A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Beverley Randolph, 1788-1791 Randolph, Beverley, Executive Papers of Governor, 1788-1791 40287

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Beverley Randolph, 1788-1791

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 40287


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
40287
Title
Executive Papers, 1788-1791
Physical Characteristics
5.39 cubic feet
Creator
Governor's Office
Physical Location
State Records Collection, Office of the Governor (Record Group 3)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Beverley Randolph Executive Papers, 1788-1791 (bulk 1789-1791). Accession 40287. State Records Collection, The Library of Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 5027-5034.


Biographical Information

Beverley Randolph was born in 1754 in Chatsworth, Henrico County, to Peter and Lucy Bolling Randolph. His father served in the House of Burgesses and as Surveyor General of Customs. Randolph attended William and Mary College where he graduated in 1771, and was later appointed to the Board of Visitors in 1784. He married Martha Cocke, daughter of James Cocke of Williamsburg, in 1775. Randolph also served on the Cumberland County Committee of Safety and commanded a regiment of cavalry as a colonel in the militia between 1776 and 1779. He represented Cumberland County in the House of Delegates in 1777 and 1779-1781. A member of the Council of State from 1781, Randolph was elected president of the Council of State in 1783, and 1786 through 1788. As president of the Council, Randolph served as Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. Consequently, Randolph performed the duties of Governor while Governor Randolph represented Virginia in the Constitutional Convention during the summer of 1787. Randolph succeeded Edmund Randolph as Governor on 12 November 1788. In addition, he was re-elected in 1789 and 1790 to two one-year terms as Governor. Randolph's administration was marked by the defense of the frontiers against Indian incursions, the fight to collect Virginia's Revolutionary claims from the United States, and the initiative to build a lighthouse at the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. Following his governorship, Randolph was appointed by President Washington as one of the commissioners to treat with the Indians in the Northwest Territory in 1793. The Commissioners failed to reach a peaceful resolution with the Indians and Randolph retired from public life. Randolph died in February 1797 at his estate "Green Creek" in Cumberland County. His remains were moved from his estate to the Westview Cemetery in Farmville, Va., in 1909.

Scope and Content Information

Governor Randolph's Executive papers are organized into two series. Series have been designated for Chronological files and Subject files. The bulk of the material can be found in the Chronological files' series which primarily consists of incoming correspondence during Randolph's three one-year terms as governor between 12 November 1788 and 1 December 1791. In addition to correspondence, there are acts & resolutions from Congress and the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates, orders of the Council of State, accounts, oaths, pardons, lists or calendars of criminals, depositions, proclamations, petitions, reports, appointments, bonds, circulars, proceedings, applications, agreements, extracts of journals & minutes, court records, certificates, returns, receipts, and other sundry items.

Series I: Chronological Files. The correspondence in this series relates to a variety of topics including state expenses & revenue, militia, recommendations for state positions, pardons, legislation, public tobacco, Revolutionary claims & pensioners, Presidential electors, Indian affairs, navigation, revisal of laws, resignations, elections, appointments, criminals & the Public Jail, the Cape Henry Lighthouse, the Point of Fork Arsenal, and the Marine Hospital. Noteworthy correspondence originates from the United States government, Virginia State government, and miscellaneous sources. Prominent correspondents from the United States government include President George Washington; Henry Knox, Secretary of War; Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury; Thomas Jefferson, Secretary of State; Edmund Randolph, Attorney General; and the Virginia Delegates to Congress including Samuel Griffin, James Monroe, Richard Henry Lee, John Walker, William Grayson, and others.

President George Washington transmits acts of Congress to Governor Beverley Randolph. His letter of 11 August 1789 transmits an act to provide for the government of the territory north west of the Ohio River. His letter of 24 August 1789 transmits the act providing for the expenses attending the treaties with Indian Tribes and the appointment of commissioners. Lastly, his letter of 8 October 1789 transmits duplicate acts to establish a Judicial Court of the United States, an act for registering & clearing vessels, and others. On 22 January 1790, the President simply writes to forward an important letter to Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. Finally, Washington's letter of 29 January 1790 relates to Gen. Wood's report respecting the materials placed at Cape Henry for the purpose of building a lighthouse and the need for a cession of the land from Virginia to the United States. (Note that these letters from Washington have separated to the Vault - George Washington Papers).

