A Guide to the Governor Henry Lee Executive Papers, 1791-1794 Lee, Henry, Executive Papers of Governor, 1791-1794 40611

A Guide to the Governor Henry Lee Executive Papers, 1791-1794

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 40611


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
40611
Title
Governor Henry Lee Executive Papers, 1791-1794
Physical Characteristics
4.83 cubic feet
Creator
Governor's Office
Physical Location
State Records Collection, Office of the Governor (Record Group 3)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Henry Lee Executive Papers, 1791-1794 (bulk 1792-1794). Accession 40611. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 5048-5055.


Biographical Information

Henry Lee was born on 29 January 1756 at Leesylvania, Virginia. The eldest son of Henry Lee (1729-1787) and Lucy Grymes, he graduated from Princeton College in 1773. On 18 June 1776, Lee was commissioned by Patrick Henry as a captain of Virginia Light Dragoons in Col. Theodorick Bland's regiment, which was later attached to the First Continental Light Dragoons. The Continental Congress promoted Lee to major on 7 April 1778 and gave him command of three troops of horse, which became known as "Lee's Legion." Lee received a gold medal by the Continental Congress for his bravery in an attack against the British garrison at Paulus Hook, New Jersey, in August 1779. He served until the end of the war, having been promoted to lieutenant colonel on 6 November 1780, and meriting the nickname "Light Horse Harry Lee."

After the war, Lee married his cousin Matilda Lee, daughter of Richard Henry Lee, in April 1782. Matilda died in 1790, and Lee married Anne Hill Carter (1773-1829) from Shirley Plantation on 18 June 1793 and had five children, including Robert E. Lee. Lee began his political career as a representative of Westmoreland County in the Virginia House of Delegates, 1785-1786. Additionally, he served in the Continental Congress, 1786-1788, followed by a second stint in the General Assembly, 1788-1791. As a member of the Virginia Convention of 1788, Lee argued in favor of adopting the new federal Constitution. Lee became Governor of Virginia in 1791, serving three consecutive one-year terms. The most significant event of his governorship took place in 1794 when the Whiskey Rebellion broke out in western Pennsylvania. Given command the forces by President Washington in August 1794, Lee successfully led the army against the insurgents. Following his terms as Governor, Lee was again elected to represent Westmoreland County in the House of Delegates, 1795-1799. His last elected office was as a member of the Federalist Party in the House of Representatives during the Sixth Congress, 1799-1801.

Lee retired from public service and returned to manage his plantation at Stratford Hall. Financial hardships led Lee to debtor's prison in 1809. Here, Lee crafted his Memoirs of the War in the Southern Department. Lee traveled to the West Indies in 1816 to recuperate from illness, but died 25 March 1818 on his return at Cumberland Island, Georgia. Lee's body was re-interred on 30 May 1913 at Lee Chapel at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia.

Scope and Content Information

Governor Lee's Executive papers are organized chronologically with undated items arranged at the end of each year. These papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during Lee's three one-year terms as governor between 1 December 1791 until 1 December 1794. These records include correspondence written to James Wood who acted as Lieutenant Governor while Lee traveled to Nashville and again when he served as commander of the United States forces during the Whiskey Rebellion in 1794. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments for state positions; the Point of Fork Arsenal; defense of the frontier; the Whiskey Rebellion; resignations; arms & ammunition; Indian attacks; French emigrants; the Federal City; the Lunatic Hospital in Williamsburg; state expenses & revenue; quarantine of vessels; foreign affairs; Revolutionary claims; public tobacco; elections; Presidential electors; the Capitol Building; fortification of Alexandria & Norfolk harbors; the militia; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from Congress and the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; muster & pay rolls; accounts; oaths; pardons; receipts; election returns; election certificates; qualifications; lists; depositions; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; bonds; commissions; orders; reports; proceedings; applications; and other sundry items. Note that the pardons for 1792 have been separated to the end of the papers for that year.

Noteworthy correspondence originates from the United States government, Virginia State government, and miscellaneous sources. Prominent correspondents from the United States government include Henry Knox, Secretary of War; Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State; Edmund Randolph, Attorney General; Alexander Campbell, District Attorney General; Thomas Johnson, David Stuart, Daniel Carroll, William Thornton, & Gustavus Scott, Commissioners of the Federal City; John Hopkins, Commissioner of Loans for Virginia; John Jacob Ulrich Rivardi, Engineer in the service of the U.S.; Samuel A. Otis, Secretary of the Senate; and the Virginia Delegates to Congress including James Monroe, Richard Henry Lee, and others.

Henry Knox, Secretary of War, corresponds the most frequently with Governor Lee from the United States government. Knox's correspondence primarily relates to Indian affairs and the defense of the frontier (1791 Dec. 5 & 24; 1792 Feb. 2; 1792 March 17; 1792 April 7; 1792 May 16; 1792 June 25 & 30; 1792 July 11; 1792 Sept. 15; 1792 Oct. 9, 11, 14, & 30; 1792 Nov. 1, 3, & 23; 1793 Feb. 16; 1793 May 16; 1793 July 25; 1793 Sept. 3; 1794 Jan. 27). In addition, Knox also writes regarding a variety of other concerns including: an escort for Governor Lee & Governor Pickens to Nashville (1792 Aug. 13), a treaty with the Indians north of the Ohio to be held at Lower Sandusky (1793 April 24), the defense of Norfolk (1793 May 10; 1794 March 19; & 1794 July 30), the capture of vessels in American waters by other powers & neutrality laws of the U.S. (1793 May 23 & 24; 1793 Aug. 21; 1793 Nov. 12; 1794 Feb. 11), money to the Commissioners of the Federal Buildings in Washington and the temporary residence of the President in Germantown, Pennsylvania (1793 Nov. 9), the recommendation of Daniel Bedinger to make gun carriages in Norfolk (1794 March 24), the appointment of Maj. Rivardi by the President to fortify Baltimore, Alexandria, & Norfolk (1794 March 28; 1794 April 3; & 1794 June 9), the spoliation at Guadeloupe by the French privateer Preus and British prisoners on parole (1794 April 17), the St. Domingo Fleet, the embargo, letters of marque, etc. (1794 May 9), an act directing a detachment from the militia of the U.S. (1794 May 19), the arming of vessels belonging to the belligerent powers in the U.S. (1794 June 27), the vessel of the British Consul taken possession by Gen. Thomas Mathews (1794 Aug. 25), and an arsenal or magazine within Virginia for the U.S. (1794 Nov. 10).

As Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson writes the Governor to transmit acts & resolutions of Congress. On 1 Feb. 1792, Jefferson transmits copies of an act carrying into effect a contract between the U.S. & the state of Pennsylvania, and an act to extend the time for settling the accounts of the U.S. with the individual states. He also writes regarding an act concerning certain fisheries of the U.S. & for the regulation and government of the fishermen employed therein, an act to establish the Post Office & Post roads, and the ratification by three-quarters of the legislatures of certain articles in addition to and amendment to the Constitution (1792 March 1). He transmits an act supplemental to the act for making further provision for the protection of the frontiers, an act establishing a mint & regulating the coins of the U.S., and an act for finishing the lighthouse on Baldhead at the mouth of the Cape Fear River in North Carolina (1792 April 10). Note that the original acts are no longer included with the above correspondence.

Edmund Randolph, U.S. Attorney General, & Alexander Campbell, District Attorney General, often submit opinions respecting various matters. On 24 June 1793, Randolph writes regarding the suit brought by the Indiana Company against the state of Virginia. A circular letter from Randolph, dated 1792 Oct. 10, relates to ships of war bringing in French prizes in violation of the 17th article of the treaty of commerce between the U.S. & France. Similarly, Randolph's letter, dated 22 Oct. 1794, relates to the complaints of Joseph Fauchet, Minister Plenipotentiary of the French Republic, concerning French prizes in U.S. ports. Campbell writes the Lieutenant Governor on 23 Aug. 1793 regarding an insult to the British Consul at Norfolk. He also provides his opinion in favor of a arming a privateer from Cape Francois (1793 Sept. 25). On 3 Dec. 1793, Campbell writes that provisions may be sold by a neutral people to either belligerent and that repairs of vessels for non-military purposes is permissible. He provides another opinion regarding accusations by the British Consul at Norfolk respecting violence against the Brigantine Ann at Yorktown. The British Consul also accused persons at Smithfield of fitting out a ship to serve as a privateer in the present war. Campbell explains that this would be a violation of the laws of the U.S. and require the Governor to arrest the offenders (1794 July 11). Lastly, Campbell provides an opinion in favor of a French schooner from Baltimore that arrived in Norfolk with a prize captured at sea (1794 Aug. 15).

Thomas Johnson, David Stuart, Daniel Carroll, William Thornton, & Gustavus Scott, Commissioners of the Federal City, write the Governor on several occasions regarding Virginia's donation for the Federal Buildings (1792 June 6; 1793 Feb. 7; 1793 Sept. 23; 1794 Jan. 30; 1794 June 26; 1794 Sept. 16; & 1794 Nov. 7). John Hopkins, as Commissioner of Loans for Virginia, also writes the Governor on behalf of these Commissioners (1792 Jan. 25; 1792 May 8; 1793 Feb. 13; 1793 Sept. 13; 1793 Oct. 29; 1793 Nov. 20; 1794 Feb. 7; & 1794 Nov. 28). On 12 March 1792, Hopkins encloses a letter from William Deakins, Treasurer for Federal Buildings, regarding the donation. Hopkins also writes with respect to the state debt subscribed to the loan of the U.S. by the act of 4 Aug. 1790 (1792 March 12).

John Jacob Ulrich Rivardi, was appointed temporary engineer in the service of the U.S. for the purpose of fortifying the ports and harbors at Baltimore, Alexandria, & Norfolk. Rivardi writes the Governor on 3 April 1794 & , enclosing a copy of his instructions from Henry Knox. These instructions provide an estimate of the expenses at Baltimore & Norfolk. On 9 June 1794, Rivardi encloses a plan of Fort Nelson and writes that drawings of the Craney Island defense are forthcoming (enclosure not included). He writes concerning his progress in Norfolk on 15 June 1794. On 11 July 1794, Rivardi forwards a map of the Elizabeth River (not enclosed) and a return of hands working at Fort Norfolk. Shortly thereafter, Rivardi encloses a plan on Craney Island (not enclosed) and a return of laborers employed at Fort Nelson (1794 July 19). John Vermonnet was later appointed by the War Dept. to fortify Annapolis & Alexandria. Vermonnet writes on 17 June 1794 that he selected Jones' Point for a battery in Alexandria.

Virginia Delegates to the Second & Third Congresses corresponded with Governor Lee intermittently throughout his tenure. On 20 Dec. 1791, James Monroe transmits the proceedings of Congress respecting the representation bill. Richard Henry Lee & Monroe also write on 14 Feb. 1792 regarding military claims of land, and for services & supplies not yet compensated. Richard Henry Lee's letter of resignation, transcribed by Samuel Coleman, can also be found (1792 Oct. 8). Samuel A. Otis, as Clerk of the U.S. Senate, often transmits the journals of the Senate to the Governor (1792 June 1; 1793 May 1; & 1794 June 1). Otis also writes requesting copies of Virginia's laws(1792 Nov. 12).

Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include Samuel Coleman, Assistant Clerk of the Council of State; Simon Morgan, Adjutant General; Wyatt Coleman, Keeper of the Capitol; James Wood, Lieutenant Governor; James Innes, Attorney General; William Hay, Robert Goode, & William Foushee, etc., Directors of Public Buildings; Charles Hay, Clerk of the House of Delegates; Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate; Capt. Elias Langham & Robert Quarles, Superintendents of the Military Stores, Arms, & Ammunition at Point of Fork Arsenal; various county lieutenants; Andrew Lewis & Hugh Caperton, Captains of Volunteer Militia; James Madison, Jr., President of the Board of Directors of the Lunatic Hospital in Williamsburg; Harry Heth, State Agent of Public Tobacco; William Davies, Commissioner of Virginia for Claims Against the United States, John Pendleton, Jr., Auditor of Public Accounts; and Jacquelin Ambler, Treasurer.

Samuel Coleman, as Assistant Clerk of the Council, communicates with the Governor frequently through the Council Office. Coleman mainly writes concerning military matters including the militia (1792 Aug. 2; 1792 Dec. 19 & 31; 1793 Jan. 9, 24, & 30; 1793 Feb. 2 & 7; 1793 March 29; 1793 April 2 & 9; 1793 May 7; 1793 June 4; 1793 July 3 & 9; 1793 Aug. 5; 1793 Sept. 4, 5, 14, 26, & 30; 1793 Oct. 4 & 29; 1793 Nov. 2, 4, & 20; 1793 Dec. 9 & 22; 1794 March 15 & 24; 1794 June 2; 1794 Aug. 1; 1794 Nov. 18 & 28), an examination of returns from the Point of Fork Arsenal (1792 Jan. 11; 1792 April 10; 1792 May 25; 1792 July 10; 1792 Oct. 15; 1792 Nov. 1; 1793 Jan. 10; 1793 Feb. 7 & 20; 1793 April 16; 1793 Aug. 6 & 15; 1793 Oct. 1; 1793 Nov. 5; 1794 Jan. 2; 1794 April 1 & 11; ), the pay & muster of scouts & rangers on the frontier (1792 Jan. 31; 1792 March 24; 1792 April 11; 1792 Dec. 5; 1793 Jan. 7; 1793 Feb. 7; 1794 Jan. 16), accounts on the books of the Foundry (1791 Dec. 8; 1792 March 21; 1792 Dec. 27), and claims for military service or supplies (1791 Dec. 10; 1792 Oct. 23; 1793 Nov. 7; 1794 Sept. 3). On 11 May 1792, Coleman requests an appointment as Adjutant General, the duties of which were already annexed to his current position in the Council. He again applies for the position on 1 Dec. 1792, however, Simon Morgan was appointed instead. A letter, dated 20 June 1794, from Morgan encloses general orders to the Division Generals of the Militia. Another letter by Morgan requests that John Stewart be appointed his deputy (1794 Aug. 22).

Coleman also corresponds with the Governor regarding the state of the Capitol Building. On 11 July 1794, he writes on the problems with the roof of the Capitol and includes a rough diagram. Wyatt Coleman, Samuel's father, was appointed Keeper of the Capitol in 1793, and too writes the Governor regarding the defective state of the roof (1794 July 10 & 27). His earliest letter, dated 1 April 1793, remarks on his duties and includes an account for hiring a person to sweep & clean the Capitol. Both Samuel & Wyatt also write requesting instructions of the Keeper of the Capitol (1794 July 16, 24, & 25). On 16 July 1794, Wyatt Coleman encloses a memo of broken windows on the Capitol. Samuel also provides a report on his father's behalf on 11 September 1794 urging repairs to the windows before winter.

James Wood, Lieutenant Governor, traveled to Ohio County on the western frontier in June 1792 for the purpose of making an arrangement of the volunteer militia and for entering into contracts for their subsistence. He writes the governor on 20 June 1792 providing a report of his mission. This letter includes proceedings of the Board of Field Officers of Ohio Co.; instructions to Capt. McMachan on augmenting his command; the bond of Archibald & Robert Woods to furnish rations to supply Capt. McMachan's Company; an order to the county lieutenants of Monongalia, Harrison, & Randolph to make returns; returns of Harrison, Randolph, & Monongalia; instructions to Capt. Lowther; and charges by John Davis against John Evans, County Lieutenant of Monongalia. He writes again on 14 June 1793 regarding the state of the frontier in the Monongalia District and encloses instructions to Capt. William Lowther.

James Innes, Attorney General of Virginia, provides his opinion for the Governor on several occasions. On 3 Jan. 1792, Innes confirms his opinion respecting requisitions from Governor Thomas Mifflin for the apprehension of McGuire & Brady. He again writes regarding this case on 12 March 1792. On 27 Feb. 1792, he writes that the bond & mortgage for the public loan made to the French emigrants in Russell County is properly drawn. Later, he certifies that the title to fifty-five thousand acres sold by Richard Smith to Monsieur Tibeauf in Russell County is valid (1792 Feb. 28). In 1794, Innes was appointed by the President on a mission to deliver communications to the state of Kentucky. Writing from Lancaster, PA., dated 20 Nov. 1794, Innes states that he holds no office of profit under the United States and encloses a letter to Gov. Lee from 14 Aug. and a letter to Lt. Gov. Wood from 3 Oct. In the latter, Innes notes that General [John] Marshall has agreed to discharge his duties during his absence. During Innes' absence, Marshall provides several opinions including the purchase & sale of lands for arrears of taxes (1794 Oct. 15), fines & penalties under the militia law (1794 Oct. 15), and the forfeiture of the commission of Elisha White as Sheriff of Hanover (1794 Nov. 28). Other correspondence from Innes relates to delinquent sheriffs (1792 Sept. 7), the ability of individuals to sue the state (1792 Nov. 10), the suit of the Indiana Company against Virginia (1793 Jan. 22), the duties of district attorneys in cases of escheats (1793 Jan. 29), mortgages on Holt Richeson's estate (1794 June 20), and the Buckingham Works (1794 Aug. 16).

