A Guide to the Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1818-1827 Gilmer, Francis Walker, Letters, 1818-1827 18764

A Guide to the Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1818-1827

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 18764


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Trenton Hizer

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
18764
Title
Francis Walker Gilmer Letters, 1818-1827
Physical Characteristics
4 leaves and 24 pages
Creator
Francis Walker Gilmer
Physical Location
Personal Papers Collection, Acc. 18764
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Francis Walker Gilmer. Letters, 1818-1827. Accession 18764. Personal papers collection. The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Purchased from the Anderson Galleries, New York, New York, 11 December 1923.


Biographical Information

Francis Walker Gilmer was born 9 October 1790 at "Pen Park" in Albemarle County, Virginia, to George Gilmer (1742-1795) and Lucy Walker Gilmer (1751-1800). He received some of his education at Monticello from Martha Jefferson Randolph (1772-1836) and at a school run by James Ogilvie (1760-1820). Gilmer attended the College of William and Mary in 1809-1810, then studied law under William Wirt (1772-1834) in Richmond, Virginia. Upon the completion of his legal studies, he travelled extensively along the eastern seaboard with the Abbe Joseph Francisco Correa de Serra (1750-1823) before beginning the practice of law in Winchester, Virginia, in 1816. A year later, Gilmer returned to Richmond to continue practicing law. In 1824, he was chosen by Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) to travel to Europe to hire professors for the newly established University of Virginia. Gilmer himself was appointed professor of law, but he died before he could assume his position on 25 February 1826 at "Farmington" in Albemarle County.

Scope and Content Information

Letters, 1818-1827, from Francis Walker Gilmer (1790-1826) of Richmond, Virginia, to John Randolph (1773-1833) of Roanoke in Charlotte County, Virginia, discussing politics, social news, Gilmer's legal career, and personal news. Gilmer comments on Spencer Roane (1762-1822) as a potential presidential candidate in 1824; the failure of Thomas Ritchie (1778-1854) to publish a letter from Randolph in the Richmond ENQUIRER; the Virginia-Kentucky commission to settle land claims between the two states; Preston's default and petition before the general assembly, and other political news. Gilmer comments on the scandal surrounding Mrs. Bell; the Virginia springs; Littleton Waller Tazewell's speeches; William Pinkney's skills as a lawyer; and other social news. He comments on a dispute with John Pickering (1777-1846) about the etymology of the word "tote." Gilmer writes Randolph about his trip to Europe to recruit professors for the soon-to-open University of Virginia, and his travels in England and Scotland. Gilmer writes upon his return how the trip adversely affected his health and comments how the university is poor shape because of Thomas Jefferson. Also includes a letter, 26 January 1827, from Peachy R. Gilmer (1779-1836) to Randolph returning some letter to Randolph and stating that Gilmer had seen Randolph's niece Elizabeth Coalter (Bryan) (1805-1856).

Arrangement

Chronological


Contents List

Letter, 14 September 1818, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, [Virginia], to John Randolph, Roanoke, [Charlotte County, Virginia], replying to Randolph's of 10 July and returning letter (not included) as requested, personal remarks.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 18 December 1820, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, thanking Randolph for praise of "A Vindication of the Laws Limiting the Rate of Interest on Loans," and commenting on speeches by Littleton Waller Tazewell made in Richmond.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 5 January 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, attacking scandalizers of Mrs. Bell and religious hypocrites. Gilmer visited Randolph's niece to offer condolences on her sister's death. Gilmer suggests Randolph writes personal remarks on the relationship between him and Gilmer.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 27 January 1822, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, declining invitation to Washington. Gilmer comments on William Pinkney; default of John Preston, Treasurer of Virginia, and his petition for indulgence; Spencer Roane's possible presidential bid in 1824; Henry Clay's visit to Richmond over the Kentucky land controversy; Mrs. Bell, and social news. Gilmer discusses the etymology of the word "tote" and his dispute over it with John Pickering.
4 p., ALS.
Letter, 6 February 1823, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, sending personal news and political news upon Randolph's return from Europe. Gilmer states that Chapman Johnson is threatening to revive the Kentucky-Virginia land compromise.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 29 April 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, informing Randolph that he delivered his letter to Benjamin Watkins Leigh so that it would be given to Thomas Ritchie, but that it hasn't been published yet. Leigh will be published in the next paper. Claim made that Ritchie cannot publish the Latin in letter and that Gilmer retained part of the manuscript. Gilmer denies the last.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 29 April 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, requesting advice and confidentiality on Gilmer's mission to England to recruit professors for the University of Virginia, and adding that he hopes to be back by autumn court.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 6 May 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, New York, New York, to John Randolph, Washington, stating that he is leaving for Liverpool Saturday aboard the "Cortes."
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, [1825], Francis Walker Gilmer, Cambridge, [England], to John Randolph, London, [England], saying that he had received Randolph's letter too late, but will keep it for further orders. States that he has kept Randolph's confidence.
1 leaf, ALS.
Letter, 25 September 1824, Francis Walker Gilmer, London, to John Randolph, "Left in the care of Mr. Barksdale, London," saying that he is leaving shortly and fearing that Randolph did not get his earlier letter. Gilmer still has the newspaper which he will return in Virginia. Gilmer states that he had great success in recruiting professors and adds that he enjoyed England, but found Scotland desolate.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 25 May 1825, Francis Walker Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Charlotte Court House, [Virginia], informing Randolph that he has just returned from Albemarle County, [Virginia], and is feeling better from his travel illness. Gilmer sends personal news including comments on W. Barksdale and Dr. Brockenbrough.
3 p., ALS.
Letter, 3 November 1825, Francis Walker Gilmer, Farmington, [Albemarle County], to John Randolph, Charlotte Court House, stating that he had poor accomodations at the Virginia springs. Gilmer became ill and has to delay return to Richmond. States that the University of Virginia is in poor shape because of Thomas Jefferson. Gilmer states that he will teach at the University as soon as he gets well. Says he expects to see Dr. and Mrs. Brockenbrough.
2 p., ALS.
Letter, 26 January 1827, Peachy Ridgway Gilmer, Richmond, to John Randolph, Washington, returning Randolph's letters with Francis Walker Gilmer's last letter. Gilmer also has seen Randolph's niece Elizabeth Coalter.
1 leaf, ALS.