As Secretary of War, Henry Knox communicates frequently with Governor Randolph predominantly concerning Indian affairs and the defense of the frontier (1788 Dec. 29, 1790 July 28, 1790 Sept. 2, 1791 Feb. 26, 1791 June 11, & 1791 Nov. 16). This correspondence also relates to raising militia (1791 July 15 & 1791 Oct. 28), employing scouts & rangers (1790 April 14, 1790 June 10, 1790 July 17), gunpowder & lead for the Chickasaw Nation (1789 Dec. 24), and General Harmar's expedition against the Indians on the Ohio River (1790 March 3 & 1790 July 19). Knox also writes the Governor about Revolutionary War pensioners from Virginia (1789 April 25, 1789 Oct. 19, 1790 Feb. 8, 1790 April 15, & 1790 Sept. 15). On 15 October 1789, Knox encloses an extract of the act to recognize and adapt to the Constitution the establishment of the troops raised under the resolves of the United States. This act specifically relates to the presidential authority to raise militia to protect the frontiers. On 10 December 1789, he writes requesting a map of Kentucky and western Virginia. Finally, Knox often transmits letters to the Governor intended for William Blount, Governor of the territory ceded by North Carolina, Harry Innes, District Judge of Kentucky, and others, especially in the District of Kentucky.

Alexander Hamilton writes Governor Randolph with respect to statements of the public debt & loan office certificates (1789 Sept. 26, 1789 Oct. 29, 1789 Dec. 24, & 1791 June 27), statements of agents for settling the accounts of their respective lines in the late Army (1791 Jan. 14), and other financial matters (1790 Jan. 27 & 1790 Sept. 28). On 10 February 1790, Hamilton informs the Governor that the United States requires 2 acres of land to be ceded by Virginia for a lighthouse near the entrance of the Chesapeake Bay. On 8 May 1790, Hamilton writes that Edward Carrington has been requested to visit Cape Henry and make a selection for the location of the lighthouse. According to his letter from 19 June 1790, Hamilton notes that Thomas Newton of Norfolk replaced Carrington in this duty. His letter from 19 August 1790 relates to the receipt of the Governor's letter containing the cession of 2 acres on Cape Henry to the United States.

Throughout the collection are acts and resolutions of Congress signed by Thomas Jefferson as Secretary of State. Noteworthy is an act to provide for the unlading of ships in cases of obstruction by ice (1791 Jan. 7); an act declaring the consent of Congress that a new state be formed by the name of Kentucky (1791 Feb. 4); a resolution that Andrew Brown be appointed printer (1791 Feb. 18); an act for regulating the number of representatives to be chosen by the states of Kentucky & Vermont (1791 Feb. 25); and an act for raising an additional regiment to the military establishment of the United States (1791 March 10). The few pieces of correspondence from Jefferson include a brief note regarding the receipt of a letter from Joseph Clarke endorsed by the President and forwarded to the Governor (1790 Feb. 6) and a letter enclosing a collection of acts of Congress passed in their second session and all the treaties promulgated by the United States (1790 Aug. 30).

Following his governorship, Edmund Randolph served as the first Attorney General of the United States. In this capacity, Randolph writes the Governor with respect to the claims of Beauregard & Bourgeois against Oliver Pollock (1790 Feb. 7 & 10); treaties belonging to the Governor (1790 July 23); and Virginia land claims within the limits of Pennsylvania (1790 Sept. 9).

The various members of Virginia's delegation to the First & Second Congresses regularly communicated with Governor Randolph on a variety of national concerns. Significant correspondence from these delegates include a letter from Josiah Parker resigning his position as naval officer of Elizabeth River at Portsmouth to take his seat in Congress (1789 Feb. 9); a letter from Samuel Griffin accepting his appointment to Congress (1789 Feb. 24); a letter from James Madison, Jr., regarding the inspection law and the separation of state debts from National debts (1790 May 11); a letter from Richard Henry Lee & John Walker regarding speculators in arrears of soldiers' pay (1790 May 25); James Madison, Jr., regarding the act of Congress concerning arrears to the Virginia line (1790 May 25); James Madison, Jr., enclosing a letter from Alexander Hamilton regarding the tobacco inspection law (1790 May 26); a letter from Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg, Speaker of the House of Representatives, enclosing proceedings concerning the death of Representative Theodorick Bland (1790 June 3); a letter from James Monroe regarding his arrival in Philadelphia (1790 Dec. 10); and another letter from Monroe regarding Harmar's unsuccessful expedition against the Indians between the Ohio and the Great Lakes including the amount of casualties (1790 Dec. 16).

Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include William Davies, Commissioner of Virginia for Claims Against the United States; Harry Heth, State Agent of Public Tobacco; William Hay, Director of Public Buildings; John Beckley & Charles Hay, Clerks of the House of Delegates; Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate; Archibald Blair, Col. Thomas Meriwether, & Samuel Coleman, Clerks & Assistant Clerk of the Council of State; Capt. Elias Langham, Superintendent of the Military Stores, Arms, & Ammunition at Point of Fork Arsenal; various county lieutenants; William Rose, Keeper of the Public Jail; James Innes, Attorney General; Leighton Wood, Jr., & Samuel Shepard, Solicitors General; John Pendleton, Jr., Auditor of Public Accounts; and Jacquelin Ambler, Treasurer.

As Commissioner of Virginia for Claims Against the United States, Col. William Davies corresponds regularly with Governor Randolph. Davies accepted this position from Governor Edmund Randolph on 27 Sept. 1788. His correspondence relates to his salary (1789 Jan. 1), instructions for persons to be employed to collect accounts & vouchers (1789 Jan. 10), examination of claims (1789 Jan. 24), pensioners (1789 Feb. 23), Andrew Dunscomb's complaints (1789 March 23), his arrival in New York (1789 April 23), the removal of the Auditor & Treasurer's Books prior to 1781 to New York (1789 Aug. 11), additional clerks (1789 Aug. 19), a plan for the final settlement of continental accounts (1790 July 12), and numerous other topics. Most of Davies' correspondence relates to particulars in the settlement of Virginia's claim against the United States for expenditures during the Revolutionary War.

On 27 Jan. 1789, a bond was posted for Harry Heth to serve as agent to dispose of public tobacco in the Treasury Office in discharge of public taxes. He encloses a letter from Benjamin Harrison, Jr., on 22 Jan. 1789, to purchase public tobacco. Heth often writes the Governor submitting reports on the sales of public tobacco (1789 May 20, 1789 Nov. 9, 1790 Jan. 5 & 9, 1790 March 18, & 1791 Oct. 6). He also specifically deals with the settlement of the accounts of the Westham Foundry (1789 March 3 & 5, 1789 June 13, & 1790 June 23).

William Hay, one of the Directors of Public Buildings, corresponds with the Governor regarding the claim on the estate of Col. Archibald Cary for monies advanced in 1785 (1789 Jan. 31); the completion of the offices for the Executive Board (1789 June 18); a contract to cover the roof of the Capitol with lead, etc. (1790 Jan. 6, April 12, & May 11); statements of an estimate of the sum necessary for paying the debts due the directors of public buildings (1791 Jan. 17); and money for the completion of the Capitol (1791 Oct. 15).

John Beckley (later Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives) & Charles Hay, Clerks of the House of Delegates, & Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate, regularly enclose resolutions from their respective bodies to the Governor. Noteworthy resolutions include a proclamation for the Governor to appoint electors to choose a president and for representatives to serve in Congress (1788 Nov. 9 & 22); the free navigation of the Mississippi River (1788 Dec. 1); the election of Beverley Randolph as Governor (1788 Dec. 6); an additional sum to William Heth in the settlement of Virginia's claim against the U.S. for the North Western Territory (1788 Dec. 3); the election of Richard Cary, John Tyler, & James Henry as judges of the General Court (1788 Dec. 24); the election of Cuthbert Bullitt as judge of the General Court & Cyrus Griffin as Privy Councilor (1788 Dec. 27); attacks by the Creek Indians against the Chickasaws and furnishing them with gun powder (1789 Oct. 23); the election of James Mercer as judge of the Court of Appeals to replace John Blair (1789 Nov. 18); the election of Joseph Jones & Spencer Roane as judges of the General Court (1789 Nov. 19); the re-election & qualification of Beverley Randolph as Governor (1789 Nov. 28); an appointment to examine the materials provided by the State to erect a lighthouse (1789 Dec. 14); the disposal of the materials used for the erection of the lighthouse (1790 Nov. 5); the election of George Nicholas as Attorney General for the District of Kentucky in place of Harry Innes (1790 Nov. 9); the election of James Monroe in the U.S. Senate to replace William Grayson (1790 Nov. 9); the election of John Steele, Miles Selden, & Hardin Burnley to the Privy Council (1790 Nov. 26); the protection of citizens on the frontiers (1790 Dec. 20); and the election of Henry Lee as Governor (1791 Nov. 2).

