A Guide to the William Wirt Letters, 1803-1832 William Wirt, Letters, 1803-1832 13779

A Guide to the William Wirt Letters, 1803-1832

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 13779


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Processed by: Trenton Hizer

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
13779
Title
Letters 1803-1832
Physical Characteristics
.225 cubic feet
Creator
William Wirt
Physical Location
Personal Papers Collection, Acc. 13779
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

William Wirt. Letters, 1803-1832. Accessions 13779, 13780, 13781, 13782, 13783. Personal papers collection. The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Holmes Conrad, Winchester, Virginia, 31 October 1914.

Alternative Form

Also available on microfilm (Misc. Reel 319).


Biographical Information

William Wirt was born 8 November 1772 in Bladensburg, Maryland, to Jacob Wirt (d. 1774) and Henrietta Wirt (d. 1779). Orphaned, Wirt fortunately received help from an uncle and from a family friend and received an education. He studied law and settled in Culpeper County, Virginia, where he was admitted to the Virginia bar and practiced in Culpeper and Albemarle Counties where he lived from 1795 to 1799. He moved to Richmond, Virginia, in 1800 to continue his practice. He was elected clerk of the House of Delegates. In 1802, he was appointed chancellor of one of the three chancery districts and moved to Williamsburg, Virginia. In 1803, he resigned as chancellor and moved to Norfolk, Virginia, to continue his private law practice. Wirt returned to Richmond in 1806 and continued practicing law. He served as one of the prosecution in the Aaron Burr trial in 1807. In 1817, he was appointed Attorney-General of the United States by President James Monroe (1758-1831) and served for twelve years through Monroe's term and through the term of John Quincy Adams (1767-1848). In 1829, he retired to private life in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1832, Wirt was the presidential candidate of the Anti-Masonic party. Wirt wrote many works including LETTERS OF THE BRITISH SPY and a biography of Patrick Henry. Wirt died in Washington D.C. 18 February 1834, and was buried in the National (Congressional) Cemetery. William Wirt married first Mildred Gilmer (d. 1799) of Albemarle County 28 May 1795. He married second Elizabeth Washington Gamble (1784-1857) of Richmond 7 September 1802, and they had twelve children.

Scope and Content Information

Letters, 1803-1832, from William Wirt (1772-1834) of Williamsburg, Norfolk, and Richmond, Virginia, and Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington D.C., lawyer and Attorney-General of the United States, to Dabney Carr, of Charlottesville, Richmond, and Winchester Virginia, discussing legal matters, including the Virginia Superior Court of Chancery, Wirt's tenure as Attorney-General, and Wirt's legal practice in Norfolk, Richmond, and Baltimore; politics, including the presidential elections of 1816, 1824, 1828, and 1832, and Wirt's campaign as the Antimasonic party candidate in 1832; the War of 1812, news of his and Carr's families, including the births and deaths of children, trips to the Virginia springs, and health; and personal news, including Wirt's literary works LETTERS OF THE BRITISH SPY, THE OLD BACHELOR, and a biography of Patrick Henry.

Letters, 1803-1804, from William Wirt (1772-1834) of Williamsburg and Norfolk, Virginia; to Dabney Carr (1773-1837) of Albemarle County, Virginia, regarding Wirt's career and his and Carr's families. Wirt discusses his resignation from the chancellorship of the Superior Court of Chancery and his proposed removal to Kentucky; his reconsideration on moving to Kentucky and his subsequent relocation to Norfolk, Virginia; his law practice; and news of both his and Carr's families, including the births and deaths of his and Carr's children. Wirt comments on his THE LETTERS OF THE BRITISH SPY, and the response of those described therein, including Edmund Randolph (1753-1813), John Wickham (1763-1839), and Wilson Cary Nicholas (1761-1820). He also remarks on several of the leading lawyers in Virginia, including Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803), George Wythe (1726-1806), and John Marshall (1755-1835). Wirt notes that Robert B. Taylor (1774-1834) and Littleton Waller Tazewell (1774-1860) are the leading attorneys in Norfolk.

