A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Edmund Randolph, 1786-1788 Randolph, Edmund, Executive Papers of Governor, 1786-178840084

A Guide to the Executive Papers of Governor Edmund Randolph, 1786-1788

A Collection in
the Library of Virginia
Accession Number 40084


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© 2003 By the Library of Virginia.

Funding: Web version of the finding aid funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Processed by: Craig S. Moore

Repository
Library of Virginia
Accession number
40084
Title
Executive Papers, 1786-1788
Physical Characteristics
3.88 cubic feet
Collector
Governor's Office
Physical Location
State Records Collection, Governor's Office (Record Group 3)
Language
English

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Use Restrictions

There are no restrictions.

Preferred Citation

Virginia. Governor's Office. Edmund Randolph Executive Papers, 1786-1788. Accession 40084. State Records Collection. The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Acquisition Information

Acquired prior to 1905.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on microfilm - Miscellaneous Reel 4922-4928.


Biographical Information

Edmund Jenings Randolph was born is Williamsburg, Virginia, on 10 August 1753. Randolph was the son of John & Ariana Jenings Randolph and nephew of Peyton Randolph, a member of the Continental Congress from 1774 to 1775. Edmund graduated from the College of William & Mary and proceeded to study law in Williamsburg. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, Randolph served as aide-de-camp to George Washington in the Continental Army. The following year, he married Elizabeth Nicholas and served as both the youngest delegate to Virginia's first Constitutional Convention & Mayor of Williamsburg. Randolph was elected the first Attorney General of Virginia and served until 1782. In addition, Randolph acted as a delegate to the Continental Congress for the years 1779, 1781, & 1782. He was elected by the General Assembly to two one-year terms as Governor from 30 November 1786 until 12 November 1788. During his first term as Governor, Randolph represented Virginia as a member of the U.S. Constitutional Convention in 1787. During the Convention, Randolph proposed his Virginia Plan for the Constitution with a strong central government and representation based on population. He opposed the final version of the Constitution, but later advocated its ratification with the proposed amendments. He was appointed the first Attorney General of the United States under President Washington serving from 1789 until 1794. Randolph then became Secretary of State, but was forced to resign on 19 August 1795. Following his political career, Randolph served as senior counsel to Aaron Burr during his trial for treason in 1807. Randolph died in Clarke County, Virginia, on 12 September 1813, and is buried in Old Chapel Cemetery, Millwood, Va.

Scope and Content Information

Governor Randolph's Executive papers are organized chronologically with undated items arranged at the end of each year. These papers primarily consist of incoming correspondence during Randolph's two one-year terms as governor between 30 November 1786 until 12 November 1788. These records include correspondence written to Beverley Randolph who acted as Lieutenant Governor while Edmund served as a member of the U.S. Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. The correspondence in this collection relates to a variety of topics including appointments for state positions; the Point of Fork Arsenal; Indian attacks in the western country & peace treaties; Shay's Rebellion in Massachusetts; arms & ammunition; the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia; the State Boats Patriot & Liberty; Revolutionary claims against Virginia and the United States; the Public Jail & prisoners; militia; the U.S. Board of Treasury; searchers; public finances; the state of Franklin; the independence of Vermont; tobacco; elections; the Northwestern territory; the District of Kentucky; and others. In addition to correspondence, there are resolutions from Congress and the Virginia Senate & House of Delegates; orders of the Council of State; accounts; oaths; pardons; lists or calendars of criminals; depositions; proclamations; petitions; reports; appointments; bonds; circulars; proceedings; applications; agreements; extracts of journals & minutes; registers of ships; and other sundry items.