Archibald Blair, as Clerk of the Council of State, encloses extracts of minutes and orders of the Council to the Governor. On 26 Nov. 1788, Blair writes regarding the request that Col. Thomas Meriwether consult with printers for 500 copies of the acts to appoint presidential electors. Meriwether, who resigned as clerk of the Council on 30 June 1789, writes regarding pensioners (1788 Dec. 9); quarterly returns and payrolls of Elias Langham at Point of Fork (1789 Jan. 5); Capt. Young's books and papers as successor of the Commercial Agent (1789 Jan. 22); estimates by Elias Langham to enclose the arsenals and magazines at Point of Fork with a stone wall, etc. (1789 April 6); and his resignation (1789 June 27). Samuel Coleman was appointed Assistant Clerk of the Council on 26 Dec. 1786. Following the resignation of Thomas Meriwether on 27 June 1789, Coleman requested to fill the vacancy. He writes the Governor respecting militia returns (1789 Nov. 3 & 30; 1790 Jan. 1; 1790 Feb. 2; 1790 April 1; 1790 June 1; 1790 Aug. 4; 1790 Oct. 12; 1791 Jan. 18; 1791 July 30; & 1791 Oct. 5); the accounts, provisions, payrolls, & returns of Elias Langham from the Point of Fork Arsenal (1789 July 6, 1790 April 5, 1790 July 3, 1790 Oct. 1, 1791 Jan. 4, 1791 Feb. 23, 1791 April 4, 1791 June 19, 1791 July 5, & 1791 Oct. 4); his resignation on account of his health (1789 April 3); the accounts of James McGavock for public lead delivered at Fort Chiswell (1790 Feb. 25); the claims of scouts & rangers (1790 June 7, 21, & 29; 1790 Oct. 9 & 25; 1790 Dec. 11; & 1791 June 20); and the indebtedness of James Hunter, deceased, former Superintendent of the Public Foundry (1791 Aug. 27).

Capt. Elias Langham, Superintendent of the Military Stores, Arms, & Ammunition at Point of Fork Arsenal, writes to Governor Randolph regarding the cannon at Taylor's Ferry (1788 Nov. 21); the contractor for provisions (1789 Jan. 6); public negroes at Point of Fork (1789 Feb. 7); a recommendation for an appointment to the Dept. of Military Stores when established by Congress (1789 April 11); ammunition for the Chief of the Chickasaw Nation and an application from Chief Piomingo for 40 gallons of rum (1789 Nov. 2); a letter from Piomingo concerning a change in his route (1789 Nov. 4); powder & lead furnished the Indians at New London (1790 Feb. 26); the complaint of Thomas Harris for his punishment & dismissal (1790 Oct. 1); opinions on his conduct (1790 Dec. 19); a contract for furnishing rations at Point of Fork and an addition built to the public mill (1791 Jan. 4); and the purchase of iron to forge bayonets (1791 July 1). Note that additional materials relating to the Point of Fork Arsenal can be found in Series II.

County lieutenants including David Shepherd, Alexander Barnett, George Clendenin, Walter Crockett, John Evans, Benjamin Wilson, Benjamin Harrison, John P. Duvall, Levi Todd, Robert Johnson, & Arthur Campbell correspond with Governor Randolph on numerous occasions primarily regarding Indian affairs in the western counties. David Shepherd, Ohio Co., writes regarding a treaty with the Indians at the falls of Muskingum (1788 Nov. 26); a general return of militia (1789 April 17); the raising of a company of rangers and Indian attacks at Dunkard Creek (1789 May 12); the account for raising troops (1789 June 8); a return of spies & rangers (1789 Sept. 13); and continued depredations by the Indians on the frontier (1791 May 9). Alexander Barnett, Russell Co., encloses court-martial proceedings for the trial of James Gibson & Richard Thompson for disobeying orders (1788 Dec. 10). George Clendenin, Greenbrier Co. (later Kanawha Co.), requests an augmentation of scouts & rangers in Washington Co. (1788 Dec. 18); writes of the treaty and atrocities by the Indians west of the Ohio (1789 May 6); the new county of Kanawha, recommendations for magistrates, Indian atrocities on Clinch Settlement, etc. (1789 Aug. 10); depredations by the Indians (1790 April 15); and the need for scouts in Kanawha Co. (1791 Jan. 1). Walter Crockett, Montgomery Co., remarks on the state of the frontier and the potential of Indian hostilities in the spring (1789 Feb. 16). John Evans, Monongalia Co., reports on Indian hostilities and the ordering of scouts (1789 April 25). Benjamin Wilson & John P. Duvall, Harrison Co., enclose a deposition concerning Indian attacks (1789 May 22); provide a list of "mischief" done by the Indians (1789 Sept. 28); and report on Indian attacks (1791 Nov. 27). Benjamin Harrison, Rockingham Co., writes in relation to the strength of militia and militia fines (1789 May 27). Levi Todd, Fayette Co., notes the need for additional magistrates, the attack on Federal troops by the Indians, and the separation of Kentucky (1789 May 27). Robert Johnson, Woodford Co., writes about the recommendation of the court for militia officers and Indian "mischief" (1789 June 15). Lastly, Arthur Campbell, Washington Co., chronicles Indian attacks in Russell Co. (1789 July 20); a confrontation between the Creek Indians & Spaniards (1789 Aug. 1); and submits a return of militia (1789 Nov. 3).