Letters, 1811-1815, from William Wirt (1772-1834) of Richmond, Virginia, to Dabney Carr (1773-1837) of Charlottesville and Winchester, Virginia, containing personal and professional news. Wirt offers his views on the on-going War of 1812, including an analysis of military leaders, comments on New England's threatened secessions, and remarks on the Virginia militia. Wirt writes about his legal career and the cases in which he is involved. He encourages Carr to accept the judgeship of the Winchester Superior Court of Chancery, and later inquires how the position is. Wirt remarks that a position on the Court of Appeals may open soon and that Carr should consider it. Wirt comments on the politics and the politicians of the day, including his defeat to James Barbour for a seat in the United States Senate. He writes about his recently published OLD BACHELOR and his again-published LETTERS OF THE BRITISH SPY. Wirt asks Carr's opinion of a play he wrote and comments on his difficulties writing a biography of Patrick Henry (1736-1799). Wirt offers news of his own family and asks about Carr's. He offers his condolences on the death of a son whom Carr had named after Wirt.

Letters, 1821-1824, from William Wirt (1772-1834) of Washington D.C. to Dabney Carr (1773-1837) of Winchester, Virginia, detailing Wirt's health, his family, and his position as Attorney-General of the United States. Wirt comments on political events, including fiscal retrenchment, his relationship with President James Monroe (1758-1831), the controversy between Ninian Edwards (1775-1833) and William H. Crawford (1772- 1834), and the presidential election of 1824. Wirt describes his political relationship with Monroe and with his fellow cabinet members John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) and John C. Calhoun (1782-1850). He comments on his work as Attorney-General before the United States Supreme Court and remarks on the case of Gibbons v Ogden (1824). Wirt comments on his relationship with the press, including its reporting on his part ownership of the Bellona Foundry (Arsenal) in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Wirt writes about the visit of the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) to the United States and about his reception. Wirt informs Carr about his private practice in Maryland, his opening of a law school, and his plans to move to Baltimore, Maryland, when he is no longer Attorney-General. Wirt comments on the characters of former Virginia governor William H. Cabell (1772-1853) and prominent Maryland attorney William Pinkney (1764-1822). Wirt describes his and his family's health, expresses concerns about Carr's health, and invites the Carr family to stay at the Wirts' home whenever in Washington. Wirt also discusses various trips to spas and springs in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Collection also includes a circular for a law school Wirt intends to open.

Letters, 1826-1830, from William Wirt (1772-1834) of Washington D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland, to Dabney Carr (1773-1837) of Richmond and Winchester, Virginia, containing political, professional, and personal news. Wirt discusses his efforts to help out two young Americans, including Carr's relative Overton Carr, in Colombia, and his conversation with the Colombian minister Jose Maria Salazar (1785-1828). He comments on the upcoming presidential election of 1828, including a letter by Chapman Johnson (1779-1849) against Andrew Jackson. Wirt comments on his status as Attorney-General, including work on a case involving the Bank of the United States. He describes a meeting with Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), the composition of Jackson's cabinet, and Duff Green (1791-1875). Wirt writes about his relationship with Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1835) and about his accepting the case of the Cherokee Nation against the state of Georgia in the United States Supreme Court. He informs Carr of a trip to Boston, Massachusetts, which he enjoyd, and of a speech he delivered at Rutgers College in New Jersey. He comments on his property in Florida. Wirt discusses his family, providing information its health and welfare, and asking about Carr's family. Wirt offers details of his legal work as a lawyer in Baltimore. He sends Carr letters of introduction for Louis Eisenmenger of Switzerland and for Clara Fisher (1811-1898), a British actress.