William Hay, Robert Goode, & William Foushee, etc., Directors of Public Buildings, kept the Governor informed of the ongoing repairs to the Capitol. On 14 June 1792, the Directors enclose a copy of their proceedings concerning the contract with Moses Austin & Co. Their letter also includes resolutions, a letter from Hay to Austin regarding problems with the Capitol's roof, and a statement of the expense of wall pipes, plastering, & covering the Pedestal cornice. Robert Goode requests an advance of fifty pounds to complete the steps of the Capitol (1793 Sept. 12). On 8 October 1794, Hay asks for an order for John Collins & George Winston on account of their contracts. Similarly, on 8 Nov. 1794, he solicits the Governor for an order for John Hart, one of the undertakers of the work on the Capitol. Finally, on 17 Jan. 1794, William Hay submits his letter of resignation to the Governor.

Charles Hay, Clerk of the House of Delegates, and Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate, often submit legislation and qualifications of election to the Governor. Noteworthy legislation includes a resolution to transmit the act to appoint electors to chose a president & vice president (1792 Oct. 10), an act to provide more effectually for the collection of the public taxes (1792 Dec. 23), a resolution for the Public Printer to print copies of the act imposing a public tax (1792 Dec. 23), a resolution regarding temporary defensive operations for the protection of the frontier (1793 Nov. 6), a resolution for the affectionate remembrance of the militia in enforcing obedience to the laws of the United States during the insurrection (1794 Nov. 12), a resolution regarding the sale of the mace used by the House of Delegates (1794 Nov. 17), and a resolution regarding the request of the President that Henry Lee take command of the army raised for the purpose of suppressing the insurrection in western Pennsylvania (1794 Nov. 19). In addition, there are qualifications of election for John Taylor to replace Richard Henry Lee in the U.S. Senate (1792 Oct. 18), Henry Lee as Governor (1792 Oct. 25), Henry Tazewell as Judge of the Court of Appeals to replace James Mercer (1793 Nov. 6), Patrick Henry to replace James Monroe in the U.S. Senate (1794 July 10), and Robert Brooke as Governor to replace Henry Lee (1794 Nov. 20).

Capt. Elias Langham, Superintendent of the Military Stores, Arms, & Ammunition at Point of Fork Arsenal, writes the Governor regarding plans for a reduction of the expenses at Point of Fork (1791 Dec. 7), accounts of hirelings' wages (1792 Jan. 11), neglect of duty by contractors for provisions (1792 Oct. 19), appointment of his brother John Langham as contractor for provisions (1792 Oct. 23), the claim of David Ross (1793 July 7), fear of a slave insurrection at Point of Fork & the need for a permanent guard (1793 Aug. 3), an account of balance due him for his pay (1793 Oct. 3), and accounts of provisions furnished Point of Fork (1794 April 5; 1794 May 20; 1794 June 11; 1794 Aug. 28; & 1794 Sept. 19). On 4 April 1792, William Price applies to the Governor to replace Langham upon his resignation. Similar applications were also submitted by John Guerrant, Jr., and J.K. Read for Col. Samuel Richardson (April 9 & 10). Langham, however, remained in office for another year. He writes to the Lt. Gov. on 24 Aug. 1793 requesting the Board to postpone the appointment of a new Superintendent for 15 days. On 26 Oct. 1793, he states that Maj. Quarles has been appointed to succeed him as Superintendent. Langham requests a certificate by the Board regarding his service and the cause of his replacement. On 29 Nov. 1793, Langham complains of the conduct of his successor in the contractor's office. Langham also includes certificates by John Peyton & D. McLaughlan, along with a letter from his brother John Langham. Quarles letter in response to these charges can also be found in this collection (1793 Nov. 29).

Maj. Robert Quarles succeeded Langham as Superintendent of Point of Fork in Sept. 1793. Quarles's correspondence relates to returns of ordnance & public stores at Point of Fork (1793 Sept. 2 & 5; 1793 Oct. 1; 1794 March 31; 1794 June 30; & 1794 Oct. 4), the punishment of a guard for neglect of duty (1793 Nov. 18); a commissary for the post (1793 Dec. 20), a request for arms (1794 April 18), an increase in wages for his sergeant for issuing rations (1794 June 2), the death of his Armourer Robert Fowler (1794 June 3), the exemption of militia duty for his garrison (1794 July 28), rations for the wives of artisans & guards (1794 July 28 & Sept. 2), and an increase in his salary (1794 Oct. 1 & Nov. 14). Note that additional materials relating to the Point of Fork Arsenal can be found at the end of the collection. Included are additional correspondence, accounts & receipts, pay rolls of state guard & artificers, quarterly accounts of cash, and returns of ordnance, military stores, etc.