Noteworthy correspondence originates from the United States government, Virginia State government, and miscellaneous sources. Prominent correspondents from the United States government include Thomas Jefferson, Minister of France; Charles Thomson, Secretary of Congress; John Jay, Secretary of Foreign Affairs; Henry Knox, Secretary of War; Joseph Martin, Agent of Indian Affairs; Samuel Osgood, Walter Livingston, & Arthur Lee, U.S. Board of Treasury; and the Virginia Delegates to Congress including Edward Carrington, William Grayson, James Madison, Jr., Henry Lee, William Heth, John Brown, Cyrus Griffin, & Richard Henry Lee.

Thomas Jefferson, as Minister of France, writes to Governor Randolph on 7 February 1787 regarding the inauguration ceremony of the bust of the Marquis de Lafayette. Jefferson also writes about shipments of arms from Bordeaux and payments to Houdon for the statue of General Washington and a second bust of Lafayette (1787 August 3). Lastly, Governor Randolph forwards to Beverley Randolph on 27 May 1787, a dispatch of W. Short enclosing the proceedings of the City of Paris on the reception of Lafayette's bust presented by the state of Virginia. This letter also encloses another letter from John Bondfield to Gen. George Washington concerning a shipment of arms to Dumfries.

Charles Thomson, Secretary of Congress, corresponds often with Randolph. He transmits Congressional journals, resolutions and acts of Congress, monthly States of Representation, extracts of important letters, etc. Significant documents transmitted by Thomson include the following: a letter regarding disorder in Massachusetts (1786 Dec. 14); a resolution for a Convention of delegates to meet in May 1787 to revise the Articles of Confederation (1787 Feb. 21); resolutions regarding a treaty of peace with Great Britain (1787 April 13); resolutions empowering the Board of Treasury to contract for coining copper, the sale of lands surveyed in the Western Territory, & the extension of the ''franking'' privilege to members of the Constitutional Convention (1787 April 25); a treaty between the U.S. and the Kingdom of Morocco (1787 July 21); a letter informing the Governor of the election of Cyrus Griffin as President of the Continental Congress (1788 Jan. 23); a resolution on the claims of David Henley, Commissioner for the Claims of Virginia on Account of the Western Territory (1788 June 4); and a letter regarding the proceedings of Congress on the independence of the District of Kentucky (1788 July 3).

John Jay, as Secretary of Foreign Affairs, communicates to Governor Randolph issues abroad. He encloses an extract of a letter he received from John Adams, Minister Plenipotentiary of the U.S. in London, regarding the counterfeiting of Carolina money (1787 July 3). Jay also encloses a copy of the signals agreed upon between the U.S. & Morocco for their vessels at sea (1787 July 27). On 26 May 1788, Jay drafted a letter to the Governor regarding a note from Schultz von Asheraden, Envoy Extraordinary of the King of Sweden, in reference to Capt. Adolph Frederick Dahlberg. Similarly, there is also a letter from Jay regarding notes from the Minister of France on the conduct of J.M. Ferrier (1788 June 13). Lastly, there is a letter respecting foreign consuls (1788 Sept. 24).

Henry Knox, Secretary of War, corresponds with the Governor on 12 February 1787 on the subject of the Board of Treasury's plan to provide for the establishment of troops and the insurrection in Massachusetts. There is also a letter from Knox concerning the appointment of Joseph Martin as Indian Agent for the Cherokee Nation (1788 June 23).

Joseph Martin, Agent for Indian Affairs and later Indian Agent for the Cherokee Nation, corresponds with Governor Randolph on many occasions. Martin writes the Governor on 16 March 1787 concerning the opening of the land office of the state of Franklin and Benjamin Logan's attack on Crow Town. On March 21, Martin's letter mentions the Chota Indians and the taking of land by the ''Franklynists.'' His letter of June 28 encloses Indian talks from Cherokee chiefs including King Fisher, Old Corn Tassle, & Tuskegetchee. He writes about the dispute between North Carolina and the state of Franklin in April 1788 and encloses a letter from John Sevier & the Cherokees. Finally, he informs the Governor of attacks against the Cherokee nation and encloses letters from Andrew McGilveray regarding Indian affairs (1788 June 11).

