A Guide to the Centreville, Virginia Collection, 1840-1977 Centreville, Virginia Collection MSS 03-04

A Guide to the Centreville, Virginia Collection, 1840-1977

A Collection in The Fairfax County Public Library

Record Group Number MSS 03-04


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Fairfax County Public Library
City of Fairfax Regional Library
Virginia Room
10360 North Street
Fairfax, VA 22030-2514 USA
Virginia Room: 703-293-6227 x6
Fax: 703-293-2155
Email: va_room@fairfaxcounty.gov
URL: https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/library/branches/virginia-room

© 2017 Fairfax County Public Library. All rights reserved.

Repository
Fairfax County Public Library
Record Group Number
MSS 03-04
Title
The Centreville, Virginia Collection, 1840-1977
Extent
0.5 linear feet
Creator
Virginia Room staff
Language
English
Abstract
The Centreville, Virginia Collections consists of 0.5 linear feet, spans the years 1840-1977, and contains historical papers, reports, lecture notes, a hand-drawn land survey, a broadside, manuscript drafts, and a photocopied map.

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions

None

Use Restrictions

Consult repository for information

Preferred Citation

Centreville, Virginia Collection, MSS 03-04, Virginia Room, Fairfax County Public Library

Acquisition Information

Collection assembled by Virginia Room staff over a period of years. 1874 and 1877 tax receipts gift of Keith Pearson.

Processing Information

Chris Barbuschak, December 2017
EAD generated by Ross Landis, 2017


Historical and Biographical Information

In 1792, an act of the Virginia General Assembly incorporated the Town of Centerville (later to be renamed Centreville). The area, originally known as the village of Newgate, consisted primarily of tobacco land owned by the Carrs, Newtons, Jetts, and Lanes as well as two local landmarks: the Newgate Tavern and Mount Gilead.

Not long after the town’s incorporation, the area saw a rise in the establishment of mills and tanneries, but the village entered a long period of gradual decline. Its deterioration was furthered by the Civil War, of which Centreville became a hotbed of activity. The town was strategically important due to its high elevation and close proximately to turnpikes, railroads, and Washington, D.C. Both the Confederate and Union armies occupied the heavily fortified town throughout the war. In 1862, the Confederate army constructed a 5.5 mile track known as the Centreville Military Railroad, making it the first exclusively military railroad ever built.

The war left Centreville heavily scarred and it struggled to recover during the post-war era. The area remained largely stagnant until the 1980s which saw a dramatic population boom with the construction of housing developments and shopping centers. In 1986, Fairfax County established the Centreville Historic Overlay District which includes notable historical buildings such as Mount Gilead, St. John’s Episcopal Church, Harrison House, Havener House, Spindle Sears House, and the Old Stone Church.

Scope and Content

The Centreville, Virginia Collections consists of 0.5 linear feet, spans the years 1840-1977, and contains historical papers, reports, lecture notes, a hand-drawn land survey, a broadside, manuscript drafts, and a photocopied map. Included are documents relating to the history of Centreville, Virginia such as tax receipts for George W. Steel and his son-in-law David Pierson; reports on the discovery of the Willoughby Newton boundary stone; preliminary drafts for “The Three Lives of Walney” by Anne S. Beresford and “Walney” by Elizabeth Brown Pryor; and an 1840 hand-drawn survey of the division of John Carter’s Sudley plantation.

Related Material

Centreville Grange No. 750 Dues Account Book, MSS 05-32


Index Terms

  • Beresford, Beatrice Anne (1922-1982)
  • Carter, John (?-1838)
  • Centreville (Va.) - History
  • Centreville United Methodist Church
  • Clarke, Susan Summers (1844-1939)
  • Newton, Willoughby
  • Old Stone Church Centreville, Va.)
  • Patterson, Rev. William
  • Pierson, David (1852-?)
  • Pryor, Elizabeth Brown (1951-2015)
  • Steel, George W. (1805-?)
  • Sudley plantation
  • Turberville, Anne S. (1885-1965)
  • Walney Farm (Centreville, Va.)

Container List

Box 1
Folder 1
Three talks about the history of Centreville, Virginia made by Anna S. Turberville, 1951, 1952, 1958
Box 1
Folder 2
Notes, Tour of Historic Landmarks of the Centreville Area, Conducted by Rev. William Patterson, St. John’s Church, 1966 October 1
Box 1
Folder 3
Briefing paper, Search for Willoughby Newton Boundary Stones. February 20-21, 1971, 1971
Box 1
Folder 4
Report, The Willoughby Newton Boundary Stone Discovery in Centreville, 1971
Box 1
Folder 5
Broadside, "Centreville United Methodist Church For Sale", Undated
Box 1
Folder 6
Preliminary draft, “Walney” by Elizabeth Brown Pryor , Undated
Box 1
Folder 7
Preliminary draft, “The Three Lives of Walney” by Anne S. Beresford, 1977 April
Box 1
Folder 8
Obituary, Susan Summers Clarke (former resident of Level Green Farm), Merced Sun Star, 1939 February 3
Box 1
Folder 9
Tax receipts, George W. Steele and David Pierson, 1874, 1877
Box 1
Folder 10
Map, "Centreville, Va. Positions of Artillery" Sept 1861-Jan 1862 [photocopy], Undated
Drawer  
Oversize
Survey, “Survey of Division of Sudley to part of the real estate left by John Carter, dec.” , 1840 June 5

Significant Persons Associated With the Collection

  • Beresford, Beatrice Anne (1922-1982)
  • Carter, John (?-1838)
  • Clarke, Susan Summers (1844-1939)
  • Newton, Willoughby
  • Patterson, Rev. William
  • Pierson, David (1852-?)
  • Pryor, Elizabeth Brown (1951-2015)
  • Steel, George W. (1805-?)
  • Turberville, Anne S. (1885-1965)