County lieutenants including Arthur Campbell, David Shepherd, George Clendenin, John P. Duvall, John Stuart, Thomas Newton, Jr., & Smith Snead communicate with the Governor Lee on various topics. Arthur Campbell, Washington Co., writes extensively on Indian affairs and frontier defense (1792 March 28; 1792 July 19 & 20; 1792 Sept. 10; 1792 Oct. 5, 11, & 17; 1792 Nov. 1, 3, & 12; 1792 Dec. 5; 1793 April 24; 1793 June 24 & 30; 1793 July 6; 1793 Oct. 3; 1794 April 15, 21, & 29; 1794 July 9). In addition, Campbell corresponds on the subject of the act of the General Assembly establishing Walker's line as the boundary between North Carolina & Virginia (1792 June 25), the jurisdiction of William Blount, Governor of the Territory South of the Ohio River (1792 Sept. 4), charges against Capt. Andrew Lewis by Lt. Willoughby of the Washington Militia (1793 Aug. 31; 1793 Oct. 9, 11, & 29; 1794 Jan. 17; 1794 May 8 & 12), and the militia law, insurrection in Pennsylvania, & movements by the Creek Indians (1794 Aug. 21). David Shepherd, Ohio Co., encloses a letter from Henry Knox on the defense of the frontier, as well as a letter from William McMachan regarding Indian attacks (1792 April 14). John Duvall, Harrison Co., writes of murder committed by the Indians in that county & the defeat of Gen. St. Claire (1791 Dec. 8). Shortly thereafter, Duvall communicates in relation to troops raised for the defense of Harrison Co. (1792 Dec. 20). George Clendenin, Kanawha Co., too writes about Indian affairs (1792 May 26; 1792 Dec. 10). In addition, he often discusses Hugh Caperton's militia and the defense of the county (1792 March 8; 1792 Sept. 21 & 22; 1793 Jan. 27, 28, & 31; 1793 March 5; 1793 April 12; 1793 Dec. 16). John Stuart, Greenbrier Co., provides information on a company being raised & commanded by Capt. Caperton for the defense of Greenbrier & Kanawha counties (1792 Feb. 8 & 1792 Aug. 6). He also mentions the appointment of six scouts on the frontier (1794 June 9) and the receipt of ammunition (1794 July 16). Thomas Newton, Jr., Norfolk, writes extensively about the pestilence in the West Indies & the quarantine of vessels (1793 June 16, 22, & 30; 1793 Sept. 23 & 28; 1793 Oct. 1, 5, 13, 15, 19-21, 25, 26 & 30; 1793 Nov. 13-15, 19, & 28; 1794 Aug. 7, 10, & 18; 1794 Sept. 24; 1794 Oct. 4, 15, & 21; 1794 Nov. 9 & 21), the Cape Henry Light House (1792 Jan. 9), a slave insurrection (1792 May 10 & 19), arms & ammunition (1792 June 20; 1793 March 12; 1793 April 29; 1793 Aug. 23; 1794 Oct. 7), Fort Nelson & coastal defense (1793 May 24 & 25; 1793 Aug. 22; 1794 June 10; 1794 Sept. 21), French ships & emigrants (1793 July 9; 1793 Aug. 2; 1794 Sept. 10; 1794 Oct. 15), privateers & the neutrality laws (1793 June 2; 1794 March 19; 1794 Oct. 15; 1794 June 14; 1794 Nov. 28), the Norfolk militia (1794 Feb. 12 & 23; 1794 March 9; 1794 Sept. 10), shots fired from the British ship Daedalus (1793 Feb. 24), the embargo (1794 April 4), and a riot in Norfolk (1794 June 4). Lastly, Smith Snead, Northampton Co., writes concerning ammunition and an attempted slave insurrection (1792 May 5, July 9 & 21).

Andrew Lewis & Hugh Caperton, Captains of Volunteer Militia in the western counties, were appointed to guard Virginia's western frontier. Lewis set out from Richmond on 2 December 1791and frequently corresponds with Governor Lee concerning Indian movements, attacks & depredations (1792 April 27; 1792 June 5; 1792 Aug. 24; 1792 Oct. 3; 1793 April 9; 1793 May 8; 1793 Sept. 12 & 29; 1793 Nov. 3; 1793 Dec. 19 & 24; 1794 Feb. 17; 1794 April 17 & 19), rations (1792 Feb. 7), arms & ammunition (1792 Feb. 6; 1793 Jan. 30), pay (1792 Dec. 22; 1793 Dec. 13 & 23; 1794 Jan. 1), recruiting of troops (1792 Dec. 22; 1794 Feb. 5), the killing of friendly Indians by Capt. Baird (1793 June 26), charges against the Washington Militia & Arthur Campbell (1793 Aug. 17; 1793 Oct. 13; 1793 Nov. 6, 7, 23, & 26; 1793 Dec. 19 & 23; 1794 May 9), volunteers for the suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion (1794 Oct. 3), and the general state of the militia & frontier (1793 Feb. 22 & 25; 1793 March 11; 1793 Nov. 6; 1794 April 4 & 8; 1794 May 9; 1794 Aug. 18).

Hugh Caperton was appointed to the command of a company of volunteer militia to defend Greenbrier & Kanawha counties. On 10 Dec. 1791, Caperton & Daniel Boone write regarding the volunteer militia to be raised in these counties. A statement of scouts for Kanawha County by Boone can also be found in these papers (1791 Undated). Caperton writes concerning rations, arms, & ammunition (1792 Oct. 4 & 30; 1793 Oct. 11), pay (1793 April 20), and the recruiting of troops (1793 Nov. 26). In a letter written with George Clendenin he encloses a list of his company in service in Greenbrier Co. (1792 May 6). Caperton accepts his commission as captain of volunteer militia in a letter dated 15 Nov. 1792. He encloses a pay roll of scouts on 20 April 1793. Col. Charles Cameron, Bath Co., writes about Caperton's arrest & trial before a court-martial (1793 Aug. 30 & 1793 Dec. 31). Caperton writes concerning the charges & court-martial on 25 Feb. 1794. On 2 April and again on 30 Aug. 1794, Caperton requests a rehearing before another court-martial. He also submits a petition on 11 Sept. 1794 for the rehearing at his own expense.