Samuel Osgood, Walter Livingston, & Arthur Lee of the U.S. Board of Treasury transmit a statement of the contingent expenditures of the U.S. from 1 January to 31 December 1786 (1787 Feb. 2). They also enclose an act of Congress regarding the repeal of another act to open a loan on the credit of the requisition (1787 May 15). On May 25, the Board writes the Governor concerning an ordinance of Congress for the settlement of accounts between individual states and the U.S. Finally, the Board encloses a letter & report to the state of Connecticut regarding invalid pensions (1788 Sept. 19).

The various members of Virginia's delegation to Congress regularly communicated with Governor Randolph on a variety of national concerns. The delegation to the Continental Congress during Randolph's administration consisted of Edward Carrington, William Grayson, James Madison, Richard H. Lee, Cyrus Griffin, Henry Lee, & John Brown. Significant correspondence from these delegates relate to Shay's Rebellion in Massachusetts (1786 December 8); the need for military stores in the Western Country (1786 December 24); Gen. Knox and arms for the state of Virginia (1787 Feb. 19); the treaty between the U.S. and United Netherlands (1787 March 5); the progress of the appointments to the Convention and the admission of Vermont to the Union (1787 March 19); trade laws, an act to ratify & confirm the independence of Vermont, the appointment of John Pierce as Commissioner for Settlement of the Illinois Accounts, the discharge of troops under the act of October 1786, the death of Vergennes, & hostilities in the Western Country (1787 April 2, 12, 13, & July 17); the inadequacy of the government due to the irregular representation in Congress, commercial deputies, & indents for 1786 & 1787 (1787 May 7, 15, & June 8); communications from Col. Evan Shelby, the dismemberment of states, Vermont, North Carolina, & problems in the Kaskaskies & Post Vincent (1787 June 12); the defense of the frontiers of Kentucky and elsewhere (1787 June 25, 27, & July 7); the Board of Treasury (1787 July 1787); an ordinance for establishing a temporary government in the Western Territory, a resolution concerning copper coinage, & an ordinance for settling the accounts between the U.S. and individual states (1787 Nov. 3); the claim of Virginia to the Northwestern Territory (1788 March 23); the settlement of the accounts of the state against the U.S. (1788 May 8); an act to extend the time to settle these accounts (1788 June 9); and rations for rangers called into service in Bourbon County (1788 June 30).

The various members of Virginia's delegation to Congress regularly communicated with Governor Randolph on a variety of national concerns. The delegation to the Continental Congress during Randolph's administration consisted of Edward Carrington, William Grayson, James Madison, Richard H. Lee, Cyrus Griffin, Henry Lee, & John Brown. Significant correspondence from these delegates relate to Shay's Rebellion in Massachusetts (1786 December 8); the need for military stores in the Western Country (1786 December 24); Gen. Knox and arms for the state of Virginia (1787 Feb. 19); the treaty between the U.S. and United Netherlands (1787 March 5); the progress of the appointments to the Convention and the admission of Vermont to the Union (1787 March 19); trade laws, an act to ratify & confirm the independence of Vermont, the appointment of John Pierce as Commissioner for Settlement of the Illinois Accounts, the discharge of troops under the act of October 1786, the death of Vergennes, & hostilities in the Western Country (1787 April 2, 12, 13, & July 17); the inadequacy of the government due to the irregular representation in Congress, commercial deputies, & indents for 1786 & 1787 (1787 May 7, 15, & June 8); communications from Col. Evan Shelby, the dismemberment of states, Vermont, North Carolina, & problems in the Kaskaskies & Post Vincent (1787 June 12); the defense of the frontiers of Kentucky and elsewhere (1787 June 25, 27, & July 7); the Board of Treasury (1787 July 1787); an ordinance for establishing a temporary government in the Western Territory, a resolution concerning copper coinage, & an ordinance for settling the accounts between the U.S. and individual states (1787 Nov. 3); the claim of Virginia to the Northwestern Territory (1788 March 23); the settlement of the accounts of the state against the U.S. (1788 May 8); an act to extend the time to settle these accounts (1788 June 9); and rations for rangers called into service in Bourbon County (1788 June 30).