William Rose as Keeper of the Public Jail periodically transmits lists or calendars of criminals convicted at the General Court (1788 Dec. 8, 1789 March 14, & 1789 Aug. 31). Rose also writes the Governor regarding specific inmates including Littlebury Cotton charged with horse stealing (1789 April 13 & 23) and John Rose imprisoned for debts (1790 Dec. 22).

James Innes served as Attorney General to the Commonwealth during Randolph's administration as Governor. Innes provides his opinion on various issues including the case of Catherine Crull sentenced to death for the murder of her husband (1789 Jan. 28); the memorial of Joseph Latil regarding the revenue law (1789 March 2); the act for granting relief to sheriffs & collectors of revenue (1789 March 2); prisoners in the new district jails of New London & Dumfries (1789 March 28); the case of Ephraim Willard & John Whitney for counterfeiting (1789 May 23); the case of George Byrd sentenced to death for horse stealing (1789 May 25); warrants issued to scouts & rangers (1789 Dec. 23); the oath to support the U.S. Constitution (1790 March 20); the Governor's right to withhold his signature from patents claiming property over the waters of the James River between the Rocky Islands (1790 April 4); the case of the executors of Archibald Cary (1790 June 4); commissioner's fees (1790 Aug. 27); the case of Caleb Hill sentenced to death for horse stealing (1791 April 27); and the case of Hunter Banks & Co. (1791 June 8).

Governor Randolph corresponds often with Leighton Wood, Jr., & Samuel Shepard (formerly Clerk), Solicitors General; John Pendleton, Jr., Auditor of Public Accounts; and Jacquelin Ambler, Treasurer, regarding various financial matters. Leighton Wood & Samuel Shepard submit lists of inspectors bonds in the Solicitor's Office (1789 Jan. 24) and reports of delinquent sheriffs (1789 April 23, 1789 May 22). On 6 Jan. 1790, Wood writes the Governor regarding the sale of the state Boats Liberty & Patriot by James Heron of Norfolk. In addition, the Solicitors often write the Governor with respect to specific accounts, especially sheriff accounts of revenue. Wood also writes in support of Samuel Shepard to serve as Solicitor General during his absence due to illness (1790 March 29). Leighton Wood eventually submits his resignation as Solicitor General on 6 July 1791 (See also 1791 May 29). John Pendleton encloses accounts of sundry expenses in protecting & defending the frontier from the Indians in the lands west of the Ohio River (1789 Feb. 19); lists of balances from inspectors & county court clerks (1789 Jan. 29); the account of the expense of the two expeditions against the Shawnee & Wabash Indians (1789 Dec. 17); the claim of Oliver Pollock (1790 Jan. 4). In addition, Pendleton administers oaths to various state officers including John Dawson & John H. Briggs to the Privy Council (1789 Dec. 21) and Beverley Randolph as Governor (1790 Dec. 3). Ambler encloses accounts of monies paid in part of the expenses attending scouts & rangers (1789 Jan. 1); accounts of payments made into the Treasury by the Superior & County Court Clerks (1789 Feb. 6); accounts of payments by inspectors of tobacco (1789 Jan. 28). He writes regarding unpaid expenses of the General Assembly (1788 Dec. 31); security for the Treasury in the new Capitol including iron bars for the windows (1789 June 15); the balance of specie in the Treasury (1789 June 30, 1789 Aug. 11, 1789 Oct. 15, 1789 Dec. 23 & 31, 1790 Feb. 1, 1790 April 27, & 1791 Jan. 14); his resignation as one of the Directors of the Public Buildings (1791 Jan. 3); and crop and transfer tobacco in the Treasury for arrears of taxes (1791 May 10).