James Madison, Jr., Director of the Lunatic Hospital at Williamsburg, & other members of the Court of Directors, often enclose orders to apply to the Auditor of Public Accounts for warrants (1792 Jan. 4; 1792 March 20; 1792 Aug. 11; 1792 Oct. 13; 1793 Feb. 25; 1793 July 19; 1793 Dec. 13; 1794 May 16). In his letter dated 26 Nov. 1793, Madison declares two vacancies in the Court of Directors by the deaths of Benjamin Harrison & William Pasteur. Lastly, on 1 Nov. 1794, James Ruffin was recommended for a vacancy after the resignation of Joseph Hornsby.

Harry Heth, Agent for the Sale of Public Tobacco, encloses the amount of sales of the balance of tobacco received by him (1791 Dec. 24). Also included is Heth's bond as Agent of the Sinking Fund (1792 March 17). Heth was appointed to take the place of Anthony Singleton whose letter of resignation can be found in this collection (1792 Jan. 5).

William Davies, Commissioner of Virginia for Claims Against the United States, continues his work in settling the Revolutionary claims. He writes the Governor with respect to additional clerks (1792 April 28); the impending completion of his work (1792 Oct. 1); accounts & expenses of his office (1793 Jan. 3; 1793 April 1; 1793 July 1; 1793 Oct. 14); the contract with Messrs. Braxton, Herbert, & Claiborne (1793 Feb. 1); a warrant paid to William Finney (1793 March 20); books & papers to be sent to the state from Philadelphia (1793 May 28; 1793 July 18); his recommendation as sheriff of Mecklenburg Co. (1793 July 22); and the report of the General Board of Commissioners including an account of supplies & services during the late war, extracts from the Council Journal, and extracts of correspondence from Virginia governors to him (1794 Feb. 25). Other correspondence from Davies relates to his appointment as agent for the collection of arrears of taxes (1794 Jan. 12); his commission as agent (1794 March 23); and executions against delinquent sheriffs (1794 March 31; 1794 April 8 & 26).

Governor Randolph corresponds often with John Pendleton, Jr., Auditor of Public Accounts, and Jacquelin Ambler, Treasurer, regarding various financial matters. Pendleton regularly encloses lists of warrants issued by him through the Auditor's Office (1792 Feb. 15; 1792 April 28; 1792 Dec. 31; 1793 Oct. 1; 1793 Nov. 5). Additionally, Pendleton encloses an abstract of the funded debt of the state (1792 June 25), a list of executions returned by sheriffs in several counties (1792 Feb. 27), accounts for sending out notices & executions against public delinquents (1792 April 20), and frontier defense expenses (1793 Feb. 11 & 13). Ambler writes regarding lists of lands purchased for non-payment of taxes (1792 Jan. 11), the amount of transfer tobacco in the Treasury (1792 Feb. 14; 1792 June 20), the state of the Treasury (1792 Feb. 25; 1792 Nov. 28; 1794 Oct. 20), funds for the Potomack Company (1792 Nov. 28), the purchase of public tobacco by Richard Bibb (1792 Dec. 11), certificates from the Sinking Fund for warrants issued to foreign creditors (1793 Jan. 10), the exchange rates of foreign coins by Congress (1793 June 13), additional door, locks, & other expenses for the Treasury (1793 Aug. 27), the claim of the state on account of the Federal buildings (1794 Aug. 28), disbursements & discounts made at the Treasury (1794 Sept. 25), and a warrant to the Court of Directors of the Lunatic Hospital (1794 Nov. 4). On 9 Jan. 1793, Ambler & Pendleton apply to the Governor requesting that Mrs. Pearson remain in the house on the public square (1793. Jan. 9).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: President George Washington re. property carried away by the British (handwritten copy) (1791 Dec. 7); Edward Telfair, Governor of Georgia, transmitting a resolution to keep the Senate doors open to the public (1792 Jan. 31); William Blount, Governor of the Territory South of the Ohio River, re. aid to troops stationed on Virginia's frontiers (1792 March 6); John Harvie & William Foushee, Directors of the James River Canal re. balance due on shares purchased on public account (1792 May 8); Benjamin R. Morgan, Solicitor of Complaints, to James Innes enclosing a bill of equity from William Grayson & others re. the tract of land known as Indiana (1792 Aug. 11); William Blount re. the boundary between Virginia and his territory at the Watkins' line (1792 Sept. 2); Gen. Anthony Wayne to Maj. William McMachan re. the protection of the frontiers of Ohio Co. (1793 Jan. 5); Henry Lee to James Wood, Lt. Gov., re. a suit against the state (1792 Feb. 7); Henry Lee to Wood re. peace with the Southwest Indians & settlement of claims (1793 Feb. 15); Richard E. Lee, Mayor of Norfolk, enclosing a letter from the British Consul re. interference with the civil authority against U.S. citizens engaged in privateering against the British (1793 May 16); Thomas Mifflin, Governor of Pennsylvania, re. the defense of the frontiers (1793 June 23); Robert Taylor, Mayor of Norfolk, re. distressed emigrants from the West Indies (1793 July 13); John Avery, Jr., Secretary, enclosing the proclamation of John Hancock, Governor of Massachusetts, concerning the complaint of William Marshall against the state (1793 July 21); John Hamilton, British Consul, re. an infringement of the President's neutrality proclamation (1793 Aug. 8 & 29); Joseph Jones re. an intended slave insurrection at Petersburg (1793 Aug. 17); Dennis Ramsay, Mayor of Alexandria, re. quarantine of vessels (1793 Sept. 13); Edward Carrington re. the rent of the room in the Capitol formerly occupied by the Solicitor (1793 Sept. 10); Robert Taylor re. measures to prevent the pestilence in Philadelphia & the West Indies (1793 Sept. 17); Fontaine Maury, Mayor of Fredericksburg, re. the infectious fever brought by trading vessels (1793 Sept. 17 & 22); John Barrett, Mayor of Richmond, re. the spread of the malady from Philadelphia (1793 Sept. 17); John Hamilton re. the French Privateer Republic (1793 Sept. 20 & 27); William Prentis, Mayor of Petersburg, re. two persons escaping from quarantine to Petersburg (1793 Oct. 1); Thomas Mifflin re. the suability of a state (1793 Dec. 19); John Hamilton re. the capture of the British Brigantine Cunningham by a French Privateer in U.S. jurisdiction (1793 Dec. 22); Monsieur P.A. Cherui, Vice-Consul of the France Republic at Alexandria, re. his title papers (1794 Jan. 14); Samuel Huntington, Governor of Connecticut, re. a resolution giving instructions to member in Congress (1794 Jan. 15); Robert Taylor re. relief of French emigrants (1794 Jan. 17 & Feb. 10); Dennis Ramsay re. statements of French emigrants from St. Domingo (1794 Feb. 1); A.J. Dallas, Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, transmitting a copy of their laws (1794 Feb. 11); William Prentis re. precautions against small pox (1794 March 20); Robert Taylor re. the British ship Daedalus (1794 March 23); John Hamilton re. the capture of the British Schooner Delight & Charles taken by a French ship within neutral limits (1794 May 29); John Marshall re. the arrest of the Ship Unicorn, a supposed privateer (1794 July 23 & 28); David Bradford re. opposition to the Excise Law (1794 Aug. 6); Dabney Minor re. leaks in the Capitol roof (1794 Aug. 7); Tench Coxe, Revenue Commissioner, to H.H. Breckinridge re. the Excise Law and the Whiskey Rebellion (1794 Aug. 8); Tench Coxe to H.H. Breckinridge re. a reported dismemberment of Virginia & Pennsylvania (1794 Aug. 29); Edward Carrington re. military stores and three thousand stand of arms to Winchester for use against the insurgents (1794 Sept. 1 & 16); George Jackson re. the Governor's letter & proclamation relative to the riotous party in Pennsylvania (1794 Sept. 9); Henry Lee to James Wood re. the fighting force of the insurgent counties (1794 Sept. 19); Mr. Oster, French Consul, re. an English Frigate with two French prizes at Hampton (1794 Sept. 25 & Oct. 15); Edward Carrington re. insurgents in Maryland, liberty poles, and the arrival of the Governor (1794 Sept. 24); Thomas Mathews re. arms, supplies, troop movements, quotas, desertions, etc. (1794 Oct. 6 & 12); George French, Mayor of Fredericksburg, re. the nomination of James Allan, Jr., as Superintendent of Quarantine (1794 Oct. 19); Edward Carrington re. provision for the return of the militia now in service (1794 Oct. 18); Henry Lee to James Wood stating that he is unable to return in time for the General Assembly (1794 Oct. 23); and Robert Mitchell, Mayor of Richmond, re. small pox (1794 Nov. 13).

