Pharaoh & Tom (1801 March 15); proclamation of Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of Isaac Venie (1801 March 16); proclamation by Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of John Anderson (1801 May 30); bond of Pickett, Pollard, & Johnson as agents to James Swan for the purchase of arms by the Commonwealth (1801 July 3); account of clothing delivered to the Public Guard including the names of officers & privates (1801 July 10); proclamation of Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of Peter Brookman (1801 Aug. 31); bills of lading for castings for the Penitentiary (1801 Oct. 21); list of arms distributed to the militia (1801 Nov. 13); schedule of the census for Eastern Virginia (1802 Jan. 20); proclamation by Governor Monroe for the apprehension of Isaac Farrow & Jacob Hersher (1802 Jan. 23); proclamation of Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of John Dunn (1802 Feb. 6); proclamation of Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of Obadiah Williams, Moses Burbridge, & Benjamin Sullivan (1802 May 20); report of the committee respecting the Penitentiary Building advising Clarke's alteration of the building by James Wood & William Foushee (1802 May 20); applications for the superintendence of the Public Tobacco Warehouse in Richmond (1802 June 7); proclamation of Governor Monroe for a reward for the capture of Thomas Gillespie (1802 June 7); proclamations by Governor Monroe for the apprehension of James & Mary Martin & John Franklin (1802 July 10); Commissioner's report on the state of the Treasury (1802 Oct. 2); return of clothing due the Public Guard (1802 Nov. 26 & 27); and an act concerning the title papers of lands in the forks of the Big Sandy from the Kentucky Legislature (1802 Dec. 22).

The Subject Files series contains subject files separated from Governor Monroe's Executive Papers related to three topics: Gabriel's Insurrection, the McCormick-Miles-Haslett Arms Contract, and Receipts for Pamphlets. Note that documents related to these subjects may still been found in the Chronological files. These files were originally separated to provide a ready-reference to researchers.

Gabriel's Insurrection was the most significant historical event during James Monroe's time in office. Included are court records, trials, condemnations, confessions, pardons, proceedings, and correspondence regarding the slaves involved in the conspiracy & insurrection led by Gabriel, the property of Thomas Prosser of Henrico County. Significant documents include: a letter from James McClurg, Mayor of Richmond, re. an intended insurrection (1800 Sept. 1); a letter from Joseph Jones warning of an intended rebellion of slaves, free negroes, and mulattoes (1800 Sept. 8); a resolution of the Common Hall of Richmond by Adam Craig re. an intended insurrection (1800 Sept. 9); Adam Craig, aid-de-camp to the Governor, requesting a temporary exemption from guard duty (1800 Sept. 13); a letter from Thomas Newton re. the capture of Gabriel on board the Schooner Mary and the conduct of its master, Richardson Taylor (1800 Sept. 24); a letter from Richard E. Lee, re. the arrival & apprehension of Gabriel in Norfolk (1800 Sept. 25); a letter from James Monroe to the Council re. the delivery of Gabriel to the Penitentiary (1800 Sept. 28); minutes of the Council re. the confession of Gabriel and advice that extra guard be dismissed (1800 Sept. 28); a letter from William Wilkinson re. an apprehended insurrection and the ordering up of part of the militia at Suffolk (1800 Oct. 1); and a letter from Thomas Newton re. accounts of an insurrection at Norfolk (1800 Dec. 29).

The McCormick-Miles-Haslett Arms Contract consists of correspondence, receipts, bills of lading, contracts, bonds, and other documents related to the contract between Robert McCormick & Company of Philadelphia, Pa., and the Commonwealth of Virginia for 4,000 muskets. McCormick sold his arms factory in May 1801 to John Miles who took over and completed the contract in 1803. General John Shee served as agent for the State of Virginia. Much of the correspondence, bills of lading, and receipts were sent by Shee in Philadelphia to Samuel Coleman in Richmond. There are also receipts from James Haslett, the superintendent of McCormick's works who continued employment when the factory was sold to John Miles.

Lastly, the Receipts for Pamphlets, are simply receipts from individuals who delivered documents from the Governor. The receipts provide the name of the recipient, the county, and the amount of miles traveled. In April 1800, Governor Monroe arranged for the delivery of reports of a select committee of the House of Delegates with copies of answers of several states to a resolution of the General Assembly of 21 December 1798 on the United States Alien & Sedition Laws. Other receipts document the delivery of dispatches to militia commanders and letters to Commissioners for Equalizing the Land Tax between August & September 1800.

Arrangement

James Monroe's Executive papers are organized into two series. Series have been designated for Chronological files and Subject files. Each series is arranged chronologically.