Significant correspondents from Virginia State government include John Beckley, Clerk of the House of Delegates, Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate; Archibald Blair, Clerk of the Council of State; Capt. John Peyton & Capt. Elias Langham, Superintendent of the Military Stores, Arms, & Ammunition at Point of Fork Arsenal; Col. Thomas Meriwether, Commissioner of Army Accounts; Benjamin Logan, County Lieutenant of Lincoln County; Arthur Campbell, County Lieutenant of Washington County; Levi Todd, County Lieutenant of Fayette County; Alexander Barnett, County Lieutenant of Russell County; David Shepherd, County Lieutenant of Ohio County; Walter Crockett, County Lieutenant of Montgomery County; William Rose, Keeper of the Public Jail; James Innes, Attorney General; Leighton Wood, Jr., Solicitor General; Andrew Dunscomb, Assistant Commissioner of Military Claims; Capt. James Barron & Capt. Richard Taylor, Virginia Navy; Beverley Randolph, Lieutenant Governor; and Jacquelin Ambler, Treasurer.

John Beckley, Clerk of the House of Delegates, & Humphrey Brooke, Clerk of the Senate, regularly enclose resolutions from their respective bodies to the Governor. On 1 December 1786, Beckley submits the appointment of Henry Lee as Delegate to Congress. He provides resolutions regarding the claims of the state of Virginia against the United States and the election of Andrew Dunscomb to serve as Commissioner to settle these accounts (1787 Jan. 5). On 23 October 1787, Beckley transmits an extract of the journal of the House of Delegates containing the ballot for five delegates in Congress including James Madison, Edward Carrington, Henry Lee, John Brown, & Cyrus Griffin. On 31 October 1788, he presents the ballot for the election of Cyrus Griffin, John Brown, James Madison, Jr., John Dawson, & Mann Page. In addition, an extract of the journal of the House of Delegates from 8 November 1788 reports on the election of Richard Henry Lee & William Grayson as Virginia's first senators in Congress. Beckley & Brooke also inform the Governor about appointments to the Privy Council including William Heth & Joseph Eggleston (1787 November 7) and Andrew Moore & Robert Goode (1788 June 28). Lastly, the clerks inform the Governor of the election of Edmund Winston as judge of the General Court (1788 June 28).

Archibald Blair, as Clerk of the Council of State, encloses orders of the Council to the Governor. In December 1786, the Council orders Col. Meriwether to contract for repairs to the Public Jail & the Governor's House, to employ someone to convey arms from France, & to purchase a sword for Capt. Jouett (1786 Dec. 14). Meriwether also receives orders related to the distribution of Articles of War (1787 May 2). His letter dated 2 May 1787 also relates to alterations in the Public Jail. The Council sends a list of grants to be signed by the Governor (1787 April 30 & 25 May). Lastly, the Council provides advice on the requisition of militia in the western counties including a resolution of Congress concerning orders for militia in Virginia & Pennsylvania to be ready to protect the inhabitants (1788 Oct. 15).

Capt. John Peyton resigns as Commissary of Stores at Point of Fork on 20 November 1786. Peyton writes to Col. Thomas Meriwether on 10 December 1786 recommending William Price, his former clerk, to succeed him. Additionally, there are letters from other individuals applying for the position. Elias Langham, however, successfully applies to the Governor on 13 December 1786. As Commissary of Military Stores, Langham corresponds with Col. Meriwether regarding provisions (1786 Dec. 25); contracts to supply rations (1787 April 26); an estimate of clothing for guards and state negroes (1787 July 5); & land belonging to David Ross near Point of Fork in Fluvanna County (1787 June 26 & Dec. 21). In turn, Col. Meriwether corresponds with Governor Randolph offering an estimate of the cost of transporting arms from Point of Fork to Redstone (1786 Dec. 26), a report of Capt. Peyton's last returns (1787 Feb. 22), delinquencies of militia officers (1787 March 1), payrolls of Point of Fork (1787 April 7), a list of his official duties (1787 May 8), a report of the militia (1787 Oct. 22), and reports on the Point of Fork Arsenal (1787 Oct. 4 & 1788 Oct. 3).