Other noteworthy items include: pay roll of Lt. Bladen Ashby's company of Rangers (1791 Dec. 20); receipt for powder & lead for the use of Daniel Boone's Company (1791 Dec. 22); returns for elections to the House of Representatives (1792 Feb. 20 & 23); pay abstract of scouts belonging to Capt. Hugh Caperton's Company (1793 Jan. 29); election certificates for electors of the Presidential & Vice- Presidential elections (1792 Nov.); a roll of Capt. Hugh Caperton's Company showing residence & place of duty (1792 Undated); roll of John Morris' Company of rangers (1793 Jan. 1); proclamation by Gov. Lee prohibiting hostile incursions against the Indians north of the Ohio River while a treaty takes place at Lower Sandusky (1793 May 13); list of Capt. Hugh Caperton's Company at Fort Lee (1793 May 27); proclamation by Gov. Lee regarding the quarantine of vessels coming from Philadelphia, the Grenades, & Tobago (1793 Sept. 17); list of persons who have taken the oath of fidelity in Fairfax County (1793 Oct. 1); pay roll of the militia on guard over the Public Arsenal at New London (1793 Oct. 19); Petersburg resolutions regarding the malignant disease in Philadelphia (1793 Oct. 3); proclamation by Gov. Lee revoking his previous proclamation to perform quarantines (1793 Nov. 25); proclamation by Gov. Lee regarding an award for the capture of Richard Adams (1793 Dec. 11); pay abstract of militia from Washington Co. under Capt. Andrew Lewis (1793 Dec. 13); applications for agents for the collection of arrears of taxes due by delinquent sheriffs (1793 Dec. & 1794 Jan.); resolutions of the North Carolina Assembly regarding the decision of the Federal judiciary that a state may be sued by an individual (1794 Jan. 4); bonds of individuals appointed as agents for collecting taxes & duties (1794 Feb.); muster roll of a detachment of Cornelius Bogard's Company of Rangers commanded by William Wells (1794 March 15); resolution of Congress for an embargo on all ships in U.S. ports for thirty days (1794 March 26); return of laborers employed at Fort Nelson & Fort Norfolk (1794 June 27); rough general orders & division orders to militia (1794 June 30); proclamation by Lt. Gov. Wood regarding a contagious disease in the West Indies and performing quarantines (1794 Aug. 2); report of Maj. G.K. Taylor regarding the taking possession of Capt. Sinclair's ship The Unicorn suspecting of equipping for the purpose of privateering (1794 Aug. 4); proclamation by Gov. Lee regarding banditti from Western Pennsylvania in Virginia (1794 Aug. 19); estimate by Edward Carrington concerning the march of the militia for the suppression of the Whiskey Insurrection (1794 Sept. 4); and a proclamation by Lt. Gov. Wood revoking his proclamation for quarantines (1794 Nov. 4).