Additional significant correspondence includes the following: Edmund Randolph to the Council of State regarding his leaving office (1788 Nov. 17); the Judges of the General Court enclosing a list of persons convicted of capital offenses (1788 Dec. 16); John Blair accepting his commission as a judge of the Court of Appeals (1789 Jan. 16); John Dawson regarding the Convention of Kentucky on the navigation of the Mississippi and surrendering the river to Spain (1789 Jan. 29); Martin Oster, French Consul regarding the controversy between Henry Cugneau & Jean Alexis Subercaseaux and John Cauvey (1789 Jan. 31, 1789 March 2 & 22); William Fleming & Peter Lyons regarding their appointments as Judges of the Court of Appeals (1789 Feb. 10); Paul Carrington regarding his appointment to the General Court (1789 Feb. 20); Cyrus Griffin regarding the appointment of William Davies (1789 March 9); Andrew Dunscomb to Davies regarding job & salary (1789 March 17); William Russell regarding the relinquishment to the public of the Capitol Square in Williamsburg and the buildings thereon (1789 May 1); a letter from James Madison, President of Board of Directors, regarding funds to support the Lunatic Hospital in Williamsburg (1789 June 7); Samuel McDowell regarding a remonstrance from inhabitants of the District of Kentucky against discharging the militia from service (1789 July 36); John Hancock regarding the conveyance of the bodies of James Brown & William Davis charged with piracy (1789 Sept. 13); David Ross recommending Piomingo, Chief of the Chickasaws, to pass through the country to New York (1789 Oct. 12); Patrick Henry regarding rifles & expenses for Indians (1789 Oct. 27); John Fitzgerald enclosing an address of the people of Georgetown & Alexandria on the advantages of the Potomac River for the permanent seat of the Federal Government (1789 Dec. 22); George Nicholas regarding his appointment as Attorney General for the District of Kentucky (1790 Jan. 30); William Tatham regarding Hutchin's map, etc. (1790 Feb. 24, April 13, & Aug. 10); James Taylor concerning the proceedings of the Commissioners of the Marine Hospital (1790 March 26, 1790 Oct. 9, & 1791 May 18); Thomas Newton, Jr., regarding a plat of the 2 acres for the Cape Henry Lighthouse (1790 July 25); Simon Fraser regarding an attempt to burn the town of Petersburg (1790 Aug. 10); Gov. J.E. Howard, Maryland, regarding the erection of a lighthouse and disposal of the materials provided for the construction (1791 Jan. 7); Thomas Newton, Jr., regarding McComb's excavation for the lighthouse (1791 July 18); John McComb regarding the foundation for the lighthouse at Cape Henry (1791 July 22); Thomas Johnson, David, Stuart, & Daniel Carroll regarding a draft for the construction of the federal buildings (1791 Aug. 2); David Stuart regarding financial problems in constructing the federal buildings (1791 Aug. 5); and James Madison enclosing proceedings of the Directors of the Hospital for Lunatics (1791 Oct. 26).

Other noteworthy items include: an act regarding the credentials of the senators (1788 Dec. 28); a court order recommending Wilson Cary Nicholas as county lieutenant of Albemarle Co. (1789 Jan. 8); the bond of William Lindsay as Naval Officer of the Elizabeth River District (1789 Feb. 23); a return of the State Electoral College & election certificates from the first Presidential election (1789 Feb.); a report of the Committee as to the Removal into the New Capitol regarding apartments (1789 June 9); proclamations by the Governor (1789 June 5, 1789 July 21, 1791 May 3); the sales at auction of the State Boats Liberty & Patriot by Capt. Richard Taylor (1789 Aug. 6); the oath of allegiance to Cyrus Griffin as Privy Councilor (1789 Oct. 29); oath of allegiance to Charles Carter as Privy Councilor (1789 Nov. 30); a report of the committee regarding appropriations for the building of the Capitol in Richmond (1789 Dec. 14); an account with Bassett Mosely to construct the lighthouse at Cape Henry (1790 Jan. 9); the report of Lt. Gov. James Wood regarding the lighthouse (1790 Jan. 13); the oath of Thomas Madison as Privy Councilor (1790 Jan. 19); the meeting of the Directors of the Lunatic Hospital regarding the resignations of John Blair & James Innes (1790 Feb. 16); the deed of cession from Virginia to the United States for 2 acres of land at Cape Henry for the purpose of erecting a lighthouse (1790 Aug. 9); a proclamation of President George Washington of a treaty between the U.S. and Creek Nation (1790 Aug. 13); and a speech of George Washington regarding public credit, the District of Kentucky & statehood, Indian incursions on frontier settlements, etc. (1790 Dec. 8).