County lieutenants including Levi Todd, Benjamin Logan, Arthur Campbell, David Shepherd, Alexander Barnett, & Walter Crockett from the western counties correspond with Governor Randolph on numerous occasions primarily regarding Indian affairs. Levi Todd writes about the strength of the militia in Fayette County and Shawnee attacks in the area (1786 Dec. 7); the need for officers & a lack of ammunition and provision (1787 Feb. 14); the defenselessness of Kentucky (1787 April 30); & war with the Indians (1788 March 29). Benjamin Logan writes about an attack on the Shawnee towns in the District of Kentucky (1786 Dec. 17); Indian outrages in Kentucky (1787 April 14); the sense of the people of Kentucky regarding the Cherokee Indians (1787 May 17); intelligence concerning the Cherokee Indians sent to Arthur Campbell (1787 May 18); & the proceedings of a meeting of the commanding officers of the District of Kentucky (1787 Sept. 24). Arthur Campbell communicates a list of field officers & captains proposed to command two regiments of militia in Washington County (1787 Feb. 14); the implications of the recent treaty with Spain (1787 Feb. 16); an attack by Col. John Logan on friendly Indians (1787 March 9); the militia in Washington County and the apprehended danger from the Cherokee Indians (1787 March 17); westward expansion, Topoka, Chief of the Chocta Nation, & the navigation of the Mississippi (1787 April 15); movements of the Cherokee Indians (1787 Aug. 16); the boundary between Virginia & North Carolina (1787 Dec. 10); & consideration for the position as Superintendent of the Southern Department (1787 Dec. 31). David Shepherd expresses his concerns in relation to Indian outrages in Monongalia (1787 April 30); Indian attacks & the state of the militia in Ohio County (1787 May 24 & 1787 Nov. 10). Finally, Alexander Barnett writes on Indian attacks in Russell County (1787 May 19 & 1787 Aug. 29) & Walter Crockett relates incidents with natives in Montgomery County (1787 June 11 & 1788 March 15).

William Rose as Keeper of the Public Jail periodically transmits lists or calendars of criminals convicted at the General Court (1786 Dec. 16, 1787 March 28, 1787 April 30, 1787 June 11, 1787 Dec. 6, 1788 March 31, 1788 April 26, 1788 June 10, 1788 Oct. 27). Rose also writes to the Governor regarding specific criminals in his jail (1787 Jan. 24 & 1787 July 26). Lastly, he send his remarks on a contract to furnish the Public Jail with provisions (1788 Jan. 30).

James Innes served as Attorney General to the Commonwealth during Randolph's administration as Governor. Innes provides his opinion on various issues including the repeal of the act of 1785 for approving, confirming, & ratifying the compact between Virginia & Maryland (1787 Feb. 28 & 1787 Aug. 3); tobacco inspection at Lynch's Ferry (1787 June 26 & 1787 Sept. 1); & foreign creditors (1787 March 19).

Andrew Dunscomb's correspondence relates to his position as Assistant Commissioner of Military Claims. Included is his oath of office and a letter regarding the same (1787 Jan. 13 & 15). He also writes on the state of claims of the Commonwealth with the U.S. (1787 June 13, 18, & Nov. 15). On 6 July 1787, he requests additional clerks, and later, he asks the Governor for a salary increase (1787 Nov. 13). Similarly, there is extensive correspondence from Leighton Wood, Jr., Solicitor General, regarding claims against the state, delinquencies of sheriffs in paying taxes, etc. Present is Wood's bond & security for his position as Solicitor (1787 Jan. 26 & Feb. 1). Treasurer, Jacquelin Ambler's letters too relate to the financial matters of the state. Ambler reveals a lack of money in the Contingent Fund for William Rose's warrants for the support of the Public Jail (1787 March 5).