Letters, 1831-1832, from William Wirt (1772-1834) of Baltimore, Maryland, to Dabney Carr (1773-1837) of Richmond, Virginia, containing political and personal news. Wirt writes Carr about William H. Crawford's political ambition, elections in Kentucky, and Wirt's non-candidacy for Congress. Wirt offers an explanation of his acceptance of the Antimasonic nomination for president, and an analysis of his chances of winning the presidential election in 1832. He comments on how Henry Clay (1777-1852), the National Republican candidate, has no chance to win the presidency. Wirt discusses what it will take to prevent Andrew Jackson's (1767-1845) reelection. Wirt thanks Carr for his advice and help in political matters. Wirt relates a conversation with James Maury (1746-1840) who attended school with Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) and Dabney Carr (1743-1773). Wirt asks Carr to relate his thanks to Thomas Jefferson Randolph (1792-1875) for permission to use a letter that Jefferson had written. He also remarks on the presidency of the University of Virginia, and how Jefferson offered it to him. Wirt also informs Carr about the death of one daughter and the marriage of another daughter. Wirt offers his plans for travelling to the Virginia Springs in the summer and his hopes of meeting Carr somewhere along his route. He comments on reading Galt's biography of George Gordon Lord Byron (1788-1824). Wirt also offers news of his family and comments on his philosophy toward death and his views of religion.

Arrangement

Arranged chronologically.