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically by date of document with undated items arranged to the rear.

Contents List

Henry Lee Executive Papers, 1791-1794
1791
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      2-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      12-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      22-24
  • Box 1
    Folder 4
    Undated
1792
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      3-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      11-19
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      21-31
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      1-8
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      21-31
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      12-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 13
      21-31
  • April
    • Box 1
      Folder 14
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 15
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 16
      21-30
  • May
    • Box 1
      Folder 17
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 18
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 19
      22-31
  • June
    • Box 1
      Folder 20
      1-9
    • Box 1
      Folder 21
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 22
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      2-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      11-19
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      21-26
  • August
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      2-8
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      11-19
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      21-31
  • September
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      2-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      12-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      21-31
  • October
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 12
      22-31
  • November
    • Box 2
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 14
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 15
      21-30
    • Box 2
      Folder 16
      Presidential & Vice Presidential Electors
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      22-31
  • Box 3
    Folder 4
    Undated
  • Pardons
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      A-I
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      J-Y
1793
  • January
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      22-31
  • February
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      21-28
  • March
    • Box 3
      Folder 13
      2-8
    • Box 3
      Folder 14
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 15
      21-30
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      22-30
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      21-31
  • June
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      1-8
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      12-16
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      22-30
  • July
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      2-9
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 14
      12-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 15
      21-31
  • September
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      2-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      21-30
  • October
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      21-31
  • November
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      2-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      12-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      21-29
  • December
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 12
      21-31
  • Box 5
    Folder 13
    Undated
1794
  • January
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      21-31
  • February
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      21-28
  • March
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      3-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      21-31
  • April
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      11-19
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      21-29
  • May
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      2-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      12-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      21-31
  • June
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      22-30
  • July
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      2-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      21-30
  • August
    • Box 7
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 7
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 7
      Folder 12
      21-31
  • September
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      11-19
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      21-30
  • October
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      12-20
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      21-30
  • November
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      12-20
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      21-30
  • Box 8
    Folder 10
    Undated
Box 8
Folder 11
Undated
Point of Fork Arsenal
  • Box 8
    Folder 12
    Accounts, Receipts, etc., 1792-1794
  • Box 8
    Folder 13
    Correspondence, 1792-1794
  • Box 8
    Folder 14
    Pay Rolls (See Oversized), 1792-1793
  • Box 8
    Folder 15
    Quarterly Accounts of Cash (See Oversized), 1792-1793
  • Box 8
    Folder 16
    Returns of Ordnance, etc. (See Oversized), 1792-1794
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1791
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Dec. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      Dec. 6
  • 1792
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      Jan. 31
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Jan. 31
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Feb. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      March 17
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      May 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      June 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      June 17
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      July 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      Aug. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      Sept. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      Oct. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      Oct. 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      Oct. 30
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Nov. 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Nov. 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Nov. 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      Nov. - Presidential Electors
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      Pardons - Anderson, Richard C.
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      Pardons - Joe & Allen (Slaves)
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      Pardons - Will (Slave)
  • 1793
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      Jan. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      Jan. 30
    • Box 9
      Folder 25
      Feb. 13
    • Box 9
      Folder 26
      Feb. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 27
      March 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 28
      April 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 29
      April 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 30
      May 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 31
      June 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 32
      July 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 33
      July 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 34
      July 9
    • Box 9
      Folder 35
      July 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 36
      Aug. 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 37
      Aug. 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 38
      Sept. 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 39
      Oct. 13
    • Box 9
      Folder 40
      Nov. 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 41
      Nov. 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 42
      Nov. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 43
      Dec. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 44
      Dec. 19
  • 1794
    • Box 9
      Folder 45
      Jan. 3
    • Box 9
      Folder 46
      Feb. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 47
      Feb. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 48
      Feb. 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 49
      March 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 50
      March 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 51
      March 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 52
      April 10
    • Box 9
      Folder 53
      May 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 54
      May 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 55
      May 21
    • Box 9
      Folder 56
      May 31
    • Box 9
      Folder 57
      May 31
    • Box 9
      Folder 58
      June 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 59
      July 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 60
      Aug. 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 61
      Aug. 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 62
      Sept. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 63
      Oct. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 64
      Nov. 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 65
      Nov. 20
  • Point of Fork Arsenal
    • Box 9
      Folder 66
      Pay Rolls, 1792-1793
    • Box 9
      Folder 67
      Quarterly Accounts of Cash, 1792-1793
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1791
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Dec. 20
  • 1792
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      Feb. 27
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      March 12
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      March 24
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      April 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      May 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      June 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      July [N.D.]
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      Dec. 23
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      Undated
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Pardons - Crane, John
  • 1793
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Jan. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      Feb. 4
    • Box 10
      Folder 14
      March 12
    • Box 10
      Folder 15
      July 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 16
      Sept. 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 17
      Sept. [N.D.]
    • Box 10
      Folder 18
      Dec. 13
    • Box 10
      Folder 19
      Undated
  • 1794
    • Box 10
      Folder 20
      Jan. 31
    • Box 10
      Folder 21
      March 15
    • Box 10
      Folder 22
      June 2
  • Box 10
    Folder 23
    Undated
  • Box 10
    Folder 24
    Point of Fork Arsenal - Returns, 1792-1794