Capt. James Barron, Virginia State Navy, died in May 1787. Applications can be found to replace him as commander of the state boats (1787 June 4). Before his death, Barron comments on the transport of small arms from Norfolk (1786 Dec. 6) and discusses the employment of a surgeon & pilots on his boats (1787 April 27). Barron was replaced by Capt. Richard Taylor in June 1787. Noteworthy among his correspondence, Taylor encloses an inventory of the articles on board the Liberty and Patriot on 12 August 1787. He also remarks on the poor state of the boats in his letter dated 7 September 1787. On 14 November 1787, Taylor complains to the Governor about his pay & pension. Lastly, Taylor talks about damage sustained to the Schooner Patriot in a storm while harbored at Portsmouth (1788 July 24).

Additional significant documents include the following: the oath of fidelity to Governor Randolph by John Harvie (1786 Dec. 1); an oath of fidelity to Bolling Starke as Privy Councilor (1786 Dec. 4); a proclamation by the governor outlawing certain escaped prisoners (1786 Dec. 23); a letter from Samuel Huntingdon, Governor of Connecticut, appointing commissioners to assemble in Convention in Philadelphia (1786 Dec. 23); a letter from John Blair regarding his appointment as a member of the committee to meet in Philadelphia in May (1786 Dec. 25); a letter from David Ross concerning his claim for the use of his property at Point of Fork (1787 Jan. 30); a proclamation by the Governor authorizing surveys to be made on the lands allotted to the Virginia Line on Continental Establishment (1787 Jan. 25); a letter from Piomingo, Chief of the Chickasaw Nation, regarding the Treaty at Kieve (1787 Feb. 15); a proclamation concerning the seizure of Spanish property by George Rogers Clark (1787 Feb. 28); the bond of John Pendleton as Auditor of Public Accounts (1787 March 1); a proclamation offering a reward for the capture of Presley Hunt & Ephraim Andrews, escaped prisoners (1787 March 2); a letter from Monsieur Oster, French Consul, applying for an order to prevent the departure of M.S. Deschamps to France (1787 April 1); a letter from William Smith enclosing a list of field officers in the Northampton County militia (1787 April 4); a letter from George Mason regarding payment as a delegate of the Constitutional Convention (1787 April 23); a proclamation for the reward & capture of Irby Philips (1787 April 28); a list of tobacco saved from Byrd Warehouse (1787 June 6); a letter from Governor Randolph to the lieutenant governor regarding a warrant for the expense of transporting his family to Philadelphia (1787 June 6); a letter from Governor Randolph enclosing George Wythe's resignation (1787 June 21); a letter from George Mason concerning the resignation of George Wythe as a delegate to the Convention (1787 June 30); a letter from the Governor providing his account for the Constitutional Convention (1787 July 12); an agreement between David Ross & Col. Meriwether for Point of Fork including a valuation of the 24 acres of land (1787 Aug. 8); a letter from Randolph forwarding a copy of the National Constitution and expressing his opposition to it (1787 Sept. 18); a letter from George Rogers Clark regarding the settlement of western accounts (1787 Oct. 8); a letter from Samuel Johnston, Governor of North Carolina, regarding an act to hold a Convention in Virginia in June (1788 Jan. 22); the proceedings of the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention to ratify the U.S. Constitution (1788 Feb. 6); the proceedings of the Georgia Constitutional Convention (1788 Feb. 5); a letter from John Sevier, Governor of Franklin, regarding the dispute between the state of Franklin & North Carolina (1788 March 27); a letter from Benjamin Franklin regarding the sanity of Mr. Elam (1788 May 12); a proclamation regarding the act establishing district courts as unconstitutional (1788 May 14); a letter from William Heth & David Henley, Commissioners of the Western Territory, enclosing their report on the claims of Virginia for the territory ceded to Congress (1788 May 15); a circular from Thomas Pinckney, Governor of South Carolina, regarding the ratification of the Constitution by a Convention in South Carolina (1788 May 24); a letter from Andrew Limonin regarding the bust of the Marquis de Lafayette (1788 Nov. 11); and a letter from the Council of State regarding Governor Randolph's departure from office (1788 Nov. 13).