Series II: Subject Files. This series is arranged alphabetically by subject and relates to the Point of Fork Arsenal in Fluvanna Co., Virginia. The series contains accounts of cash & provisions, pay rolls of artificers & state guard, quarterly accounts of muskets, quarter master stores, & clothing, returns of ordnance & military stores, and vouchers between 1789 and 1791. Note that not all materials related to the Point of Fork Arsenal have been separated to this series. Correspondence related to the Arsenal can be found in Series I.

Arrangement

Arrangement

Series I is arranged chronologically by date of document and Series II is arranged alphabetically by subject.

Organization

Organized into two (2) series: I. Chronological Files and II. Subject Files.

Contents List

Series I: Chronological Files, 1788-1791
1788
  • November
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      10-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      21-31
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 4
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      22-31
1789
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      12-19
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      21-31
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      21-27
    • Box 1
      Folder 12
      Presidential Electors, Jan.-Feb. 1789
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 14
      12-31
  • April
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      22-30
  • May
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      22-30
  • June
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 9
      22-30
  • July
    • Box 2
      Folder 10
      2-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 11
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 2
      Folder 12
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 13
      11-31
  • September
    • Box 2
      Folder 14
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 15
      11-18
    • Box 2
      Folder 16
      21-30
  • October
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      1-15
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      17-31
  • November
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      12-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      23-30
  • December
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      12-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      21-31
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      Undated
1790
  • January
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      24-31
  • February
    • Box 3
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 14
      16-28
  • March
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      22-30
  • April
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      12-22
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      23-30
  • May
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      11-19
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      21-31
  • June
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      12-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 11
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 4
      Folder 12
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 13
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 14
      21-20
  • August
    • Box 4
      Folder 15
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 16
      11-19
    • Box 4
      Folder 17
      21-31
  • September
    • Box 4
      Folder 18
      1-9
    • Box 4
      Folder 19
      14-28
  • October
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      22-30
  • November
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      1-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      21-30
  • December
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      21-31
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      Undated
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      Revisal of Laws
1791
  • January
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 12
      14-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 13
      22-29
  • February
    • Box 5
      Folder 14
      1-18
    • Box 5
      Folder 15
      21-26
  • March
    • Box 5
      Folder 16
      1-18
    • Box 5
      Folder 17
      21-31
  • April
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      2-15
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      22-29
  • May
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      2-18
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      22-31
  • June
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      1-14
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      15-30
  • July
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      1-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      21-30
  • August
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      2-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      21-29
  • September
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      1-9
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      12-29
  • October
    • Box 6
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 14
      12-19
    • Box 6
      Folder 15
      21-29
  • November
    • Box 6
      Folder 16
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 17
      12-19
    • Box 6
      Folder 18
      24-30
    • Box 6
      Folder 19
      Undated
Series II: Subject Files
  • Point of Fork Arsenal
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      Accounts of Cash, 1789-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      Accounts of Provisions, 1789-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 3
      Miscellaneous, 1790-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 4
      Pay Rolls, 1789-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 5
      Quarterly Account of Muskets, 1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 6
      Quarterly Accounts of Quarter Master Stores, 1789-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 7
      Quarterly Summary Accounts of Clothing, 1789-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 8
      Returns of Ordnance & Military Stores, 1789-1791
    • Box 7
      Folder 9
      Vouchers for Provisions, 1789-1790
Oversized (Clamshell Boxes)
  • 1788
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      Nov. 13