Contents List

Folder 1
Letter, 23 March 1803, William Wirt, Williamsburg, [Virginia], to Dabney Carr, Dunlora, near Charlottesville, [Virginia], containing personal and family news and commentary on international affairs and United States politics.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 1
Letter, 28 March 1803, William Wirt, Williamsburg, to Dabney Carr, Dunlora, near Charlottesville, regarding his resignation from the chancellorship of the Superior Court of Chancery, Williamsburg, his tentative plans to move to Kentucky, and prominent Virginia lawyers.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 1
Letter, 6 June 1803, William Wirt, Richmond, [Virginia], to Dabney Carr, Dunlora, near Charlottesville, congratulating Carr on the birth of a daughter, concerning his resignation as chancellor, informing Carr he is moving to Norfolk, [Virginia], and planning for the future.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 1
Letter, 24 June 1803, William Wirt, Williamsburg, to Dabney Carr, Dunlora near Charlottesville, providing a whimsical discussion of their children's future and family news.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 1
Letter, 16 January 1804, William Wirt, Norfolk, to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, concerning Wirt's The Letters of the British Spy, their children, and his legal practice in Norfolk. Wirt mentions several prominent Virginia lawyers.
8 p., ALS.
Folder 1
Letter, 8 June 1804, William Wirt, Norfolk, to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, concerning the difficulties of beginning a new practice, The Letters of the British Spy, future literary endeavors, and family news. Wirt favorably mentions St. George Tucker's contribution to the Enquirer, and informs Carr that "The Spy" wrote the pieces signed "Masterius Scriblerius."
11 p., ALS.
Folder 1
Cover, n.d., titled "William Wirt to Dabney Carr 1803 1804"
1 leaf, Ms.
Folder 2
Letter, 12 August 1811, William Wirt, Doctor Hare's, [Virginia], to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, [Virginia], sending personal news, and recommending readings in law and in science. Wirt returns to [William H.] Cabell's tomorrow and then heads for Richmond.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 29 January 1812, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, discussing Carr's nomination to the new Chancery Court judgeship in Winchester, [Virginia], and advising him to take it.
5 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 31 March 1813, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr apologizing for not writing and describing militia activities at the start of the War of 1812. Wirt states that The Old Bachelor is nearly finished and that he is writing a play which he will send Carr for criticism. Encloses a letter dated 18 and 22 November 1812 which had been written by Wirt at Montevideo, Buckingham County, [Virginia]. 18 November-states that the Wirts had stopped in Buckingham for the delivery of his wife's children and consoles Carr on moving to Winchester. 22 November-informs Carr that his wife had twin girls.
3 p., ALS., and 3 p., AL.
Folder 2
Letter, 20 April 1813, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Charlottesville, thanking Carr for a compliment, discussing criticism of The Old Bachelor, commenting on a play he is writing, and inviting Carr to visit.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, ,23 August 1813 William Wirt, Montevideo, Buckingham County, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, commenting on militia training and preparedness. Wirt discusses George Croghan's victory at Fort Stephenson, Ohio, the United States' invasion of Canada, and mentions William Henry Harrison, James Wilkinson, Wade Hampton, and John Randolph. Wirt also sends family news.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 2 October 1813, William Wirt, Montevideo, Buckingham County, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, mentioning the progress of the war, Carr's success in Winchester, the progress of his play, and news of friends.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 15 January 1814, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, enclosing a previously begun letter dated 3 January 1814.
3 p., ALS. and 2 p. AL.
Folder 2
Letter, 15 February 1814, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, sending George Hay's pamphlet on expatriation, asking about Carr's son, and providing personal news, thoughts on children's education, and remarks on his play.
7 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 20 February 1814, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, discussing his legal practice, the authorship of "Emeritas," and sending the copy of George Hay's pamphlet that he previously meant to send. Wirt mentions an impending vacancy on the Court of Appeals which Carr might get.
2 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 15 May 1814, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, offering condolences on the death of Carr's son, and mentioning the illness of one of his daughters and the birth of another.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 10 December 1814, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, detailing his defeat in the U.S. Senate race against Governor James Barbour, and discussing New England's threatened secession, the presidential election, and personal and family news. States that the fifth edition of The Letters of the British Spy has been published.
11 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 8 March 1815, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, extending condolences on the death of a friend, and advising treatment for an unnamed illness.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 10 June 1815, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, suggesting another remedy for Carr's illness. Wirst discusses his play and Carr's criticism, and mentions several acquaintances.
12 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 20 August 1815, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, discussing his play, mentioning St. George Tucker and John Randolph, remarking on difficulties with his biography of Patrick Henry, mentioning future literary ambitions, and providing personal and family news.
12 p., ALS.
Folder 2
Letter, 23 December 1815, William Wirt, Richmond, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, rejecting suggestions of a political career for Wirt. Wirt's play in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for consideration. Wirt has a new son.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 14 May 1821, William Wirt, Washington [D.C.], to [Dabney Carr], discussing the history of his attacks of vertigo, the effect of his work on his health, the Neapolitan and French Revolutions, budget-cutting, family news, and his plans for opening a law school. Includes a printed enclosure "Rules of Office, for the Law Students Under the Direction of Mr. Wirt."