Arrangement

Material arranged chronologically with undated items arranged at the end of each year.

Contents List

Executive Papers of Governor Edmund Randolph
1786
  • December
    • Box 1
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 3
      21-30
  • Box 1
    Folder 4
    Undated
1787
  • January
    • Box 1
      Folder 5
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 6
      11-20
    • Box 1
      Folder 7
      21-30
  • February
    • Box 1
      Folder 8
      1-10
    • Box 1
      Folder 9
      12-19
    • Box 1
      Folder 10
      21-28
  • March
    • Box 1
      Folder 11
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 1
      12-19
    • Box 2
      Folder 2
      21-31
  • April
    • Box 2
      Folder 3
      1-10
    • Box 2
      Folder 4
      11-20
    • Box 2
      Folder 5
      21-25
    • Box 2
      Folder 6
      26-30
  • May
    • Box 2
      Folder 7
      1-9
    • Box 2
      Folder 8
      11-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 1
      21-31
  • June
    • Box 3
      Folder 2
      1-9
    • Box 3
      Folder 3
      11-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 4
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 3
      Folder 5
      2-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 6
      11-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 7
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 3
      Folder 8
      1-10
    • Box 3
      Folder 9
      11-19
    • Box 3
      Folder 10
      20-30
  • September
    • Box 3
      Folder 11
      1-13
    • Box 3
      Folder 12
      15-20
    • Box 3
      Folder 13
      22-29
  • October
    • Box 4
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 2
      11-19
    • Box 4
      Folder 3
      21-31
    • Box 4
      Folder 4
      Report on Naval Offices
  • November
    • Box 4
      Folder 5
      2-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 6
      11-19
    • Box 4
      Folder 7
      21-30
  • December
    • Box 4
      Folder 8
      1-10
    • Box 4
      Folder 9
      11-20
    • Box 4
      Folder 10
      21-31
  • Box 4
    Folder 11
    Undated
  • Box 4
    Folder 12
    Board of Treasury
  • Box 4
    Folder 13
    Land Grants
1788
  • January
    • Box 5
      Folder 1
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 2
      12-17
    • Box 5
      Folder 3
      22-31
  • February
    • Box 5
      Folder 4
      1-9
    • Box 5
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 6
      21-29
  • March
    • Box 5
      Folder 7
      2-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 9
      21-31
  • April
    • Box 5
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 12
      21-30 (31)
  • May
    • Box 5
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 5
      Folder 14
      12-20
    • Box 5
      Folder 15
      22-31
  • June
    • Box 6
      Folder 1
      2-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 2
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 3
      21-30
  • July
    • Box 6
      Folder 4
      2-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 5
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 6
      21-31
  • August
    • Box 6
      Folder 7
      1-9
    • Box 6
      Folder 8
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 9
      21-26
  • September
    • Box 6
      Folder 10
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 11
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 12
      21-30
  • October
    • Box 6
      Folder 13
      1-10
    • Box 6
      Folder 14
      11-20
    • Box 6
      Folder 15
      21-31
  • November
    • Box 7
      Folder 1
      1-13
    • Box 7
      Folder 2
      Undated
  • Box 7
    Folder 3
    Land Grants
Box 7
Folder 4
Dunscomb, Andrew - 1786-1788
Box 7
Folder 5
Point of Fork Arsenal - 1786-1787