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      Nov. 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      Nov. 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      Nov. 24
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      Dec. 3
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      Dec. 16
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      Dec. 18
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      Dec. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      Dec. 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 10
      Dec. 27
    • Box 8
      Folder 11
      Dec. 30
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      [N.D.]
  • 1789
    • Box 8
      Folder 13
      Jan. 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 14
      Jan. 29
    • Box 8
      Folder 15
      Feb. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 16
      March 16
    • Box 8
      Folder 17
      March 23
    • Box 8
      Folder 18
      May 20
    • Box 8
      Folder 19
      May 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 20
      May 23
    • Box 8
      Folder 21
      May 25
    • Box 8
      Folder 22
      June 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 23
      June 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 24
      July 21
    • Box 8
      Folder 25
      July 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 26
      Aug. 6
    • Box 8
      Folder 27
      Aug. 8
    • Box 8
      Folder 28
      Nov. 14
    • Box 8
      Folder 29
      Nov. 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 30
      Nov. 18
    • Box 8
      Folder 31
      Nov. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 32
      Nov. 28
    • Box 8
      Folder 33
      Dec. 12
    • Box 8
      Folder 34
      Dec. 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 35
      Dec. 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 36
      [N.D.]
  • 1790
    • Box 8
      Folder 37
      Jan. 9
    • Box 8
      Folder 38
      March 20
    • Box 8
      Folder 39
      March 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 40
      April 22
    • Box 8
      Folder 41
      April 23
    • Box 8
      Folder 42
      May 1
    • Box 8
      Folder 43
      May 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 44
      May 31
    • Box 8
      Folder 45
      July 4
    • Box 8
      Folder 46
      Aug. 9
    • Box 8
      Folder 47
      Sept. 1
    • Box 8
      Folder 48
      Sept. 27
    • Box 8
      Folder 49
      Oct. 12
    • Box 8
      Folder 50
      Oct. 14
    • Box 8
      Folder 51
      Nov. 8
    • Box 8
      Folder 52
      Nov. 9
    • Box 8
      Folder 53
      Nov. 9
    • Box 8
      Folder 54
      Nov. 10
    • Box 8
      Folder 55
      Nov. 18
    • Box 8
      Folder 56
      Nov. 24
    • Box 8
      Folder 57
      Nov. 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 58
      Nov. 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 59
      Nov. 30
    • Box 8
      Folder 60
      Dec. 4
    • Box 8
      Folder 61
      Dec. 16
    • Box 8
      Folder 62
      Dec. 30
    • Box 8
      Folder 63
      [N.D.]
  • 1791
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Jan. 7
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      Feb. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      Feb. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      Feb. 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Feb. 25
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      March 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      March 31
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      April 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      May 10
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      May 10
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      May 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      June 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      July 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      July 7
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      July 20
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Aug. 11
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Aug. 27
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Sept. 9
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      Sept. 15
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      Sept. 15
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      Sept. 29
    • Box 9
      Folder 22
      Oct. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 23
      Oct. 6
    • Box 9
      Folder 24
      Oct. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 25
      Oct. 13
    • Box 9
      Folder 26
      Oct. 18
    • Box 9
      Folder 27
      Oct. 24
    • Box 9
      Folder 28
      Oct. 26
    • Box 9
      Folder 29
      Nov. 1
    • Box 9
      Folder 30
      Nov. 2
Oversized (Newspaper Boxes)
  • 1788
    • Box 10
      Folder 1
      Nov. 10
    • Box 10
      Folder 2
      Nov. 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 3
      Nov. 24
    • Box 10
      Folder 4
      Dec. 11
  • 1789
    • Box 10
      Folder 5
      Jan. 28
    • Box 10
      Folder 6
      Feb. 6
    • Box 10
      Folder 7
      March 2
    • Box 10
      Folder 8
      May 8
    • Box 10
      Folder 9
      May 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 10
      July 6
    • Box 10
      Folder 11
      Nov. 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 12
      Nov. 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 13
      [N.D.]
  • 1790
    • Box 10
      Folder 14
      Jan. 1
    • Box 10
      Folder 15
      March 18
    • Box 10
      Folder 16
      April 22
    • Box 10
      Folder 17
      May 5
    • Box 10
      Folder 18
      May 21
    • Box 10
      Folder 19
      May 27
    • Box 10
      Folder 20
      June 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 21
      June & July
    • Box 10
      Folder 22
      July 12
    • Box 10
      Folder 23
      July 20
    • Box 10
      Folder 24
      Aug. 13
    • Box 10
      Folder 25
      Aug. 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 26
      Nov. 9
    • Box 10
      Folder 27
      Dec. 7
    • Box 10
      Folder 28
      Dec. 8
  • 1791
    • Box 10
      Folder 29
      March 30
    • Box 10
      Folder 30
      June 6
    • Box 10
      Folder 31
      Oct. 10
  • Point of Fork Arsenal
    • Box 11
      Folder 1
      Quarterly Accounts of Quarter Master Stores, 1789-1791
    • Box 11
      Folder 2
      Returns of Ordnance & Military Stores, 1789-1791