11 p., ALS., and 1 leaf, printed.
Folder 3
Letter, 8 October 1821, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr], inviting Carr and his family to stay with the Wirts and asking about mutual friends.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 21 December 1821, William Wirt, Annapolis, [Maryland], to [Dabney Carr], inviting Carr to Christmas dinner. Wirt also states that he has a speaking engagement the next day.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 19 January 1822, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr], acknowledging receipt of Carr's letter informing Wirt of the Carr family's safe arrival home. Wirt also encloses a letter from Laura Wirt (not found).
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, February 1822, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, [Virginia], concerning his health. Also includes a note at the end of the letter from Louisa Henrietta Wirt acknowledging the receipt of Jane Carr's letter.
2 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 9 March 1822, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr], thanking Carr for his letter, and informing Carr that his health is improving. Wirt writes that he is attending court in Baltimore, [Maryland], and that he might resign the attorney-generalship.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 8 July 1822, William Wirt, Annapolis, to [Dabney Carr] enclosing a letter from Laura Henrietta Wirt (not found).
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 27 July 1822, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr informing Carr that Wirt and his family are leaving for Bedford, [Pennsylvania], and sending music in Laura Wirt's name.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 10 August 1822, William Wirt, Bedford, Pennsylvania, to [Dabney Carr] informing Carr that the Wirts will be going to Shanandale Springs in Virginia, and hoping that Carr will be there. Wirt states that he is considering moving to Baltimore and comments on his motives and reservations.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 20 February 1823, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr] informing Carr that he had influenza but is now well. Wirt has received Carr's letter and attended to it, but received no answer. However, he will see [John C.] Calhoun about it (no mention of what Carr's letter was about). Wirt has been practicing in Baltimore and will eventually move there.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 1 February 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, Virginia, stating that he heard of Carr's illness and advising him to come to Washington for treatment. Wirt discusses his own health and the strain work puts on him. Wirt mentions that the Supreme Court will be hearing the "steam-boat" question [Gibbons v Ogden] and Wirt is preparing for it.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 8 August 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr] discussing his role in the controversial charges made by Ninian Edwards against William H. Crawford and how it could affect the 1824 presidential election. Wirt comments on his relationship as attorney-general with the President, and charges against himself in the press, especially regarding his half-ownership of the Bellona Foundry in Chesterfield County, [Virginia].
12 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 27 August 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, Virginia, commenting on an article in the Washington Gazette and his attitudes toward the press in general.
8 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 9 September 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr] reflecting on their friendship and their future, his shortcomings, William Pinkney's character, literary events, and friends.
14 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 15 September 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, Virginia, informing Carr that he won't be able to visit because he is preparing for a case before the Supreme Court. Wirt also states that he is opening a law school.
2 p., ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 22 September 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr] forwarding a letter from [William H.] Cabell.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 3
Letter, 27 September 1824, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Winchester, Virginia, inviting Carr to stay at their home while visiting Washington.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 3
cover, n.d.,"William Wirt to Dabney Carr. 1821 1822 1823 1824" with accession number and date.
1 leaf, Ms.
Folder 4
Letter, 17 November 1826, William Wirt, Annapolis, [Maryland], to [Dabney Carr] forwarding a corrected copy of his Jefferson-Adams memorial address (not included) and asking for criticism.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 19 November 1826, Williams Wirt, Annapolis, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, sending a letter of introduction for Louis Eisenmenger.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 9 February 1827, William Wirt, Washingtonl, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, asking for news of Peachy [Gilmer] and the copy of the epitaph that was sent. Wirt mentions the problems of overwork
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 27 October 1827, William Wirt, Philadelphia, [Pennsylvania], to Dabney Carr, Richmond, forwarding a letter (not included) concerning Colonel James' son in Bogata, Colombia, and describing his actions in that matter. Wirt also discusses his work and politics.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 7 November 1827, William Wirt, Philadelphia, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, describing meeting with Mr. Salazer, the Colombian minister, on behalf of Overton Carr. Wirt discusses the effect of Chapman Johnson's letter on the upcoming presidential election.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 15 November 1827, William Wirt, Baltimore, [Maryland], to Dabney Carr, Richmond, sending Salazar's card. Wirt discusses Chapman Johnson's letter, and comments on his possible future in Andrew Jackson's cabinet or law practice in Baltimore or New York.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 20 December 1827, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, discussing his work, his relationship with John Marshall since 1800, his possible New York practice, and family news.
6 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 7 February 1828, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, introducing Clara Fisher, the London actress.