Contents List

Series I: Chronological Files
  • 1799
    • December
      • Box 1
        Folder 1
        7-20
      • Box 1
        Folder 2
        21-31
  • 1800
    • January
      • Box 1
        Folder 3
        1-14
      • Box 1
        Folder 4
        18-31
    • February
      • Box 1
        Folder 5
        3-10
      • Box 1
        Folder 6
        11-27
    • March
      • Box 1
        Folder 7
        1-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 8
        17-31
    • April
      • Box 1
        Folder 9
        1-14
      • Box 1
        Folder 10
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 1
        Folder 11
        2-15
      • Box 1
        Folder 12
        16-31
    • June
      • Box 2
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 2
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • July
      • Box 2
        Folder 3
        1-12
      • Box 2
        Folder 4
        19-31
    • August
      • Box 2
        Folder 5
        1-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 6
        21-31
    • September
      • Box 2
        Folder 7
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        11-20
      • Box 2
        Folder 8
        22-30
    • October
      • Box 2
        Folder 10
        1-10
      • Box 2
        Folder 11
        11-31
    • November
      • Box 3
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 3
        Folder 2
        11-29
    • December
      • Box 3
        Folder 3
        1-14
      • Box 3
        Folder 4
        16-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      Undated
  • 1801
    • January
      • Box 3
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • February
      • Box 3
        Folder 8
        2-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 9
        16-28
    • March
      • Box 3
        Folder 10
        3-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 11
        16-30
    • April
      • Box 3
        Folder 12
        2-15
      • Box 3
        Folder 13
        18-30
    • May
      • Box 4
        Folder 1
        2-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • June
      • Box 4
        Folder 3
        1-10
      • Box 4
        Folder 4
        11-20
      • Box 4
        Folder 5
        21-30
    • July
      • Box 4
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 4
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • August
      • Box 4
        Folder 8
        1-14
      • Box 4
        Folder 9
        20-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      September
    • October
      • Box 4
        Folder 11
        1-14
      • Box 4
        Folder 12
        16-31
      • Box 4
        Folder 13
        Beaumarchais Case
    • November
      • Box 5
        Folder 1
        2-14
      • Box 5
        Folder 2
        17-30
    • December
      • Box 5
        Folder 3
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 4
        16-31
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      Undated
  • 1802
    • January
      • Box 5
        Folder 6
        2-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 7
        16-30
    • February
      • Box 5
        Folder 8
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 9
        18-28
    • March
      • Box 5
        Folder 10
        1-15
      • Box 5
        Folder 11
        16-31
    • April
      • Box 5
        Folder 12
        1-14
      • Box 5
        Folder 13
        16-30
    • May
      • Box 6
        Folder 1
        1-10
      • Box 6
        Folder 2
        11-20
      • Box 6
        Folder 3
        21-30
    • June
      • Box 6
        Folder 4
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 5
        16-29
    • July
      • Box 6
        Folder 6
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 7
        16-31
    • August
      • Box 6
        Folder 8
        2-14
      • Box 6
        Folder 9
        16-31
    • September
      • Box 6
        Folder 10
        1-16
      • Box 6
        Folder 11
        17-30
    • October
      • Box 6
        Folder 12
        1-15
      • Box 6
        Folder 13
        16-31
    • November
      • Box 7
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 7
        Folder 2
        16-29
    • December
      • Box 7
        Folder 3
        1-24
    • Pardons
      • Box 7
        Folder 4
        A-I
      • Box 7
        Folder 5
        J-P
      • Box 7
        Folder 6
        R-W
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      Undated
  • Box 7
    Folder 8
    Undated
Series II: Subject Files
  • Gabriel's Insurrection (1800)
    • September
      • Box 8
        Folder 1
        1-15
      • Box 8
        Folder 2
        16-30
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      October
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      November-December
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      Undated
  • McCormick-Miles-Haslett Arms Contract
    • 1800
      • Box 8
        Folder 6
        April
      • Box 8
        Folder 7
        September-December
    • 1801
      • Box 8
        Folder 8
        January-June
      • Box 8
        Folder 9
        July-September
      • Box 8
        Folder 10
        October-December
    • 1802
      • Box 8a
        Folder 1
        January-February
      • Box 8a
        Folder 2
        March-May
      • Box 8a
        Folder 3
        July-December
  • Box 8a
    Folder 4
    Receipts for Pamphlets, 1800
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1800
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Jan. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      Jan. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      Jan. 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Feb. 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Feb. 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      April 17
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      May 26
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      June 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      June 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      July 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      Sept. 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      Sept. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      Nov. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      Nov. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      Nov. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Dec. 3
  • 1801
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Jan. 17
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Jan. 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Feb. 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      April 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      May 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      May 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      May 30
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      June 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      July 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 25
      July 22
    • Box 9
      Folder 26
      Oct. 22
  • 1802
    • Box 9
      Folder 27
      Jan. 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 28
      Feb. 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 29
      March 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 30
      March 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 31
      June 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 32
      Aug. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 33
      Aug. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 34
      Aug. 7
    • Box 9
      Folder 35
      Aug. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 36
      Sept. 17
    • Box 9
      Folder 37
      Oct. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 38
      Nov. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 39
      Pardons
    • Box 9
      Folder 40
      Undated
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1800
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Nov. 5
  • 1801
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      April [N.D.]
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      May 25
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      June 15
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      Oct. 29
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      Nov. 12
  • 1802
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      Jan. 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      Jan. 17
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      Feb. 2
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      May 12
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Oct. 26
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Dec. 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Pardons