Oversized (Clamshell Box)
  • 1786
    • Box 8
      Folder 1
      Dec. 11
    • Box 8
      Folder 2
      Dec. 20
  • 1787
    • Box 8
      Folder 3
      Jan. 10
    • Box 8
      Folder 4
      March 30
    • Box 8
      Folder 5
      April 10
    • Box 8
      Folder 6
      April 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 7
      April 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 8
      April 30
    • Box 8
      Folder 9
      May 1
    • Box 8
      Folder 10
      May 6
    • Box 8
      Folder 11
      May 27
    • Box 8
      Folder 12
      June 20
    • Box 8
      Folder 13
      July 5
    • Box 8
      Folder 14
      Nov. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 15
      Dec. 21
    • Box 8
      Folder 16
      Board of Treasury
  • 1788
    • Box 8
      Folder 17
      Feb. 4
    • Box 8
      Folder 18
      Feb. 5
    • Box 8
      Folder 19
      March 13
    • Box 8
      Folder 20
      March 13
    • Box 8
      Folder 21
      April 3
    • Box 8
      Folder 22
      April 3
    • Box 8
      Folder 23
      April 14
    • Box 8
      Folder 24
      April 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 25
      April 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 26
      May 3
    • Box 8
      Folder 27
      May 8
    • Box 8
      Folder 28
      May 12
    • Box 8
      Folder 29
      May 13
    • Box 8
      Folder 30
      May 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 31
      May 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 32
      May 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 33
      May 17
    • Box 8
      Folder 34
      May 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 35
      May 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 36
      June 2
    • Box 8
      Folder 37
      June 12
    • Box 8
      Folder 38
      June 16
    • Box 8
      Folder 39
      June 21
    • Box 8
      Folder 40
      July 7
    • Box 8
      Folder 41
      July 14
    • Box 8
      Folder 42
      July 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 43
      July 15
    • Box 8
      Folder 44
      July 30
    • Box 8
      Folder 45
      Aug. 19
    • Box 8
      Folder 46
      Aug. 26
    • Box 8
      Folder 47
      Sept. 12
    • Box 8
      Folder 48
      Oct. 8
    • Box 8
      Folder 49
      Oct. 30
  • Point of Fork Arsenal
    • Box 8
      Folder 50
      Pay Roll of Artificers, 1787 April-June
    • Box 8
      Folder 51
      Quarterly Return of Clothing, 1787 March
    • Return of Provisions, 1787 Jan.-March
Oversized (Newspaper Box)
  • 1787
    • Box 9
      Folder 1
      Jan. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 2
      April 2
    • Box 9
      Folder 3
      May 19
    • Box 9
      Folder 4
      June 5
    • Box 9
      Folder 5
      Oct. 16
    • Box 9
      Folder 6
      Oct. 21
    • Box 9
      Folder 7
      Nov. 3
  • 1788
    • Box 9
      Folder 8
      Jan. 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 9
      April 8
    • Box 9
      Folder 10
      June 12
    • Box 9
      Folder 11
      July 28
    • Box 9
      Folder 12
      Aug. 23
    • Box 9
      Folder 13
      Sept. 30
    • Box 9
      Folder 14
      Oct. 4
    • Box 9
      Folder 15
      Oct. 31
  • Point of Fork Arsenal
    • Box 9
      Folder 16
      Quarterly Return of Ordnance & Military Stores, 1787 April-June
    • Box 9
      Folder 17
      Quarterly Return of Quarter Master Stores, 1787 Jan.-March
    • Box 9
      Folder 18
      Quarterlty Return of Quarter Master Stores, 1787 April-June
    • Box 9
      Folder 19
      Quarterly Summary Account of Clothing 1787 April-June
    • Box 9
      Folder 20
      Return of Military Stores, 1787 April-June
    • Box 9
      Folder 21
      Return of Ordnance & Military Stores 1787 Jan.-March