1 leaf, ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 17 November 1828, William Wirt, Washington, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, stating that he has not seen Carr's published address. Wirt comments on Nancy Carr's wedding and mentions that he rode to Baltimore with John Carr.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 28 February 1829, William Wirt, Washington, to [Dabney Carr] commenting on his bout of vertigo. Wirt describes his anticipation upon leaving public office, an interview with Andrew Jackson, Jackson's cabinet, and Duff Green. Wirt also sends personal and family news.
7 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 8 August 1829, William Wirt, Annapolis, to Dabney Carr, c/o Mr. Conrad, Winchester, discussing his health and work. Wirt comments on his reception on a trip to Boston, Massachusetts, and his opinion of the people. Wirt mentions his Florida lands, and ruminates upon personal matters
7 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 21 June 1830, William Wirt, Baltimore, to [Dabney Carr] stating that he has been solicited as counsel for the Cherokee nation to fight their expulsion from Georgia and wants Carr's opinion on the wisdom of accepting and on the merits of the case. Wirt also asks Carr to sound out John Marshall's opinion on the case.
5 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 23 July 1830, William Wirt, Cape May, [New Jersey], to Dabney Carr, Martinsburg, [(West) Virginia], detailing his travels and his speech given at Rutgers College. He also discusses Carr's interview with JOhn Marshall concerning the Cherokee case. Wirt sends personal news.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 29 September 1830, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, thanking Carr for the published letter defending Wirt's acceptance of the Cherokees' case. Wirt describes the publicity and public reaction to the case, as well as his progress on the case. Wirt sends personal and family news
4 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Letter, 9 October 1830, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, thanking Carr for his support on the Cherokee case. Wirt quotes letters of support from James Madison and John Marshall, and quotes his own letter to John Ross, president of the Cherokee National Council about removal to the west. Wirt attacks Thomas Loraine McKenny, Chief, Bureau of Indian Affairs. Wirt also sends personal and family news.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 4
Cover, n.d.,"William Wirt to Dabney Carr. 1826 1827 1828 1829 1830"
1 leaf, Ms.
Folder 5
Letter, 23 and 24 March 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, reflecting on his daughter's death adn his religious beliefs. Wirt comments on Washington politics, including William H. Crawford's presidential ambitions. Wirt's preference is Henry Clay.
8 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 22 May 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, commenting on their friendship and mentioning a visit with James Maury. Wirt discusses the presidential election and planned conventions. Wirt informs Carr of his summer travel plans.
5 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 16 June 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, stating that he had a court appearance on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Wirt mentions his summer travel plans and election activities.
Folder 5
Letter, 15 July 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Martinsburg, again mentioning his travel plans, and stating that he will not run for Congress.
1 leaf, AL., signature cut from letter.
Folder 5
Letter, 22 August 1831, William Wirt, Sweet Sulphur Springs, [Virginia], to Dabney Carr, Scottsville, Albemarle County, [Virginia], describing his travels to the springs and his accomodations. Wirt comments on work he needs to do and mentions the Kentucky elections.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 30 September 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, regarding his nomination as the Antimasonic presidential candidate, analyzing the political situation, and asking for news and reactions.
6 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 5 October 1831, William Wirt, Annapolis, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, analyzing his support and chances in the presidential election.
2 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 7 October 1831, William Wirt, Annapolis, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, discussing his campaign, press reaction to his candidacy, and his campaign biography. Wirt mentions Chapman Johnson, Duff Green, Thomas Jefferson, and David Watson.
7 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 26 October 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, thanking Carr for the biographical sketch and mentioning requests for it. Wirt mentions a letter by Thomas Jefferson, "Democritus," and the presidential election.
3 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 2 November 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr describing his daughter Elizabeth's marriage to Lieutenant Louis Goldsborough of the United States Navy. Wirt comments on Thomas Jefferson Randolph's permission to use letter by Thomas Jefferson. He mentions another letter by Jefferson regarding the University of Virginia. Wirt comments on the National Republican convention, the press, and Henry Clay's prospect in the election.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 23 November 1831, William Wirt, Annapolis, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, concerning newspaper reports, subscriptions, Clay's activities, and the progress of the election.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 27 November 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, discussing his motives in accepting the Antimasonic nomination. Wirt also comments on what course to take since Clay's nomination by the National Republicans.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 5 December 1831, William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, sending box of printed materials on Antimasonry and recommending rural distribution. Wirt states that the probable nomination of Clays is a relief to him. He comments on Jackson's message. Wirt has read Galt's life of Byron.
4 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Letter, 12 January 1831 [1832], William Wirt, Baltimore, to Dabney Carr, Richmond, stating that he is recovering from an illness and that he is seeking a way out of the Antimasons nomination. Wirt had an interview with Whittlesley about this. Wirt comments on prospects for the election.
8 p., ALS.
Folder 5
Cover, n.d.,"William Wirt to Dabney Carr 1831"
1 leaf, Ms.